Newsweek

Does Trump Know More Than the Scientists Do?

Scientists are concerned that Trump could become the most anti-science president ever.

Donor blood samples. If Donald Trump persuades Congress to cut taxes, federal funding for scientific research might be cut.
RTX2OU1N Source: Michaela Rehle/REUTERS

In his victory speech in the early-morning hours on Wednesday, President-elect Donald Trump said he would rebuild the nation’s highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools and hospitals. He promised to “finally take care of our great veterans” and double the nation’s economic growth. “Nothing we want for our future is beyond our reach,” he proclaimed.

Except, perhaps, clean water, clean air, limits on greenhouse gases, solar power, wind energy, protection of fish stocks, medical research, advances in information technology, support for basic and applied medical research, space exploration and protection of biodiversity, which is as important for our food in the future

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