Inc.

Here’s to a Year Without Surprises

Technological change is dizzying—unless you pay attention to what’s coming

WHAT DO INGESTIBLE nanobots, algorithms that predict human behavior, and self-aware drones have in common—and why should you care? They are the next wave of disruptive technologies, which will enhance our daily lives even as they upend hundreds of established businesses. Maybe even one like yours.

If you sell dietary supplements, your customers may soon swallow tiny robots, not pills, to

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