Nautilus

Testosterone Can Make Men Feel Generous

Testosterone gets a pretty bad reputation. It’s been long known as the hormone of aggression. In his 1998 book, The Trouble With Testosterone: And Other Essays on the Biology of the Human Predicament, the neuroscientist Robert Sapolsky writes, “What evidence links testosterone with aggression? Some pretty obvious stuff”: Males tend to have more testosterone than women, and tend to be more aggressive. “Times of life when males are swimming in testosterone (for example, after reaching puberty) correspond to when aggression peaks.”

High testosterone correlates with thrill-seeking, mate-seeking, and dominance in males. If you

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