Popular Science

12 gardening buys for the horticulturally hopeless

Can't keep anything alive? You're not alone.
cacti garden

Pixabay

Wouldn't it be nice?

A lot of things can go wrong in the garden. Some seeds just won’t sprout. A plant’s leaves droop and turn colors they shouldn’t. Thankfully, inventive people are starting to tackle this problem, manipulating hot tech to help you keep things...less dead. Don't fret about the color of your thumb; this stuff will bring you a few steps closer to becoming the 21st century's Frederick Law Olmsted (or whatever landscape architect inspires you).

Teeny Tiny Gardening Book by Emma Hardy

Amazon

A helpful gardening book

Start off small. Teeny Tiny Gardening by Emma Hardy features 35 small-scale gardening projects to get your horticultural hands dirty. With step-by-step instructions, this book helps you grow things to eat, make use of recycled containers, and nurture small gardens to decorate your table.

Amazon; $11.

Click and Grow Smart garden

Amazon

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