Literary Hub

Eileen Myles on the Most Interesting Nights of Their Life

In this video in support of the Festival Neue Literatur, which celebrates contemporary German-language and American fiction (this year’s theme: Queer as Volk) and begins today in New York, Eileen Myles talks about the importance of translators and FNL. “The most interesting nights of my life have been when I’ve sat down with a table of translators, because they are the most sophisticated people I know,” Myles says, which is certainly saying something, coming from a poet this legendary. They also mention the political urgency of festivals like FNL, which are important in part because of the way they work “against the isolationism that is in the air in America right now.” Watch the video below, and be sure to check out some of the FNL events this week.

Bonus: Here’s another video of Myles reading the poem “Merk” from their 2015 collection I Must Be Living Twice: New and Selected Poems—which includes the genius image of “a dick that crawls up from the bottom of your ice cream cone” in order to “accidentally get eaten.” Watch below:

Originally published in Literary Hub.

Related Interests

More from Literary Hub

Literary Hub5 min read
Lit Hub Recommends
In the past three days, I have listened to five episodes of the Wondery podcast “Dr. Death,” which has confirmed two things I have long suspected: 1) the American medical system is, at every level, well and truly fucked (I know, hot take alert!), and
Literary Hub4 min read
This Is A Truly Bizarre Way To Write A Novel
I’m a tinkerer by temperament. My most frequent nerdy joke with my writing students is that if you sat me down at a computer every day for a year when I was 22 and let me have at it, a year later I’d have come up with Pound’s two-line poem “In a Stat
Literary Hub8 min read
Protest Art And The Fight For Standing Rock
To write about blankets is to be lured to metaphor and cliché. Patchwork, weave, unravel, unfold, stitch. A blanket of snow. A blanket of stars. Blanket statement. Blanket policy. To pull the wool over one’s eyes. A wolf in sheep’s clothing. Good met