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Supreme Court Sends Cross-Border Shooting Case Back To Lower Court

Can the family of a slain Mexican teenager sue the federal agent who shot him from across the U.S.-Mexico border? The case tests a long-held doctrine called a Bivens action.
Maria Guadalupe Guereca, 60, visits the grave of her son Sergio Hernandez Guereca at the Jardines del Recuerdo cemetery in Juarez, Mexico, earlier this year. Her son was shot by a U.S. agent across the border in 2010. Source: Yuri Cortez

Can the family of a slain Mexican teenager sue the federal agent who shot him across the U.S.-Mexico border for damages? The U.S. Supreme Court did not answer this question on Monday, instead opting to send a case back to a lower court.

The case centers on a larger question: whether the Constitution extends protection to an individual who

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