Newsweek

Engraved Bones Reveal Cannibal Rituals 15,000 Years Ago

Arm bone at cave site had been carved with a zigzag pattern before being broken open to get at the marrow.
One of the skulls found in Gough's Cave.
Skull_of_Gough's_Cave

Archaeologists have long known about our cannibalistic past, but why humans who lived thousands of years ago ate each other has been unclear. Now, a human bone engraved 15,000 years ago has fleshed out a long-incomplete picture about this ancient practice. providing clear evidence that some Paleolithic humans engaged in cannibalism for ritual purposes. 

After filleting and consuming dead bodies, these groups stopped to inscribe a design on the bones before sucking out the marrow, and then using the skulls as cups. In

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