The Atlantic

Groups Are Better Than Individuals at Sniffing Out Lies

People are not generally great at detecting deception, but new research shows that discussing with others makes a big difference.
Source: Panarat Thepgumpanat / Reuters

The official board game of my house is , and whenever we play, the unspoken (or, more often, spoken) assumption is that my roommate Adam is always the werewolf. To be fair, he often the werewolf. And he has a habit of saying “I’m the werewolf,” right at the beginning of the game, essentially short-circuiting everyone’s thought processes, because the point of the game is to lie, and to find the liars. Admitting upfront to being a werewolf just does not compute. Unless,

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