Bloomberg Businessweek

An AI Fix For Hospital Falls

Qventus has developed software that identifies patients most likely to take a spill

El Camino Hospital, located in the heart of Silicon Valley, has a problem. Its nurses, tending to patients amid a chorus of machines, monitors, and devices, are only human. One missed signal from, say, a call light—the bedside button patients press when they need help—could set in motion a chain of actions that end in a fall. “As fast as we all run to these bed alarms, sometimes we can’t get there in time,” says Cheryl Reinking, chief nursing officer at El Camino.

Falls are dangerous and costly. According to the Department of Health and Human Services’ Agency for Healthcare

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