The Atlantic

George H. W. Bush Is Dead

The former president died at the age of 94. “I want somebody else to define the legacy,” he once told his granddaughter.
Source: Gary Cameron / Reuters

Had George Herbert Walker Bush never become the 41st president of the United States, he’d still be remembered as one of the great Americans of the 20th century.

Bush, who died Friday at the age of 94, according to his spokesman, began his public service more than six decades ago, at age 18, as a naval aviator during World War II. Over the ensuing decades, he founded a successful oil company, served in Congress, was the chair of the Republican National Committee, the ambassador to the United Nations, the envoy to China, the director of the CIA, and the U.S. vice president; in his later years, he raised money for the victims of Hurricane Katrina and the Indian Ocean tsunami. His wife, Barbara Bush, died at age 92 in April.

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