The New York Times

Children's Books: Fantasy

A SHAPE-SHIFTING FOX, A SENTIENT ISLAND, AN EERILY PERFECT TOWN AND TWINS WHO USE MAGIC TO STAY TOGETHER.

Beloved by young readers, speculative fiction often gets a very different reception from grown-ups, some of whom lament that such books lack the depth of literary fiction, especially if — horrors! — they are popular ones in a series. It took a tsunami of media attention to get such adults to capitulate to J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books and, once they did, they raved about the series as an exception, seemingly unaware of its distinguished lineage. Fortunately, others feel differently, aware that some of the most inventive, enthralling, provocative and (yes) literary writing for children comes in this form. Setting their stories in invented places,

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