New York Magazine

Is Marriage Obsolete?

I RECENTLY WATCHED Planet Earth II with my family, and the footage of various animals waiting not so patiently for their mates to return to the proper rendezvous point in order to make sweet marital bird love or regurgitate a little fish smoothie into crying-baby throats was enough to send a chill down my spine. This penguin dad is seriously inept at scaling wave-tossed rocks and at locating his lady in a million-strong crowd of other penguin ladies screeching at the moon together, I found myself thinking. Does her screeching have the faintest hint of burgeoning contempt to it, or am I just imagining that? Later, as a seabird’s baby mama took her sweet time showing up at their appointed meeting spot, I nervously wondered if she’d wandered off with a more dashing seabird and left her endearingly devoted mate in the dust. (Okay, he did have a bad habit of nodding and pecking in a faintly insecure, unattractive way.) You could see the enormous misunderstandings in play: “You do know that I almost got pulverized against the rocks diving for these fish?”

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