NPR

'Umbrella' Protesters Sentenced For 2014 Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Demonstration

A judge sentenced the leaders of the protests to up to 16 months in prison. Rights groups said the sentencing would have a chilling effect on future demonstrations in Hong Kong.
Sociology professor Chan Kin-man (left), law professor Benny Tai (center), and Baptist minister Chu Yiu-ming (right) chant slogans before entering the West Kowloon Magistrates Court in Hong Kong on Wednesday to receive their sentences after being convicted on "public nuisance" charges for their role in organizing mass pro-democracy protests in 2014. Source: Anthony Wallace

A court in Hong Kong has sentenced pro-democracy demonstrators to up to 16 months in jail for their role in the 2014 protests that clogged the city's financial district for months.

The protests came to be known as the Umbrella Movement, signified earlier this month on "public nuisance" charges for organizing the sit-ins and peaceful demonstrations that obstructed major roads for 79 days.

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