NPR

'The Heartland' Aims To Debunk Myths About The Midwest

Though leaving no answer to the region's political future, author Kristin L. Hoganson writes a deeply researched book that will remain useful and readable long after this election cycle.
The Heartland: An American History, by Kristin L. Hoganson Source: Penguin Press

History books are often saddled — or blessed, depending on one's perspective — by the context in which they are written.

Kristin L. Hoganson's her new book, The Heartland: An American History, is a product of its time — seeking to answer questions about the Midwest that have arisen since the election of Donald Trump.

What do people living there want? Who are they? As commentators played the difference between so-called "coastal elites" and everyone else, interest in understanding whether the Midwest really is the isolationist, change-averse region it was made

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR4 min read
An Imagined Future Speaks In 'Talking To Robots'
If you want to see what that future might look like, David Ewing Duncan's book is a fun place to start; he envisions various bots based on interviews with scientists and engineers, among others.
NPR5 min readPolitics
Trump's 'Go Back' Rhetoric Is Sign Of A Racially Divisive And Turbulent Year To Come
President Trump has used white grievance to fuel his candidacy since he first came onto the political scene. So what he's doing now with four congresswomen of color is hardly a surprise.
NPR4 min read
Notre Dame Fire Revives Demand For Skilled Stone Carvers In France
"With stone carving, we give life to an edifice and perpetuate history. We're also creating a link with the past and transmitting values that are important to conserve in society," one student says.