The New York Times

CORRECTION: By the Book: Ruth Reichl

THE FOOD WRITER AND AUTHOR, MOST RECENTLY, OF THE MEMOIR ‘SAVE ME THE PLUMS’ WAS 10 WHEN SHE READ HENRY MILLER. ‘IF IT’S OVER HER HEAD, SHE SIMPLY WON’T UNDERSTAND IT,’ HER MOTHER SAID.

Q: What books are on your nightstand?

A: At the moment there’s a great pile of books by friends and colleagues that are just about to see the light of day. I have, of course, promised to read them all yesterday. They include Monique Truong’s wonderful “The Sweetest Fruits”; Jeff Gordinier’s poetic take on the chef René Redzepi, “Hungry”; Kevin Alexander’s “Burn the Ice”; and Adam Platt’s “The Book of Eating.” I’m excited about Mark Arax’s “The Dreamt Land”; the excerpt I read last year was an extraordinary piece of reporting. Also on the pile, “Wayfarer,” by James S. Rockefeller Jr. (related to Standard Oil on his father’s side and Andrew Carnegie on his mother’s), which boasts one of the best opening paragraphs I’ve encountered. And

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