Nautilus

Game of Thrones and the Evolutionary Significance of Storytelling

What is it about storytelling that gets people so riled up when they feel it goes wrong? Perhaps the fury stems from the evolutionary burden stories, and storytellers, have had to carry.Photograph by HBO / BagoGames / Flickr

told myself it was absurd to be discontented with the way ended. Why should I feel anything for the fate of a fictional world? Even so, I watched with interest, on YouTube, videos of how several of the episodes—particularly “,” “,” and “”—could have been re-written to heighten thematic consistency, the drama of certain deaths and the coherence of other characters’ story arcs, and the feeling that the conclusion, including Westeros’ geopolitical fallout, made sense. No, I did not sign the Change.org petition to have season eight re-made with “competent writers,” which, wrote about how, in 2012, fans pleaded for the game developer Bioware to remake the ending of the last entry in their space-opera trilogy, —and .

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