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Editor’s Note

“Eloquent history…”

This elegant and eloquent history of humanity examines not just how human society developed, but why it developed differently in different cultures. A must–read for the history buff and the layperson alike.
Scribd Editor

From the Publisher

In this groundbreaking work, evolutionary biologist Jared Diamond stunningly dismantles racially based theories of human history by revealing the environmental factors actually responsible for history's broadest patterns. It is a story that spans 13,000 years of human history, beginning when Stone Age hunter-gatherers constituted the entire human population.

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize
Published: HighBridge Audio on
ISBN: 9781598873481
Abridged
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