• audiobook
    0% of House of Cards completed

From the Publisher

In March 2008, Bear Stearns, a swashbuckling eighty-four-year-old financial institution, was forced to sell itself to JPMorgan Chase for an outrageously low price in a deal brokered by Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, who was desperately trying to prevent the impending catastrophic market crash. But mere months before, an industry-wide boom had "the Bear" clocking a record high stock price. How did a giant investment bank with $18 billion in cash on hand disappear in a mere ten days? In this tour de force, Cohan provides a minute-by-minute account of the events that brought America's second Gilded Age to an end.



Filled with intimate portraits of the major players, high-end gossip, and smart financial analysis, House of Cards recounts in delicious narrative form the dramatic events behind the fall of Bear Stearns and what it revealed about the financial world's progression from irrational boom to cataclysmic bust. House of Cards is the Rosetta Stone for understanding the dramatic and the unprecedented events that have reshaped Wall Street and global finance in the past two years.
Published: Tantor Audio on
ISBN: 9781400111688
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for House of Cards by William D. Cohan and Alan Sklar
With a 30 day free trial you can listen to one free audiobook per month

    Related Articles

    New York Magazine
    3 min read

    A Curious Lag

    ON SEPTEMBER 17, 2011, three years after the financial crisis and the dawn of the Great Recession, there was every reason to believe that public attention to bank fraud, massive foreclosures, executive wealth, and middle-class debt had come to an end—if it had ever really begun. At a call for citizens to come “occupy” Wall Street in lower Manhattan, a small crowd showed up, promising to sleep over until they were heard. Through an accident of circumstance, the protesters were pushed from where they wanted to be—Chase Manhattan Plaza, by Wall Street—onto a pathetic, ugly square of paved “park,”
    TIME
    2 min read

    The Economy: Brexit Is Part of a Dysfunctional Cycle

    BREXIT ISN’T A LEHMAN BROTHERS MOMENT, AT LEAST not yet. Financial institutions, which have done a fair bit of debt reduction since 2008, aren’t melting down, and U.S. markets have regained some of their mojo, in large part because it’s now clear that the U.S. Federal Reserve, along with other central banks around the world, will be keeping monetary policy loose. But that’s exactly the reason we should be worried about the longer-term economic impact of Brexit. It locks us into a dysfunctional cycle that helped cause the crisis as well as dictate the response to it, which has created a false
    New York Magazine
    3 min read
    Politics

    Triumph of the Oligarchs

    FRANKLIN FOER: Dodd-Frank was clearly a sincere effort to try to reform the system, to at least stop a repeat of the last …. BERNIE SANDERS: I wouldn’t say “reform the system.” I would say put some checks and balances into a system which had been deregulated [to the point] where Wall Street could do anything. FF: Why isn’t that reform? Is that too strong a word for you? BS: Reform would be to say that it is bad public policy when six financial institutions have assets equivalent to 57 percent of the GDP of the United States. That would be reform. FF: There’s no reform without breaking them