• audiobook

From the Publisher

A new novel from Zadie Smith, set in Northwest London

 

Somewhere in Northwest London stands Caldwell housing estate, relic of 70s urban planning. Five identical blocks, deliberately named: Hobbes, Smith, Bentham, Locke, and Russell. If you grew up here, the plan was to get out and get on, to something bigger, better. Thirty years later ex-Caldwell kids Leah, Natalie, Felix, and Nathan have all made it out, with varying degrees of succes-whatever that means. Living only streets apart, they occupy separate worlds and navigate an atomized city where few wish to be their neighbor's keeper. Then one April afternoon a stranger comes to Leah's door seeking help, disturbing the peace, and forcing Leah out of her isolation. . . .

 

From private houses to public parks, at work and at play, in this delicate, devastating novel of encounters, the main streets hide the back alleys, and taking the high road can sometimes lead to a dead end. Zadie Smith's NW brilliantly depicts the modern urban zone-familiar to city dwellers everywhere-in a tragicomic novel as mercurial as the city itself.

Published: Penguin Audiobooks on
ISBN: 9781101579473
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for NW: A Novel
With a 30 day free trial you can listen to one free audiobook per month

    Related Articles

    TIME
    2 min read

    A Death in the Family Inspires Two Works of Art

    RADHIKA JONES THE PARTY SCENE THAT OPENS Ann Patchett’s new novel unspools like a home movie. A lawyer from the L.A. district attorney’s office, Albert Cousins, crashes the christening celebration of baby Frances, second daughter of L.A. cop Fix Keating. Bert brings a bottle of gin; Beverly, Fix’s wife, halves oranges from the backyard for cocktails. Their collaboration on an assembly line of freshly squeezed drinks leads to an affair that breaks up two families—and joins them. It’s chaotic in the moment, but the patina of time reveals a graceful choreography. Commonwealth’s family saga, whi
    Literary Hub
    12 min read

    The Writer As Public Figure vs. The Writer Who Actually Writes

    I’m supposed to be writing a speech about my new novel, The White City. It’s a March morning, no sun. I’m standing by my secretary desk. I’ve shut the doors to the rest of the apartment and have been on the verge of sitting down to begin, but each time I tried someone called for me: my husband, my son, or one of my daughters. I can still hear them out in the hall. It’s impossible to speak to someone about a book one has written. I’m supposed to be writing, but this is the only sentence inside me. There are mere days before the book comes out. A number of so-called “author appearances” have be
    Foreign Policy
    5 min read

    Does the World Really Need Nation-States?

    To CHIGOZIE OBIOMA, there is more to writing fiction than crafting engaging characters and plots. Writers, he says, have an opportunity to assess and critique the world in which they live. The 2015 Global Thinker’s debut novel, The Fishermen, is a domestic drama about sibling rivalry, but it’s also an allegory for Nigeria’s destructive colonial legacy. TAIYE SELASI, though, finds value in literary stories that singularly explore interior landscapes, free of societal or political metaphor. To that end, her acclaimed 2013 novel, Ghana Must Go, delves into an immigrant family dealing with the dea