• audiobook

From the Publisher

Maggie Shipstead's irresistible social satire, set on an exclusive New England island over a wedding weekend in June, provides a deliciously biting glimpse into the lives of the well-bred and ill-behaved.

Winn Van Meter is heading for his family's retreat on the pristine New England island of Waskeke. Normally a haven of calm, for the next three days this sanctuary will be overrun by tipsy revelers as Winn prepares for the marriage of his daughter Daphne to the affable young scion Greyson Duff.  Winn's wife, Biddy, has planned the wedding with military precision, but arrangements are sideswept by a storm of salacious misbehavior and intractable lust: Daphne's sister, Livia, who has recently had her heart broken by Teddy Fenn, the son of her father's oldest rival, is an eager target for the seductive wiles of Greyson's best man; Winn, instead of reveling in his patriarchal duties, is tormented by his long-standing crush on Daphne's beguiling bridesmaid Agatha; and the bride and groom find themselves presiding over a spectacle of misplaced desire, marital infidelity, and monumental loss of faith in the rituals of American life.

Hilarious, keenly intelligent, and commandingly well written, Shipstead's deceptively frothy first novel is a piercing rumination on desire, on love and its obligations, and on the dangers of leading an inauthentic life, heralding the debut of an exciting new literary voice. 


From the Hardcover edition.
Published: Random House Audio on
ISBN: 9780449008782
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Seating Arrangements
With a 30 day free trial you can listen to one free audiobook per month

    Related Articles

    The Atlantic
    4 min read
    Society

    Catastrophe And The Comedy Of The Self-Aware Marriage

    Toward the end of the first episode of Catastrophe’s third season, Sharon sits down on a couch next to her husband Rob after confessing that she’s betrayed his trust. She asks a question: “What now?” Rob re-etches his magnificent block of a face, and what had been stoic rage at his wife’s betrayal becomes resignation. “I don’t know,” he says. “I guess over time I’ll have to learn to forgive you.” “Right,” Sharon says, her brows knotting and her lip twitching, a picture of worry and shame. “Over how much time?” “I don’t know. I guess it’ll take two or three months. A season.” Sharon starts sile
    Bloomberg Businessweek
    2 min read
    Society

    Sex on Tap

    In a world of too much stuff, too many images, and too many opinions, it’s a compliment to call Future Sex (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $25), culture reporter Emily Witt’s first book, useful. Because Witt is beautiful and writing about sex in the internet age, she’s gotten media attention. But she’s bristled at calling her work a memoir. Although being single at 30 led her to her topic, Witt travels beyond her own psychic distress and into a journalistic tour of 21st century mating. The result serves as a new economics of sex or, equally, an economics of new sex. Witt, now 35, is at the tail e
    New York Magazine
    1 min read

    The Controversial Rachel Cusk

    MOST DIVISIVE A Life’s Work (2001) Cusk’s elegy for her pre-motherhood self infuriates mothers and critics alike. “This isn’t what it’s like to have a baby; it’s what it’s like for a depressed and melodramatic novelist to have a baby.” (THE SUNDAY TIMES) Aftermath (2012) An unsentimental look at her divorce from her stay-at-home husband. “This is writerly greed, swooping on everything and wringing meaning from it, transforming it into something else rather than just letting it be.” (THE GUARDIAN) “Every experience, from having a tooth extracted to Cusk’s daughters’ hamsters’ inability to