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From the Publisher

With more than six million copies sold worldwide, David Schwartz's timeless guide and bestselling phenomenon, The Magic of Thinking Big, is now available for the first time as an unabridged audio edition.

Millions of people around the world have improved their lives through the timeless advice David Schwartz offers in The Magic of Thinking Big. In this bestselling audiobook, Schwartz proves you don't need innate talent to become successful, but you do need to understand the habit of thinking and behaving in ways that will get you there.

Filled with easy-to-understand advice, this unabridged audio edition-perfect for gift giving-will put you on the road to changing the way you think, helping you work better, manage smarter, earn more money, achieve your goals, and most importantly, live a fuller happier life.
Published: Simon & Schuster Audio on
ISBN: 073181598X
Unabridged
Listen on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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