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From the Publisher

Live More, Want Less gives readers a user-friendly non-judgmental approach to simplifying their lives in a week-at-a-time format. Offering personal narratives, a reflection on a Taoist-inspired "way" toward more meaning, and a list of daily practices that bring tangible change, Live More, Want Less provides universal guidelines for every reader's unique issue. Covering themes like shopping addictions, procrastination, prioritizing, "busyness", weight loss, and more, Mary's "been there, done that" approach reassures the tentative that greater clarity can be gained by voluntarily living with less, and that de-cluttering both physically and mentally can allow one to experience life more fully.

Topics: Happiness, Healthy Habits, Simple Living, Zen, Inspirational, Prescriptive, Poignant, and Guides

Published: Storey Publishing an imprint of Workman eBooks on
ISBN: 9781603427425
List price: $12.95
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