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Editor’s Note

“An Impassioned Look...”

This scathing takedown of the current political ecosystem by outspoken commentator & founder of the widely popular The Huffington Post is a must read for ordinary citizens & pundits alike.
Scribd Editor

From the Publisher

Powerful and enlightening. How to Overthrow the Government is an impassioned call to arms from one of America's sharpest and most independent commentators. In its pages Huffington breaks away from the party-line platitudes of Republicans and Democrats alike while challenging Amerians to rise up and take back their government. From the power of special interests to the ravages of the war on drugs, Huffington offers radical yet viable strategies for reclaiming our nation from the corporate and political powers that hold it hostage. For, as she argues, if We the People are to preserve and protect our more perfect union, we must stand up and fight for our country -- before it's too late.

Topics: Politics, American Government, Government, Provocative, Inspirational, Political Commentary, Social Change, Social Policy, Contemplative, and Media Personalities

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061952166
List price: $10.99
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