• book

From the Publisher

From one of the pioneers in the field of leadership studies comes a provocative reassessment of how people lead in the digital age: in The End of Leadership, Barbara Kellerman reveals a new way of thinking about leadership—and followership—in the twenty-first century. Building off of the strengths and insights of her work as a scholar and a teacher, Kellerman critically reexamines our most strongly-held assumptions about the role of leadership in driving success. Revealing which of our beliefs have become dangerously out-of-date thanks to advances in social media culture, she also calls into question the value of the so-called “leadership industry” itself. Asking whether leadership can truly be taught, Kellerman forces us to think critically and expansively about how to thrive as leaders in a global information age.
Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062069177
List price: $14.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The End of Leadership
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Entrepreneur
2 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

9 Ways to Become a Better Leader

Encourage employees to disagree with you. Companies get into trouble when everyone is afraid to speak truth to power. "If all you hear is how great you're doing, that should be a danger sign," says executive coach Ray Williams. Don't micromanage. Empower the people below you, then leave them alone. "A good part of leadership is stepping back," says Bill Pasmore, senior vice president at the Center for Creative Leadership. "A good leader leads from front and back." When people err, don't destroy them.But make sure they learn whatever lessons there are to be learned from their mistakes. Show com
Entrepreneur
3 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

What to Do When Your Boss Doesn't Trust You

Q: I work part time at a company. My desk sits out of the owner’s view. After I called in sick for a few days thanks to a case of shingles, the owner had his administrative assistant—also a part-time employee—tell me they can’t trust the hours on my timecard because they can’t see when I arrive or leave, and I “could be ripping them off.” I’m insulted. I report hours accurately, have been there a year and resent that a peer was sent to deliver this message to me. My initial instinct was to quit. How should I handle this?  A: Your experience underscores some ethical problems that can be avoided
Entrepreneur
3 min read
Leadership & Mentoring

Up, Down and Sideways: How to Be a Better Leader in 2016

This article is part of our Trends 2016 coverage. The light bulb went on for Jeff Greenfield, co-founder and COO of media analytics firm C3 Metrics, on a rare vacation. It was the first one he had taken unplugged, without his phone or computer; his major activity while in Camden, Maine, turned out to be sleeping. One day he conked out at 5 p.m. This prompted his wife to suggest that he shed some entrepreneurial hats. In the crystallizing absence of digital distractions, he realized she was right. “It was time for me to step away,” says Greenfield, whose Portsmouth, N.H.-based company uses soph