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From the Publisher

Words that Change Minds is based on the Language and Behavior Profile (LAB Profile); an easy to learn tool which illustrates how each person is unique. The LAB Profile will enable you to understand and predict from someone's language in everyday conversation, how he or she will behave in a given situation. You will learn to customize your language to change people's minds.

The author, Shelle Rose Charvet is the international expert on influencing and persuasion; what motivates and demotives people.

Topics: Language, Communication, Personality Psychology, Informative, and Guides

Published: Shelle Rose Charvet on
ISBN: 9780968522912
List price: $9.99
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