From the Publisher

In a society where unwanted teens are salvaged for their body parts, three runaways fight the system that would "unwind" them.

Connor's parents want to be rid of him because he's a troublemaker. Risa has no parents and is being unwound to cut orphanage costs. Lev's unwinding has been planned since his birth, as part of his family's strict religion. Brought together by chance, and kept together by desperation, these three unlikely companions make a harrowing cross-country journey, knowing their lives hang in the balance. If they can survive until their eighteenth birthday, they can't be harmed -- but when every piece of them, from their hands to their hearts, are wanted by a world gone mad, eighteen seems far, far away.

In Unwind, Boston Globe/Horn Book Award winner Neal Shusterman challenges readers' ideas about life -- not just where life begins, and where it ends, but what it truly means to be alive.

Topics: Survival, Dystopia, Dark, First in a Series, Tetralogy, Series, Speculative Fiction, Arizona, Ohio, Indiana, Missouri, Futuristic, Abortions, Runaways, On the Run, Ethics, Civil and Political Rights, Child Abuse, Adventurous, and Suspenseful

Published: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on
ISBN: 9781416994961
List price: $8.99
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