• book

From the Publisher


Critically acclaimed and award-winning actress Marlee Matlin reveals the illuminating, moving, and often surprising story of how she defied all expectations to become one of the most prolific and beloved actresses of our time.

Marlee Matlin entered our lives as the deaf pupil turned custodian audiences fell in love with in Children of a Lesser God, a role for which she became the youngest woman ever to win a Best Actress Oscar. More than twenty years after her stunning big screen debut, the Golden Globe- and Emmy-nominated actress is an inspirational force of nature -- a mother, an activist, and a role model for millions of deaf and hard-of-hearing people around the world.

In I'll Scream Later, Marlee takes readers on the frank and touching journey of her life, from the frightening loss of her hearing at eighteen months old to the highs and lows of Hollywood, her battles with addiction, and the unexpected challenges of being thrust into the spotlight as an emissary for the deaf community. She speaks candidly for the first time about the troubles of her youth, the passionate and tumultuous two-year relationship with Oscar winner William Hurt that dovetailed with a stint in rehab, and her subsequent romances with heartthrobs like Rob Lowe, Richard Dean Anderson, and David E. Kelley.

Though she became famous at the age of twenty-one, Marlee struggled all her life to connect with people, fighting against anyone who tried to hold her back. Her own mother often hid behind their communication barrier, and Marlee turned to drugs before she even started high school. However, she found in acting -- with the encouragement of her mentor, Henry Winkler -- a discipline, a drive, and a talent for understanding the human condition that belied her age and her inability to hear. By the time Hollywood embraced her, she had almost no formal training, a fact that caused many other deaf actors to give her the cold shoulder, even as she was looked upon as a spokesperson for their community.

She has played memorable roles on wildly popular television shows such as Seinfeld, The West Wing, and The L Word, danced a show-stopping cha-cha-cha on Dancing with the Stars, and now, with uncompromising honesty and humor, Marlee shares the story of her life -- an enduring tale that is an unforgettable lesson in following your dreams.

Topics: Celebrities, Physical Disabilities, Addiction, Success, Heartfelt, Hollywood, and Creative Nonfiction

Published: Gallery Books on
ISBN: 9781439117637
List price: $11.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for I'll Scream Later
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

The Atlantic
5 min read
Society

When Preschool Happens at Home

Samira Abdulkadir came to the United States 10 years ago, a young bride with a baby boy. She was from Somalia but came to the U.S. by route of Kenya, where she was married. The family settled just outside of Boston, in Chelsea, Massachusetts, and Abdulkadir had more children. Her second child, a girl, was born deaf. Then she had a boy, who died after five months in the hospital. Her next child, another girl, was also deaf—like their father. When this youngest girl was born without hearing, Abdulkadir drifted toward despair. She spoke very little English, she didn’t have any extended family in
Entrepreneur
3 min read

What Owning a Franchise Has Taught Two Deaf Brothers About Communication

Waylon and Jerrel Mathern are like any small-business owners: They know how important communication skills are. But the brothers have had to work harder than most to get their message across. They were born profoundly deaf, a term that means they’re unable to detect sound at all, and so have spent their lives reaching out in a hearing-impairment-unfriendly world. In succeeding, they’ve defied the odds: About 50 percent of deaf or hard-of-hearing people in the U.S. are unemployed, and another 20 percent are underemployed. Related: The Franchise Opportunity That Brought This Australian to Texas
Futurity
2 min read
Science

Gene Could Let Hearing Recover From Loud Noises

A protein implicated in human longevity may also play a role in restoring hearing after noise exposure, say researchers. Their findings could one day lead to new tools to prevent hearing loss. The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, reveals that a gene called Forkhead Box O3 (Foxo3) appears to play a role in protecting outer hair cells in the inner ear from damage. The outer hair cells act as a biological sound amplifier and are critical to hearing. When exposed to loud noises, these cells undergo stress. In some individuals, these cells are able to recover, but in others the o