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From the Publisher

If you read the original Buffettology, you know exactly half of what you need to know to effectively apply Warren Buffett's investment strategies.
Published in 1997, the bestselling Buffettology was written specifically for investors in the midst of a long bull market. Since then we've seen the internet bubble burst, the collapse of Enron, and investors scrambling to move their assets -- what remains of them -- back to the safety of traditional blue chip companies. As price peaks turned into troughs, worried investors wondered if there was any constant in today's volatile market. The answer is yes: Warren Buffett's value investing strategies make money.
The New Buffettology is the first guide to Warren Buffett's selective contrarian investment strategy for exploiting down stocks -- a strategy that has made him the nation's second-richest person. Designed to teach investors how to decipher and use financial information the way Buffett himself does, this book guides investors through opportunity-rich bear markets, walking them step-by-step through the equations and formulas Buffett uses to determine what to buy, what to sell -- and when. Authors Mary Buffett and David Clark explore Buffett's recent investments in detail, proving time and again that his strategy has earned enormous profits at a time no one expects them to -- and with almost zero risk to his capital.
In short, The New Buffettology is an essential companion to the original Buffettology, a road map to investment success in the worst of times.

Topics: Stock Market, Money Management , Wealth, Prescriptive, Informative, and Success

Published: Scribner on
ISBN: 9780743234115
List price: $14.99
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