• book

From the Publisher

This work offers a summary of the book "THE RICHEST MAN IN BABYLON: Success Secrets of the Ancients" by George S. Clason.

The Richest Man in Babylon is composed of a collection of parables all taking place in the ancient city of Babylon. The main message of The Richest Man in Babylon is that ahead of any person lies their future with ambitions and dreams and, to fulfill those ambitions and realize those dreams, people need to learn how to be successful with money. This book gives precious guidance and presents basic principles of effective money management.

George Clason also tells the story of different characters that need to manage household finance. Through these experiences, the reader can identify himself with the situation. Indeed, even if the story happens in ancient times, it contains wisdom which applies to any time in history.

The Richest Man in Babylon, described as "the mostinspiring book on wealth ever written", is a valuable book for businesspeople, even more specifically for those willing to learn the basics. But it is also very handy for those seeking to acquire timeless financial principles that can help their business thrive.

Topics: Success, Ambition, Goals & Aspirations, Wealth, Entrepreneurship, Informative, Reader Guide, Ancient Times, and Middle East

Published: Must Read Summaries an imprint of Vearsa Limited on
ISBN: 9782806235596
List price: $7.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Richest Man in Babylon George S. Clason (BusinessNew...
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

Nautilus
1 min read
Science

Spark of Science: Robbert Dijkgraaf: The director of the Institute for Advanced Study on the wonders of his childhood attic.

Robbert Dijkgraaf will sometimes let himself drift back to his childhood attic in the Netherlands. It was there that he did some of his first physics experiments, playing with discarded binocular optics that his father kept stacked in boxes. As he has risen to take the leadership of the Institute for Advanced Study, one of the world’s most prestigious academic institutions, those early experiences have not lost their power. “It’s very important to go back to the origin of your passion,” he says. They have also helped to shape his ideas about science education. Like many educators we talk to, D
Nautilus
1 min read
Science

Graphing Human Uniqueness

Throughout this issue, we’ve explored the question of whether humans are unique, and if so, in what ways. In one interactive piece, “The Vocabulary of Our Uniqueness,” we asked readers which words best described what makes us special. And here are the results. Readers cast 1,234 votes for 56 different terms, which we have grouped together thematically (and subjectively). This is obviously not a rigorously precise survey, but it’s enough to give a general snapshot of how people think of the question. The number one choice turned out to be “science,” which also included the terms “math” and “ast
NPR
2 min read
Science

PHOTOS: Scientists Take To Washington To Stress A Nonpartisan Agenda

Attendees from across the country descended on the nation's capital to speak up for science. The March for Science unfolded on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, and in multiple cities around the world. Coinciding with Earth Day, the event drew researchers, educators and scientifically-minded people. The event kicked off with open teaching sessions on the Mall, followed by a rally near the Washington Monument, and then a march that traveled to the U.S. Capitol building. NPR spoke to some of the participants about why they decided to attend the March for Science. Brad Slocum, a