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Editor’s Note

“A haunting debut...”

What's going on in this haunting debut? Can Mara kill people with mere thoughts? How does her sexy love interest play into it all? Discerning what’s real or not has me hooked, even as it scares me out of my wits.
Scribd Editor

From the Publisher

Mara Dyer doesn’t know if she is crazy or haunted—all she knows is that everyone around her is dying in this suspenseful and “strong, inventive tale” (Kirkus Reviews).

Mara Dyer doesn’t think life can get any stranger than waking up in a hospital with no memory of how she got there.
     It can.
     She believes there must be more to the accident she can’t remember that killed her friends and left her mysteriously unharmed.
     There is.
     She doesn’t believe that after everything she’s been through, she can fall in love.
     She’s wrong.
     After Mara survives the traumatizing accident at the old asylum, it makes sense that she has issues. She lost her best friend, her boyfriend, and her boyfriend’s sister, and as if that weren’t enough to cope with, her family moves to a new state in order to give her a fresh start. But that fresh start is quickly filled with hallucinations—or are they premonitions?—and then corpses, and the boundary between reality and nightmare is wavering. At school, there’s Noah, a devastatingly handsome charmer who seems determined to help Mara piece together what’s real, what’s imagined—and what’s very, very dangerous.
     This fast-paced psychological—or is it paranormal?—thriller will leave you breathless for its sequel, The Evolution of Mara Dyer.

Topics: Love Story, Amnesia, Death, Murder, Supernatural Powers, Mental Illness, Grief, Trauma, First Love, Female Protagonist, Guilt, Suspenseful, Psychological, Unreliable Narrator, Miami, Florida, Debut, Trilogy, Series, and First in a Series

Published: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers on
ISBN: 9781442421783
List price: $9.99
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