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From the Publisher

An engaging look at what led to the financial turmoil we now find ourselves in

Bailout Nation offers one of the clearest looks at the financial lenders, regulators, and politicians responsible for the financial crisis of 2008. Written by Barry Ritholtz, one of today's most popular economic bloggers and a well-established industry pundit, this book skillfully explores how the United States evolved from a rugged independent nation to a soft Bailout Nation-where financial firms are allowed to self-regulate in good times, but are bailed out by taxpayers in bad times.

Entertaining and informative, this book clearly shows you how years of trying to control the economy with easy money has finally caught up with the federal government and how its practice of repeatedly rescuing Wall Street has come back to bite them.

The definitive book on the financial crisis of 2008 Names the culprits responsible for this tragedy-from financial regulators to politicians Shows how each bailout throughout modern history has impacted what happened in the future Examines why the consumer/taxpayer is left suffering in an economy of bubbles, bailouts, and possible inflation Ritholtz operates a hugely popular blog, www.ritholtz.com/blog

Scathing, but fair, Bailout Nation is a voice of reason in these uncertain economic times.

Published: Wiley on
ISBN: 9780470535981
List price: $21.95
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