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From the Publisher


Cybercrime is increasingly in the news on both an individual and national level--from the stolen identities and personal information of millions of Americans to the infiltration of our national security networks allowing access to both economic and trade secrets.

In Cyberphobia, Edward Lucas unpacks this shadowy but metastasizing problem confronting our security. The uncomfortable truth is that we do not take cybersecurity seriously enough. When it comes to the internet, it might as well be the Wild West. Standards of securing our computers and other internet-connected technology are diverse, but just like the rules of the road meant to protect both individual drivers and everyone else driving alongside them, weak cybersecurity on the computers and internet systems near us put everyone at risk. Lucas sounds a necessary alarm on behalf of cybersecurity and prescribes immediate and bold solutions to this grave threat.
Published: Bloomsbury USA an imprint of Bloomsbury USA on
ISBN: 9781632862266
List price: $19.99
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