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From the Publisher

America’s Sherlock Holmes makes histhrilling debutin this classic volume of mind-boggling mysteries

Craig Kennedy is a Columbia University chemistry professor by day and New York’s premier sleuth by night. With the help of his roommate and partner in detection, newspaper reporter Walter Jameson, Kennedy uses his mastery of technology to solve the most puzzling of mysteries. In “The Deadly Tube,” he investigates a case of murder by X-ray, and in “The Terror in the Air,” he applies the scientific method to a rash of airplane accidents blamed on gyroscopes.
 
First appearing in the pages of Cosmopolitan magazine, Craig Kennedy was one of the most popular detectives of the early twentieth century, and Arthur B. Reeve’s stories featuring the scientific sleuth were the first mysteries by an American author to gain wide readership in Great Britain.
 
This ebook features a new introduction by Otto Penzler and has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.
Published: MysteriousPress.com Open Road an imprint of Open Road Integrated Media on
ISBN: 9781480442887
List price: $0.99
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