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From the Publisher

A collection of essays by leading Chinese political economists about the economic challenges facing China today and the reforms—to everything from financial institutions to urban housing policy—that will be necessary to prepare for the next ten years.
Published: Simon & Schuster on
ISBN: 9781476775012
List price: $2.99
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