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History of Architecture (AP313) II Term Paper | 2014

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Architecture of Malls & Offices of GURGAON & NOIDA

History of Architecture (AP131)
Sheifali Aggarwal
Roll Number: 07616901611
Sushant School of Art and Architecture

THE GLASS-WALLED OFFICE BLOCK
HAS BECOME THE COCA-COLA OF
ARCHITECTURE
- ROBERT ADAM, GLOBALISATION AND ARCHITECTURE
Globalization can be understood as a part of a modernization and westernization
process via which a tendentious global transition from traditional to modern
societies takes place. It has achieved the status of a master concept in the world
today attracting a lot of critiques. It is assumed that specifically for India, the
number of Indian mega cities will double from the current three (Mumbai, Delhi &
Kolkata) to six in 2021 (new additions being Chennai, Bangalore & Hyderabad),
when India will have the largest concentration of mega cities in the world.
As technology advances and India progresses it gets more difficult to not believe
that globalisation is inevitable. Virtually, but in everything crossing of national
boundaries can be observed, be it people, places, commodities or idea. Of course,
there is no proof. It is like a myth, which has its own rational and a modern myth at
that. (1)
Architecture represents the cultural adaptation of building technology for social and
personal space programming. It is an cultural expression and expresses cultural
and social values and ethics. It is also a representation of social symbols of status,
vanity and power. Architecture is never disassociated from the elite and rich, but
also as buildings are needed for human activities, architecture defines our attitude
towards the built. Cultural symbolism of architecture is unfortunately connected to
materials, size and myths of the society. It is influenced more by values of foreign
goods and ideas, for fashion and trends, consumerism and the market. Far from
satisfying the need for shelter, architecture is becoming more as a commodity for
conspicuous consumption announcing social class. Different class of people
respond to different built masses - shops, hospitals, markets, offices, houses,
schools, etc.
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Figure 1: GLOBALISATION IN ARCHITECTURE
Ref: http://shu1229.blogspot.in/

Creation of new elite class of individuals, firms with the impact of glitz and glitter
changes the technological and architectural programs and representations. The
localised labour segment with its innovativeness and improvisation drastically
changing the expected industry standards and blatant violations of property rights
and legal and safety standards will thrive on the gullies beside highways of
globalisation. As it already does. (1)
NOW, AFTER THE MATERIAL RESOURCES OF THE COLONIES
HAVE BEEN LOOTED, THEIR SPIRITUAL AND CULTURAL
RESOURCES ARE BEING TRANSFORMED INTO COMMODITIES FOR
THE WORLD MARKET.
- MARIA MIES
Cheap amendments of structural glazing and aluminium cladding are already in
place.
The IT and BPO offices/sector have transformed the social structure of peoples
living and their lifestyle patterns.
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Figure 2: GURGAON (L) BANGALORE (R)
Ref: http://www.theurbanvision.com/blogs/?p=676
Also shopping is the medium by which the market has solidified its grip on our
spaces, buildings, activities, cities and lives. It is the material outcome of the degree
to which market economy has shaped our surroundings and ultimately us with the
trend of malls being one major part of it.
Figure 3: SHOPPING AND MARKETTING
Ref: http://www.theurbanvision.com/blogs/?p=676

GURGAON
Gurgaon evolved as an extension to Delhi becoming a part of the National Capital
Region. The city of Gurgaon had various social classes migrating from various
territories and has painted a black canvas with their imagery. Every single migrant
has created its own micro-environment under the macro-environment of Gurgaon.
(2)
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Figure 4: THE PATTERN OF URBANISATION ON A SETTLEMENT
Ref: file:///C:/Users/Sheifali/Downloads/297-123-1-PB.pdf
The consumption culture when mixed with individual local and migrated imageries
creates an absolutely new breed of culture. Be it the bangla dwellers of Chakkarpur
or Tamil techies working in an IT company, when they paint their imagery over an
existing settlement, a new type of architecture is evolved. (2)
Also, the expansion of auto culture (dependence on vehicles) has nurtured a new
kind of lifestyle in all metropolitan cities including Gurgaon. The busy, exuberant
street life that proliferates in most Indian cities is virtually absent in Gurgaon. The
energy and commerce of traditional cities has been harnessed in a new kind of
space retail malls. Gurgaon is currently home to 43 malls most built since 2007.
Among these is the nations largest The Mall of India, which boasts 4.5 million
square feet of shopping. (3)







Figure 5: Ambience Mall, Gurgaon
Ref: http://gyaandarpan.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Ambience-mall-.jpg

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Figure 6: Sahara Mall, Gurgaon
Ref: http://www.gurgaonsite.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/sahara-mall.jpg

With names like Ambience Shopping Centre and The Sahara Mall, these spaces
are clearly not just for retail consumption, but represent a private oasis for a
wealthy self-selecting group looking for close interaction with similar people. The
architecture of Gurgaon has likewise been transfigured into something new: a
patchwork of styles and historical references. (3)
What is striking about Gurgaons rocky and bleak landscape is that amid several
construction sites and half built buildings, all the high rise luxury condominiums,
massive shopping malls, multiplexes and office buildings have Western architecture
and facades, reflecting a peculiarly modern aesthetic and urban design. (4)
Out of all the malls features a central point from which consumers enjoy an
expansive view of various floors and shoppers throughout the building. (5)










Figure 7: City Centre Mall, Gurgaon
Ref: http://www.speed4haryana.com/gurgaon/m2.jpg

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Figure 8: MGF Metropolitan Mall, Gurgaon
Ref: http://local.images.burrp.net/images/e/c/w/photo_mgf-metropolitan-mall

DLF City Centre, the first mall built in Gurgaon (2001), may have provided a
template in this regard. It consists of three floors wrapped around central open
space, which, on the ground floor, has seating for shoppers who wish to look up.
Inevitable they have something to look at: shoppers on the second and third floor
seem drawn to the railing, where they stand gazing down, up, or across at their
fellow consumers.
The architecture of these malls can seem odd to those accustomed to a different,
more horizontally oriented mall archetype. (5)
Talking about offices of Gurgaon, we will discuss it with a few examples.
DLF ATRIA (CONVERGYS) makes for a powerful architectural gesture. The central
design idea always envisaged creating a building with a forceful disposition in tune
with it architecturally strong surrounds. The design essentially consists of two
parts: a basic rectilinear body with glass curtain walling that houses the office space
fronted by a clear glass atrium running the full height of the building from which
the structure derives its name. A cantilevered pointed pergola supported by
tapering column further enhances the drama of the 6-storey high atrium. The
offices overlook the green spaces on its two zones. (6)




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Figure 9: DLF Atria (Convergys), Gurgaon
Ref: http://media.glassdoor.com/m/10/e1/7b/88/dlf-atria.jpg

The treatment of the form and the materials used are in line with the international
architectural argot of the other DLF projects in Gurgaon. (6)
DLF SQUARE & NESTLE has contrasting diversity: the cubist high-rise DLF Square
and the forceful low-slung DLF Nestle House. It completes the trilogy on NH-8
along with the DLF Gateway Tower and DLF Atria. The first building, DLF Square
verbalises absolute minimalism. Its simplicity is especially evident in the square
module used in the plan. The faade with rhythmic patterning of minor
fenestrations in the concrete cradle adds to the structures austere charm. Four
aluminium clad bastions hold up the structure. The recessive blue glass entrance
almost blends with the blue sky and funnels down the structures enormity. (6)
As a sharp contrast to symmetry of the DLF Square, DLF Nestle is a blend of curves.
A trussed roof supports the roof slab while an extended pergola gives it an added
visual dimension. The glass clad organic form creates visual interest and gives a
different dimension to the building. (6)




Figure 10: DLF Square & DLF Nestle Gurgaon
Ref: http://www.mncprobuild.net/dlf/commercial-projects/square-gurgaon-images/banner.jpg



NOIDA
India Glycols Corporate Office, Noida exemplifies the identity and corporate
ideology of equity and transparency in the workplace as an integral part of the
architectural vocabulary. The site surroundings and context along with an optimum
enclosed square volume enabled a built form with minimum exposed surface area.
A stacking system is used to generate the variety of open space; courtyards,
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verandas, terraces, green roofs etc. that help to structure the office spaces. A
central spine traversing the built volume serves as the common activity zone, with
other departments branching out. (7)









Figure 11: India Glycols Corporate Office, Noida
Ref: http://ad009cdnb.archdaily.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/1308430072-1993-andre-j-fanthome-edit-
528x321.jpg

SB Towers at Film City, NOIDA is planned with flexible, adaptable modular grids to
suit noveaou work practices. (8) Building is a RCC structure building with staircases
and openings. It constitutes of external glass cladding, stone and aluminium
composite panel composition. External and internal infill walls including
plaster/cladding/finishes. Incorporates rain
water harvesting systems and is an earthquake
resistant building. (9)







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Figure 12: SB Towers at Film City, Noida
Ref: https://assets.regus.com/images/1863/businesscentre/1_454x340.jpg


CONCLUSION
Increase in land values and the demand for floor space is one reason for putting
architecture on the fast track of change. But moreover, it is the peoples perception
of style thats seems to blame for accelerating this change. Few years ago Punjabi
baroque was an emerging style in Delhi in which the persuasion to elevate the
modern domestic buildings to higher levels of ornamentation was just a joke. At
that point of time this type of architecture seemed to have no purpose other than
that of exterior decoration and was just thought of a passing stage that would soon
die down. But the short span of 2- years of early globalisation had an adverse effect
on architecture. Architecture, once a profession considered to be that of creating
spaces with an aesthetic value that will live through the ages have lost its meaning.
Architecture seems to have given in to the age of globalisation, it has lost its
purpose of influencing people and the society, purpose of making habitable spaces
to one of assembling masses in space.
THE IDEAL HOUSE MUST BE BUILT OF MATERIALS
AND SKILLS GATHERED FROM WITHIN FIVE MILE
RADIUS OF THE SITE
- MAHATMA GANDHI
The last two decades of globalisation has taken Gurgaon and Noida from sleepy
village of buffaloes and mud housed and industries and warehouses to a city of
multinational tower blocks and apartments. Here the idea of Punjabi baroque has
acquired a great deal of respectability. Architecture in these cities and similar
upcoming cities has now become a lifelong materialistic buffet that relies on
technology to display newer forms of abundance with the extensive use of exterior
materials for cladding, for example, GLASS & ACP (Aluminium Composite Panels),
and make them available to growing market of Indian consumers.
In this age of malls, big fancy offices, cinemas and multiplexes there lies a hunger
for novelty and delight. The fate of a building is now that of a commercial
commodity. The old definitions of architecture as creating spaces of rest,
containment, comfort and protection dont make sense anymore. It can only be
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directed towards real life situations, built on an assumption that any desired
change id effective if only it is an enhancement of the present condition.



Bibliography
1. Shahshi Bhooshan. Globalisation, Building technology and Architecture. 2010
2. Saurabh Tiwari. Urban Interfaces in Gurgaon
3. Peggy Deamer. Architecture and Capitalism: 1845 to present. Routledge
4. Ingrid Leman Stefanovic, Stephen B. Scharper. The Natural City: Re-
envisioning the Built Environment. University of Toronto Press. 2012
5. Isabelle Clark-Decs. A Companion to the Anthropology of India. John Wiley
& Sons. 2011
6. Prathima Manohar. Architect Hafeez Contractor. Architecture publishing.
2006
7. http://www.e-architect.co.uk/india/india-glycols-corporate-office
8. http://www.businesscenterindia.in/office/india/uttar-
pradesh/noida/noida/noida-sb-tower/
9. http://www.slideshare.net/Rohit_24/sb-towers
10. Robert Adam. Globalisation and Architecture.