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Part No.

320985-A November 2005 4655 Great America Parkway Santa Clara, CA 95054

System Configuration Guide


Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Software Release 3.6

*320985-A*

Copyright 2005 Nortel Networks. All rights reserved.


The information in this document is subject to change without notice. The statements, configurations, technical data, and recommendations in this document are believed to be accurate and reliable, but are presented without express or implied warranty. Users must take full responsibility for their applications of any products specified in this document. The information in this document is proprietary to Nortel Networks. The software described in this document is furnished under a license agreement and may be used only in accordance with the terms of that license. The software license agreement is included in this document.

Trademarks
*Nortel, Nortel Networks, the Nortel logo, the Globemark, Unified Networks, and BayStack are trademarks of Nortel Networks. Adobe and Adobe Reader are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated. Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. The asterisk after a name denotes a trademarked item.

Restricted rights legend


Use, duplication, or disclosure by the United States Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013. Notwithstanding any other license agreement that may pertain to, or accompany the delivery of, this computer software, the rights of the United States Government regarding its use, reproduction, and disclosure are as set forth in the Commercial Computer Software-Restricted Rights clause at FAR 52.227-19.

Statement of conditions
In the interest of improving internal design, operational function, and/or reliability, Nortel Networks reserves the right to make changes to the products described in this document without notice. Nortel Networks does not assume any liability that may occur due to the use or application of the product(s) or circuit layout(s) described herein. Portions of the code in this software product may be Copyright 1988, Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved. Redistribution and use in source and binary forms of such portions are permitted, provided that the above copyright notice and this paragraph are duplicated in all such forms and that any documentation, advertising materials, and other materials related to such distribution and use acknowledge that such portions of the software were developed by the University of California, Berkeley. The name of the University may not be used to endorse or promote products derived from such portions of the software without specific prior written permission. SUCH PORTIONS OF THE SOFTWARE ARE PROVIDED AS IS AND WITHOUT ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. In addition, the program and information contained herein are licensed only pursuant to a license agreement that contains restrictions on use and disclosure (that may incorporate by reference certain limitations and notices imposed by third parties).

320985-A

Nortel Networks software license agreement


This Software License Agreement (License Agreement) is between you, the end-user (Customer) and Nortel Networks Corporation and its subsidiaries and affiliates (Nortel Networks). PLEASE READ THE FOLLOWING CAREFULLY. YOU MUST ACCEPT THESE LICENSE TERMS IN ORDER TO DOWNLOAD AND/OR USE THE SOFTWARE. USE OF THE SOFTWARE CONSTITUTES YOUR ACCEPTANCE OF THIS LICENSE AGREEMENT. If you do not accept these terms and conditions, return the Software, unused and in the original shipping container, within 30 days of purchase to obtain a credit for the full purchase price. Software is owned or licensed by Nortel Networks, its parent or one of its subsidiaries or affiliates, and is copyrighted and licensed, not sold. Software consists of machine-readable instructions, its components, data, audio-visual content (such as images, text, recordings or pictures) and related licensed materials including all whole or partial copies. Nortel Networks grants you a license to use the Software only in the country where you acquired the Software. You obtain no rights other than those granted to you under this License Agreement. You are responsible for the selection of the Software and for the installation of, use of, and results obtained from the Software. 1. Licensed Use of Software. Nortel Networks grants Customer a nonexclusive license to use a copy of the Software on only one machine at any one time or to the extent of the activation or authorized usage level, whichever is applicable. To the extent Software is furnished for use with designated hardware or Customer furnished equipment (CFE), Customer is granted a nonexclusive license to use Software only on such hardware or CFE, as applicable. Software contains trade secrets and Customer agrees to treat Software as confidential information using the same care and discretion Customer uses with its own similar information that it does not wish to disclose, publish or disseminate. Customer will ensure that anyone who uses the Software does so only in compliance with the terms of this Agreement. Customer shall not a) use, copy, modify, transfer or distribute the Software except as expressly authorized; b) reverse assemble, reverse compile, reverse engineer or otherwise translate the Software; c) create derivative works or modifications unless expressly authorized; or d) sublicense, rent or lease the Software. Licensors of intellectual property to Nortel Networks are beneficiaries of this provision. Upon termination or breach of the license by Customer or in the event designated hardware or CFE is no longer in use, Customer will promptly return the Software to Nortel Networks or certify its destruction. Nortel Networks may audit by remote polling or other reasonable means to determine Customers Software activation or usage levels. If suppliers of third party software included in Software require Nortel Networks to include additional or different terms, Customer agrees to abide by such terms provided by Nortel Networks with respect to such third party software. 2. Warranty. Except as may be otherwise expressly agreed to in writing between Nortel Networks and Customer, Software is provided AS IS without any warranties (conditions) of any kind. NORTEL NETWORKS DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES (CONDITIONS) FOR THE SOFTWARE, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND ANY WARRANTY OF NON-INFRINGEMENT. Nortel Networks is not obligated to provide support of any kind for the Software. Some jurisdictions do not allow exclusion of implied warranties, and, in such event, the above exclusions may not apply. 3. Limitation of Remedies. IN NO EVENT SHALL NORTEL NETWORKS OR ITS AGENTS OR SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY OF THE FOLLOWING: a) DAMAGES BASED ON ANY THIRD PARTY CLAIM; b) LOSS OF, OR DAMAGE TO, CUSTOMERS RECORDS, FILES OR DATA; OR c) DIRECT, INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING LOST PROFITS OR SAVINGS), WHETHER IN CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE) ARISING OUT OF YOUR USE OF THE SOFTWARE, EVEN IF NORTEL NETWORKS, ITS AGENTS OR SUPPLIERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THEIR POSSIBILITY. The foregoing limitations of remedies also apply to any developer and/or supplier of the Software. Such developer and/or supplier is an intended beneficiary of this Section. Some jurisdictions do not allow these limitations or exclusions and, in such event, they may not apply. 4. General a. If Customer is the United States Government, the following paragraph shall apply: All Nortel Networks Software available under this License Agreement is commercial computer software and commercial computer software documentation and, in the event Software is licensed for or on behalf of the United States

System Configuration Guide

4
Government, the respective rights to the software and software documentation are governed by Nortel Networks standard commercial license in accordance with U.S. Federal Regulations at 48 C.F.R. Sections 12.212 (for non-DoD entities) and 48 C.F.R. 227.7202 (for DoD entities). b. Customer may terminate the license at any time. Nortel Networks may terminate the license if Customer fails to comply with the terms and conditions of this license. In either event, upon termination, Customer must either return the Software to Nortel Networks or certify its destruction. Customer is responsible for payment of any taxes, including personal property taxes, resulting from Customers use of the Software. Customer agrees to comply with all applicable laws including all applicable export and import laws and regulations. Neither party may bring an action, regardless of form, more than two years after the cause of the action arose. The terms and conditions of this License Agreement form the complete and exclusive agreement between Customer and Nortel Networks. This License Agreement is governed by the laws of the country in which Customer acquires the Software. If the Software is acquired in the United States, then this License Agreement is governed by the laws of the state of New York.

c.

d. e. f.

320985-A

Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Before you begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Text conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 How to get help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Getting help from the Nortel web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Getting help through a Nortel distributor or reseller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Getting help over the phone from a Nortel Solutions Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Getting help from a specialist by using an Express Routing Code . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39


New features in software release 3.6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Link Layer Discovery Protocol (IEEE 802.1ab) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 LLDP operational modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Connectivity and management information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Transmitting LLDPDUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 TLV system MIBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 LLDPDU and TLV error handling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Configuring LLDP using the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Ethernet Switch 425-48T stacking support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Username and password enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Radius password fallback enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 SNMP trap port enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 EAPoL with Guest VLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 shutdown command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 reload command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 show mac-address-table enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

System Configuration Guide

Contents restore factory-default command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Ping enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 show interfaces config command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Autosave enable/disable enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Download without reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 write memory and save config commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Daylight savings time enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 BootP when needed as default . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 VLAN tagging enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 VLAN Configuration Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Port mirroring configuration rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Other features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 SFP GBIC Support on the Ethernet Switch 425 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Flash memory storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Switch software image storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Autosensing, and autonegotiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 RFCs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 BootP automatic IP configuration/MAC address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Configuration and switch management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Hardware components of the Ethernet Switch 325 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Console port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Port connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 LED display panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Cooling fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 AC power receptacle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Hardware components of the Ethernet Switch 425 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 User Interface button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Setting the unit as the Base Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Setting the unit as the non-base unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Setting the unit as a standalone unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Resetting the stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

320985-A

Contents Resetting the unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Aborting a command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Setting the default IP address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 LED display during change in IP address and subnet mask . . . . . . . . . . 73 Console port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Gigabit Interface Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Port connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 LED display panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Cascade Up and Down connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Cooling fans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 AC power receptacle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Network configuration examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Desktop switch application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Segment switch application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 High-density switched workgroup application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Stack operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Base unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Initial installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Stack MAC address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Removing a unit from the stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Stack configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Stack up configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Stack down configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

Chapter 2 Using the console interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93


Accessing the CI menus and screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Using the CI menus and screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Navigating the CI menus and screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Screen fields and descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Main menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 System Characteristics screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Switch Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Port list syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

System Configuration Guide

Contents Accelerator keys for repetitive tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Adding a new port to an existing port number list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Removing a port from an existing port number list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Choosing a high speed flow control mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Symmetric mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Asymmetric mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Rate Limiting Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115

Chapter 3 CLI Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119


CLI command modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Port numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Port numbering in standalone mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Port numbering in stacked mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Accessing CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Setting the system username and password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Getting help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Basic navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 General navigation commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Keystroke navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 help command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 no command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 default command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 logout command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 enable command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 configure command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 interface command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 disable command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 end command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 exit command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 shutdown command for the unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 reload command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Managing basic system information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 320985-A

Contents show sys-info command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 show tech command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 show stack-info command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 show stacking-mode command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 renumber unit command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Managing MAC address forwarding database table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 show mac-address-table command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 mac-address-table aging-time command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 default mac-address-table aging-time command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

Chapter 4 Getting Started with Device Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147


Installing Device Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 JDM installation precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Installing the Device Manager software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Installing JDM on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Windows minimum requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Removing previous versions of JDM on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Installing JDM on Windows from the CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Installing JDM on Windows from the web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Executing the JDM installation software on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 Installing JDM on UNIX or Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 Minimum requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Installing JDM on Solaris from the CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Installing JDM on HP-UX from the CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Installing JDM on Linux from the CD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Installing JDM on UNIX or Linux from the web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Executing the JDM installation software on UNIX or Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Removing JDM in Unix or Linux environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Device Manager basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Starting Device Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Setting the Device Manager properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Opening a device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Device Manager window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Menu bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177

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Contents Toolbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Device view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Selecting objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Selecting a single object . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Selecting multiple objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Viewing information about a GBIC port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 LEDs and ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Shortcut menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Status bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Using the buttons in Device Manager dialog boxes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Editing objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Working with statistics and graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186 Types of statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Types of graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Statistics for single and multiple objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Viewing statistics as graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Telnet session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 Opening an SSH connection to the device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Opening the Web-based management home page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Trap log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196

Chapter 5 Using the Web-based management interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199


Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Logging in to the Web-based management interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 Management page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Viewing summary information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Viewing summary switch information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Viewing stack information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Changing stack numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Identifying unit numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211

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Chapter 6 System configuration using the Console Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213


IP Configuration/Setup screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Choosing a BootP request mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 BootP When Needed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 BootP Always . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 BootP Disabled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 BootP or Last Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 SNMP Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 System Characteristics screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Logging in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Renumber Stack Units screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Hardware Unit Information screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 Software Download screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 LED Indications during the download process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Configuration File Download/Upload screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Binary configuration download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 ASCII Configuration file Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 Enabling and disabling autosave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Using SNTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 Configuring with CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 Setting local time zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 Using DNS to ping and Telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 Configuring with CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249

Chapter 7 System configuration using the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251


Configuring the switch IP address, subnet mask and default gateway . . . . . . . . . . . 252 IP notation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 Assigning and clearing IP addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 ip address command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 no ip address command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 System Configuration Guide

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Contents ip default-gateway command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 no ip default-gateway command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 show ip command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 show ip address command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Assigning and clearing IP addresses for specific units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 ip address unit command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 no ip address unit command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 default ip address unit command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Pinging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 ping command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 Resetting the switch to default configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Using DNS to ping and telnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 show ip dns command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 ping command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 ip name-server command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 no ip name-server command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 ip domain-name command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 no ip domain-name command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 default ip domain-name command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 Configuration Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266 Automatically loading Configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266 configure network command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266 show config-network command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 ASCII Configuration Generator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 show running-config command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 copy running-config tftp command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Customizing your system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Setting the terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 show terminal command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 terminal command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 show cli command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 Displaying system information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 Setting boot parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 boot command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 ip bootp server command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275

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no ip bootp server command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 default ip bootp server command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Setting TFTP parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 show tftp-server command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 tftp-server command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 no tftp-server command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 copy config tftp command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 copy tftp config command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 Setting the default management interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 cmd-interface command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 Customizing the opening banner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 banner command for displaying banner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 show banner command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 no banner command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Displaying the ARP table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Displaying interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 show interfaces command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 show interfaces config command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Saving the configuration to NVRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 copy config nvram command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 write memory command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286 save config command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286 Enabling and disabling autosave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 show autosave command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 autosave enable command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 no autosave enable command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 default autosave enable command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Setting time on network elements using Simple Network Time Protocol . . . . . . . . . . 289 show sntp command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 sntp enable command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290 no sntp enable command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290 sntp server primary address command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291 sntp server secondary address command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291 no sntp server command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 sntp sync-now command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293

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Contents sntp sync-interval command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 Setting local time zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294 clock time-zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294 no clock time-zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 clock summer-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 no clock summer-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 show clock time-zone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 show clock summer-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 Enabling Autopology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297 autotopology command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297 no autotopology command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298 default autotopology command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298 show autotopology settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298 show autotopology nmm-table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 Configuring LLDP using the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 lldp command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 default lldp command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 lldp port config notification command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 no lldp port config notification command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 default lldp port config notification command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 lldp tx-tlv command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 no lldp tx-tlv command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 default lldp tx-tlv command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 lldp port status command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 no lldp port status command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 default lldp port status command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 show lldp command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 show lldp port command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Configuring LEDs on the display panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Configuring UI button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 ui-button enable command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 ui-button unit command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 show ui-button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 default ui-button command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315 no ui-button command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315

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Upgrading software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315 download command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316

Chapter 8 Ethernet port management using the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319


Enabling or disabling a port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319 shutdown command for the port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319 no shutdown command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 Naming ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 name command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 no name command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 default name command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 Setting port speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323 speed command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323 default speed command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324 duplex command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 default duplex command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 Enabling flow control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 flowcontrol command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327 no flowcontrol command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327 default flowcontrol command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328 Enabling rate-limiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 show rate-limit command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 rate-limit command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 no rate-limit command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 default rate-limit command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 Enabling Custom Autonegotiation Advertisements (CANA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 show auto-negotiation-advertisements command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 show auto-negotiation-capabilities command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 auto-negotiation-advertisements command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 no auto-negotiation-advertisements command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 default auto-negotiation-advertisements command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335

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Contents

Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337


Viewing Unit information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337 Unit tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 Rate Limit tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 Viewing switch IP information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 Globals tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 Addresses tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341 ARP tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342 Editing the chassis configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343 System tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343 Base Unit Info tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346 Stack Info tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347 Agent tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 349 PowerSupply tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 Fan tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 Banner tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353 Custom Banner tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Working with configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 FileSystem dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 ASCII config file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360 Working with SNTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362 Configuring SNTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362 Displaying topology information using Device Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 Topology tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 Topology Table tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365

Chapter 10 Configuring ports using Device Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367


Viewing and editing a single port configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367 Interface tab for a single port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368 Viewing and editing multiple port configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371 Interface tab for multiple ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372

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Chapter 11 Administering the switch using Web-based management. . . . . . . . . . . . 375


Viewing system information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Quick Start . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Configuring system security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Rebooting the Ethernet Switch 325/425 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Changing the Ethernet Switch 325/425 to system defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 Logging out of the management interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382

Chapter 12 Configuring the switch using Web-based management . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385


Configuring BootP, IP, and gateway settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385 Modifying system settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 Configuring switch port autonegotiation speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Configuring high speed flow control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Downloading switch images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 Downloading ASCII configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 Storing and retrieving a switch configuration file from a TFTP server . . . . . . . . . . . . 397 Requirements for storing and retrieving configuration parameters on a TFTP server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399 Enabling and disabling autosave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Configuring port communication speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Configuring Rate Limiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Configuring Rate Limiting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402

Chapter 13 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405


Interpreting the LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405 Diagnosing and correcting problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 405 Normal power-up sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 406 Port connection problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Autonegotiation modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Port interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408

Appendix A
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Contents

Installing an SFP Transceiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 409


Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410 Product Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410 Locking/extractor mechanisms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 SFP labeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 SFP models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 CWDM SFP models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413 Installing SFPs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 Removing an SFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415 Technical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 SFP specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 SFP physical specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 1000BASE-SX (LC Type) specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 1000BASE-LX (LC Type) specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type) specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 CWDM SFP specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 How to get help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423 Hard-copy technical manuals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423

Appendix B Connectors and pin assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425


RJ-45 (10BASE-T/100BASE-TX) port connectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 MDI and MDI-X devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 MDI-X to MDI cable connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427 MDI-X to MDI-X cable connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427 DB-9 (RS-232-D) Console/Comm Port connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428 1000Base-T pinouts for the Ethernet Switch 425 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 430

Appendix C Default settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431 Appendix D Sample BootP configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443 Appendix E

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Command List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447 Appendix F Technical specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469


Environmental specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469 Electrical parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469 Physical dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 470 Performance specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471 Data rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471 Network protocol and standards compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472 Safety agency certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472 Electromagnetic emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472 Electromagnetic immunity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475

System Configuration Guide

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Contents

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Figures
Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 21 Figure 22 Figure 23 Figure 24 Figure 25 Figure 26 Figure 27 Figure 28 Figure 29 LLDP how it works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Ethernet Switch 325-24G . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Ethernet Switch 325-24G front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Ethernet Switch 325-24G LED display panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Ethernet Switch 325-24T back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Ethernet Switch 425 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Ethernet Switch 425-24T front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Ethernet Switch 425 LED display panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Ethernet Switch 425 back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Ethernet Switch 325 used as a desktop switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Ethernet Switch 425 used as a desktop switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Ethernet Switch 325 used as a segment switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Ethernet Switch 425 used as a segment switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Configuring power workgroups and a shared media hub . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Stack up configuration example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Stack down configuration example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Map of console interface screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Console interface main menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 System Characteristics screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Switch Configuration Menu screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 MAC Address Security Port Lists screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Port Configuration screen (1 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Port Configuration screen (2 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 High Speed Flow Control Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Rate Limiting Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 CLI command mode hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Ethernet Switch 425-48T banner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Main Menu for Ethernet Switch 425-48T console interface . . . . . . . . . . 127 help command output in privExec mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 System Configuration Guide

22

Figures Figure 30 Figure 31 Figure 32 Figure 33 Figure 34 Figure 35 Figure 36 Figure 37 Figure 38 Figure 39 Figure 40 Figure 41 Figure 42 Figure 43 Figure 44 Figure 45 Figure 46 Figure 47 Figure 48 Figure 49 Figure 50 Figure 51 Figure 52 Figure 53 Figure 54 Figure 55 Figure 56 Figure 57 Figure 58 Figure 59 Figure 60 Figure 61 Figure 62 Figure 63 Figure 64 show sys-info command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 show tech command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 show tech command output (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 show tech command output (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 show stack-info command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 show stacking-mode command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 show mac-address-table command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 mac-address-table aging-time output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 InstallAnywhere Introduction dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 License Agreement dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Choose Install Set dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Feature Sets dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Choose Install Folder dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Choose Shortcut Folder dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Pre-Installation Summary dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Install Complete dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158 InstallAnywhere Introduction dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 License Agreement dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Choose Install Set dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Feature Sets dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Choose Install Folder dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Pre-Installation Summary dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Installing Java Device Manager dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Install Complete dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Device Manager window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Properties dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Open Device dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 Device view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Parts of the Device Manager window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Objects in the device view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Interface tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Color port legend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Switch unit shortcut menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Port shortcut menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Line graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188

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Figures Figure 65 Figure 66 Figure 67 Figure 68 Figure 69 Figure 70 Figure 71 Figure 72 Figure 73 Figure 74 Figure 75 Figure 76 Figure 77 Figure 78 Figure 79 Figure 80 Figure 81 Figure 82 Figure 83 Figure 84 Figure 85 Figure 86 Figure 87 Figure 88 Figure 89 Figure 90 Figure 91 Figure 92 Figure 93 Figure 94 Figure 95 Figure 96 Figure 97 Figure 98 Figure 99

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Area graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Bar graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Pie graph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Interface statistics for a single port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Interface statistics for multiple ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Statistics dialog box for a port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Web-based management home page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Web-based management interface home page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 Console page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Switch Information page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Stack Information page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Stack Numbering Setting page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Identify Unit Numbers page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 IP Configuration/Setup screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 SNMP Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 System Characteristics screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Login screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Renumber Stack Units screen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Hardware Unit Information screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 TELNET Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 Software Download screen for an Ethernet Switch 325/425 stack . . . . . 239 Configuration File menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Configuration File Download/Upload screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 ASCII Configuration File Download screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Autosave Configuration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 show ip command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 show ip address command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 ping command responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 show ip dns command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262 ping command responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 show config-network command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 Output of the show running-config command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 show terminal command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271

System Configuration Guide

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Figures Figure 100 show cli command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 Figure 101 show sys-info command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 Figure 102 show tftp-server command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 Figure 103 show arp-table command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Figure 104 show interfaces names command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 Figure 105 show interfaces command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Figure 106 show interfaces config command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 Figure 107 show autosave command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Figure 108 show sntp command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290 Figure 109 show clock time-zone output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 Figure 110 show clock summer-time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297 Figure 111 show autotopology settings command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 Figure 112 show autotopology nmm-table command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 Figure 113 show lldp local-sys-data command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308 Figure 114 show lldp mgmt-sys-data command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Figure 115 show lldp stats command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Figure 116 show lldp port neighbor command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 Figure 117 show lldp port neighbor-mgmt-addr command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 Figure 118 show lldp port rx-stats command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 Figure 119 show lldp port tx-stats command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Figure 120 show lldp port tx-tlv command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Figure 121 ui-button enable command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 Figure 122 show ui-button command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 Figure 123 download message for Ethernet Switch 425-48T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317 Figure 124 shutdown [port <portlist>] command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 Figure 125 show rate-limit command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 Figure 126 show auto-negotiation-advertisements command output . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 Figure 127 show auto-negotiation-capabilities command output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 Figure 128 Unit dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 Figure 129 Rate Limit tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 Figure 130 Globals tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 Figure 131 Edit IP dialog box IP Address tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341 Figure 132 Edit IP dialog box ARP tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342 Figure 133 Edit Chassis dialog box System tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344 Figure 134 Edit Chassis dialog box Base Unit Info tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346

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Figures

25

Figure 135 Edit Chassis dialog box Stack Info tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 Figure 136 Edit Chassis dialog box Agent tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 Figure 137 Edit Chassis dialog box Power Supply tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 Figure 138 Edit Chassis dialog box Fan tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 Figure 139 Edit Chassis dialog box Banner tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Figure 140 Telnet window with default banner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355 Figure 141 Telnet window without banner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Figure 142 Edit Chassis dialog box Custom Banner tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 Figure 143 Telnet window with custom banner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Figure 144 FileSystem - Config/Image/Diag File tab dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359 Figure 145 File system - ASCII Config File dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 Figure 146 SNTP dialog box . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363 Figure 147 Diagnostics dialog box Topology tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 Figure 148 Diagnostics dialog box Topology Table tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366 Figure 149 Port dialog box Interface tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369 Figure 150 Interface tab fields for multiple ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372 Figure 151 System Information page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Figure 152 Quick Start page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Figure 153 Reset page message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Figure 154 Reset page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Figure 155 Reset to Default page message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 381 Figure 156 Reset to Default page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382 Figure 157 Logout message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382 Figure 158 IP page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386 Figure 159 System page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 Figure 160 Port Management page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 Figure 161 High Speed Flow Control page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Figure 162 Software Download page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 Figure 163 Ascii Configuration file download page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 Figure 164 Configuration File Download/Upload page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398 Figure 165 Console/Communication Port page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401 Figure 166 Rate Limiting page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Figure 167 Locking/extractor mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 411 Figure 168 Nortel SFP label . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Figure 169 Inserting an SFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 415

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26

Figures Figure 170 Removing an SFP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 Figure 171 RJ-45 (8-pin modular) port connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 Figure 172 MDI-X to MDI cable connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 427 Figure 173 MDI-X to MDI-X cable connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428 Figure 174 DB-9 Console port connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428

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Tables
Table 1 Table 2 Table 3 Table 4 Table 5 Table 6 Table 7 Table 8 Table 9 Table 10 Table 11 Table 12 Table 13 Table 14 Table 15 Table 16 Table 17 Table 18 Table 19 Table 20 Table 21 Table 22 Table 23 Table 24 Table 25 Table 26 Table 27 Table 28 Table 29 VLAN Tagging mode definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Components on the Ethernet Switch 325 switch front panel . . . . . . . . . . 58 Ethernet Switch 325-24G LED descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Components on the Ethernet Switch 325 back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 International power cord specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Components of the Ethernet Switch 425-24T front panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 UI button LEDs on the Ethernet Switch 425-24T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 UI button LED display during change in IP address and subnet mask . . . 74 Ethernet Switch 425 LED descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Components on the Ethernet Switch 425 back panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 International power cord specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Stack up configuration description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Stack down configuration description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Console interface main menu options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 System Characteristics screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Switch Configuration Menu options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Port Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Rate Limiting Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Command mode prompts and entrance/exit commands . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Keystroke navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 configure command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 interface command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 shutdown command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 reload command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 show mac-address-table command parameters and variables . . . . . . . 144 mac-address-table aging-time command parameters and variables . . . 145 Properties dialog box fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 SNMP community string default values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 System Configuration Guide

28

Tables Table 30 Table 31 Table 32 Table 33 Table 34 Table 35 Table 36 Table 37 Table 38 Table 39 Table 40 Table 41 Table 42 Table 43 Table 44 Table 45 Table 46 Table 47 Table 48 Table 49 Table 50 Table 51 Table 52 Table 53 Table 54 Table 55 Table 56 Table 57 Table 58 Table 59 Table 60 Table 61 Table 62 Table 63 Table 64 Open Device dialog box fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Menu bar commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Toolbar buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Selecting multiple objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 Port color codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183 Switch unit shortcut menu command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Port shortcut menu commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Device Manager buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Types of statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Graph dialog box buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 Help file locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Main headings and options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Menu icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Page icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Switch Information page fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Stack Information page fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Stack Numbering Setting page fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 IP Configuration/Setup screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 SNMP Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 System Characteristics screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 Renumber Stack Units screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . 235 Software Download screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Configuration File Download/Upload screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Parameters not saved to the configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 ASCII Configuration File Download/Upload screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Autosave Configuration screen fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 ip address command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 no ip address command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 ip default-gateway command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 show ip command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 show ip address command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 ip address unit command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 no ip address unit command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258

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Tables Table 65 Table 66 Table 67 Table 68 Table 69 Table 70 Table 71 Table 72 Table 73 Table 74 Table 75 Table 76 Table 77 Table 78 Table 79 Table 80 Table 81 Table 82 Table 83 Table 84 Table 85 Table 86 Table 87 Table 88 Table 89 Table 90 Table 91 Table 92 Table 93 Table 94 Table 95 Table 96 Table 97 Table 98 Table 99

29

default ip address unit command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . 259 ping command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 ping command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 ip name-server command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 no ip name-server command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 ip domain-name command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 configure network command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 copy running-config tftp command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . 270 terminal command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 show cli command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 boot command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 ip bootp server command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 tftp-server command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 copy config tftp command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 copy tftp config command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 cmd-interface command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 banner command parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 show banner command parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 show interfaces command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 show interfaces config command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . 285 sntp server primary address command parameters and variables . . . . . 291 sntp server secondary address command parameters and variables . . 292 no sntp server command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 sntp sync-interval command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 clock time-zone command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294 clock summer-time command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 lldp command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 default lldp command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 lldp port config notification command parameters and variables . . . . . . 302 no lldp port config notification command parameters and variables . . . . 303 no lldp port config notification command parameters and variables . . . . 303 lldp tx-tlv command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 no lldp tx-tlv command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 default lldp tx-tlv command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 lldp port status command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306

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Tables Table 100 Table 101 Table 102 Table 103 Table 104 Table 105 Table 106 Table 107 Table 108 Table 109 Table 110 Table 111 Table 112 Table 113 Table 114 Table 115 Table 116 Table 117 Table 118 Table 119 Table 120 Table 121 Table 122 Table 123 Table 124 Table 125 Table 126 Table 127 Table 128 Table 129 Table 130 Table 131 Table 132 Table 133 Table 134 no lldp port status command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 default lldp port status command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . 307 show lldp command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 show lldp port command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 blink-leds command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 download command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 shutdown [port <portlist>] command parameters and variables . . . . . . 320 no shutdown command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321 name command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 no name command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 default name command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323 speed command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324 default speed command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 duplex command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 default duplex command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 flowcontrol command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327 no flowcontrol command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328 default flowcontrol command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328 rate-limit command parameters and variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 show auto-negotiation-advertisements command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 show auto-negotiation-capabilities command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 auto-negotiation-advertisements command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 no auto-negotiation-advertisements command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 default auto-negotiation-advertisements command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335 Unit tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 Rate Limit tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 Globals tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 Addresses tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341 ARP tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342 System tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344 Base Unit Info tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347 Stack Info tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 Agent tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350 Power Supply tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 Fan tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353

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Tables Table 135 Table 136 Table 137 Table 138 Table 139 Table 140 Table 141 Table 142 Table 143 Table 144 Table 145 Table 146 Table 147 Table 148 Table 149 Table 150 Table 151 Table 152 Table 153 Table 154 Table 155 Table 156 Table 157 Table 158 Table 159 Table 160 Table 161 Table 162 Table 163 Table 164 Table 165 Table 166 Table 167 Table 168 Table 169

31

FileSystem Config/Image/Diag file dialog box fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359 ASCII Config File tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 SNTP dialog box fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363 Topology tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 Topology Table tab fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366 Interface tab fields for a single port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 370 Interface tab fields for multiple ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372 System Information page items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Items on the Quick Start page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 IP page items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 System page items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Port Management page items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 High Speed Flow Control page items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Software Download page fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395 LED Indications during the software download process . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 Ascii Configuration file download page items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397 Configuration File Setting items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398 Parameters not saved to the configuration file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399 Console/Communication Port page items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401 Rate Limiting page items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Corrective actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 1000BASE-SFP models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Nortel CWDM SFP transceiver list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413 Technical specifications for 1000BASE-SX, and 1000BASE-LX SFPs . 417 1000BASE-SX SFP specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418 1000BASE-LX SFP specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419 1000BASE-SX SFP specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 CWDM SFP (70 km) specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 CWDM SFP (40 km) specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 RJ-45 port connector pin assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 426 DB-9 Console port connector pin assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429 Pin descriptions for 1000Base-T pinouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 430 Factory default settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431 CLI command list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447 Environmental specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469

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Tables Table 170 Table 171 Table 172 Table 173 Table 174 Electrical parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 469 Physical dimensions of the Ethernet Switch 325 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 470 Physical dimensions of the Ethernet Switch 425 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 470 Performance specifications of the Ethernet Switch 325 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471 Performance specifications of the Ethernet Switch 425 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471

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Preface
This guide provides information about configuring and managing basic switching features on the Nortel Ethernet Switch 325 and Nortel Ethernet Switch 425. This guide describes the features of the following Nortel switches. Nortel Ethernet Switch 325-24T Nortel Ethernet Switch 325-24G Nortel Ethernet Switch 425-24T Nortel Ethernet Switch 425-48T

The term Ethernet Switch 325/425 is used in this document to describe the features common to the switches mentioned above. The term Ethernet Switch 325 is used to describe features of the Ethernet Switch 325-24G and Ethernet Switch 325-24T collectively. Similarly the term Ethernet Switch 425 is used to describe the features of the Ethernet Switch 425-24T and the Ethernet Switch 425-48T collectively. A switch is referred to by its specific name while describing a feature exclusive to the switch. You can use the Ethernet Switch 425-24T and the Ethernet Switch 425-48T in the standalone and stack configuration mode. The Ethernet Switch 325 operates only in the standalone mode.

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34

Preface

Before you begin


This guide is intended for network administrators who have the following background: basic knowledge of networks, Ethernet bridging, and IP routing familiarity with networking concepts and terminology basic knowledge of network topologies

Text conventions
This guide uses the following text conventions: angle brackets (< >) Indicate that you choose the text to enter based on the description inside the brackets. Do not type the brackets when entering the command. Example: If the command syntax is ping <ip_address>, you enter
ping 192.32.10.12

bold body text

Indicates objects such as window names, dialog box names, and icons, as well as user interface objects such as buttons, tabs, and menu items. Indicate required elements in syntax descriptions where there is more than one option. You must choose only one of the options. Do not type the braces when entering the command. Example: If the command syntax is show ip {alerts|routes}, you must enter either show ip alerts or show ip routes, but not both. Indicate optional elements in syntax descriptions. Do not type the brackets when entering the command. Example: If the command syntax is show ip interfaces [-alerts], you can enter either show ip interfaces or
show ip interfaces -alerts.

braces ({})

brackets ([ ])

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Preface 35

italic text

Indicates variables in command syntax descriptions. Also indicates new terms and book titles. Where a variable is two or more words, the words are connected by an underscore. Example: If the command syntax is show at <valid_route>, valid_route is one variable and you substitute one value for it. Indicates command syntax and system output, for example, prompts and system messages. Example: Set Trap Monitor Filters Shows menu paths. Example: Protocols > IP identifies the IP command on the Protocols menu. Separates choices for command keywords and arguments. Enter only one of the choices. Do not type the vertical line when entering the command. Example: If the command syntax is show ip {alerts|routes}, you enter either show ip alerts or show ip routes, but not both.

plain Courier text

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Related publications
For more information about using the Ethernet Switch 325/425, refer to the following publications: Release Notes for the Nortel Ethernet Switch 325/425, Software Release 3.6 (217155-C) Documents important changes about the software and hardware that are not covered in other related publications. Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Describes how to configure Virtual Local Area Networks (VLAN), Spanning Tree Protocol (STP), and MultiLink Trunk (MLT) features for the Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425.
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Preface

Configuring QoS for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320987-A) Describes how to configure and manage Quality of Service and IP Filtering features for the Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425.

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Describes how to configure and manage security for the Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425.

System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) Describes how to configure system logging and network monitoring, and how to display system statistics for the Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425.

Configuring IP Multicast for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320990-A) Describes how to configure IP Multicast Routing Protocol features for the Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425.

You can print selected technical manuals and release notes free, directly from Internet. Go to www.nortel.com/support. Find the product for which you need documentation. Then locate the specific category and model or version for your hardware or software product. Use Adobe* Reader* to open the manuals and release notes, search for the sections you need, and print them on most standard printers. Go to www.adobe.com to download a free copy of Adobe Reader.

How to get help


This section explains how to get help for Nortel products and services.

Getting help from the Nortel web site


The best way to get technical support for Nortel products is from the Nortel Technical Support web site: www.nortel.com/support

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This site provides quick access to software, documentation, bulletins, and tools to address issues with Nortel products. More specifically, the site enables you to: download software, documentation, and product bulletins search the Technical Support web site and the Nortel Knowledge Base for answers to technical issues sign up for automatic notification of new software and documentation for Nortel equipment open and manage technical support cases

Getting help through a Nortel distributor or reseller


If you purchased a service contract for your Nortel product from a distributor or authorized reseller, contact the technical support staff for that distributor or reseller.

Getting help over the phone from a Nortel Solutions Center


If you do not find the information you require on the Nortel Technical Support web site, and have a Nortel support contract, you can also get help over the phone from a Nortel Solutions Center. In North America, call 1-800-4NORTEL (1-800-466-7835). Outside North America, go to the following web site to obtain the phone number for your region: www.nortel.com/callus

Getting help from a specialist by using an Express Routing Code


An Express Routing Code (ERC) is available for many Nortel products and services. When you use an ERC, your call is routed to a technical support person who specializes in supporting that product or service. To locate the ERC for your product or service, go to: www.nortel.com/erc
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Preface

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425


This chapter provides an introduction to the Ethernet switch software release 3.6. This version of the Ethernet switch software supports the following devices: Ethernet Switch 325 Ethernet Switch 425

This chapter describes the hardware components and features of the Ethernet Switch 325/425, and covers the following topics: New features in software release 3.6 Hardware components of the Ethernet Switch 325 on page 57 Hardware components of the Ethernet Switch 425 on page 67 Network configuration examples on page 83 Stack operation on page 87

New features in software release 3.6


The Ethernet Switch 325/425 provides wire-speed switching for high-performance, low-cost connections to full-duplex and half-duplex 10/100/1000 Mb/s Ethernet Local Area Networks (LANs). The following is the list of new features introduced in the Ethernet Switch 325/ 425 software release 3.6. Link Layer Discovery Protocol (IEEE 802.1ab) on page 40 Ethernet Switch 425-48T stacking support on page 44 Username and password enhancement on page 44
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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

Radius password fallback enhancement on page 45 SNMP trap port enhancement on page 46 EAPoL with Guest VLAN on page 46 shutdown command on page 46 reload command on page 47 show mac-address-table enhancement on page 48 restore factory-default command on page 48 Ping enhancement on page 49 show interfaces config command on page 49 Autosave enable/disable enhancement on page 49 Download without reset on page 50 write memory and save config commands on page 50 Daylight savings time enhancement on page 50 BootP when needed as default on page 51 VLAN tagging enhancement on page 51 VLAN Configuration Control on page 52 Port mirroring configuration rules on page 53

Link Layer Discovery Protocol (IEEE 802.1ab)


Release 3.6 software supports the Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) (IEEE 802.1ab), which allows stations connected to a LAN to advertise their capabilities to each other, enabling the discovery of physical topology information for network management. LLDP-compatible stations can consist of any interconnection device including PCs, IP Phones, switches, and routers. Each LLDP station stores LLDP information in a standard Management Information Base (MIB), making it possible for the information to be accessed by a network management system (NMS) or application. Each LLDP station: advertises connectivity and management information about the local station to adjacent stations on the same 802 LAN (802.3 Ethernet with Ethernet Switches 325 and 425).

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receives network management information from adjacent stations on the same LAN.

LLDP also makes it possible to discover certain configuration inconsistencies or malfunctions that can result in impaired communications at higher layers. For example, it can be used to discover duplex mismatches between an IP Phone and the connected switch. LLDP is compatible with IETF PROTO MIB (IETF RFC 2922). Figure 1 shows an example of how LLDP works in a network.
Figure 1 LLDP how it works

Router

Ethernet Switch 425

TM

Management Workstation

IP Phone

1 2 3

The Ethernet Switch and router advertise chassis/port IDs and system descriptions to each other. The devices store the information about each other in local MIB databases, accessible using SNMP. A network management system retrieves the data stored by each device and builds a network topology map.

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

LLDP operational modes


LLDP is a one-way protocol. An LLDP agent can transmit information about the capabilities and current status of the system associated with its MAC service access point (MSAP) identifier. The LLDP agent can also receive information about the capabilities and current status of the system associated with a remote MSAP identifier. However, LLDP agents cannot solicit information from each other. You can set the local LLDP agent to transmit only, receive only, or to both transmit and receive LLDP information. You can configure the state for LLDP reception and transmission using SNMP or CLI commands.

Connectivity and management information


The information fields in each LLDP frame are contained in a Link Layer Discovery Protocol Data Unit (LLDPDU) as a sequence of short, variable length, information elements known as TLVs (type, length, value). Each LLDPDU includes the following four mandatory TLVs: Chassis ID TLV Port ID TLV Time To Live TLV End Of LLDPDU TLV

The chassis ID and the port ID values are concatenated to form a logical MSAP identifier that is used by the recipient to identify the sending LLDP agent and port. A non-zero value in the Time to Live (TTL) field of the TTL TLV indicates to the receiving LLDP agent how long the LLDPDU information from the MSAP identifier remains valid. All LLDPDU information is automatically discarded by the receiving LLDP agent if the sender fails to update it in a timely manner. A zero value in TTL field of Time To Live TLV tells the receiving LLDP agent to discard the information associated with the LLDPDU MSAP identifier.

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In addition to the four mandatory TLVs, Release 3.6 software supports the basic management TLV set. You can specify which of these optional TLVs to include in the transmitted LLDPDUs for each port. The optional management TLVs are as follows: Port Description TLV System Name TLV System Description TLV System Capabilities TLV (indicates both the system supported capabilities and enabled capabilities, such as end station, bridge, or router) Management Address TLV

Transmitting LLDPDUs
When a transmit cycle is initiated, the LLDP manager extracts the managed objects from the LLDP local system MIB and formats this information into TLVs. The TLVs are then inserted into the LLDPDU. LLDPDU are regularly transmitted at a user-configurable transmit interval (tx-delay), or when any of the variables contained in the LLPDU is modified on the local system (such as system name or management address). Tx-delay is the minimum delay between successive LLDP frame transmissions.

TLV system MIBs


The LLDP local system MIB stores the information for constructing the various TLVs to be sent. The LLDP remote systems MIB stores the information received from remote LLDP agents.

LLDPDU and TLV error handling


LLDPDUs and TLVs that contain detectable errors are discarded. TLVs that are not recognized, but that also contain no basic format errors, are assumed to be validated and are stored for possible later retrieval by network management.

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

Configuring LLDP using the CLI


For information about configuring LLDP using the CLI, refer to Configuring LLDP using the CLI on page 300.

Ethernet Switch 425-48T stacking support


With Release 3.6 software, the Ethernet Switch 425-48T can be stacked together with the Ethernet Switch 425-24T up to eight units high. You can stack the units using the Ethernet Switch 425 stack cables, which are available in 30 cm (1 foot) and 1 m (3 foot) lengths. These cables can be ordered separately (order number AL2018005 and AL2018006, respectively).

Note: With Release 3.6 software, the Ethernet Switches 425-24T and 425-48T have stacking enabled by default, which means that ports 26 and 50, respectively, are disabled by default. This is because the cascade port shares resources with port 26 on the Ethernet Switch 425-24T and port 50 on the Ethernet Switch 425-48T. Either the cascade port can be active, or port 26 or 50 can be active. If you want to use port 26 or port 50 in standalone mode, disable stacking and reboot the switch. For more information about stacking the Ethernet Switch 425-48T and Ethernet Switch 425-24T devices, see Stack operation on page 87.

Username and password enhancement


With Release 3.6 software, you can use the CLI to set usernames as well as passwords for system access through the Console Interface, CLI, Telnet, and Web-based management. The syntax for the new username command is:
username <username> <password> [ro|rw]

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If you set a password using the cli password command, the Console/Comm Port Configuration screen, or the Password Setting Web-based management page, the next time you log in to the switch, you are prompted to enter a valid username. Therefore, ensure you are aware of the valid usernames (default RW and RO) before you change passwords. For more information, refer to Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A).

Radius password fallback enhancement


With Release 3.6 software, you can configure RADIUS password fallback as an option when you use RADIUS authentication for login and password. When RADIUS password fallback is enabled and the RADIUS server is unavailable or unreachable, you can use the local switch or stack password to log in to the switch or stack. When RADIUS password fallback is disabled, you must specify the RADIUS username and password from the NetLogin screen. You cannot log in to the switch or stack unless the RADIUS server is configured and reachable in order to authenticate the login and password. The Radius password fallback feature is disabled by default. You can use the Console Interface or the radius-server password fallback CLI command to enable this feature. For more information, refer to Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A).

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

SNMP trap port enhancement


The SNMP trap port enhancement allows you to configure the SNMP trap port. The default SNMP trap port used for communicating with the trap receiver is port 162. You can now configure a different SNMP trap port using the following CLI command:
snmp-server host <host-ip> [port <1-65535>] {<community-string>|v2c <community-string>| v3 {auth|no-auth|auth-priv} <username>}

For more information, see Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A).

EAPoL with Guest VLAN


Prior to Release 3.6, EAP (802.1x) Authentication supported Port Based User Access. At any time, only one user (MAC) could be authenticated on a port, and the port could be assigned to only one Port-based VLAN. Only the MAC address of the device/user that completed the EAP negotiations on the port had access to that port for traffic. Any tagging of ingress packets would be to the PVID of that port. This remains the default configuration. With Software Release 3.6, EAP also allows Guest VLANs to be configured for access to that port. Any active VLAN can be made a Guest VLAN. For more information, see Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A).

shutdown command
The shutdown CLI command allows you to safely shut down and power off the switch. Once the shutdown command is initiated, the switch saves the current configuration, allowing you to power off the switch within the specified time period (1 to 60 minutes). If the switch is not powered off within the allotted time, the switch performs a reset.

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For more information, see shutdown command for the unit on page 134.

reload command
The reload CLI command provides you with a configuration rollback mechanism to prevent loss of connectivity to a switch, typically for remote configurations. The reload command allows you to temporarily disable the autosave feature for a specified time period (1 to 60 minutes), allowing you to make a number of configuration changes on remote switches without affecting the current saved configuration. During the interval in which the autosave feature is disabled by the reload command, you must use the copy config nvram, write mem, or save config command to force a manual save of your configurations. Once the reload timer expires, the switch reloads the last saved configuration. To abort the switch reload before the timer expires, you must enter the reload cancel command. The reload command provides you with a safeguard against any misconfigurations when you perform dynamic configuration changes on a remote switch. The following example describes how you can use the reload command to prevent connectivity loss to a remote switch. 1 Enter the CLI command reload force 30. This instructs the switch to reboot in 30 minutes, loading the configuration from NVRAM. During this 30-minute period, autosave of the configuration to NVRAM is disabled. 2 Execute dynamic switch configuration commands, which take effect immediately. These configurations are not saved to NVRAM.

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If the configurations cause no problems and switch connectivity is maintained, you can perform the following: a b Save the current running configuration using the copy config nvram, write mem, or save config command. Since the new configuration is working properly, cancel the reload using the reload cancel command.

If you make an error when performing configurations in Step 2 that results in the loss of switch connectivity (for example, an error in the IP address mask, MLT configuration, or VLAN trunking), the reload command provides you with a safeguard: when the reload timer expires, the switch reboots to the last saved configuration, and connectivity is re-established. Therefore, you do not have to travel to the remote site to reconfigure the switch. For more information, see reload command on page 136.

show mac-address-table enhancement


The show mac-address-table CLI command provides the following new parameters: include/exclude <pattern>. These new parameters allow you to filter the results of the command by displaying only those entries in the address table that include or exclude the specified pattern. The value for <pattern> must be a sequence of 1 to 6 bytes in hex, separated by dashes, for example:
show mac-address-table port 1/1-5 address include 00-0E-45-23

For more information, see show mac-address-table command on page 144.

restore factory-default command


The restore factory-default CLI command resets the switch or stack back to its default configuration. The syntax for the restore factory-default command is:

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49

where the [-y] parameter instructs the switch not to prompt for confirmation. For more information, refer to Resetting the switch to default configuration on page 261.

Ping enhancement
Release 3.6 software extends the ping capabilities of the device. Using the CLI, you can now specify additional ping parameters, including the number of ICMP packets to be sent, the packet size, the interval between packets, and the timeout. You can also set ping to continuous, or you can set a debug flag to obtain extra debug information. For more information, see Pinging on page 259.

show interfaces config command


The show interfaces config CLI command displays the current operational status of interfaces and provides supplementary information about the current port settings for Spanning Tree Protocol. For more information, see show interfaces config command on page 284.

Autosave enable/disable enhancement


Release 3.6 software extends the ability to set autosave enable/disable using the Console Interface (Configuration File > Autosave Configuration) and Web-based management (Configuration > Configuration File).

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

Download without reset


The download without reset enhancement allows you to download diagnostic and image software to the switch without the switch performing an automatic reset. Once the software is downloaded, you must initiate a manual reset to load the new diagnostic and software images. For more information, see Software Download screen on page 237 and download command on page 316.

write memory and save config commands


Release 3.6 software provides two additional CLI commands to save the switch configuration to NVRAM. The write memory and save config commands function identically to the copy config nvram command. For more information, see the following: write memory command on page 286 save config command on page 286

Daylight savings time enhancement


SNTP uses Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) for all time synchronizations so it is not affected by different time zones. With Release 3.6 software, you can use the following commands to set the switch to report the correct time for your local time zone and for daylight savings time: clock time-zone on page 294 no clock time-zone on page 295 clock summer-time on page 295 no clock summer-time on page 296 show clock time-zone on page 296 show clock summer-time on page 296

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BootP when needed as default


With Release 3.6 software, the default operational mode for BootP on the switch or stack is now BootP when needed. By default, the switch or stack attempts to use BootP if no management address is configured.

VLAN tagging enhancement


Release 3.6 software provides additional options for VLAN port tagging. Rather than setting a port to untagged or tagged mode, you can now also choose to enable or disable PVID tagging. Table 1 summarize the new tagging options.

Table 1 VLAN Tagging mode definitions


Tagging mode PVID Tagging Definition Non-PVID Tagging

Untag All (Untagged Access) Disabled Tag All (Tagged Trunk) Tag PVID Only Untag PVID Only Enabled Enabled Disabled

Disabled Enabled Disabled Enabled

The additional options are available using only the Console Interface VLAN Port Configuration screen or the vlan ports CLI command. For more information, refer to Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A).

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

VLAN Configuration Control


VLAN Configuration Control (VCC) is a new feature in Software Release 3.6 that allows a switch administrator to control how VLANs are modified. VLAN Configuration Control is a superset of the existing AutoPVID functionality and incorporates this functionality for backwards compatibility. VLAN Configuration Control is globally applied to all VLANs on the switch. VLAN Configuration Control offers four options for controlling VLAN modification: 1 Strict This option restricts the addition of an untagged port to a VLAN if it is already a member of another VLAN. To add an untagged port to a new VLAN, the switch administrator must remove the port from all other VLANs of which it is a member of before adding it to the new VLAN. The PVID of the port will be changed to the new VID to which it was added. Note: Strict is the factory default setting. 1 2 Automatic This option automatically adds an untagged port to a new VLAN and automatically removes it from any previous VLAN membership. The PVID of the port is automatically changed to the VID of the VLAN it joins. Since the port is first added to the new VLAN and then removed from any previous membership, the Spanning Tree Group participation of the port will not be disabled as long as the VLANs involved are in the same Spanning Tree Group. AutoPVID This option functions in the same manner as previous AutoPVID functionality. When an untagged port is added to a new VLAN, the port is added to the new VLAN and the PVID assigned to the new VID without removing it from any previous VLAN memberships. Using this option an untagged port can have membership in multiple VLANs. Flexible This option functions in a similar manner to disabling AutoPVID functionality. When this option is used, there are no restrictions on the number of VLANs to which an untagged port can belong. Any new additions of an untagged port to a new VLAN does not change the PVID of that port.

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VLAN Configuration Control is only applied to ports with the tagging modes of Untag All and Tag PVID Only. Ports with the tagging modes of Tag All and Untag PVID Only are not governed by VLAN Configuration Control. Ports with the tagging modes of Tag All and Untag PVID Only can belong to multiple VLANs regardless of VLAN Configuration Control settings and must have their PVID manually changed. For more information, refer to Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A).

Port mirroring configuration rules


Additional port mirroring configuration rules are available in System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A).

Other features
SFP GBIC Support on the Ethernet Switch 425
Small Form Factor Pluggable transceivers (SFPs) are hot-swappable input/output enhancement components designed for use with Nortel products to allow Gigabit Ethernet ports to link with other Gigabit Ethernet ports over various media types. The Ethernet Switch 425 supports the following SFPs: 1000Base-SX SFP GBIC (mini-GBIC, connector type: LC) 1000Base-SX SFP GBIC (mini-GBIC, connector type: MT-RJ) 1000Base-LX SFP GBIC (mini-GBIC, connector type: LC) CWDM SFPs

For more information about the SFP GBICs see Appendix A, Installing an SFP Transceiver, on page 409.

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

Flash memory storage Switch software image storage


The Ethernet Switch 325/425 uses flash memory to store the switch software image. The flash memory allows you to update the software image with a newer version without changing the switch hardware (see Software Download screen on page 237). An in-band connection between the switch and the TFTP load host is required to download the software image.

Autosensing, and autonegotiation


The Ethernet Switch 325/425 is an autosensing and autonegotiating device: The term autosense refers to the ability of a port to sense the speed of an attached device. The term autonegotiation refers to a standardized protocol (IEEE 802.3u) that exists between two IEEE 802.3u-capable devices. Autonegotiation allows the switch to select the best of speed and duplex modes.

Autosensing is used when the attached device is not capable of autonegotiation or is using a form of autonegotiation that is not compatible with the IEEE 802.3u standard. In this case, since it is not possible to sense the duplex mode of the attached device, the Ethernet Switch 325/425 reverts to half-duplex mode. When autonegotiation-capable devices are attached to the Ethernet Switch 325/ 425, the ports negotiate down from 100 Mb/s speed and full-duplex mode until the attached device acknowledges a supported speed and duplex mode. For more information about autosensing and autonegotiation modes, see Chapter 13, Troubleshooting, on page 405.

RFCs
For more information about networking concepts, protocols, and topologies, consult the following RFCs:
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RFC 1213 (MIB-II) RFC 1493 (Bridge MIB)

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RFC 1573 (Interface MIB) RFC 1643 (Ethernet MIB) RFC 1757 (RMON) RFC 1271 (RMON) RFC 1157 (SNMP)

Standards
The following IEEE Standards also contain information germane to the Ethernet Switch 325/425: IEEE 802.1D (Standard for Spanning Tree Protocol) IEEE 802.3 (Ethernet) IEEE 802.1Q (VLAN Tagging)

BootP automatic IP configuration/MAC address


The Ethernet Switch 325/425 has a unique 48-bit hardware address, or MAC address, that is printed on a label on the back panel. You use this MAC address when you configure the network BootP server to recognize the Ethernet Switch 425-24T BootP requests. A properly configured BootP server enables the switch to automatically learn its assigned IP address, subnet mask, IP address of the default router (default gateway), and software image file name. For information about a stack MAC address, see Stack MAC address on page 89. For more information and an example of a BootP configuration file, see Appendix D, Sample BootP configuration file, on page 443.

Configuration and switch management


The Ethernet Switch 325/425 that is shipped directly from the factory is ready to operate in any 10BASE-T or 100BASE-TX standard network. You must assign an IP address to the switch or stack, depending on the mode of operation. You can set both addresses by using the console port or BootP, which resides on the switch. You can manage the switch using:

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

Console interface The console interface allows you to configure and manage the switch locally or remotely. Access the CI menus and screens locally through a console terminal attached to the Ethernet Switch 325/425, remotely through a dial-up modem connection, or in-band through a Telnet session. For information about the console interface, see Chapter 2, Using the console interface, on page 93.

Command Line Interface (CLI) The CLI is used to automate general management and configuration of the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425. Use the CLI through a Telnet connection or through the serial port on the console. See Chapter 3, CLI Basics, on page 119 for more information.

Java-based Device Manager Device Manager is a Java-based set of graphical network management applications used to configure and manage an Ethernet Switch 325/425. See Chapter 4, Getting Started with Device Manager, on page 171 for more information.

Web-based management You can manage the network from the World Wide Web. Access the Web-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) through the Embedded Web Server (EWS), the HTML-based browser located on your network. The GUI allows you to configure, monitor, and maintain your network through Web browsers. You can also download software using the Web. For information about Web-based management, refer to Chapter 5, Using the Web-based management interface, on page 199.

Any generic SNMP-based network management software. You can use any generic SNMP-based network management software to configure and manage an Ethernet Switch 325/425.

Nortel Enterprise Policy Manager The Nortel Enterprise Policy Manager (formerly Optivity Policy Services) allows you to configure the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 with a single system.

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Hardware components of the Ethernet Switch 325


Front panel
Figure 2 shows the front and side views of the Ethernet Switch 325.
Figure 2 Ethernet Switch 325-24G

Figure 3 shows the configuration of the front panel on the Ethernet Switch 325. Table 2 describes the components on the front panel.
Figure 3 Ethernet Switch 325-24G front panel
1
26

2
25 LED Status - Amber:10Mps Green:100 Mps Blink:Activity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

3
LED Status - Off:Half Duplex Green:Full Duplex 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

4
Ethernet Switch 325-24G
Console

UI UI Cmd Pwr UI Set Spd Act Spd: 10/100/1000T Spd Act Act: Activity

Ethernet Switch 325-24G


11108ER

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Table 2 Components on the Ethernet Switch 325 switch front panel
Item 1 2 3 4 Description UI button 1000T Connectors (not available with Ethernet Switch 325-24T) Port connectors Console port

Note: 1000T connectors are not available for the Ethernet Switch 325-24T.

Console port
The Console port allows you to access the Console Interface (CI) screens and customize your network using the console menu and screens. For more information on using the Console Interface see Chapter 2, Using the console interface, on page 93. The Console port is a DB-9, RS-232-D male serial port connector. You can use this connector to connect a management station, console, or terminal to the Ethernet Switch 325 by using a straight-through DB-9 to DB-9 standard serial port cable. You must use a VT100/ANSI-compatible terminal (for cursor control and to enable cursor and functions keys) to use the console port. Note: The console port is configured as a Data Communications Equipment (DCE) connector. Ensure that your RS-232 cable pinouts are configured for DCE connections. For more information see Appendix B, Connectors and pin assignments, on page 425. The default settings of the Console port are:
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Port connectors
The Ethernet Switch 325 uses 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX RJ-45 (8-pin modular) port connectors. The 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX port connectors are configured as MDI-X (Media Dependent Interface-crossover). These ports are connected by straight cables to the Network Interface Card (NIC) in a node or a server, similar to a conventional Ethernet repeater hub. If you are connecting to an Ethernet hub or Ethernet switch, use a crossover cable unless an MDI connection exists on the associated port of the attached device (For more information see Appendix B, Connectors and pin assignments, on page 425). The Ethernet Switch 325 uses autosensing ports designed to operate at 10 Mb/s (megabits per second) or at 100 Mb/s, depending on the connecting device. These ports support the IEEE 802.3u autonegotiation standard, which means that when a port is connected to another device which also supports the IEEE 802.3u standard, the two devices negotiate the best speed and duplex mode. The 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX switch ports also support half- and full-duplex mode operation. The 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX RJ-45 switch ports can connect to 10 Mb/s or 100 Mb/s Ethernet segments or nodes. Note: Use only Category 5 copper Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cable connections when connecting 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX ports. For more information on RJ-45 port connectors see Appendix B, Connectors and pin assignments, on page 425 for more information.

LED display panel


Figure 4 shows the LED display panel of the Ethernet Switch 325-24G. See Table 3 for a description of the LEDs.

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Figure 4 Ethernet Switch 325-24G LED display panel
26 25 LED StatusAmber:10MpsGreen:100 Mps Blink:Activity StatusOff:Hal LED D 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

UI UICmd Pwr UISet T A T A

T: 1000T

A: Activity

Table 3 Ethernet Switch 325-24G LED descriptions


Label Color/Status Meaning Station connected at 100 Mbps. Station connected at 10 Mbps. Traffic activity at 100 Mbps. Traffic activity at 10 Mbps. No link/No traffic. Full duplex Half duplex connection. The UI Set button is used to reset the switch without a console connection. Indicates the switch is in cmd mode. ON for about 3 seconds when executing a cmd, then goes OFF. The UI LED should be off, unless active. Normally off. The UI Cmd LED blinks once each time the UI Set button is pressed, and while the UI LED is blinking. Power on. Unit not connected to a power source.

Link/Activity Green Amber Green/Flashing Amber/Flashing Off Half/Full Duplex UI Set UI Green Off Button Green/Flashing Green Off UI Cmd Off Green/blinking

Pwr

Green Off

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Table 3 Ethernet Switch 325-24G LED descriptions (continued)
Label T Color/Status Green/steady Amber/steady Off A Green/blinking Off Meaning This port is set to operate at 1000 Mb/s, and the link is good. Station connected at 10/100 Mb/s. No link on Copper uplink port. Indicates activity on link. No activity on the link.

61

Back panel
The back panel of the Ethernet Switch 325-24T is shown in Figure 5. Table 4 describes the components on the back panel.
Figure 5 Ethernet Switch 325-24T back panel
1

100-240 V50-60Hz 2A

11110EA

Table 4 Components on the Ethernet Switch 325 back panel


Item 1 Description AC power receptacle

Cooling fans
Two cooling fans are located on one side of the Ethernet Switch 325 to provide cooling for the internal components. (See Figure 2 on page 57). When you install the switch, be sure to allow enough space on both sides of the switch for adequate ventilation. For more information on installing the Ethernet Switch 325, see Installing the Nortel Ethernet Switch 325 (217149-B).

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AC power receptacle
The AC power receptacle accepts the AC power cord which is supplied with the switch. For installation outside North America, make sure that you have the proper power cord for your region. Any cord used must have a CEE-22 standard V female connector on one end and must meet the IEC 320-030 specifications. Table 5 lists specifications for international power cords.
Table 5 International power cord specifications
Country/Plug description Continental Europe: CEE7 standard VII male plug Harmonized cord (HAR marking on the outside of the cord jacket to comply with the CENELEC Harmonized Document HD-21) Specifications 220 or 230 VAC 50 Hz Single phase Typical plug

228FA

U.S./Canada/Japan: 100 or 120 VAC 5060 Hz Single phase NEMA5-15P male plug UL recognized (UL stamped on cord jacket) CSA certified (CSA label secured to the cord)

227FA

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Country/Plug description United Kingdom: BS1363 male plug with fuse Harmonized cord Specifications 240 VAC 50 Hz Single phase Typical plug

63

229FA

Australia: AS3112-1981 Male plug

240 VAC 50 Hz Single phase

230FA

Caution: Please read immediately. Inspect the power cord and determine if it provides the proper plug and is appropriately certified for use with your electrical system. Immediately discard this power cord if it is inappropriate for your country's electrical system and obtain the proper cord as required by your national electrical codes or ordinances. Refer to this product's technical documentation for detailed installation procedures to be followed by qualified service personnel.

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

Vorsicht: Bitte sofort lesen. Sehen Sie nach, ob dieses Netzkabel ber den richtigen Stecker verfgt und fr die Verwendung in Ihrem Stromversogungsnetz zertifiziert ist. Falls dieses Kabel nicht fr das Stromversorgungsnetz in Ihrem Land geeignet ist, darf es nicht verwendet werden. Besorgen Sie sich ein Kabel, das die Vorschriften der Zulassungsbehrden in Ihrem Land erfllt. Die technische Dokumentation dieses Produkts enthlt ausfhrliche Installationsanweisungen, die nur von qualifiziertem Kundendienstpersonal ausgefhrt werden drfen.

Attention: Lisez ceci immdiatement. Examinez ce cordon d'alimentation pour dterminer s'il dispose de la fiche approprie et s'il est bien agr pour utilisation sur votre installation lectrique. Dbarrassez-vous en immdiatement s'il ne convient pas l'utilisation sur le secteur lectrique en usage dans votre pays et procurez-vous un cordon conforme la rglementation nationale en vigueur. Reportez-vous la documentation technique de ce produit pour obtenir des instructions dtailles d'installation, destines un technicien qualifi.

Attenzione: Leggere attentamente. Controllare questo cavo di alimentazione, verificarne il collegamento con la presa appropriata nonch la certificazione per l'uso nell'impianto elettrico posseduto. Non utilizzare assolutamente in caso tale cavo non sia adatto al sistema elettrico del paese in cui viene utilizzato e richiederne un altro certificato dall'ente nazionale di fornitura elettrica. Per le procedure di installazione che devono essere seguite dal personale di servizio, consultare questa documentazione tecnica del prodotto.

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Advertencia: Srvase leer inmediatamente. Inspeccione este cable de alimentacin elctrica y determine si viene con el enchufe apropiado y est debidamente certificado para el uso con su sistema elctrico. Si no cumple con los reglamentos del sistema elctrico de su pas, despjese de este cable de alimentacin inmediatamente y obtenga el cable requerido, segn las ordenanzas y cdigos elctricos nacionales. Refirase a la documentacin tcnica de este producto para recibir informacin detallada sobre los procedimientos que el personal calificado de reparaciones deber seguir.

Caution:

Warning: Removal of the power cord is the only way to turn off power to this device. The power cord must always be connected in a location that can be accessed quickly and safely in case of an emergency. Vorsicht: Die Stromzufuhr zu diesem Gert kann nur durch Ziehen des Netzstromkabels unterbrochen werden. Die Netzsteckdose, an die das Netzstromkabel angeschlossen ist, mu sich stets an einem Ort befinden, der bei einem Notfall schnell und einfach zugnglich ist.

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Avertissement: Le dbranchement du cordon d'alimentation constitue le seul moyen de mettre cet appareil hors tension. Le cordon d'alimentation doit donc toujours tre branch dans une prise accessible pour faciliter la mise hors tension en cas d'urgence. Advertencia: La nica forma de desconectar la alimentacin de este dispositivo es desenchufar el cable de alimentacin. El cable de alimentacin siempre debe estar conectado en una ubicacin que permita acceder al cable de forma rpida y segura en caso de emergencia. Avvertenza: Estrarre il cavo di alimentazione l'unico sistema per spegnere il dispositivo. Il cavo di alimentazione deve essere sempre collegato in una posizione che permetta l'accesso facile e sicuro in caso di emergenza.

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Hardware components of the Ethernet Switch 425


Figure 6 shows the front and side views of the Ethernet Switch 425.
Figure 6 Ethernet Switch 425

TM

11107FA

Front panel
Figure 7 shows the configuration of the front panel on the Ethernet Switch 425-24T.
Figure 7 Ethernet Switch 425-24T front panel
1
26

2
25 LED Status - Amber:10Mps Green:100 Mps Blink:Activity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

4
LED Status - Off:Half Duplex Green:Full Duplex 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Console

UI

Base M T A M T A

TM

GBK/Stack Up Pwr UI Set Down

M:MGBIC T:1000T A:Activity

11108EA

Table 6 describes the components on the front panel.

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Table 6 Components of the Ethernet Switch 425-24T front panel
Item 1 2 3 4 5 Description UI button 10/100/1000BaseT (copper) port 25 and 26 Gigabit Interface Converter (GBIC) ports 25 and 26 10/100BaseT ports 1 to 24 Console port

Note: With Release 3.6 software, the Ethernet Switches 425-24T and 425-48T have stacking enabled by default, which means that ports 26 and 50, respectively, are disabled by default. This is because the cascade port shares resources with port 26 on the Ethernet Switch 425-24T and port 50 on the Ethernet Switch 425-48T. Either the cascade port can be active, or port 26 or 50 can be active. If you want to use port 26 or port 50 in standalone mode, disable stacking and reboot the switch.

User Interface button


The User Interface (UI) button on the Ethernet Switch 425 provides easy-to-use features for stacking configuration. You can perform the following tasks using the User Interface button on the Ethernet Switch 425-24T: Setting the unit as the Base Unit on page 69 Setting the unit as the non-base unit on page 69 Setting the unit as a standalone unit on page 70 Resetting the stack on page 70 Resetting the unit on page 70 Setting the default IP address on page 72 Note: On the Ethernet Switch 425-24T and 425-48T, the User Interface button allows you to reset the unit.

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Setting the unit as the Base Unit


To set the unit as the Base Unit with the UI button: 1 Press the UI button and hold in for three seconds. The unit is now in the Configuration mode, and the color and status of the UI LED turns green blinking. 2 Press the UI button once. The Base LED turns on, and the Up and Down LEDs are steady green to indicate that the button press was recognized. 3 Press the UI button and hold it for three seconds to confirm the command. The color and status of the UI LED returns to green once the command has been accepted. If the command is rejected, the UI LED turns amber blinking. Note: Changing the Base Unit does not take effect until you restart the system.

Setting the unit as the non-base unit


To set the unit as a non-base unit using the UI button: 1 Press the UI button and hold it for three seconds. The unit will now be in the Configuration mode, and the color and status of the UI LED turns green blinking. 2 Press the UI button twice. The Base LED will be off, and the Up and Down LEDs are steady green. 3 Press the UI button and hold it for three seconds to confirm the command.

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The color and status of the UI LED returns to steady green once the command has been accepted. If the command is rejected, the UI LED turns amber blinking. Note: Changing the Base Unit does not take effect until you restart the system.

Setting the unit as a standalone unit


To set the unit as a standalone unit using the UI button: 1 2 3 Press and hold the UI button until the UI LED displays the Green/blinking status. Press the UI button 6 times. Press the UI button and hold it for 3 seconds to confirm the command.

Resetting the stack


To reset the stack using the UI button: 1 Press the UI button and hold in for three seconds. The unit is now in configuration mode, and the color and status of the UI LED turns green blinking. 2 Press the UI button three times. The color and status of the Base, Down, and Up LEDs turn amber blinking. 3 Press the UI button and hold it for three seconds to confirm the command.

Resetting the unit


To reset the unit at any time, with the UI button, do the following: 1 2 Press the UI button for 3 seconds. The switch operates in the Configuration mode. The UI LED turns green and will blink. Press UI button 3 times.

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To confirm, keep the UI button pressed for 3 seconds more. The UI LED turns either to solid-green (command accepted) or to solid-amber (error). After another period (5 seconds) the UI LED turns Off. Once the command is accepted, the new configuration is stored in NVRAM. Note: When resetting the unit using the UI button, wait 60 seconds after your last configuration change. The system takes up to 60 seconds to save configuration changes to NVRAM. You can reset the stack immediately after changing the configuration using the UI button without losing any of the changed configuration.

Table 7 describes the LED indications associated with the UI button.


Table 7 UI button LEDs on the Ethernet Switch 425-24T
Label UI Color/Status Green/blinking Description The user pushed the UI button and activated the front-panel configuration mode; the system is awaiting input. The system accepts the UI button input. The system rejected the UI button input. Power on. The system will reset in < 3 seconds. To stop reset, release UI button. The system will reset in < 1 second. To stop reset, release UI button. The unit is the base unit for the stack. The unit is in configuration mode using the UI button. The UI LED is also blinking green. The stack is reset using the UI button. The switch is not the stack base unit, or it is operating in standalone mode. The unit is being set as base or non-base unit using the UI buttonbase unit has Base LED on as well. The stack is reset using the UI button.

Green/steady Amber/blinking Pwr Green Amber/slow blinking Amber/fast blinking Base Green/steady Green/blinking Amber Off Up Green/steady

Amber/blinking

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425


Color/Status Green/steady Description The unit is being set as base or non-base unit using the UI button base unit has Base LED on as well. The stack is reset using the UI button.

Label Down

Amber/blinking

Aborting a command
To abort a command entered using the UI button, do one of the following actions: Wait for about 20 seconds after entering either the one-press (set to base unit) or the two-press (reset to base) and the input is ignored. Press the UI button 7 or more times, which exits the Configuration mode and does not change any settings on the switch.

Setting the default IP address


You can set a default IP address and subnet mask for the switch or stack by using the UI button on the front panel of the Ethernet Switch 425. You can also manage the switch or stack remotely by using a Default IP address. The default IP address is 192.168.192.168. Depending on the mode of operation of the switch (standalone or stack) the default IP address is applied to the local unit or to the entire stack. When the Ethernet Switch 425-24T is operating in the stack mode, the UI button on the front panel on any unit of the stack can be used to set the default IP address. Ensure that you do not create duplicate IP addresses on the network. Note: The UI button may be used at any time to change the In-Use IP address and subnet mask of the switch. It overrides the current In-use IP address and subnet mask, if any, regardless of the BootP mode settings for the switch or stack.

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If the default IP configuration is set, any change to the configured IP address or subnet mask through the other user interfaces, will cause the In-use IP configuration of the switch or stack to change. Therefore, the newly configured IP address must be used to manage the switch or stack. Note: If there is a change in the switch state, that is, if it joins or exits a stack after the default IP configuration is set, the In-Use IP configuration will change, and must be set again using the UI button. To set the default IP address and subnet mask, do the following: 1 Press the UI button and hold in for 3 seconds. The unit is now in the Configuration mode. The color and status of the UI LED will turn green blinking. 2 Press the UI button five times. The Base LED and the Up and Down LEDs will now be steady amber to indicate that the button press was recognized. 3 Press the UI button and hold in for 3 seconds to confirm the command. The In-Use IP address will now be changed to 192.168.192.168. The color and status of the UI LED will turn to steady green once the command has been accepted. If the command is rejected, the UI LED turns amber blinking.

LED display during change in IP address and subnet mask


The LEDs on the front panel change color or display blinking signals to indicate that the In-Use configuration has changed. If the unit is in a stack, only the LEDs of that unit will change color or blink. There will be no change in the LEDs of other units in the stack.

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Table 8 describes the LED behavior at the time of setting the default IP address and subnet mask.
Table 8 UI button LED display during change in IP address and subnet mask
Label UI Color/Status Green Status Blinking Description The UI button has been pushed. The front panel configuration mode has been activated. The system is awaiting input. The input has been accepted The input has been rejected The default IP address and subnet mask for this unit or stack has been set to 192.168.192.168.

Steady Amber Base Amber Blinking Steady

You cannot set the default IP address through the CLI, SNMP, Console, or WEB interface.

Console port
The Console port allows you to access the Console Interface (CI) screens and customize your network using the Console menu options and screens (see Chapter 2, Using the console interface, on page 93). The Console port is a DB-9, RS-232-D male serial port connector. You can use this connector to connect a management station or console/terminal to the Ethernet Switch 425 by using a straight-through DB-9 to DB-9 standard serial port cable. You must use a VT100/ANSI-compatible terminal (for cursor control and to enable cursor and functions keys) to use the Console port. Note: The Console port is configured as a Data Communications Equipment (DCE) connector. Ensure that your RS-232 cable pinouts are configured for DCE connections (see Appendix B, Connectors and pin assignments, on page 425). The Console port default settings are: 9600 baud with eight data bits One stop bit No parity as the communications format
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Flow control set to disabled.

Gigabit Interface Converter


SFP GBICs (Small Form Factor Pluggable Gigabit Interface Converters) are hot-swappable input/output enhancement components designed for use with Nortel products to allow Gigabit Ethernet ports to link with fiber optic networks.

Port connectors
The Ethernet Switch 425 uses 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX RJ-45 (8-pin modular) port connectors. The 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX port connectors are configured as MDI-X (media-dependent interface-crossover). These ports are connected using straight cables to the NIC in a node or server, similar to a conventional Ethernet repeater hub. If you are connecting to an Ethernet hub or an Ethernet switch, use a crossover cable unless an MDI connection exists on the associated port of the attached device (see Appendix B, Connectors and pin assignments, on page 425). The Ethernet Switch 425 uses autosensing ports designed to operate at 10 Mb/s (megabits per second) or at 100 Mb/s, depending on the connecting device. These ports support the IEEE 802.3u autonegotiation standard, which means that when a port is connected to another device which also supports the IEEE 802.3u standard, the two devices negotiate at the best speed and duplex mode. The 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX switch ports also support half- and full-duplex mode operation. The 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX RJ-45 ports can connect to 10 Mb/s or 100 Mb/s Ethernet segments or nodes. Note: Use only Category 5 copper Unshielded Twisted Pair (UTP) cable connections when connecting 10BASE-T/100BASE-TX ports. See Appendix B, Connectors and pin assignments, on page 425 for more information about the RJ-45 port connectors.

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LED display panel


Figure 8 shows the Ethernet Switch 425 LED display panel.
Figure 8 Ethernet Switch 425 LED display panel
LED Duplex Green:Full Du LED StatusAmber:10MpsGreen:100 Mps Blink:Activity StatusOff:Half 1 2 3 4
4

26

25

10

11

12

13

UI

Base M T A M T A

GBK/Stack Up Pwr Down UISet

M:MGBIC T:1000TA:Activity

Table 9 describe the LEDs found in the Ethernet Switch 425.


Table 9 Ethernet Switch 425 LED descriptions
Label UI Command Status Power status Color Green State Blinking On Off GBIC/ Stack Pwr Stack Mode Green On Off Power status Green on Off Base Base mode Green on Off Amber Up Stack mode Green Off On Down Stack mode Green Off On Meaning Indicates the switch is in cmd mode. ON for about 3 seconds when executing a cmd, then goes OFF. The UI LED should be off, unless active. The switch is in standalone mode. The switch is in stack mode. DC power is available to the switchs internal circuitry. No AC power to switch or power supply failed. The switch is configured as the stack base unit. The switch is not configured as the stack base unit (or is in standalone mode). Due to a stack error, the unit is unable to maintain the stack connection. The switch is in standalone mode. The switch is connected to the upstream unit. The switch is in standalone mode. The switch is connected to the downstream unit.

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Table 9 Ethernet Switch 425 LED descriptions (continued)
Label M (MGBIC) Command Status Duplex Mode Color Green State On Off Green T 10/100/1000 (Copper) Mb/s port speed Amber 10/100/ indicator 1000 Link Amber/ Green Off A (Activity) Port activity Green On On On Off Blinking Meaning

77

This port has a good connection (fiber), and is configured to full duplex. This port does not have a good connection (fiber), and port is configured to half duplex. This port has a good connection (copper - at 1000 Mbps). This port has a good connection (copper - at 100 Mbps). This port has a good connection (copper - at 10 Mbps). This port does not have a good connection. Indicates network activity for the corresponding port. A high level of network activity can cause the LEDs to appear to be on continuously.

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Back panel
Figure 9 shows the back panel of the Ethernet Switch 425.
Figure 9 Ethernet Switch 425 back panel
1 2

Cascade 100-240 V50-60Hz 2A Down Up

11110EA

Table 10 describes the components on the back panel.


Table 10 Components on the Ethernet Switch 425 back panel
Item 1 2 Description AC power receptacle Cascade Up and Down Connectors

Cascade Up and Down connectors


The Cascade Up and Down connectors allow the Ethernet Switch 425 to be connected to the upstream units Cascade Up connector, or to the downstream units Cascade Down connector (see Stack configurations on page 89.)

Cooling fans
Two cooling fans are located on the side of the Ethernet Switch 425 to provide cooling for internal components. (See Figure 6 on page 67.) When you install the switch, ensure that there is adequate space on both sides of the switch for ventilation. For more information on installing the Ethernet Switch 425, see Installing the Ethernet Switch 425 (217150-B).

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AC power receptacle
The AC power receptacle accepts the AC power cord which is supplied with the switch. For installation outside North America, make sure that you have the proper power cord for your region. Any cord used must have a CEE-22 standard V female connector on one end and must meet the IEC 320-030 specifications. Table 11 lists specifications for international power cords.
Table 11 International power cord specifications
Country/Plug description Continental Europe: CEE7 standard VII male plug Harmonized cord (HAR marking on the outside of the cord jacket to comply with the CENELEC Harmonized Document HD-21) Specifications 220 or 230 VAC 50 Hz Single phase Typical plug

228FA

U.S./Canada/Japan: NEMA5-15P male plug UL recognized (UL stamped on cord jacket) CSA certified (CSA label secured to the cord)

100 or 120 VAC 5060 Hz Single phase

227FA

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Table 11 International power cord specifications (continued)
Country/Plug description United Kingdom: BS1363 male plug with fuse Harmonized cord Specifications 240 VAC 50 Hz Single phase Typical plug

229FA

Australia: AS3112-1981 Male plug

240 VAC 50 Hz Single phase

230FA

Caution: Please read immediately. Inspect this power cord and determine if it provides the proper plug and is appropriately certified for use with your electrical system. Immediately discard this cord if it is inappropriate for your country's electrical system and obtain the proper cord as required by your national electrical codes or ordinances. Refer to this product's technical documentation for detailed installation procedures to be followed by qualified service personnel.

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Vorsicht: Bitte sofort lesen. Sehen Sie nach, ob dieses Netzkabel ber den richtigen Stecker verfgt und fr die Verwendung in Ihrem Stromversogungsnetz zertifiziert ist. Falls dieses Kabel nicht fr das Stromversorgungsnetz in Ihrem Land geeignet ist, darf es nicht verwendet werden. Besorgen Sie sich ein Kabel, das die Vorschriften der Zulassungsbehrden in Ihrem Land erfllt. Die technische Dokumentation dieses Produkts enthlt ausfhrliche Installationsanweisungen, die nur von qualifiziertem Kundendienstpersonal ausgefhrt werden drfen. Attention: Lisez ceci immdiatement. Examinez ce cordon d'alimentation pour dterminer s'il dispose de la fiche approprie et s'il est bien agr pour utilisation sur votre installation lectrique. Dbarrassez-vous en immdiatement s'il ne convient pas l'utilisation sur le secteur lectrique en usage dans votre pays et procurez-vous un cordon conforme la rglementation nationale en vigueur. Reportez-vous la documentation technique de ce produit pour obtenir des instructions dtailles d'installation, destines un technicien qualifi. Attenzione: Leggere attentamente. Controllare questo cavo di alimentazione, verificarne il collegamento con la presa appropriata nonch la certificazione per l'uso nell'impianto elettrico posseduto. Non utilizzare assolutamente in caso tale cavo non sia adatto al sistema elettrico del paese in cui viene utilizzato e richiederne un altro certificato dall'ente nazionale di fornitura elettrica. Per le procedure di installazione che devono essere seguite dal personale di servizio, consultare questa documentazione tecnica del prodotto. Advertencia: Srvase leer inmediatamente. Inspeccione este cable de alimentacin elctrica y determine si viene con el enchufe apropiado y est debidamente certificado para el uso con su sistema elctrico. Si no cumple con los reglamentos del sistema elctrico de su pas, despjese de este cable de alimentacin inmediatamente y obtenga el cable requerido, segn las ordenanzas y cdigos elctricos nacionales. Refirase a la documentacin tcnica de este producto para recibir informacin detallada sobre los procedimientos que el personal calificado de reparaciones deber seguir.

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

Caution:

Warning: Removal of the power cord is the only way to turn off power to this device. The power cord must always be connected in a location that can be accessed quickly and safely in case of an emergency. Vorsicht: Die Stromzufuhr zu diesem Gert kann nur durch Ziehen des Netzstromkabels unterbrochen werden. Die Netzsteckdose, an die das Netzstromkabel angeschlossen ist, mu sich stets an einem Ort befinden, der bei einem Notfall schnell und einfach zugnglich ist. Avertissement: Le dbranchement du cordon d'alimentation constitue le seul moyen de mettre cet appareil hors tension. Le cordon d'alimentation doit donc toujours tre branch dans une prise accessible pour faciliter la mise hors tension en cas d'urgence. Advertencia: La nica forma de desconectar la alimentacin de este dispositivo es desenchufar el cable de alimentacin. El cable de alimentacin siempre debe estar conectado en una ubicacin que permita acceder al cable de forma rpida y segura en caso de emergencia. Avvertenza: Estrarre il cavo di alimentazione l'unico sistema per spegnere il dispositivo. Il cavo di alimentazione deve essere sempre collegato in una posizione che permetta l'accesso facile e sicuro in caso di emergenza.

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Network configuration examples


This section provides network configuration examples using the Ethernet Switch 325/425. In these examples, the packet classification feature can be used to prioritize the traffic of the network to ensure uninterrupted traffic of critical applications. The examples are: Desktop switch application Segment switch application on page 85 High-density switched workgroup application on page 86

Desktop switch application


Figure 10 and Figure 11 show the Ethernet Switch 325/425 used as a desktop switch. The desktop workstations are connected directly to switch ports.
Figure 10 Ethernet Switch 325 used as a desktop switch
Before
26 UI

After Ethernet 325-24G


25 LED Status - Amber:10Mps Green:100 Mps Blink:Activity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LED Status - Off:Half Duplex Green:Full Duplex 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Ethernet Switch 325-24G


Console

10BASE-T hub

UI Cmd Pwr UI Set

Spd Act

Spd Act

Spd: 10/100/1000T Act: Activity

To Network Center Key

Up to 24 users

To Network Center

Up to 24 users

10 Mb/s 100 Mb/s 1000 Mb/s - 23 users share 10 Mb/s (10/24 Mb/s per user) - Network center bottleneck (10 Mb/s bandwidth) - 24 users; each with dedicated 100 Mb/s bandwidth - Network center with dedicated 1 Gb/s full-duplex bandwith
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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Figure 11 Ethernet Switch 425 used as a desktop switch
Before After Ethernet Switch 425-24T

10BASE-T hub

To Network Center Key

Up to 24 users

To Network Center

Up to 24 users

10 Mb/s 100 Mb/s 1000 Mb/s - 23 users share 10 Mb/s (10/24 Mb/s per user) - Network center bottleneck (10 Mb/s bandwidth) - 24 users; each with dedicated 100 Mb/s bandwidth - Network center with dedicated 1 Gb/s full-duplex bandwith
11112EA

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Segment switch application


Figure 12 and Figure 13 show the Ethernet Switch 325/425 used as a segment switch to alleviate user contention for bandwidth and eliminate server and network bottlenecks. Before segmentation, 88 users had a total bandwidth of only 10 Mb/s available. After segmentation, 92 users have 40 Mb/s, four times the previous bandwidth, while adding 22 dedicated 100 Mb/s connections. This configuration can be extended to add more segments without degrading performance.
Figure 12 Ethernet Switch 325 used as a segment switch
Before After Ethernet Switch 325-24G
26 25 LED Status - Amber:10Mps Green:100 Mps Blink:Activity 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LED Status - Off:Half Duplex Green:Full Duplex 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Server

Ethernet Switch 325-24G


Console

10BASE-T hubs
UI Set

UI UI Cmd Pwr Spd Act Spd: 10/100/1000T Spd Act Act: Activity

Up to 20 users

Server

Up to 23 users

Up to 23 users

To Network Center Key 10 Mb/s 100 Mb/s 1000 Mb/s

Up to 23 users Up to 88 users To Network Center

- 88 users share 10 Mb/s (10/88 Mb/s per user) - Server bottleneck (10 Mb/s bandwidth) - Network center bottleneck (10 Mb/s bandwidth) -Total of 88 users

- Three sets of 23 users; each set shares 10 Mb/s (10/23 Mb/s per user) - Addition of 21 users; each with dedicated 100 Mb/s bandwidth - Server with dedicated 100 Mb/s bandwidth - Network center with dedicated 1 Gb/s full-duplex bandwidth - Total of 89 users
11113EA

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Figure 13 Ethernet Switch 425 used as a segment switch
Before After Server

10BASE-T hubs Server

Ethernet Switch 425-24T

Up to 20 users

Up to 23 users

Up to 23 users

To Network Center Key 10 Mb/s 100 Mb/s 1000 Mb/s

Up to 23 users Up to 88 users To Network Center

- 88 users share 10 Mb/s (10/88 Mb/s per user) - Server bottleneck (10 Mb/s bandwidth) - Network center bottleneck (10 Mb/s bandwidth) -Total of 88 users

- Three sets of 23 users; each set shares 10 Mb/s (10/23 Mb/s per user) - Addition of 21 users; each with dedicated 100 Mb/s bandwidth - Server with dedicated 100 Mb/s bandwidth - Network center with dedicated 1 Gb/s full-duplex bandwidth - Total of 89 users
11113EA

High-density switched workgroup application


Figure 14 shows an example of using an Ethernet Switch 425 with a high-speed (gigabit) connection to a Nortel Ethernet Routing Switch 8600. Ethernet Switch 425 and Ethernet Switch 325 are also shown in this example of a high-density switched workgroup.

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As shown in Figure 14, the Ethernet Routing Switch 8600 switch is used as a backbone switch, connecting to the Ethernet Switch 425 with an optional (1000BASE-SX) GBIC for maximum bandwidth. The Ethernet Switch 425-24T and the Ethernet Switch 325-24T have 100 Mb/s connections to the Ethernet Switch 425-24T, a 100BASE-TX hub, and a 100 Mb/s server as well as 10 Mb/s connections to DTE (data terminal equipment).
Figure 14 Configuring power workgroups and a shared media hub

Ethernet Switch 425-24T

Ethernt Switch 325-24G


26 25 UI UICmd Pwr UISet Spd Act Spd Act Spd:10/100/1000T Act: Activity

LED Duplex Duplex LED StatusAmber:10MpsGreen:100 Blink:Activity StatusOff:Half Green:Full Mps 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Ethernet Switch325-24G
Console

CPU PS1 PS2 FAN

Ethernet Routing SwitchServer 8600


26 25 LED Duplex Duplex LED StatusAmber:10MpsGreen:100 Blink:Activity StatusOff:Half Green:Full Mps 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Ethernet Switch325-24G
Console

Key
UISet

UI UICmd Pwr Spd Act Spd Act

Spd:10/100/1000T Act: Activity

10 Mb/s 100 Mb/s 1000 Mb/s (Gigabit)

Stack operation
You can connect up to eight units of the Ethernet Switch 425-24T and Ethernet Switch 425-48T to provide uninterrupted connectivity for up to 392 ports. The entire stack can be managed as a single unit with a single IP and MAC address You can select the base unit of the stack by using the momentary switch mechanism. It is recommended that you use only one base unit in the stack and the selection of the same should be done before powering the stack.

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425

The Ethernet Switch 425 does not support stack redundancy. In case of cable or unit failure, all units of the stack begin to work as standalone switches. However, the stack is automatically formed again once the missing cable is re-inserted or the faulty unit is replaced. Ethernet units in a stack are interconnected through FireWire cables. Ensure that the downlink connection on a unit is always connected to the Up link of the next unit in the ring.

Base unit
The base unit is the unique unit in the stack that you can configure with the User Interface button on the front panel. A single Ethernet Switch 425-24T or Ethernet Switch 425-48T in the stack must be configured as the base unit. You can assign any unit in the stack as the base unit. The physical order of all other units in the stack is determined by the position of the base unit within the stack. This is important for network management applications that view the physical ordering of the units within the stack. Some characteristics of the base unit are described in the following sections. Note: Only Ethernet Switch 425-24T and Ethernet Switch 425-48T can operate together in the stack mode in release 3.6 software.

Initial installation
During the initial installation of the stack, the software automatically determines the physical order of all units in the stack according to the position of the base unit within the stack. Thereafter, the individual units maintain their original unit numbering, even if you change the position of one or more units in the stack. For example, when you initially power up the stack, the base unit becomes unit 1 and the unit that the base unit connects to becomes unit 2 (and the next unit is unit 3 and so on), until the maximum stack configuration (up to 8 units) is reached. If you change the base unit to another unit in the stack, the new base unit keeps its original unit number in the stack.

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Stack MAC address


When the switch is participating in a stack configuration, a stack MAC address is automatically assigned during the stack initialization. The base units MAC address, with a software offset, is used for the stack MAC address. For example, if the base units MAC address is 00-00-82-99-44-00, and the stack software offset is 1F, then the stack MAC address becomes: 00-00-82-99-44-1F If another unit in the stack is assigned as the base unit, the MAC address of the new base unit (with offset) now applies to the stack configuration. The original stack IP address still applies to the new base unit.

Removing a unit from the stack


If a unit is removed from the stack (therefore operating in standalone mode), the following switch configuration settings revert back to the settings configured before the unit became a member of the stack: IP address Console password Telnet password SNMP community strings

Stack configurations
As shown in Figure 16, the cable connectors provide the ability to stack up to eight switches. Because stack parameters are associated with the base unit (see Base unit on page 88), the physical stack order depends on the base units position and whether the stack is configured stack up or stack down.

Stack up configurations
In Figure 15, data flows from the base unit (unit 1) to the next switch, which is assigned as unit 2, and continues until the last switch in the stack is assigned as unit 8. The physical order of the switches is from top to bottom (unit 1 to unit 8).

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Figure 15 Stack up configuration example

Down
Cascade

Down

Up

Unit 1

Cascade Down Up

Unit 2

Cascade Down Up

Unit 3

Cascade Down Up

Unit 4

Cascade Down Up

Unit 5

Cascade Down Up

Unit 6

Cascade Down Up

Unit 7

Cascade

Down

Up

Unit 8

3
Up

Table 12 describes the stack up configuration illustration references.


Table 12 Stack up configuration description
Item 1 2 3 4 Description Base unit Last unit Stacking cable 30 cm (order number AL 2018005) Stacking cable 1 m (order number AL 2018006)

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Stack down configurations


In Figure 16, data flows from the base unit (unit 1) to the next switch, which is assigned as unit 2, and continues until the last switch in the stack is assigned as unit 8. The physical order of the switches is from bottom to top (unit 1 to unit 8).
Figure 16 Stack down configuration example

Up

100-240 V50-60Hz2A

Cascade Down Up

Unit 8

100-240 V50-60Hz2A

Cascade Down Up

Unit 7

100-240 V50-60Hz2A

Cascade Down Up

Unit 6

100-240 V50-60Hz2A

Cascade Down Up

Unit 5

100-240 V50-60Hz2A

Cascade Down Up

Unit 4

100-240 V50-60Hz2A

Cascade Down Up

Unit 3

100-240 V50-60Hz2A

Cascade Down Up

Unit 2

100-240 V50-60Hz2A

Cascade Down Up

Unit 1

Down

Table 13 describes the stack down configuration illustration references.


Table 13 Stack down configuration description
Item 1 2 Description Last unit Base unit

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Chapter 1 About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 Table 13 Stack down configuration description (continued)
3 4 Stacking cable 30 cm (order number AL 2018005) Stacking max-return cable 1 m (part number AL 2018006)

Certain Network Management Station (NMS) applications assume a stack up configuration for the GUI which represents the stack (see Figure 15). For this reason, Nortel recommends that you always configure the top unit in the stack as the base unit. In any stack configuration, the following applies: When you apply power to the stack, the base unit initializes and the entire stack powers up as a single logical unit. You can attach an RS-232 communications cable to the console port of any switch in the stack. You can downline upgrade the entire stack from any switch in the stack from the console interface, a Telnet session, the Web-based management interface, or any generic SNMP-based network management software. You can access and manage the stack using a Telnet connection, the Web-based management interface, or any generic SNMP management tool through any switch port that is part of the stack configuration. When you stack three or more switches, use the longer (1-meter) stacking max-return cable to complete the link from the last unit in the stack to the base unit.

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This chapter describes how to configure and manage the Ethernet Switch 325/425 using the menu-driven Console Interface (CI). This chapter covers the following topics: Accessing the CI menus and screens Using the CI menus and screens on page 94 Main menu on page 96

Accessing the CI menus and screens


You can access the CI menus and screens locally through a console terminal attached to your Ethernet Switch 325/425, remotely through a dial-up modem connection, or in-band through a Telnet session. You can connect your console cable into any unit in the Ethernet Switch 325/425-only stack for a unified stack interface. Note: If you have a properly configured BootP server in your network, it detects the IP address; you will not need to configure the IP address. For information about SNMP, see your network management documentation.

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Using the CI menus and screens


The CI menus and screens provide options that allow you to configure and manage the Ethernet Switch 325/425. Help prompts at the bottom of each menu and screen explain how to enter data in the highlighted field and how to navigate the menus and screens. The default settings for the Console port are: 9600 baud with eight data bits One stop bit No parity as the communications format Flow control set to disabled Some options allow you to toggle among several possible values; other options allow you to set or modify a parameter.

Navigating the CI menus and screens


Use the following methods to navigate the CI menus and screens. To select a menu option: 1 2 Use the arrow keys to highlight the option name. Press Enter. Alternatively, you can press the key corresponding to the letter that is underlined in the menu option. For example, to select the Switch Configuration option in the main menu, press the w key. The text characters are not case-sensitive. 3 To toggle between values in a form: a b 4 Use the spacebar to highlight the value. Press Enter.

To clear a string field: a b Position the cursor in the string field. Press Ctrl+K.

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5 6 7 8

To return to the previous menu, press Ctrl+R. To go to the next screen in a series, press Ctrl+N. To return to the main menu at any time, press Ctrl+C. Press Backspace to delete entered text.

You can set the options that appear in brackets. For example [Enabled].

Screen fields and descriptions


This section describes the CI screens and their fields, beginning with the main menu. Figure 17 shows a map of the CI screens.
Figure 17 Map of console interface screens
Main Menu IP Configuration/Setup SNMP Configuration System Characteristics Switch Configuration Console/Comm Port Configuration Identify Unit Numbers1 Renumber Units1 Display Hardware Units Spanning Tree Configuration TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration Software Download Configuration File Display System Log Reset Reset to Default Settings Shutdown Command Logout MAC Address Table MAC Address Security Configuration EAPoL Security Configuration VLAN Configuration Port Configuration High Speed Flow Control Configuration2 MultiLink Trunk Configuration Port Mirroring Configuration Rate Limiting Configuration IGMP Configuration Display Port Statistics Clear All Port Statistics MAC Address Security Configuration MAC Address Security Port Configuration MAC Address Security Port Lists MAC Address Security Table

VLAN Configuration VLAN Port Configuration VLAN Display by Port Traffic Class Configuration
MultiLink Trunk Configuration MultiLink Trunk Utilization IGMP Configuration Display Multicast Group Membership

Spanning Tree Spanning Tree Port Configuration Display Spanning Tree Switch Settings Display Spanning Tree VLAN Membership

Configuration File Download/Upload Ascii Configuration File Download

1 2

Only appears when the switch is participating in a stack configuration. Only appears when a gigabit is installed in one or more units in a stack configuration.

BS45041F

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The CI screens for your specific switch model display the model name in the main menu screen title and the correct number of ports and port types in the Port Configuration screen. Note: The field values shown in the CI screens in this section are provided as examples only.

Main menu
This section describes the options available from the CI main menu (Figure 18). The CI screens and submenus for these options are described in the following sections. Note: Some menu options shown in this main menu example and in other screen examples in this chapter may not appear on your screen, depending on the switch options installed. However, the full menu options are shown in the screen examples and described in the following sections.

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Chapter 2 Using the console interface Figure 18 Console interface main menu
Ethernet Switch 425-48T Main Menu IP Configuration/Setup... SNMP Configuration... System Characteristics... Switch Configuration... Console/Comm Port Configuration... Display Hardware Units... Spanning Tree Configuration... TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration... Software Download... Configuration File... Display System Log... Reset... Reset to Default Settings... Shutdown Command... Command Line Interface... Logout...

97

Use arrow keys to highlight option, press <Return> or <Enter> to select

Table 14 describes the CI main menu options.


Table 14 Console interface main menu options
Option IP Configuration/ Setup... SNMP Configuration... Description Displays the IP Configuration/Setup screen (see IP Configuration/Setup screen on page 214). This screen allows you to set or modify IP configuration parameters. Displays the SNMP Configuration screen (see SNMP Configuration screen on page 219). This screen allows you to set or modify the SNMP read-only community and read-write community strings, enable or disable the authentication trap and the link Up/down trap, set the IP address of trap receivers, and set the trap community strings.

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Table 14 Console interface main menu options (continued)


Option System Characteristics... Description Displays the System Characteristics screen (see System Characteristics screen on page 100). This screen allows you to view switch characteristics, including number of resets, power status, hardware and firmware version, and MAC address. This screen also contains three user-configurable fields: sysContact, sysName, and sysLocation. When the switch is part of a stack configuration, this screen also displays the base unit identification, the number of units configured in the stack, and the local unit stack number. Displays the Switch Configuration Menu screen (see Switch Configuration Menu screen on page 103). This menu provides the following configuration options: MAC Address Table, MAC Address-Based Security, EAPOL Security Configuration, VLAN Configuration, Port Configuration, High Speed Flow Control, MultiLink Trunk Configuration, Port Mirroring Configuration, Rate Limiting Configuration, IGMP Configuration, Display Port Statistics, Clear All Port Statistics, and Stack Operational Mode. Displays the Console/Comm Port Configuration screen (see Console/Comm Port Configuration screen on page 223). This screen allows you to configure and modify the Console/Comm port parameters, including the console port speed and password settings for the switch and stack operation.

Switch Configuration...

Console/Comm Port Configuration...

Display Hardware Units Displays the Display Hardware Unit Information screen (see Hardware Unit Information screen on page 233). This screen displays the switch model and the software version running. The screen also displays the SPF GBIC. Spanning Tree Configuration... Displays the Spanning Tree Configuration Menu (see Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)). This menu provides the following options: Spanning Tree Group Configuration, Spanning Tree Port Configuration, Display Spanning Tree Switch Settings, Display Spanning Tree VLAN Membership Displays the TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen (see TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration... TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen on page 234). This screen allows you to set your switch to enable a user at a remote console terminal to Configuration... communicate with the Ethernet Switch 325/425 as if the console terminal were directly connected to it. You can have up to four active Telnet sessions running at one time in either a standalone switch or a stack configuration. Software Download... Displays the Software Download screen (see Software Download screen on page 237). This screen allows you to revise the Ethernet Switch 325/425 software image and diagnostics images that are located in nonvolatile flash memory. Displays the Configuration File Download/Upload screen (see Configuration File Download/Upload screen on page 240). This screen allows you to store your switch/stack configuration parameters on a TFTP server. You can retrieve the configuration parameters for automatically configuring a replacement switch or stack with the same configuration when required. This screen also allows you to download the ASCII configuration file from a TFTP server to the switch or stack.

Configuration File

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Option Display System Log Reset Description

99

Displays the System Log screen (see System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)). Resets the switch with the current configuration settings. This option is followed by a screen prompt that precedes the action. Enter Yes to reset the switch; enter No to abort the option: If the switch is participating in a stack configuration, you can reset the entire stack. When you select this option, the switch resets, runs a self-test, then displays the Nortel logo screen. Press Ctrl+Y to access the Ethernet Switch 325/425 main menu. Resets the switch to the factory default configuration settings. This option is followed by a screen prompt that precedes the action. Enter Yes to reset the switch to the factory default configuration settings; enter No to abort the option: If the switch is participating in a stack configuration, you can reset the entire stack. When you select this option, the switch resets, runs a self-test, then displays the Nortel logo screen. Press Ctrl+Y to access the Ethernet Switch 325/425 main menu. Caution: If you choose the Reset to Default Settings option, all configured settings are replaced with factory default settings when you press [Enter] Achtung: Bei Auswahl des Befehls zur Rcksetzung auf die Standardeinstellungen werden alle von Ihnen konfigurierten Einstellungen durch die werkseitigen Standardeinstellungen ersetzt, wenn Sie die Eingabetaste drcken. Attention: Si vous restaurez la configuration usine, votre configuration courante sera remplace par la configuration usine ds que vous appuierez sur [Entre]. Precaucin: Si selecciona el comando Restaurar valores predeterminados, todos los valores de configuracin se sustituirn por las valores predeterminados en fbrica al pulsar [Intro]. Attenzione: Nel caso in cui si selezioni la reimpostazione dei valori di default, tutte le impostazioni configurate verranno sostituite dai default di fabbrica premendo il tasto [Invio].

Reset to Default Settings

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Table 14 Console interface main menu options (continued)


Option Shutdown Description Allows the switch to be safely shut down and powered off. This option is followed by two screen prompts that precede the action. At the first prompt, enter the time in minutes to wait before the switch is shut down. At the second prompt, enter Yes to confirm the action; or, enter No to abort the option: Once the shutdown command is initiated, the switch saves the current configuration and can then be safely powered off. If the switch is not powered off within the user-specified time period, it is reset. Once the shutdown command is initiated, all existing and subsequent Console Interface sessions display the following message:

Switch will reset (shutdown) in <xxxx> seconds.


While existing CLI sessions do not receive a warning message, all subsequent CLI sessions display the following message:

The shutdown process is in progress. It is safe to poweroff the stack. Configuration changes will not be saved. Shutdown has blocked the flash. Autoreset in <xxxx> seconds.
Neither Web-based management nor Device Manager receive any shutdown warning messages. Command Line Interface Logout Displays the prompt to execute the CLI commands. Allows a user in a Telnet session or a user working at a password-protected console terminal to terminate the session.

System Characteristics screen


The System Characteristics screen (Figure 19) allows you to view system characteristics and contains three user-configurable fields: sysContact, sysName, and sysLocation. To open the System Characteristics screen:

Choose System Characteristics (or press s) from the main menu.

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Chapter 2 Using the console interface Figure 19 System Characteristics screen


System Characteristics

101

Operation Mode:

Switch

MAC Address: Reset Count: Last Reset Type: Power Status: Local GBIC Type: sysDescr: sysObjectID: sysUpTime: sysServices: sysContact: sysName: sysLocation:

00-0F-CD-BF-1E-80 9 Management Reset Primary Power port 49, None port 50, None Ethernet Switch 425-48T HW:00 FW:3.5.0.2 SW:v3.6.0 1.3.6.1.4.1.45.3.57.1 7 days, 17:49:05 sysNtpTime: SNTP not synchronized. 3 [ ] [ Ethernet 428-48T ] [ ]

Enter text, press <Return> or <Enter> when complete. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Table 15 System Characteristics screen fields


Field Operation Mode Description Read-only field that indicates the operation mode of the unit, for example: When the unit is part of a stack configuration, the (read-only) field indicates the unit is operational in a stack, and lists the current unit number of this switch. When the unit is not part of a stack configuration (operating standalone), the read-only field indicates the unit is operating as a switch. When in this operation mode, the Size of Stack and Base Unit fields (see following description) do not appear. This read-only field only appears when the switch is participating in a stack configuration. This field indicates the number of units configured in the stack configuration (1 to 8 units maximum). This read-only field only appears when the switch is participating in a stack configuration. This field indicates the unit number of the switch that is currently operating as the base unit.

Size of Stack

Base Unit

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Table 15 System Characteristics screen fields (continued)


Field MAC Address Reset Count Description The MAC address of the switch or, when the switch is participating in a stack configuration, the MAC address of the stack configuration. A read-only field that indicates the number of resets since the operational firmware was first loaded on the switch. Default Value Range Last Reset Type 1 0 to 232 -1 (4,294,967,295)

A read-only field that indicates the last type of reset. Default Value Range Power Cycle Power Cycle, Software Download, Management Reset, Management Factory Reset

Power Status

A read-only field that indicates the current power source (primary, RPSU, or both). Default Value Range Primary Power Primary Power, Redundant Power, Primary and Redundant Power

Local GBIC Type sysDescr sysObjectID sysUpTime sysNtpTime sysServices sysContact

A read-only field that indicates the GBIC type that is configured in this unit. (This field is applicable only to the Ethernet Switch 425). A read-only field that specifies hardware and software versions. A read-only field that provides a unique identification of the switch, which contains the vendors private enterprise number. A read-only field that shows the length of time since the last reset. Note that this field is updated when the screen is redisplayed. A read-only field that displays the current date and time and the configured time offset from Universal Coordinated Time (UTC). A read-only field that indicates the switchs physical and data link layer functionality. The name and phone number of the person responsible for the switch. Default Value Range Zero-length string Any ASCII string of up to 56 printable characters1

sysName

A name that uniquely identifies the switch. Default Value Range Zero-length string Any ASCII string of up to 56 printable characters1

sysLocation

The physical location of the switch. Default Value Range Zero-length string Any ASCII string of up to 56 printable characters

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1 Although this field can be set to up to 255 characters from a Network Management Station (NMS), only 56 characters are displayed on the console terminal.

Switch Configuration Menu screen


The Switch Configuration Menu screen (Figure 20) allows you to set or modify the switch configuration. Choose Switch Configuration (or press w) from the main menu to open the Switch Configuration Menu screen (Table 16).
Figure 20 Switch Configuration Menu screen
Switch Configuration Menu

MAC Address Table MAC Address Security Configuration... EAPOL Security Configuration... VLAN Configuration... Port Configuration... High Speed Flow Control Configuration... MultiLink Trunk Configuration... Port Mirroring Configuration... Rate Limiting Configuration... IGMP Configuration... Display Port Statistics Clear All Port Statistics Return to Main Menu Use arrow keys to highlight option, press <Return> or <Enter> to select option. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Note: The Ethernet Switch 325 does not support the High Speed flow control feature.

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Table 16 describes the Switch Configuration Menu options.


Table 16 Switch Configuration Menu options
Option MAC Address Table Description Displays the MAC Address Table screen (see Configuring

and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)). This screen allows you to view

all MAC addresses and their associated port or trunk that the switch has learned, or to search for a particular MAC address (to see if the switch has learned the address). MAC Address Security Configuration... Displays the MAC Address Security Configuration Menu (see

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)). This screen allows you to set up the MAC
address security feature and provides the following options: MAC Address Security Configuration, MAC Address Security Port Configuration, MAC Address Security Port Lists, and MAC Address Security Table. This menu allows you to enable and disable security features on the port and trunk levels.

EAPoL Security Configuration

Displays the EAPOL Security Configuration Menu (see Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel

Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)). This screen allows you to set up
Extensible Authentication Protocol over LAN (EAPOL)- based security. VLAN Configuration... Displays the VLAN Configuration Menu (see Configuring

VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)). This menu provides the following options:

VLAN Configuration, VLAN Port Configuration, VLAN Display by Port, MAC-SA, and Return to Switch Configuration Menu screen. This menu allows you to create and modify VLANs. Port Configuration... Displays the Port Configuration screen (see Port Configuration screen on page 109). This screen allows you to configure a specific switch port, all switch ports or, when in a stack configuration, all stack ports. Displays the High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen. (see High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen on page 112).

High Speed Flow Control Configuration...

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Option Description

105

MultiLink Trunk Configuration... Displays the MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu (see

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)). This menu provides the following options:
MultiLink Trunk Configuration and MultiLink Trunk Utilization. This menu allows you to create and modify trunks, and to monitor the bandwidth utilization of configured trunks. Port Mirroring Configuration... Displays the Port Mirroring Configuration screen (see System

Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)). This screen allows you to
designate a single switch port as a traffic monitor for one specific port. Rate Limiting Configuration Displays the Rate Limiting Configuration screen (Rate Limiting Configuration screen on page 115). This screen allows you to limit the forwarding rate of broadcast and multicast packets at ingress. Displays the IGMP Configuration screen (Configuring IP Multicast for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320990-A)). This screen allows you to optimize multicast traffic by setting up IGMP port memberships that filter multicast on a per port basis Display Port Statistics Displays the Port Statistics screen (see System Monitoring Guide

IGMP Configuration

for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)). This screen allows you to view detailed
information about any switch port. Clear All Port Statistics Allows you to clear all port statistics. This option is followed by screen prompts that precede a choice of the actions: If the switch is operating standalone, choose one of the following: Yes, to clear all port statistics for all switch ports No, to abort the option If the switch is participating in a stack configuration, choose one of the following: Clear all port statistics for a specific unit in the stack Clear all port statistics for the entire stack No, to abort the option

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Port list syntax


When you enter a port list in a stack configuration, you must specify either a unit/ port list, NONE, or ALL. In a stack configuration, ALL indicates all of the stack port; whereas, in a standalone scenario, ALL indicates all ports of the switch. Note: NONE and ALL must be entered in uppercase characters as shown in the screen prompt. A unit/port number list is composed of one or more list items, each of which can be a single number or a range of numbers (where the numbers represents one or more ports). If a list item is preceded by a number and then a slash (/), the number represents a stack unit. For example, 1/1-7,2/1-7,2/9,3/1-4,4/12 is a valid unit/port number list (see entry S1 in Figure 21 on page 107). It represents the following port order: Unit 1: ports 1 to 7 Unit 2: ports 1 to 7 and port 9 Unit 3: ports 1 to 4 Unit 4: port 12

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Chapter 2 Using the console interface Figure 21 MAC Address Security Port Lists screen
MAC Address Security Port Lists Entry ----S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 S6 S7 Port List --------[ ] [ ]

107

[1/3,2/7,3/1-4] [ [ [ [ ] ] ] ] More...

Press Ctrl-N to display next screen. Enter port list, NONE,ALL,1,3,7-9, press <Return> or <Enter> when done. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Accelerator keys for repetitive tasks


You can use certain keystrokes known as accelerator keys to help speed up repetitive tasks. For example, you can assign accelerator keys to modify the Port List field in the MAC Address Security Port List screen (Figure 21). You can modify the port list in any of the following ways: Add a new port to an existing port number list Remove a port from an existing port number list Copy an existing field into an adjacent field

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Adding a new port to an existing port number list


In the example shown in Figure 21, S3 shows the Port List field values as: 1/3,2/7,3/1-4 If you want to add another port (for example, port 2/9) to the existing port number list, you could highlight the field and then type another port list, including the new port number 1/3,2/7,2/9,3/1-4 Enter. This method can be cumbersome. As an alternative method instead, you can highlight the field and then enter +2/9 Enter. The existing field keeps the previous list and adds the new port number (2/ 9) between ports 2/7 and 3/14. (If you choose to add port 2/8 to the existing port number list, the field accepts the new port 2/8 but shows the new port number list field as: 1/3,2/7-8,3/1-4.)

Removing a port from an existing port number list


To remove a port from the port number list, use the minus sign (-) character instead of the plus sign (+) character as described above.

Copying an existing field into and adjacent field


You can use the period (.) character to copy a previously entered field value into the field directly next to it. For example, to copy the Allowed Source S3 (shown in Figure 21) into the next field (entry 6): 1 2 3 Enter a MAC address into the next MAC address field. Highlight the (blank) Allowed Source field. Enter the period (.) character and click Return.

The port number list from the previous entry is copied into the new field.

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Port Configuration screen


The Port Configuration screen (Figures 22 and 23) allows you to configure specific switch ports or all switch ports. You can enable or disable the port status of specified switch ports, set the switch ports to autonegotiate for the highest available speed of the connected station, or set the speed for selected switch ports (autonegotiation is not supported on fiber optic ports). You can disable switch ports that are trunk members (except the lowest member of an active trunk which cannot be disabled until it is removed from the MLT); however, the screen prompts for verification of the request before completing the action. Choosing Yes disables the port and removes it from the trunk. Note: You cannot disable a port that is a member of the MLT if the switch is operating in the RSTP/MSTP mode.

Note: The Autonegotiation fields, the Speed fields, and the Duplex fields are independent of MultiLink Trunking, VLANs, and the STP. To open the Port Configuration screen:

Choose Port Configuration (or press p) from the Switch Configuration


Menu screen.

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Figure 22 Port Configuration screen (1 of 2)


Port Configuration Port ---1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Trunk Status ----- -----------[ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] Link ----Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down LnkTrap ------[ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] Autonegotiation Speed Duplex --------------- ----------------[ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] More...

Press Ctrl-N to display next screen. Use space bar to display choices, press <Return> or <Enter> to select choice. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

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Chapter 2 Using the console interface Figure 23 Port Configuration screen (2 of 2)


Port Configuration Port ---15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Trunk Status ----- -----------[ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] [ Enabled ] Link ----Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down LnkTrap ------[ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ] [ On ]

111

Autonegotiation Speed Duplex --------------- ----------------[ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] [ Enabled ] [ ] More...

Press Ctrl-N to display next screen. Press Ctrl-P to display previous screen. Use space bar to display choices, press <Return> or <Enter> to select choice. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Table 17 describes the Port Configuration screen fields.


Table 17 Port Configuration screen fields
Field Unit Description Indicates the unit number that corresponds to the field values from the table displayed in Figure 23. This field is not visible when the switch is operating in the standalone mode. Indicates the switch port numbers that correspond to the field values in that row of the screen (for example, the field values in row 2 apply to switch port 2). The values that you set in the Switch row affect all switch ports and, when the switch is part of a stack, the values that you set in the Stack row affects all ports in the entire stack. The read-only data displayed in this column indicates the trunks that correspond to the switch ports specified in the Trunk Members fields of the Trunk Configuration screen (see Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)).

Port

Trunk

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Table 17 Port Configuration screen fields (continued)


Field Status Description Allows you to disable any of the switch ports. You can also use this field to control access to any switch port. Default Value Range Link Enabled Enabled, Disabled

A read-only field that indicates the current link state of the corresponding port, as follows: Up: The port is connected and operational. Down: The port is not connected or is not operational. Allows you to control whether link up/link down traps are sent to the configured trap sink from the switch. Default Value Range On On, Off

LnkTrap

Autonegotiation

When enabled, sets the corresponding port speed to match the best service provided by the connected station, up to 100 Mb/s in full-duplex mode. This field is disabled for all fiber optic ports. Default Value Range Enabled Enabled, Disabled

Speed/Duplex

Allows you to manually configure any port to support an Ethernet speed of 10 Mb/s or 100 Mb/s, in half- or full-duplex mode. This field is set (by default) to 1000 Mb/s, full-duplex for Gigabit ports only. Default Value Range 10Mbs/Half (when Autonegotiation is Disabled) 10Mbs/Half, 10Mbs/Full, 100Mbs/Half, 100Mbs/Full

High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen


The High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen (Figure 24) allows you to set the port parameters for the Gigabit Ethernet Interface. Note: The GBIC module must be installed to configure the port.

Choose High Speed Flow Control Configuration (or press h) from the
Switch Configuration Menu screen.

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Chapter 2 Using the console interface Figure 24 High Speed Flow Control Configuration
High Speed Flow Control Configuration

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Port ---49 50

Autonegotiation --------------Enabled Enabled

Speed Duplex -------------1000Mbs / Full 1000Mbs / Full

Flow Control -------------Disabled Disabled

Use space bar to display choices, press <Return> or <Enter> to select choice. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Table 18 describes the High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen fields.
Table 18 High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen fields
Field Unit Description Allows you to select the unit number (when stacking is configured) to view or configure. To view or configure another unit, type its unit number and press Enter, or press the spacebar to toggle the unit numbers (the system only displays a screen for units that are configured with a Gigabit MDA). This field is not visible if the switch is operating in the standalone mode. Displays the port number

Port

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Table 18 High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen fields (continued)


Field Autonegotiation Description Indicates if the Autonegotiation has been enabled on the port. When enabled, the port only advertises support for 1000 Mb/s operation, in full-duplex mode. Default Value Range Speed/Duplex Enabled Enabled, Disabled

Displays if a port is configured to support an Ethernet speed of 10 Mb/s or 100 Mb/s, in half- or full-duplex mode. This field is set (by default) to 1000 Mb/s, full-duplex for Gigabit ports only. Default Range 100Mbs/Half (when Autonegotiation is Disabled) 10Mbs/Half, 10Mbs/Full, 100Mbs/Half, 100Mbs/Full

Flow Control

Indicates if the switch or unit has been configured to control traffic and avoid congestion on the Gigabit MDA port. Two modes are available (see Choosing a high speed flow control mode, next, for details about the two modes). The Flow Control field cannot be configured unless you set the Autonegotiation field value to Disabled. Default Value Range Disabled Disabled, Symmetric, Asymmetric

Note: All fields (except the Unit field) described in Table 18 are read-only fields.

Choosing a high speed flow control mode


The high speed flow control feature allows you to control traffic and avoid congestion on the Gigabit full-duplex link. If the receive port buffer becomes full, the Ethernet Switch 425-24T issues a flow-control signal to the device at the other end of the link to suspend transmission. When the receive buffer is no longer full, the switch issues a signal to resume the transmission. You can choose Symmetric or Asymmetric flow control mode.

Symmetric mode
This mode allows both the GBIC port and its link partner to send flow control pause frames to each other.
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When a pause frame is received (by either the GBIC port or its link partner), the port suspends transmission of frames for a number of slot times specified in the control frame or until a pause-release control frame is received. Both devices on the link must support this mode when it is selected.

Asymmetric mode
This mode allows the link partner to send flow control pause frames to the GBIC port. When a pause frame is received, the receiving port suspends transmission of frames for a number of slot times specified in the control frame or until a pause-release control frame is received. In this mode, the GBIC port is disabled from transmitting pause frames to its link partner. Use this mode when the GBIC port is connected to a buffered repeater device. You can choose a high speed flow control mode using CLI commands. For more information about the commands see Enabling flow control on page 326.

Rate Limiting Configuration screen


The Rate Limiting feature allows you to configure the threshold limits for broadcast and multicast packets ingressing on a port for a given time interval. The Ethernet Switch 325/425 drops any packets received above the threshold value if the traffic ingressing on the port exceeds the threshold. The hardware restrictions on this platform do not allow you to determine if the traffic from a port is the cause of excess broadcast or multicast traffic. Consequently you cannot perform port specific actions such as disabling a port. You can generate a trap to detect the excess traffic or you can configure the switch to store a message in the system log when the traffic on the port exceeds the threshold value. This message in the system log conveys that some traffic to the switch will be dropped.

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The Rate Limiting Configuration screen allows you to limit the forwarding rate of broadcast and multicast packets at ingress. Note: All configuration settings that you make in the Rate Limiting Configuration screen are applied across the entire unit (if stacking in configured). You cannot set some ports in the unit to limit broadcast traffic with a value of X pps (Packets Per Second) and some other ports in the same unit to limit multicast traffic with a value of Y pps. Figure 25 show sample rate limiting values for the two Rate Limiting Configuration screens. To open the Rate Limiting Configuration screen:

Choose Rate Limiting Configuration (or press l) from the Switch


Configuration Menu screen.

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Chapter 2 Using the console interface Figure 25 Rate Limiting Configuration screen
Rate Limiting Configuration Packet Type ------------[ [ Both Both Limit -------] [ 0 pps ] ] [ 0 pps ]

117

---Switch Stack

Use space bar to display choices, press <Return> or <Enter> to select choice. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Table 19 describes the fields in the Rate Limiting Configuration screen.


Table 19 Rate Limiting Configuration screen fields
Field Unit Description Allows you to select the unit number (when stacking is configured) to view or configure. To view or configure another unit, type its unit number and press Enter, or press the spacebar to toggle the unit numbers. This field is not present in a standalone configuration. Displays information relevant to the stack, if the switch is operating in the stack configuration. Allows you to select the packet types for rate-limiting. Default value: Range: Both Both, Multicast, Broadcast

Stack Packet Type

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Table 19 Rate Limiting Configuration screen fields (continued)


Field Limit Description Sets the amount of Packets Per Second allowed for forwarding. 0 pps means Rate Limiting has been disabled. Default value: Range: Switch Stack 0 pps 0-262143

Allows you to enable Rate Limiting on current selected unit. Allows you to enable Rate Limiting on an entire stack. This field is visible only if stacking has been configured.

When the volume of either packet type is high, placing severe strain on the network (often referred to as a storm), you can set the forwarding rate of those packet types to not exceed a specified percentage of the total available bandwidth. The percentage you set refers to the total available bandwidth, not to a percentage of current traffic.

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You can manage the Ethernet Switch 325/425 with a number of management tools such as: Device Manager (GUI) Web-based management system Console Interface (CI menus) Command Line Interface (CLI)

The Ethernet Switch 325/425 Command Line Interface (CLI) is a management tool that provides methods for configuring, managing, and monitoring the operational functions of the switch. You can access CLI through a direct connection to the switch console port, or remotely using Telnet. For a complete, alphabetical list of CLI commands, refer to Appendix E, Command List, on page 447. You can use the CLI interactively, or you can load and execute CLI scripts. CLI scripts are loaded in one of the following ways: Entering the configure network command Manually loading the script in the console menu Automatically loading the script at boot-up

This chapter discusses the following CLI topics: CLI command modes Port numbering on page 123 Accessing CLI on page 125 Setting the system username and password on page 127 Getting help on page 128
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Basic navigation on page 128 Managing basic system information on page 137 Managing MAC address forwarding database table on page 143

CLI command modes


Most CLI commands are available only under a certain command mode. The Ethernet Switch 325/425 has the following four command modes: User EXEC Privileged EXEC Global Configuration Interface Configuration

The User EXEC mode is the default mode; it is also referred to as exec. This command mode is the initial mode of access on powering-up the Ethernet Switch 325/425. In this command mode, the user can access only a subset of the total CLI commands; however, the commands in this mode are available while the user is in any of the other four modes. The commands in this mode are those you would generally need, such as ping and logout. Commands in the Privileged EXEC mode are available to all other modes but the User EXEC mode. The commands in this mode allow you to perform basic switch-level management tasks, such as downloading the software image, setting passwords, and booting the Ethernet Switch 325/425. The Privileged EXEC mode is also referred to as privExec mode. The Global Configuration mode and the Interface Configuration mode allow you to change the configuration of the Ethernet Switch 325/425. Changes made in these command modes are immediately applied to the switch configuration and saved to NVRAM. The Global Configuration commands allow you to set and display general configurations for the switch, such as the IP address, SNMP parameters, the Telnet access, and VLANs. The Global Configuration mode is also referred to as config mode.

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The Interface Configuration commands allow you to configure parameters for each port, such as speed and duplex mode. The Interface Configuration mode is also referred to as config-if mode. Figure 26 provides an illustration of the hierarchy of Ethernet Switch 325/425 CLI command modes.
Figure 26 CLI command mode hierarchy

User Exec (exec)

Privileged EXEC (privExec)

Global Configuration (config)

Interface Configuration (config-if)

10194EA

You can see a specific value for each command mode at the prompt line, and you can use specific commands to enter or exit each command mode (Table 20). Additionally, you can only enter command modes from specific modes and only exit to specific command modes.

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Table 20 describes the command mode prompts and entrance/exit commands.


Table 20 Command mode prompts and entrance/exit commands
Command mode User EXEC (exec) Prompt for the Ethernet Switch 325 Prompt for the Ethernet Switch 425 Enter/exit command Default mode, automatically enter logout or exit to quit to Main Menu

325-24T>

425-48T>

Privileged EXEC 325-24T# (privExec)

425-48T#

enable to enter from


User EXEC mode

logout or exit to
quit to Main Menu Global Configuration (config)

325-24T(config)#

425-48T(config)#

configure to enter
from Privileged EXEC mode end or exit to exit to Privileged EXEC mode; logout to quit to Main Menu

Interface Configuration (config-if)

325-24T(config-if)# 425-48T(config-if)#

interface FastEthernet {<portnum>|all} to


enter from Global Configuration mode logout to quit to Main Menu; end to exit to Privileged EXEC mode; exit to exit to Global Configuration mode

The prompt displays the switch name, and the current CLI command mode. For example: User EXEC425-48T> Privileged EXEC425-48T# Global Configuration425-48T(config)# Interface Configuration425-48T(config-if)#

Refer to Appendix E, Command List, on page 447, for a complete, alphabetical list of all CLI commands and where they are explained.
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The initial command mode in CLI depends on your access level when you logged into the Ethernet Switch 325/425 CI menus: With no password protection, you can enter the CLI in userExec mode, and use the enable command to move to the privExec command mode. If you have logged into the CI menus with read-only access, you can enter the CLI in userExec mode and cannot access any other CLI command modes. If you have logged into the CI menus with read-write access, you can enter the CLI in privExec mode and use the commands to move to the other command modes.

Port numbering
The port numbering for different versions of Ethernet switches are listed below: Ethernet Switch 325-24T has twenty-four 10/100 Mb/s ports. Ethernet Switch 325-24G has twenty-four 10/100 Mb/s ports and two 10/100/1000 ports. Ethernet Switch 425-24T has twenty-four 10/100 Mb/s ports on the front, as well as two combo ports, which includes two GBIC or two copper ports 10/100/1000Mbps. Ethernet Switch 425-48T has forty-eight 10/100 ports on the front, as well as two combo ports, which includes two GBIC or two copper ports 10/100/1000Mbps.

The CLI uses the variable <portlist> when a command specifies one or more ports for the command. Note: The Ethernet Switch 425-24T operates either in standalone mode or in stack mode. The format of the variable <portlist> is different if you are working on a standalone Ethernet Switch 425-24T or a stack.

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Port numbering in standalone mode


In a standalone mode, the port number variable is an integer between 1 to 50 for Ethernet Switch 425-48T and 1 to 26 for Ethernet Switch 425-24T. You can use the <portlist> variable in the following formats: A single port numberan integer between 1 to 50. Example: 7 means port 7 A range of port numbersa pair of port numbers between 1 and 50 separated by a dash. Example: 1-3 means ports 1, 2, and 3 Example: 5-24 means all ports from port 5 through port 24 A list of port numbers and/or port ranges, separated by commas. Example: 1,3,7 means ports 1, 3, and 7 Example: 1-3,9-11 means ports 1, 2, 3, 9, 10, and 11 Example: 1,3-5,9-11,15 means ports 1, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, and 15 none means no ports. all means all the ports on the standalone Ethernet Switch 325/425, including any GBIC ports.

You can also use the unit/port convention discussed in Port numbering in stacked mode, with a standalone Ethernet Switch 325/425 as long as the unit number is 1.

Port numbering in stacked mode


In Ethernet Switch 425-24T Stack mode, use the <portlist> variable to represent the number of the unit within the stack, followed by a forward slash (/), and the port number(s). Unit number will always be an integer between 1 and 8, and the port numbers will always be integers between 1 and 25. You can also use none to indicate none of the ports in the stack or all to indicate all of the ports in the stack. In the Stack mode, use the <portlist> variable in the following formats: A single port numberan integer for the unit, followed by /, and an integer for the port number Example: 1/7 means unit 1 port 7

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Example: 3/24 means unit 3, port 24 A range of port numbersan integer for the unit, followed by /, and integers for the port number between 1 and 24 separated by a dash Example: 1/1-3 means unit 1, ports 1, 2, and 3 Example: 3/5-24 means unit 3, port 5 through port 24 A unit with no ports specifiedan integer for the unit, followed by /, and the word none. 3/none means unit 3 with no ports A unit with all ports specifiedan integer for the unit, followed by /, and the word all. 3/all means unit 3 with all ports A list of port numbers, port ranges, and/or units with all ports or no ports using the unit/port formatseparated by commas Example: 1/1,2/3,3/7 means unit 1 port 1; unit 2, port 3; and unit 3, port 7 Example: 1/1-3,3/9-11 means unit 1, ports 1, 2, 3; and unit 3, ports 9, 10, and 11 Example: 1/1,4/3-5,5/9-11,7/15 means unit 1, port 1; unit 4, ports 3, 4, 5; unit 5, ports 9, 10, 11; and unit 7, port 15 Example: 1/3,3/ALL,4/NONE means unit 1, port 3; unit 3, all ports; and unit 4, no ports none means no ports in the stack. all means all the ports in the stack, including all GBIC ports.

To view the unit numbers in the stack, issue the show stack-info command (show stack-info command on page 141). You must be in the Privileged EXEC (privExec) mode to execute this command.

Accessing CLI
You access the CI menus using Telnet or through a direct connection to the switch from a terminal or personal computer (PC). You can use any terminal or PC with a terminal emulator as the CLI command station. Make sure that the terminal has the following features: 9600 bits per second (b/s), 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, no parity, no flow control
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Serial terminal-emulation program such as Terminal or Hyperterm for Windows* 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows XP or Windows NT*. Cable and connector to match the male DTE connector (DB-9) on the Ethernet Switch 325/425 console port, with the DCE/DTE switch on the switch management module set to DTE VT100 Arrows checked in the Terminal Preferences window under Terminal Options, and Block Cursor unchecked; VT-100/ANSI checked under Emulation.

To access CLI: 1 When you access the Ethernet Switch 325/425, the banner appears (Figure 27).

Figure 27 Ethernet Switch 425-48T banner

Enter Ctrl-Y to begin. *************************************************************** *** Ethernet Switch 425-48T *** *** Nortel *** *** Copyright (c) 1996-2005, All Rights Reserved *** *** Release 3.6 SSH *** *** HW:00 FW:3.5.0.2 SW:v3.6.0 *** ***************************************************************

Press Ctrl+Y, and the Main Menu appears on the console screen (Figure 28) with the top line highlighted.

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Chapter 3 CLI Basics 127 Figure 28 Main Menu for Ethernet Switch 425-48T console interface
Ethernet Switch 425-48T Main Menu IP Configuration/Setup... SNMP Configuration... System Characteristics... Switch Configuration... Console/Comm Port Configuration... Display Hardware Units... Spanning Tree Configuration... TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration... Software Download... Configuration File... Display System Log... Reset... Reset to Default Settings... Shutdown Command... Command Line Interface... Logout... Use arrow keys to highlight option, press <Return> or <Enter> to select option.

Using the Down Arrow key, scroll down to Command Line Interface, and press Enter. The CLI prompt appears:
425-48T>

The > sign at the end of the name of the switch indicates that the default CLI mode is User EXEC mode. Refer to CLI command modes on page 120, to select the command mode you want to use (and are authorized to use).

Setting the system username and password


You can set usernames and passwords for system access through the Console Interface, CLI, Telnet, and Web-based management. For more information, refer to Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A).

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Getting help
When you navigate through the CLI, online Help is available at all levels. Entering a portion of the command, space, and a question mark (?) at the prompt results in a list of all options for that command. Refer to help command on page 130 for more information about the specific types of Help.

Basic navigation
This section discusses basic navigation around the CLI and between the command modes. As you see, the CLI incorporates various shortcut commands and keystrokes to simplify its use. The following topics are covered in this section: General navigation commands Keystroke navigation on page 129 help command on page 130 no command on page 131 default command on page 131 logout command on page 132 enable command on page 132 configure command on page 132 interface command on page 133 disable command on page 133 end command on page 134 exit command on page 134

General navigation commands


When you enter ? at any point in the CLI session, the system retrieves help information for whatever portion of the command you entered thus far. Refer to help command on page 130 for more information.

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The system records the last command in a CLI session. However, the last command is not saved across reboots. Add the word no to the beginning of most CLI configuration commands to clear or remove the parameters of the actual command. For example, when you enter the command ip stack address 192.32.154.126, you set the IP stack address. However, when you enter no ip stack address, the system returns the IP address to zero. Refer to Appendix E, Command List, on page 447 for an alphabetical list of no commands. Add the word default to the beginning of most CLI configuration commands to set the parameters of the command to the factory default values. Refer to Appendix E, Command List, on page 447 for an alphabetical list of default commands. When you enter a portion of the command and press the [Tab] key, the system finds the first unambiguous match of a command and displays that command. For example, if you enter down+[Tab], the system displays download.

Keystroke navigation
You can change the location of the cursor using the key combinations shown in Table 21.
Table 21 Keystroke navigation
Key combination Function Start of line Back 1 character Abort command Delete the character indicated by the cursor End of line Forward 1 character Delete character left of cursor (Backspace key) Command/parameter completion Redisplay line Next history command

Ctrl+A Ctrl+B Ctrl+C Ctrl+D Ctrl+E Ctrl+F Ctrl+H


Tab

Ctrl+K and Ctrl+R Ctrl+N or Down arrow

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Key combination Function Previous history command Transpose characters Delete entire line Delete word left of cursor Delete all characters to left of cursor Exit Global Configuration mode (to Privileged EXEC mode) Context-sensitive help Capitalize character at cursor Change character at cursor to lowercase Move back 1 word Delete 1 word to the right Move 1 word forward

Ctrl+P or Up arrow Ctrl+T Ctrl+U Ctrl+W Ctrl+X Ctrl+z


? Esc+C and Esc+U Esc+l Esc+B Esc+D Esc+F

help command
The help command is in all command modes and displays a brief message about using the CLI help system. The syntax for the help command is:
help

The help command has no parameters or variables. Figure 29 shows the output from the help command.

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Chapter 3 CLI Basics 131 Figure 29 help command output in privExec mode
425-48T>help Context help may be requested at any point in a command by entering a question mark '?'. If nothing matches, the help list will be empty and you must backup until entering a '?' shows the available options. Two styles of help are provided: 1. Full help is available when you are ready to enter a command argument (e.g. 'show?') and describes each possible argument. 2. Partial help is provided when an abbreviated argument is entered and you want to know what arguments match the input (e.g. 'show pr?'.)

no command
The no command is always used as a prefix to a configuration command, and it negates the action performed by that command. The effect of the no command is to remove or to clear the configuration controlled by the specified command. Various no commands are in the config and config-if command modes. Refer to Appendix E, Command List, on page 447 for an alphabetical listing of all no commands. Note: Not all configuration commands support the no prefix command.

default command
The default command is always used as a prefix to a configuration command, and it restores the configuration parameters to default values. The default values are specified by each command. Refer to Appendix A for an alphabetical listing of all default commands. Note: Not all commands support the default prefix command.

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logout command
The logout command logs you out of the CLI session and returns you to the Main Menu of the Console Interface (CI) menus (Figure 28). The syntax for the logout command is:
logout

The logout command is in all command modes. The logout command has no parameters or variables.

enable command
The enable command changes the command mode from User EXEC to privExec mode. The syntax for the enable command is:
enable

The enable command is in the exec command mode. The enable command has no parameters or variables.

configure command
The configure command moves you to the Global Configuration (config) command mode and identifies the source for the configuration commands. The syntax for the configure command is:
configure {terminal|network}

The configure command is in the privExec command mode.

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Table 22 describes the parameters and variables for the configure command.
Table 22 configure command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables terminal | network Description Specifies the source for the configuration commands for the Ethernet Switch 325/425: terminalallows you to enter config mode to enter configuration commands networkallows you to set up parameters for auto-loading a script at boot-up or for loading and executing a script immediately

interface command
The interface command moves you to the Interface Configuration (config-if) command mode. The syntax for the interface command is:
interface FastEthernet <portlist>

The interface command is in the config command mode. Table 23 describes the parameters and variables for the interface command.
Table 23 interface command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables <portlist> Description Specifies the portlist you want to be affected by all the commands issued in the config-if command mode.

disable command
The disable command returns you to the User EXEC (exec) command mode. The syntax for the disable command is:
disable

The disable command is in the privExec command mode. The disable command has no parameters or variables.
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end command
The end command moves you to the priv Exec mode from either the Global Configuration (config) mode or the Interface Configuration (config-if) mode. The syntax for the end command is:
end

The end command has no parameters or variables.

exit command
The exit command moves you around the command modes: In User EXEC (exec) and Privileged EXEC (privExec) command modes, exit allows you to quit the CLI session. In Global Configuration (config) mode, exit moves you back to the privExec command mode. In Interface Configuration (config-if) command mode, exit moves you back to the config mode.

The syntax for the exit command is:


exit

The exit command has no parameters or variables.

shutdown command for the unit


The shutdown command allows you to safely shut down and power off the switch. Once the shutdown command is initiated, the switch saves the current configuration which allows users to power off the switch within the specified time period (1 to 60 minutes); otherwise, the switch performs a reset. When the shutdown command is initiated in the CLI, the following message appears:
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Enter yes at this prompt to shut down the switch. The following warning message then appears:
Warning the switch/stack has been set to reboot in <xx> minutes. Current configuration has been saved, no further configuration changes can be saved until reboot occurs or 'shutdown cancel' command is issued.

The syntax for the shutdown command is:


shutdown [force] [minutes-to-wait <1-60>] [cancel]

Once the shutdown command is initiated, all existing and subsequent Console Interface sessions display the following message:
Stack will reset in <xxxx> seconds.

While existing CLI sessions do not receive a warning message, all subsequent CLI sessions display the following message:
The shutdown process is in progress. It is safe to poweroff the stack. Configuration changes will not be saved. Shutdown has blocked the flash. Autoreset in <xxxx> seconds.

Neither Web-based management nor Device Manager receive any shutdown warning messages.

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Table 23 describes the parameters and variables for the shutdown command.
Table 24 shutdown command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables force minutes-to-wait <1-60>] cancel Description Instructs the switch to skip the shutdown confirmation prompt. Specifies the number of minutes that pass before the switch resets itself. The default wait time is set at 10 minutes. Aborts all scheduled switch shutdowns

Note: Any configurations or logins performed on the switch after the shutdown command is initiated are not saved to NVRAM and are lost after the reset. The shutdown command is in the privExec command mode.

reload command
The reload command provides you with a configuration rollback mechanism to prevent loss of connectivity to a switch, typically for remote configurations. The reload command allows you to temporarily disable the autosave feature for a specified time period (1 to 60 minutes), allowing you to make a number of configuration changes on remote switches without affecting the current saved configuration. During the interval in which the autosave feature is disabled by the reload command, you must use the copy config nvram command to force a manual save of your configurations. Initiate the reload command before you start the switch configuration commands. Once you initiate the command in the CLI, the following message appears:
Reload (y/n) ?

Enter yes at this prompt to set the switch reload. The following warning message then appears:

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Chapter 3 CLI Basics 137 Warning the switch/stack has been set to reload in <xx> minutes. Current configuration has NOT been saved. Configuration must be explicitly saved.

Once the reload timer expires, the switch resets, reloads the last saved configuration, and re-enables the autosave feature. The syntax for the reload command is:
reload [force] [minutes-to-wait <1-60>] [cancel]

Table 23 describes the parameters and variables for the interface command.
Table 25 reload command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables force minutes-to-wait <1-60>] cancel Description Instructs the switch to skip the reload confirmation prompt. Specifies the number of minutes that pass before the switch reloads itself. The default wait time is set at 10 minutes. Aborts all scheduled switch reloads

The reload command is in the privExec command mode.

Managing basic system information


This section shows you how to view basic system information, such as the current software version and the stack mode; you can renumber the units within a stack. The following topics are covered: show sys-info command show tech command on page 139 show stack-info command on page 141 show stacking-mode command on page 142 renumber unit command on page 143

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show sys-info command


The show sys-info command displays the current system characteristics. The syntax for the show sys-info command is:
show sys-info

The show sys-info command is in the privExec command mode. The show sys-info command has no parameters or variables. Figure 30 displays sample output from the show sys-info command.
Figure 30 show sys-info command output
425-48T#show sys-info Operation Mode: Switch MAC Address: 00-0F-CD-BF-1E-80 Reset Count: 34 Last Reset Type: Power Cycle Power Status: Primary Power Autotopology: Enabled Local GBIC Type: (port 49) GBIC is missing Local GBIC Type: (port 50) GBIC is missing sysDescr: Ethernet Switch 425-48T HW:00 FW:3.5.0.2 SW:v3.6.0 Mfg Date: 05122004 Serial #: SACC2600E5 Operational State:Normal sysObjectID: 1.3.6.1.4.1.45.3.57.1 sysUpTime: 2 days, 17:26:24 sysNtpTime: SNTP not synchronized. sysServices: 3 sysContact: c sysName: Ethernet 425-48T sysLocation: 425-48T#

To change the system contact, name, or location, refer to the snmp-server command (see Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)).

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show tech command


The show tech command displays the system information. The syntax for the show tech command is:
show tech

The show tech command is in the privExec command mode. The show tech command has no parameters or variables. Figure 31, Figure 31 on page 139, and Figure 32 on page 140 display a sample output from the show tech command.
Figure 31 show tech command output
425# show tech *****SYS Info***** System Information: Operation Mode: MAC Address: Reset Count: Last Reset Type: Autotopology: sysObjectID: sysUpTime: sysNtpTime: sysServices: sysContact: sysName: sysLocation: Unit #1: Switch Model: MDA Model: Cascade Module: Hardware Version: Firmware Version: Software Version: Serial Number: Manufacturing Date: Power Status: Fan #1 Status: Fan #2 Status: *****UI Button***** Unit # Button Mode ------ ------------1 Enabled

Switch 00-09-97-A2-9D-80 123 Management Reset Enabled 1.3.6.1.4.1.45.3.57.2 2 days, 04:41:28 SNTP not synchronized. 3 425

425-24T None 400-ST1 0B 3.5.0.2 v3.6.0 SACC25003U 05232003 Primary Normal Normal

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*****MEMORY INFORMATION***** status bytes blocks avg block max block ------ --------- -------- ---------- ---------current free 3384136 154 21974 3333064 alloc 7077632 4335 1632 cumulative alloc 1036033356 11295553 91 *****IP Configuration***** BootP Mode: BootP Disabled Configured In Use Last BootP --------------- --------------- --------------Stack IP Address: 192.168.100.100 0.0.0.0 Switch IP Address: 192.168.100.13 192.168.100.13 0.0.0.0 Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 0.0.0.0 Default Gateway: 192.168.100.1 192.168.100.1 0.0.0.0 *****MLT Configuration***** Trunk Name Members Bpdu Mode Status ----- -------------------- ------------------- ------ ------ -------1 Trunk #1 NONE All basic Disabled 2 Trunk #2 NONE All basic Disabled 3 Trunk #3 NONE All basic Disabled 4 Trunk #4 NONE All basic Disabled 5 Trunk #5 NONE All basic Disabled 6 Trunk #6 NONE All basic Disabled *****VLAN Configuration***** Id Name Type Protocol User PID Active Mgmt --- -------------------- -------- ---------------- -------- ------ ---1 VLAN #1 Port None 0x0000 Yes Yes Port Members: 1-25 *****STP Configuration***** Current STP Operation Mode: MSTP Maximum Mst Instance Number: 8 Number of Msti Supported: 1 Cist Bridge Priority (hex): 8000 Stp Version: Mstp Mode Cist Bridge Max Age: 20 seconds Cist Bridge Forward Delay: 15 seconds Tx Hold Count: 3 Path Cost Default Type: 32-bit Max Hop Count: 2000

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Chapter 3 CLI Basics 141 Figure 33 show tech command output (continued)
VLAN members ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ ------ -----1 Msti Config Id Selector: 0 Msti Region Name: 00:0f:6a:7d:bb:e0 Msti Region Version: 0 Msti Config Digest: AC:36:17:7F:50:28:3C:D4:B8:38:21:D8:AB:26:DE:62 Port Role State STP Status Oper Status ---- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------1 Root Forwarding Enabled Enabled 2 Disabled Discarding Enabled Disabled 3 Disabled Discarding Enabled Disabled [...] 24 Designated Forwarding Enabled Enabled 25 Disabled Discarding Enabled Disabled *****Port Interface***** Status Auto Flow Port Trunk Admin Oper Link LinkTrap Negotiation Speed Duplex Control ---- ----- ------- ---- ---- -------- ----------- -------- ------ ------1 Enable Up Up Enabled Enabled 100Mbps Full 2 Enable Down Down Enabled Enabled 3 Enable Down Down Enabled Enabled [...] 24 Enable Up Up Enabled Enabled 100Mbps Full 25 Enable Down Down Enabled Enabled *****System Log***** Type Time Idx Src Message ---- ----------------------------- ---- --- ------S 00:00:00:00 1 NVR Base Unit changed S 00:00:00:00 2 NVR #1 Reset initiated through telnet by IP address: 11.127.249.74, access mode: no security S 00:00:00:00 3 NVR SMGR event JOIN STACK

show stack-info command


The show stack-info is specific only to Ethernet Switch 425-24T and 425-48T in stacked mode. This command displays the current stack information, which includes unit numbers, GBIC, and software version for all units.

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The syntax for the show stack-info command is:


show stack-info

The show stack-info command is in the privExec command mode. The show stack-info command has no parameters or variables. Figure 34 displays sample output from the show stack-info command.
Figure 34 show stack-info command output
425-24T(config)#show stack-info Unit # Switch Model GBIC Port ------ ---------------- ----------1 425-24T (1/25) SX 2 425-24T (2/25) None 425-24T(config)#

SW Version -----------v3.6.0 v3.6.0

show stacking-mode command


The show stacking-mode command displays the current and next stacking mode for the switch or stack. The syntax for the show stacking-mode command is:
show stacking-mode

The show stacking-mode command is in the exec command mode. The show stacking-mode command has no parameters or variables.

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Figure 35 displays sample output from the show stacking-mode command.


Figure 35 show stacking-mode command output
425-24T>show stacking-mode Current mode for unit 1 is stackable, base unit set. Next mode for unit 1 is stackable, base unit set. Current mode for unit 2 is stackable, base unit not set. Next mode for unit 3 is stackable, base unit not set. Next mode will be applied after reset

renumber unit command


This command is applicable only to Ethernet Switch 425-24T, in its stacked mode. The renumber unit command changes the unit number of each switch in the stack. The syntax for the renumber unit command is:
renumber unit

The renumber unit command is in the config command mode. The renumber unit command has no parameters or variables. Note: This command does not take effect until you reset the stack.

Managing MAC address forwarding database table


This section describes the commands to view the contents of the MAC address forwarding database table, as well as setting the age-out time for the addresses. The following topics are covered: show mac-address-table command on page 144 mac-address-table aging-time command on page 145 default mac-address-table aging-time command on page 146
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show mac-address-table command


The show mac-address-table command displays the current contents of the MAC address forwarding database table. The syntax for the show mac-address-table command is:
show mac-address-table [vid <1-4094>] [aging-time] [address <H.H.H>] [port <LINE>] [include/exclude <pattern>]

The show mac-address-table command is in the privExec command mode. Table 26 describes the parameters and variables for the show
mac-address-table command. Table 26 show mac-address-table command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables vid <1-4094> Description Enter the number of the VLAN you want to display the forwarding database. Default is to display the management VLANs database. Displays the time in seconds after which an unused entry is removed from the forwarding database. Displays a specific MAC address if it exists in the database. Enter the MAC address you want displayed. List of ports. Allows you to filter the results of the command by printing only those entries in the address table that include or exclude a given pattern. The value for <pattern> must be a sequence of 1 to 6 bytes in hex, separated by dashes. for example: show mac-address-table

aging-time address <H.H.H> port <LINE> include/exclude <pattern>

port 1/1-5 address include 00-0E-45-23

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Figure 36 displays sample output from the show mac-address-table command.


Figure 36 show mac-address-table command output
425-48T(config)#show mac-address-table Mac Address Table Aging Time: 400 Number of addresses: 13 MAC Address ----------------00-00-81-9B-12-78 00-00-E2-1F-9D-0D 00-09-97-89-82-C1 00-0C-F8-61-00-01 00-0F-6A-82-2E-C1 00-0F-CD-BF-1E-80 00-80-2D-6E-47-82 425-48T(config)# Source -------Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3 MAC Address ----------------00-00-E2-13-38-38 00-04-DC-6F-43-F4 00-0C-F8-1A-0F-F8 00-0F-3D-E5-28-01 00-0F-6A-82-36-21 00-80-2D-6E-47-38 08-00-20-9F-F3-2C Source -------Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3 Trunk: 3

mac-address-table aging-time command


The mac-address-table aging-time command sets the time that the switch retains unseen MAC addresses. The syntax for the mac-address-table aging-time command is:
mac-address-table aging-time <time>

The mac-address-table aging-time command is in the config command mode. Table 27 describes the parameters and variables for the mac-address-table aging-time command.
Table 27 mac-address-table aging-time command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables time Description

Enter the aging time in seconds that you want for MAC addresses before they are flushed.

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Figure 37 displays sample output from the mac-address-table aging-time command.


Figure 37 mac-address-table aging-time output
425-48T(config)#mac-address-table aging-time 400 425-48T(config)#

default mac-address-table aging-time command


The default mac-address-table aging-time command sets the time that the switch retains unseen MAC addresses to 300 seconds. The syntax for the default mac-address-table aging-time command is:
default mac-address aging-time

The default mac-address-table aging-time command is in the config command mode. The default mac-address-table aging-time command has no parameters or variables.

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Chapter 4 Getting Started with Device Manager


The Java Device Manager (JDM) software is a Graphical User Interface (GUI) that allows you to manage a standalone switch or a stack. JDM (also referred to as Device Manager) provides options found in other management tools such as management of VLANs and MultiLink Trunks, and displaying and printing of statistics in graph format. To use Device Manager, you must have network connectivity to a management station running Device Manager on one of the supported platforms. You must also assign an IP address to the switch or stack. This chapter contains information on the following topics: Installing Device Manager Device Manager basics on page 171

Installing Device Manager


The JDM software is provided on the device software CD as a self-extracting executable file, and is also available from the Nortel web site. This chapter provides instructions for installing the JDM software in a Windows*, UNIX*, or Linux* environment. The Java Runtime Environment (JRE) is bundled with the JDM software and does not require a separate installation. For details on installing JDM, refer to the following sections: JDM installation precautions on page 148 Installing the Device Manager software on page 149
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Installing JDM on Windows on page 149 Installing JDM on UNIX or Linux on page 159 Starting Device Manager on page 171

JDM installation precautions


The following warnings apply to Device Manager on all operating environments: The JDM and Ethernet Switch software versions must match for the correct dialog boxes and information to be shown and accessible. Please refer to the Release Notes for a complete compatibility list. If you want to use JDM to support multiple Nortel switches in your network, ensure that the JDM version you use supports each version of software running on each Nortel device in your network. Prior to upgrading JDM, either uninstall your previous version of the Device Manager software, or install the new software to a different directory. (You can have multiple versions of Device Manager stored on your Windows, UNIX, or Linux machine, provided that each version is stored in a separate directory.)

Note: Do not install the JDM to a directory where a previous version of Device Manager software already exists.

JDM saves the IP addresses that are visited to a settings file. A JDM uninstall operation does not remove this settings file. In a Windows environment, the settings file is dm.ini, and is created in the JDM install directory. In a UNIX environment, the settings file is ~/.jdm/dm.ini. In a Linux environment, the settings file is ~/.jdm/dm.ini. The dm.ini file containing IP addresses visited from a previous JDM version is automatically used by a new JDM version installed in the same directory. You must manually move or copy the dm.ini file from a previous version of JDM to a new JDM installation in a different directory.

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Installing the Device Manager software


Device Manager software can be installed in Windows, UNIX, or Linux environment. The following sections provide information on the system requirements and installation procedures to install Device Manager software in Windows, UNIX, and Linux environments. Installing JDM on Windows Installing JDM on UNIX or Linux on page 159

Installing JDM on Windows


This section includes the following topics: Windows minimum requirements Removing previous versions of JDM on Windows on page 150 Installing JDM on Windows from the CD on page 150 Installing JDM on Windows from the web on page 151 Executing the JDM installation software on Windows on page 152

Windows minimum requirements


The minimum system requirements for installing JDM on Microsoft* Windows NT*, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000, or Windows XP are: 350 MHz or higher Pentium processor 256 MB DRAM 300 MB space on hard drive

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Removing previous versions of JDM on Windows


Note: Removing previous versions of JDM is an optional process. Multiple versions of JDM can exist on one system, as long as each version is in a separate location.

If you decide to allow previous versions of JDM to remain, then you must choose a different folder to use during the installation process. Remove existing versions of Device Manager software by using the Uninstall DM option that was created in the Windows Start menu during installation. For example, to remove Device Manager from a Windows XP system using the default program group, choose the following option from the Windows Start menu: All Programs>Nortel>Java Device Manager>Uninstall DM. If no program group was added to the Windows Start menu during installation, then complete the following steps to remove existing Device Manager software: 1 2 3 Navigate to the folder where the JDM software is installed. Open the UninstallerData sub-folder. Run the following file: Uninstall Java Device Manager.exe.

Note: If more than one version of Device Manager software is installed, ensure you select the correct software to uninstall.

Installing JDM on Windows from the CD


To access the JDM software from the installation CD: 1 2 3 Close all programs. Insert the software CD into your CD-ROM drive. From the Windows Start menu, choose Run. The Run dialog box opens. 4
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Use Browse to navigate to the drive where the CD-ROM is located.

Chapter 4 Getting Started with Device Manager 151

5 6

On the CD-ROM drive, locate the \Windows\Device Manager subdirectory. Double-click the jdm_xxxx.exe file. Note: In the file name, xxxx represents the current version of the JDM software. Continue with Executing the JDM installation software on Windows on page 152.

Installing JDM on Windows from the web


To obtain the JDM software from the Nortel web site: 1 Go to the following URL: http://www.nortel.com/support 2 Select the software support page for your product. The software page opens. 3 Click the Java Device Manager version you want. The Software Detail Information page opens. 4 Download the JDM software for Windows to a desired directory on your system. The software download is a self-extracting .exe file. Once the file transfer is complete, continue with step 5. 5 6 7 Close all programs. Navigate to the directory on your system where you downloaded the JDM Software. Double-click the jdm_xxxx.exe file. Note: In the file name, xxxx represents the current version of the JDM software. Continue with Executing the JDM installation software on Windows on page 152.

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Executing the JDM installation software on Windows


An install screen opens, followed by a Nortel dialog box. When the InstallAnywhere Introduction dialog box appears (Figure 38), you are ready to install the JDM.
Figure 38 InstallAnywhere Introduction dialog box

Click Next to begin the installation process. The License Agreement dialog box opens.

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Chapter 4 Getting Started with Device Manager 153

Click I accept the terms of the License Agreement (Figure 39).

Figure 39 License Agreement dialog box

Click Next. The Choose Install Set dialog box opens (Figure 40).

Figure 40 Choose Install Set dialog box

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Do one of the following: Select Typical installation to install the common set features, as well as online help. Select Minimal installation to select minimal features to install (recommended for those with limited disk space). Select Help to install only the online help. Select Custom installation to customize the features prior to installation.

Click Next. If you did not select Custom installation in step 4, then the Choose Install Folder dialog box opens. Continue with step 8 on page 155. If you selected Custom installation in step 4, then the Feature Sets dialog box opens (Figure 41).

Figure 41 Feature Sets dialog box

Select which features to install from the feature sets list.

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Click Next. The Choose Install Folder dialog box opens (Figure 42).

Figure 42 Choose Install Folder dialog box

Click Restore Default Folder to use the default location for JDM, or click Choose to select a different storage path.

Note: If Device Manager is already installed on your computer, you must choose a storage path that does not conflict with the already existing version.

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Click Next. The Choose Shortcut Folder dialog box opens (Figure 43).

Figure 43 Choose Shortcut Folder dialog box

10 Select the desired shortcut path from the list provided. 11 Click Next.

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The Pre-Installation Summary dialog box opens (Figure 44). A summary of the choices you have made is displayed for confirmation.
Figure 44 Pre-Installation Summary dialog box

12 Verify the folder, shortcut, and disk space required to install the software. If necessary, click Previous to return to the appropriate dialog box and make changes.

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13 Click Install. The installation process begins. When the installation is complete, the Install Complete dialog box opens (Figure 45).
Figure 45 Install Complete dialog box

14 Click Done to exit the installation. JDM is now installed on your machine.

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Installing JDM on UNIX or Linux


Note: JDM installation procedures are standardized across all platforms. In addition, the required Java Runtime Environment (JRE) version 1.4.1 is part of the JDM installation package and does not require a separate installation. The bundled JRE is used with this JDM only, and does not affect other Java applications on the same system. Note: With Solaris and HP-UX, certain OS patches are required for JRE and JDM to function properly. Please consult SUN or HP to install the appropriate OS patches before launching JDM. Note: UNIX and Linux systems are case-sensitive. Use lower-case to specify file names, and check to ensure that directories are entered correctly.

This section includes the following topics: Minimum requirements on page 160 Installing JDM on Linux from the CD on page 161 Installing JDM on Solaris from the CD on page 160 Installing JDM on HP-UX from the CD on page 160 Installing JDM on UNIX or Linux from the web on page 161

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Minimum requirements
JDM supports two UNIX platforms and one Linux platform: a UNIX SPARC* workstation running the Sun* Solaris* 2.7.x (or higher) an HP* workstation running the HP-UX* 11.x operating system (or higher) a PC running Linux Kernel 2.2 operating system (or higher)

The minimum system requirements for installing JDM on any UNIX or Linux platform are: 4 MB available in a temporary directory 300 MB free in the directory where you want to install the JDM software 128 MB DRAM

Installing JDM on Solaris from the CD


To install the JDM software to a Solaris environment from the CD: 1 2 3 4 Close all programs. Insert the software CD into your CD-ROM drive. Navigate to the Solaris/JDM subdirectory on the software CD. Run the dm_xxxx_solaris_sparc.sh file. Continue with Executing the JDM installation software on UNIX or Linux on page 163.

Installing JDM on HP-UX from the CD


To install the JDM software to a HP-UX environment from the CD, follow these steps with the exact syntax: 1 2 3 Close all programs. Insert the software CD into your CD-ROM drive. Navigate to the HP-UX/JDM subdirectory on the software CD.

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Run the jdm_xxxx_hpux_pa-risc.sh file. Continue with Executing the JDM installation software on UNIX or Linux on page 163.

Installing JDM on Linux from the CD


To install the Device Manager software to a Linux environment from the CD: 1 2 3 4 Close all programs. Insert the software CD into your CD-ROM drive. Navigate to the Linux/JDM subdirectory on the software CD. Run the jdm_xxxx_linux.sh file. Continue with Executing the JDM installation software on UNIX or Linux on page 163.

Installing JDM on UNIX or Linux from the web


To install the JDM software to a UNIX (Solaris or HP-UX) environment from the web: 1 Go to the following URL: http://www.nortel.com/support 2 Select the software support page for your product. The software page opens. 3 Click the Java Device Manager version you want. The Software Detail Information page opens. 4 Download the JDM software for your operating environment to a desired directory on your system. The software download is a self-extracting .sh file. Once the file transfer is complete, continue with step 5. 5 6 Close all programs. Navigate to the directory on your system where you loaded the JDM software.

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Make the installation file executable. For the Solaris environment, make the file executable by entering:
chmod a+x dm_xxxx_solaris_sparc.sh

For the HP-UX environment, make the file executable by entering:


chmod a+x jdm_xxxx_hpux_pa-risc.sh

For the Linux environment, make the file executable by entering:


chmod a+x jdm_xxxx_linux.sh

Run the installation file. For the Solaris environment, run the dm_xxxx_solaris_sparc.sh file. For the HP-UX environment, run the jdm_xxxx_hpux_pa-risc.sh file. For the Linux environment, run the jdm_xxxx_linux.sh file. Continue with Executing the JDM installation software on UNIX or Linux on page 163.

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Executing the JDM installation software on UNIX or Linux


An install screen opens, followed by a Nortel dialog box. When the InstallAnywhere Introduction dialog box appears (Figure 46), you are ready to begin the JDM installation.
Figure 46 InstallAnywhere Introduction dialog box

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Click Next to continue the installation process. The License Agreement dialog box opens (Figure 47).

Figure 47 License Agreement dialog box

Click I accept the terms of the License Agreement.

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Click Next. The Choose Install Set dialog box opens (Figure 48).

Figure 48 Choose Install Set dialog box

Do one of the following: Select Typical installation to install the common set features, as well as online help. Select Minimal installation to select minimal features to install (recommended for those with limited disk space). Select Help to install only the online help. Select Custom installation to customize the features prior to installation.

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Click Next. If you did not select Custom installation in step 4, then the Choose Install Folder dialog box opens. Continue with step 8 on page 167. If you selected Custom installation in step 4, then the Feature Sets dialog box opens (Figure 49).

Figure 49 Feature Sets dialog box

6 7

Select which features to install from the feature sets list. Click Next. The Choose Install Folder dialog box opens (Figure 50).

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Chapter 4 Getting Started with Device Manager 167 Figure 50 Choose Install Folder dialog box

Click Restore Default Folder to use the default location for JDM, or click Choose to select a storage path.

Note: If Device Manager is already installed on your computer, you must choose a storage path that does not conflict with the already existing version.

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Click Next. The Pre-Installation Summary dialog box opens (Figure 51).

Figure 51 Pre-Installation Summary dialog box

10 Verify the folder and disk space required to install the software. If necessary, click Previous to return to the appropriate dialog box and make changes.

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11 Click Install. The installation process begins (Figure 52).


Figure 52 Installing Java Device Manager dialog box

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When the installation is complete, the Install Complete dialog box opens (Figure 53).
Figure 53 Install Complete dialog box

12 Click Done to exit the installation. JDM is now installed on your machine.

Removing JDM in Unix or Linux environments


In a UNIX or Linux environment, complete the following steps to remove the existing JDM software: 1 2 3 Navigate to the directory where the JDM software is installed (for example /JDM). Open the UninstallerData sub-directory. Run the following file: Uninstall_Java_Device_Manager.

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Device Manager basics


This section describes basic procedures for using the Device Manager software. The section includes the following information: Starting Device Manager Setting the Device Manager properties on page 172 Opening a device on page 174 Device Manager window on page 177 Editing objects on page 186 Working with statistics and graphs on page 186 Telnet session on page 193 Opening an SSH connection to the device on page 194 Opening the Web-based management home page on page 194 Trap log on page 195 Online Help on page 196

Starting Device Manager


Do one of the following, depending upon your operating system environment:
In a Microsoft* Windows* environment, choose All Programs > Nortel > Java Device Manager > DM from the Windows Start menu. In a UNIX environment, verify that the Device Manager installation directory is in your search path; then enter:
./JDM

The initial Device Manager window opens (Figure 54).

Note: On startup, the Device Manager performs a DNS lookup for the machine on which it is running. If the DNS lookup is slow or fails, the initial Device Manager window may take up to 30 seconds to open.

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Setting the Device Manager properties


The Device Manager communicates with the Ethernet Switch 325/425 using Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). The software is shipped with default values set for important communication parameters, such as the polling interval, timeout, and retry count. You can set the parameters before you open a device to manage. To set the Device Manager properties: 1 Choose Device > Properties. The Properties dialog box opens (Figure 55).

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Chapter 4 Getting Started with Device Manager 173 Figure 55 Properties dialog box

2 3

Type information and select check boxes. Click OK.

Table 28 describes the Properties dialog box fields.


Table 28 Properties dialog box fields
Area Polling Field Status Interval (If Traps, Status Interval:) Hotswap Detect every: Enable Description Interval at which status information is gathered (default is 20 seconds). For a full stack, set this interval to 60 seconds. Interval at which statistics and status information are gathered when traps are enabled. The default is 60. The interval at which Device Manager detects the module information. The default is 1 interval. Enables (true) or disables (false) periodic polling of the device for updated status. If polling is disabled, the chassis status is updated only when you click Refresh on the Chassis tab.

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Area SNMP Field Retry Count Description Number of times Device Manager sends the same polling request if a response is not returned to Device Manager. You may want to set this field to three or four. Length of each retry of each polling waiting period. When you access the device through a slow link, you may want to increase the timeout interval and then change the Retransmission Strategy to superlinear. The trace field is used to enable and disable SNMP tracing. When Trace is selected, SNMP protocol data units (PDUs) are displayed in the Device > Log dialog box. When selected (enabled), automatically registers to received traps when Device Manager is launched against a device. This attribute does not apply to Ethernet Switch 325/425. When selected (enabled), Device Manager will listen for traps from the device. The specified number of traps that may exist in the trap log. The default is 500. Specifies the UDP port that Device Manager will listen to receive SNMP traps. When selected (enabled), Device Manager will listen to the syslog. A dialog box displays when checked, before deleting a row. Specifies the default read community. Specifies the default write community.

Timeout

Trace

Register for Traps

Listen for Traps Max Traps in Log Trap Port Listen for Syslogs Confirm row deletion Default Read Community Default Write Community

Opening a device
Opening a device displays the device view, a picture of the device. To open the device view, you must enter community strings that determine the access level granted to the device.

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Table 29 describes the default access community strings for the Device Manager software.
Table 29 SNMP community string default values
Access level Read-only Read/write Description public private

To display the device view: 1 Do one of the following: Choose Device > Open. Choose Device > Open Last, and select an IP address from the list. Click the folder icon in the Device Manager window.

Press Ctrl+O.

The Open Device dialog box opens (Figure 56).


Figure 56 Open Device dialog box

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Table 30 describes the Open Device dialog box fields.


Table 30 Open Device dialog box fields
Field Device Name Read Community Write Community v3 Enabled User Name Authentication Protocol Authentication Password Privacy Protocol Privacy Password Description Either an IP address or a DNS name for the device, entered by the user. SNMP read community string for the device. Default is public (displayed as ******). The entry is case-sensitive. SNMP write community string for the device. Default is

private (displayed as *******).The entry is case-sensitive.


When selected (enabled), Open Device dialog box will display SNMPv3 options. Indicates the name of the user. Identifies the authentication protocol used. Specifies the current authentication password. Identifies the privacy protocol. Specifies the current privacy password.

2 3

In the Device Name text box, type the DNS name or IP address of the device. In the Read Community and Write Community text boxes, type the appropriate community strings. Note: To gain read/write access to a device in Device Manager, you must enter the read/write community string for both the Read Community and Write Community strings.

Click Open. Device Manager automatically determines what version of software the selected device is running and displays the appropriate Device Manager dialog boxes. The Device Manager window opens, showing a picture of the device (Figure 57) that represents the physical features of the device.

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Device Manager window


The Device Manager window (Figure 58) has the following parts: Menu bar Toolbar Device view Status bar

Figure 58 Parts of the Device Manager window


Menu bar Toolbar

Device view

Status bar

Menu bar
Use the menu bar to set up and operate the Device Manager

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Table 31 describes the Menu Bar commands.


Table 31 Menu bar commands
Command Device Description Opens the Open Device dialog box. It also allows you to: Set the Properties used during a Device Manager session Refresh the status of the currently viewed device Rediscover device Telnet to a device Open an SSH connection to a device View SNMP traps that the Device Manager receives View Syslogs View SNMP trace logs Opens edit dialog boxes for selected objects in the device view. This command opens dialog boxes for managing files, running diagnostic tests and configuring data for selected objects. This command also lets you set security parameters, SNTP, and SNMP v3 related configurations. Opens statistics and graphing dialog boxes for the selected object. Opens dialog boxes for managing VLANs, Spanning Tree Groups (STGs), RSTP, MSTP, Multi-Link Trunks and Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP). Opens configuration dialog boxes for Quality of Service (QoS) and DSCP. Opens RMON configuration and monitoring dialog boxes. Provides quick access to the Web Management Software Home page. Opens online Help topics for Device Manager and provides a legend for the port colors in the device view.

Edit

Graph VLAN

QoS RMON Actions Help

Toolbar
The toolbar contains buttons that provide quick access to commonly used commands and some additional actions.

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Table 32 describes the toolbar buttons.


Table 32 Toolbar buttons
Button Name Open Device Refresh Device Status Telnet Description Opens the Open Device dialog box. Refreshes the device view information. Opens a Telnet session. Menu bar equivalent Device > Open Device > Refresh Status

Device > Telnet

SSH

Opens an SSH session.

Device > SSH Connection Device > Trap Log

Trap Log

Opens the trap log.

Help

Opens online Help in a Web browser. Displays configuration data for the selected chassis object. Opens statistics and graphing dialog boxes for the selected object. Opens the Web Management Software Home Page. Opens the Rmon Alarm Manager.

Help > Device

Edit Selected Graph Selected Home Page

Edit > Unit

Graph > Port Graph > Chassis Actions > Open Home Page Rmon > Alarm Manager

Alarm Manager

Device view
The device view allows you to determine at a glance the operating status of the various units and ports in your hardware configuration. You can also use the device view to perform management tasks on specific objects.

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Selecting objects
The types of objects contained in the device view are: A standalone switch (called a unit in the menus and dialog boxes) A switch stack (called a chassis in the menus and dialog boxes) A port (including the SFP GBIC port)

Figure 59 shows the objects in the device view.


Figure 59 Objects in the device view
Port object

Unit or Chassis
object

SFP GBIC Port object

Selecting a single object


To select a single object:

Click the edge of the object.


The object is outlined in yellow, indicating that it is selected. Subsequent activities in Device Manager refer to the selected object.

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Selecting multiple objects


For instructions on selecting multiple objects of the same type (such as ports or switches of the same type), see Table 33:

Table 33 Selecting multiple objects


Object to be selected To select a block of contiguous ports To select multiple ports or switches in a stack To select all ports in a standalone switch or in a stack To select all the units (all switches in a stack) To select an entire stack Action Drag to select the group of ports

Press Ctrl+left-click on the objects


Choose Edit > Select > Ports Choose Edit > Select > Units Choose Edit > Select > Chassis

Viewing information about a GBIC port


To view information about a GBIC port: 1 2 Select the GBIC. Choose Edit > Port.

The Port dialog box opens with the Interface tab displayed (Figure 60). The Interface tab describes the GBIC installed in the switch. (The Edit > Unit dialog box describes the MDA installed in the switch.)

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LEDs and ports


The color of LEDs in the device view is the same as the colors of the LEDs on the physical switch. However, the device view does not show blinking activity of the LEDs. For a full description of the LEDs for the Ethernet Switch 325/425, refer to About Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 on page 39. The ports on the device view are color coded to show port status.

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Table 34 describes the status assigned to each color.


Table 34 Port color codes
Color Green Red Orange Description Port is operating. Port has been manually disabled. Port has no link.

In addition, the Help menu provides a legend that identifies the port colors and their meanings (Figure 61).
Figure 61 Color port legend

Shortcut menus
Each object in the device view has a shortcut menu that opens when you right-click a selected object. The switch unit shortcut menu (Figure 62) provides access to basic hardware information about the switch and to the graphing dialog boxes for the switch.
Figure 62 Switch unit shortcut menu

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Table 35 describes the Switch unit shortcut menu command on the switch unit shortcut menu.
Table 35 Switch unit shortcut menu command
Command Edit Description Opens a dialog box that provides basic hardware information about the switch and allows you to set the Rate Limiting configuration for the switch unit. Indicates that the tooltip function is active. When unchecked, the tooltip function is disabled. A Tooltip is a descriptive text box that appears when the mouse pointer is held over a tool, button or other object. Refreshes the tooltip information.

Show Port Tooltip

Refresh Port Tooltip

The port shortcut menu (Figure 63) provides a faster path for editing and graphing a single port; however, you can access the same options using the menu bar or the toolbar.
Figure 63 Port shortcut menu

Table 36 describes the commands on the port shortcut menu.


Table 36 Port shortcut menu commands
Command Edit Graph Enable Disable Description Opens a dialog box that allows you to set operating parameters for the port. Opens a dialog box that displays statistics for the port and allows you to display the statistics as a graph. Administratively brings a port up. Administratively shuts down a port. The color of the port changes to red in the device view.

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Status bar
The status bar displays error and informational messages from the software application. These messages are not related to the device being managed.

Using the buttons in Device Manager dialog boxes


Table 37 describes buttons in Device Manager dialog boxes.
Table 37 Device Manager buttons
Button Name Insert Copy Description Opens a dialog box to create a new entry for a table; then from the dialog box, inserts the new entry in the table. Copies selected cells from a table.

Paste

Pastes copied values to a currently selected table cell.

Reset Changes Print Table or Print Graph Stop/Refresh

Causes changed (but not applied) fields to revert to their previous values. Prints the table or graph that is displayed.

Stops the current action (compiling, saving, and so forth). If you are updating or compiling a large data table, the Refresh button changes to a Stop button while this action is taking place. Clicking the Stop button interrupts the polling process. Exports information to a file you specify. You can then import this file into a text editor or spreadsheet for further analysis.

Export Data

Note: Not all buttons appear in all the dialog boxes.

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Editing objects
You can edit objects and values in the Device Manager device view in the following ways: Select an object on the toolbar, click the Edit Selected button.

The Edit dialog box opens for that object. From a switch or port shortcut menu, choose Edit. The Edit dialog box opens for that object.

When you change the value in a box, the changed value is displayed in bold. However, changes are not applied to the running configuration until you click Apply. Note: Many dialog boxes contain a Refresh button. After you apply changes to fields, click Refresh to display the new information in the dialog box.

Working with statistics and graphs


Device Manager tracks a wide range of statistics for the stack (chassis), and each port. You can view and graph statistics for a single object or multiple objects. For information about the statistics tracked for the switch and ports, refer to Statistics for single and multiple objects on page 190 and to the System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A). This section describes the types of statistics and graphs available, the graph dialog boxes, and the procedure for creating a graph.

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Types of statistics
The data tables in the statistics dialog boxes list the counters, or categories of statistics being gathered, for the specified object. For example, the categories for ports include Interface, Ethernet Errors, Bridge, and Rmon. Each category can be associated with six types of statistics. Table 38 describes the types of statistics that are available.
Table 38 Types of statistics
Statistic AbsoluteValue Cumulative Description The total count since the last time counters were reset. A system reboot resets all counters. The total count since the statistics window was first opened. The elapsed time for the cumulative counter is displayed at the bottom of the graph window. The cumulative count divided by the cumulative elapsed time. The minimum average for the counter for a given polling interval over the cumulative elapsed time. The maximum average for the counter for a given polling interval over the cumulative elapsed time. The average for the counter over the last polling interval.

Average Minimum Maximum LastValue

Types of graphs
With Device Manager, you can create line, area, bar, and pie graphs. Figure 64, Figure 65, Figure 66, and Figure 67 provide examples of different types of graphs.

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Figure 65 Area graph

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Figure 67 Pie graph

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Statistics for single and multiple objects


Statistics for a selected object or objects are displayed in the statistics dialog box. The dialog box for a single object shows all six types of statistics for each counter (Figure 68).
Figure 68 Interface statistics for a single port

The statistics dialog box for multiple objects shows a single type of statistics (Table 38 on page 187) for the selected objects. For example, Figure 69 shows LastValue statistics for the selected ports.
Figure 69 Interface statistics for multiple ports

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To change the type of statistics displayed, select a different type from the show list at the bottom of the dialog box. The statistics are updated based on the poll interval shown at the bottom of the dialog box. You can select a different polling interval. Buttons for bar, pie, and line graphs are located at the bottom of a statistics dialog box. See the next section, Viewing statistics as graphs, for instructions to use these buttons. You can export the statistics to a tab-separated file format and import the file into other applications. To export the information, use the Export Data button below the table.

Viewing statistics as graphs


To create a graph for an object: 1 Select the object or objects to be graphed. See Selecting objects on page 180. 2 Do one of the following: On the toolbar, click Graph Selected.

From the shortcut menu for the object, choose Graph. From the main menu, choose Graph > Chassis or Graph > Port.

A statistics dialog box opens with tabs for different categories of statistics for the selected object (Figure 70).

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3 4 5

Select a tab for the group of statistics you want to view. On the displayed data table, click and drag to select the cells you want to graph. (They must be in the same row or column.) Click one of the graph buttons at the bottom of the dialog box See Types of graphs on page 187. A graph dialog box opens for the selected graph type.

To print a copy of the graph, click Print.

Buttons at the top of the graph dialog boxes for line, area, and bar graphs allow you to change the orientation of the graph, change the scale, or change the graph type.

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Table 39 describes the buttons in the graph dialog boxes.


Table 39 Graph dialog box buttons
Button Name Stacked Description Stacks data quantities instead of displaying them side-by-side. Rotates the graph 90 degrees.

Horizontal

Log Scale

Changes the scale of the x-axis (of an unrotated graph) from numeric to logarithmic. Converts an area graph or bar graph to a line graph.

Line Chart

Area Chart

Converts a line graph or bar graph to an area graph.

Bar Chart

Converts a line graph or area graph to a bar graph.

Pie Chart

Converts a line graph or area graph to a pie chart.

Telnet session
From Device Manager, you can initiate a Telnet session to the console interface for the switch or stack you are currently accessing. To Telnet to a switch:

Do one of the following:


From the Device Manager main menu, choose Device> Telnet. On the toolbar, click the Telnet button.

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A Telnet window to the switch opens.

Opening an SSH connection to the device


From Device Manager, you can initiate a Secure Shell (SSH) connection to the Console Interface for the switch or stack you are currently accessing. To open an SSH connection to a device:

Do one of the following:


From the Device Manager main menu, choose Device > SSH Connection. On the toolbar, click the SSH button.

An SSH window to the device opens.

Note: The SSH connection is established only when the device is SSH capable and enabled. For more information on SSH connections, refer to Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A).

Opening the Web-based management home page


From the Device Manager, you can access the Web-based management home page. To open the Web-based management home page:

Do one of the following:

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From the Device Manager main menu, choose Actions > Open Home Page. On the toolbar, click the Open Home Page button.

The Web-based management home page opens (Figure 71).


Figure 71 Web-based management home page

Trap log
You can configure an Ethernet Switch 325/425 to send SNMP generic traps. When the Device Manager is running, any traps received are recorded in the trap log. You set the maximum number of entries in the trap log using the Properties dialog box (Figure 55 on page 173). The default number of trap log entries is 500. To view the trap log:

Do one of the following:


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On the toolbar, click the Trap Log button.

From the Device Manager Main Menu, choose Device > Trap Log. Note: When you operate Device Manager from a UNIX platform, you must be logged in as root in order to receive traps.

Device Manager receives traps on port 162. If this port is being used by another application, you will not be able to view the trap log until the other application is disabled and Device Manager is restarted. By default, traps are sent in SNMP V2c format. However, if you are using an older network management system (NMS), one that supports only SNMP V1 traps (HP OpenView), you can specify the traps to be sent in V1 format. For more information about traps and trap receivers, refer to Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A).

Online Help
Online Help in Device Manager is context-sensitive. You use a Web browser to display online Help. The Web browser should launch automatically when you click the Help button. If the Help topic you are accessing is not displayed in your browser, exit the existing browser session and click the Help button again. If the Web browser does not launch, the default locations of the Help files are the directories listed below.

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Table 40 describes the Help file locations.


Table 40 Help file locations
Platform Default path

Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT, <JDM Installation directory>/help/ Windows 2000, Windows XP hummingbird/v360.zip. After you unzip the file, <JDM Installation directory>/help/ hummingbird/v360/help.html. help.html is the home page for the online help. UNIX <JDM Installation directory>/help/ hummingbird/v360.zip. After you unzip the file, <JDM Installation directory>/help/ hummingbird/v360/help.html. help.html is the home page for the online help.

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Chapter 5 Using the Web-based management interface


This chapter describes the requirements for using the Web-based management interface and how to use it as a tool to configure your Ethernet Switch 325/425.

Requirements
To use the Web-based management interface, you need the following items: A computer connected to a network port that is a member of the management VLAN One of the following Web browsers installed on the computer: Microsoft* Internet Explorer, version 4.0 or later on Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows NT*, or Windows XP* Netscape Navigator*, version 4.51 or later on Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000, Windows NT, Windows XP, and UNIX* IP address of the Ethernet Switch 325/425 Note: The Web pages of the Web-based management interface may load at different speeds depending on the Web browser you use.

Note: In order to use the Ethernet Switch 325/425 Web-based management functionality, such as downloading software, you must connect your TFTP server to an Ethernet Switch 325/425. For instructions to set the IP address of the switch, refer to IP Configuration/ Setup screen on page 214.

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Access to the Web management interface must also be enabled for the switch (the default setting) using the Console Interface. For information about enabling Web access, refer to TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen on page 234.

Logging in to the Web-based management interface


Before you log in to the Web-based management interface, use the console interface to verify the VLAN port assignments and to ensure that your switch CPU and computer are assigned to the same VLAN. If the devices are not connected to the same VLAN, the IP address will not display the home page. To log in to the Web-based management interface: 1 2 Start your Web browser. In the address bar, type the IP address for your host switch, for example, http://192.168.151.175, and press Enter. The home page opens (Figure 72).
Figure 72 Web-based management interface home page

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Network security does not exist the first time you access the Embedded Web Server. The system administrator must create access parameters and passwords to protect the integrity of your network configuration(s). For more information, refer to Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A).

Menu
The menu (Figure 73) is the same for all pages. It contains a list of seven main headings.
Figure 73 Menu

To navigate the Web-based management interface menu, click a menu title and then click one of its options. When you click an option, the corresponding page opens. The first six headings provide options for viewing and configuring switch parameters. The Support heading provides options to open the online Help file and the Nortel Web site.
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Table 41 lists the main headings in the Web-based management user interface and their associated options.
Table 41 Main headings and options
Main menu titles Summary Option Stack Information (stack mode only) Switch Information Identify Unit Numbers (stack mode only) Stack Numbering (stack mode only) IP System SNMPv1 SNMPv3 SNMP Trap MAC Address Table Find MAC Address Port Management High Speed Flow Control Software Download ASCII Config Download Configuration File Console/Comm Port RMON Threshold RMON Event Log System Log Port Interface Ethernet Errors Transparent Bridging RMON Ethernet RMON History Port Mirroring Rate Limiting MAC Address Security VLAN Spanning Tree Multilink Trunk LACP QoS

Configuration

Fault

Statistics

Application

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Main menu titles Administration Option System Information Quick Start Security Logout Reset Reset to Defaults Help Release Notes Manuals Upgrade

203

Support

Tools are provided in the menu to assist you in navigating the Web-based management interface. Caution: Web browser capabilities such as page bookmarking, refresh, and page forward and page back, function as they would in any other Web site. However, these capabilities do not enhance the functionality of the Web-based management interface. Nortel recommends that you use only the navigation tools provided in the management interface. Table 42 describes the icons that appear on the menu.
Table 42 Menu icons
Button or icon Description This icon identifies a menu title. Click on this icon to display its options. This icon identifies a menu title option. Click on this icon to display the corresponding page. This icon identifies a menu title option with a hyperlink to related pages. This icon is linked to an action, for example, logout, reset, or reset to system defaults. Clicking on the Nortel logo opens the corporate home page in a new Web browser.

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Management page
When you click a menu option, the corresponding management page opens. Figure 74 shows the page displayed for the Administration > Security > Console option.
Figure 74 Console page

Note: The Console Stack Password Setting section is active only when the switch is in the stack mode. A page is composed of one or more of the following elements: Tables and input forms The gray cells in a page are display only, and white cells are input fields. Check boxes You enable or disable a selection by clicking a check box. When a check mark is displayed in the box, that selection is enabled. You disable a selection by clicking the checked box.

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Icons and buttons Icons and buttons perform an action concerning the displayed page or the switch. Some pages include a button that opens another page or updates the values shown on the current page. Some pages include icons that initiate an action, such as reformatting the current displayed data as a bar or pie chart.

Table 43 describes the icons that you use to modify information in a statistical table.
Table 43 Page icons
Icon Name Modify View Delete Help Description Accesses a modification page for the selected row. Accesses a view only statistics page for the selected row. Deletes a row. Accesses the Help menu in a new Web browser.

Note: Text within a table that is underlined and highlighted in blue and is a hyperlink to a related management page.

Viewing summary information


This section contains information on the following topics: Viewing summary switch information Viewing stack information on page 207 Changing stack numbering on page 209 Identifying unit numbers on page 211

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Viewing summary switch information


You can view summary information about the switch. For example, the unit number and its corresponding physical description and serial number. To view summary switch information:

From the main menu, choose Summary > Switch Information.


The Switch Information page opens (Figure 75).
Figure 75 Switch Information page

Table 44 describes the fields on the Switch Information page.


Table 44 Switch Information page fields
Item Module Description GBIC Description Firmware Version Software Version Description The factory set description of the policy switch. The factory set description of the sub-component/GBIC. The firmware version of the policy switch. The version of the running software.

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Item Manufacturing Data Code Hardware Version Serial Number Operational State Description The date of manufacture of the board in ASCII format. The hardware version of the policy switch. The serial number of the policy switch.

207

The current operational state of the device. The operational states are: Other, Not Available, Removed, Disabled, Normal, Reset in Progress, Testing, Warning, Non Fatal Errors, Fatal Error, and Not Configured. The mac address of the switch. The IP address of the switch. The power status of the switch. The fan status of the switch.

Mac Address IP Address Power Status Fans Status

Viewing stack information


You can view a summary of your stack framework, for example, the current version of the running software and the IP address of the Web-based management interface. Note: The Web-based management user interface automatically detects the operational mode of your system. If the system is in standalone mode, the Stack Information page is not an option listed in the menu. To view stack information: 1 From the main menu, choose Summary > Stack Information. The Stack Information page opens (Figure 76).

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Chapter 5 Using the Web-based management interface Figure 76 Stack Information page

Table 45 describes the fields on the Stack Information and Stack Inventory sections of the Stack Information page.
Table 45 Stack Information page fields
Section Stack Information Field System Description Software Version MAC Address IP Address Manufacturing Date Code Serial Number Operational State Description The name created in the configuration process to identify the stack. The version of the running software. The MAC address of the stack. The IP address of the stack. The date of manufacture of the board in ASCII format: YYYYMMDD. The serial number of the base unit. The current operational state of the device. The operational states are: Other, Not Available, Removed, Disabled, Normal, Reset in Progress, Testing, Warning, Non Fatal Errors, Fatal Error, and Not Configured

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Chapter 5 Using the Web-based management interface Table 45 Stack Information page fields (continued)
Section Stack Inventory Field Unit Description The unit number assigned to the device by the network manager. For more information on stack numbering, see page 209. The description of the device or its subcomponent.

209

Description Operational State

The current operational state of the stack. The operational states are: Other, Not Available, Removed, Disabled, Normal, Reset in Progress, Testing, Warning, Non Fatal Errors, Fatal Error, and Not Configured.

In the lower-left corner of the Stack Information page, click the number of the device you want to view. The Stack Information page is updated with information about the selected switch.

Changing stack numbering


If your system is set to stack operational mode, you can view existing stack numbering information and renumber the devices in your stack framework. To view or renumber devices within the stack framework: Note: The unit number does not affect the base unit designation.

From the main menu, choose Summary > Stack Numbering. The Stack Numbering page opens (Figure 77).

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Chapter 5 Using the Web-based management interface Figure 77 Stack Numbering Setting page

Table 46 describes the fields on the Stack Numbering Setting page.


Table 46 Stack Numbering Setting page fields
Item Range Description Unit number previously assigned to the policy switch. The entries in this column are displayed in the order of their current physical cabling with respect to the base unit, and can show nonconsecutive unit numbering if one or more units were previously moved or modified. The entries can also include unit numbers of units that are no longer participating in the stack (not currently active).

Current Unit Number 1..8

MAC Address New Unit Number

XX.XX.XX.XX.XX.XX MAC address of the corresponding unit listed in the Current Unit Number field. 1..8 Choose a new number from the list to assign to your selected policy switch.

Click Submit. A message opens prompting you to confirm your request.

Do one of the following: Click OK to renumber the stack. Click Cancel to return to the Stack Numbering page without making changes.

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Identifying unit numbers


You can identify unit numbers of the switches participating in a stack configuration by viewing the active LEDs on the front panel of each switch. To identify unit numbers in your configuration: 1 From the main menu, choose Summary > Identify Unit Numbers. The Identify Unit Numbers page opens (Figure 78).
Figure 78 Identify Unit Numbers page

To continue viewing summary information or to start the configuration process, choose another option from the main menu.

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Chapter 6 System configuration using the Console Interface


This chapter describes how to configure and manage the Ethernet Switch 325/425 using the menu-driven Console Interface (CI). This chapter covers the following topics: IP Configuration/Setup screen SNMP Configuration screen System Characteristics screen on page 221 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen on page 223 Logging in on page 231 Renumber Stack Units screen on page 232 Hardware Unit Information screen on page 233 TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen on page 234 Software Download screen on page 237 Configuration File Download/Upload screen on page 240 ASCII Configuration file Download on page 244 Using SNTP Using DNS to ping and Telnet

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IP Configuration/Setup screen
The IP Configuration/Setup screen (Figure 79) allows you to set or modify the Ethernet Switch 325/425 IP configuration parameters. Data that you enter in the user-configurable fields takes effect as soon as you press Enter. To open the IP Configuration/Setup screen:

Choose IP Configuration/Setup (or press i) from the main menu.


Figure 79 IP Configuration/Setup screen
IP Configuration/Setup

BootP Request Mode:

[ BootP When Needed ]

Configurable In Use Last BootP ------------------- --------------- ------------In-Band Stack IP Address: [ 0.0.0.0 ] 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 In-Band Switch IP Address: [ 134.177.224.102 ] 134.177.224.102 0.0.0.0 In-Band Subnet Mask: [ 255.255.255.0 ] 255.255.255.0 0.0.0.0 Default Gateway: IP Address to Ping: Start Ping: [ 134.177.224.1 ] [ 10.30.40.1 ] [ No ] 134.177.224.1 0.0.0.0

Use space bar to display choices, press <Return> or <Enter> to select choice. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Table 47 describes the IP Configuration/Setup screen fields. Note: The read-only fields in this screen are updated based on the BootP mode specified in the BootP Request Mode field. (See Choosing a BootP request mode on page 216 for more information.)

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Field BootP Request Mode Description

215

One of four modes of operation for BootP. (See Choosing a BootP request mode on page 216 for details about the four modes.) Default Value Range BootP When Needed BootP Disabled, BootP When Needed, BootP Always, BootP or Last Address

Configurable In Use Last BootP

Column header for the user-configurable IP configuration fields in this screen. Column header for the read-only fields in this screen. The read-only data displayed in this column represents IP configuration that is currently in use. Column header for the read-only fields in this screen. The read-only data displayed in this column represents IP configuration obtained from the last BootP reply received.

In-Band Stack IP The in-band stack IP address field. This field is not required for the operation of the Address standalone switch. Default Value Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, between 0 and 255, separated by a decimal point

In-Band Switch IP Address

The in-band IP address of the switch. This field is not required for the operation of the stack. This field can not use the same IP address used for the stack. Default Value Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, between 0 and 255, separated by a decimal point

Note: When the IP address is entered in the In-Band IP Address field, and the In-Band Subnet Mask field value is not present, the software provides an in-use default value for the In-Band Subnet Mask field that is based on the class of the IP address entered in the In-Band IP Address field.

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Table 47 IP Configuration/Setup screen fields (continued)


Field In-Band Subnet Mask Description The subnet address mask associated with the in-band IP address shown on the screen (see In-Band Switch IP address field). Network routers use the subnet mask to determine the network or subnet address portion of a hosts IP address. The bits in the IP address that contain the network address (including the subnet) are set to 1 in the address mask, and the bits that contain the host identifier are set to 0. Default Value Range 0.0.0.0 (no subnet mask assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, between 0 and 255, separated by a decimal point

Default Gateway

The IP address of the default gateway. Default Value Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, between 0 and 255, separated by a decimal point

IP Address to Ping

The IP address of the network device you want to ping. This field is not required for the operation of the stack. Default Value Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, between 0 and 255, separated by a decimal point

Start Ping

Pings the selected network device when you choose Yes. Default Value Range No No, Yes

Choosing a BootP request mode


The BootP Request Mode field in the IP Configuration screen allows you to choose which method the switch uses to broadcast BootP requests: BootP When Needed BootP Always BootP Disabled

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BootP or Last Address Note: Whenever the switch is broadcasting BootP requests, the BootP process eventually times out if a reply is not received. When the process times out, the BootP request mode automatically changes to BootP Disabled mode. To restart the BootP process, change the BootP request mode to any of the three following modes: BootP When Needed BootP Always BootP or Last Address.

BootP When Needed


Allows the switch to request an IP address if one has not already been set from the console terminal. The Ethernet Switch 325/425 operates in the BootP When Needed mode as described in the steps below: When the IP data is entered from the console terminal, the data becomes the in-use address of the switch and BootP requests are not broadcast. The switch can be managed using this in-band IP address. When the in-band IP address is not set from the console terminal, the switch broadcasts BootP requests until it receives a BootP reply containing an IP address. If the switch does not receive a BootP reply that contains an IP address, the switch cannot be managed in-band.

If an IP address is not currently in use, these actions take effect immediately. If an IP address is currently in use, these actions take effect only after the switch is reset or power cycled.

BootP Always
This option allows you to manage the switch that has been configured with the IP address obtained from the BootP server. The Ethernet Switch 325/425 operates in the BootP Always mode as described in the steps below: The switch continues to broadcast BootP requests, regardless of whether an in-band IP address is set from the console terminal. If the switch receives a BootP reply that contains an in-band IP address, the switch uses this new in-band IP address.
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If the switch does not receive a BootP reply, the switch cannot be managed using the in-band IP address set from the console terminal.

If an IP address is not currently in use, these actions take effect immediately. If an IP address is currently in use, these actions take effect only after the switch is reset or power cycled.

BootP Disabled
This option allows you to manage the switch by using the IP address set from the console terminal. The Ethernet Switch 325/425 operates in the BootP Disabled mode as described in the steps below: The switch does not broadcast BootP requests, regardless of whether an IP address is set from the console terminal. The switch can be managed only by using the in-band switch IP address set from the console terminal.

BootP or Last Address


This option allows you to manage the switch even if a BootP server is not reachable. The Ethernet Switch 325/425 operates in the BootP or Last Address mode as described in the steps below: When you specify the IP data from the console terminal, the IP address becomes the in-band address of the switch. BootP requests are not broadcast. You can manage the switch using this in-band IP address. When you do not specify the in-band IP address from the console terminal, the switch broadcasts BootP requests until it receives a BootP reply containing an in-band IP address. If the switch does not receive a BootP reply that contains an in-band IP address within 10 minutes, the switch uses the last in-band IP address it received from a BootP server. This IP information is displayed in the Last BootP column.

If the IP address specified as the in-band IP address is not currently in use, these actions take effect immediately. If an IP address is currently in use, these actions take effect only after the switch is reset or power cycled.

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SNMP Configuration screen


The SNMP Configuration screen (Figure 80) allows you to set or modify the SNMP configuration parameters. To open the SNMP Configuration screen:

Choose SNMP Configuration (or press m) from the main menu.


Figure 80 SNMP Configuration screen
SNMP Configuration

Read-Only Community String: Read-Write Community String: Trap #1 IP Address: Community String: Trap #2 IP Address: Community String: Trap #3 IP Address: Community String: Trap #4 IP Address: Community String: Authentication Trap: AutoTopology:

[ public ] [ private ] [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ 0.0.0.0 ] 0.0.0.0 ] 0.0.0.0 ] 0.0.0.0 ] ] ] ] ]

[ Enabled [ Enabled

] ]

Enter text, press <Return> or <Enter> when complete. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

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Table 48 describes the SNMP Configuration screen fields.


Table 48 SNMP Configuration screen fields
Field Read-Only Community String Description The community string used for in-band read-only SNMP operations. Default Value Range Read-Write Community String public Any ASCII string of up to 32 printable characters

The community string used for in-band read-write SNMP operations. Default value Range private Any ASCII string of up to 32 printable characters

Trap #1 IP Address1

Number one of four trap IP addresses. Successive Trap IP address fields are numbered 2, 3, and 4. Each trap address has an associated community string (see Community String). Default value Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point

Community String

The community string associated with one of the four trap IP addresses (see Trap #1 IP Address). Default value Range Zero-length string Any ASCII string of up to 32 printable characters

Authentication Trap

Determines whether a trap is sent when there is an SNMP authentication failure. Default value Range Enabled Enabled, Disabled

Autotopology

Allows you to enable or disable the switch participation in autotopology, which allows network topology mapping of other switches in your network. Default value Range Enabled Disabled

1 The Trap IP Address and Community String fields can be set using a MIB table (in a Nortel proprietary MIB). The status of the row in the MIB table can be set to Ignore. If the row status is set to Ignore, the fields appear to be set when viewed from the console terminal; however, no traps are sent to that address until the row status is set to Valid.

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System Characteristics screen


The System Characteristics screen (Figure 81) allows you to view system characteristics and contains three user-configurable fields: sysContact, sysName, and sysLocation. To open the System Characteristics screen:

Choose System Characteristics (or press s) from the main menu.


Figure 81 System Characteristics screen
System Characteristics

Operation Mode:

Switch

MAC Address: Reset Count: Last Reset Type: Power Status: Local GBIC Type: sysDescr: sysObjectID: sysUpTime: sysServices: sysContact: sysName: sysLocation:

00-0F-CD-BF-1E-80 9 Management Reset Primary Power port 49, None port 50, None Ethernet Switch 425-48T HW:00 FW:3.5.0.2 SW:v3.6.0 1.3.6.1.4.1.45.3.57.1 7 days, 17:49:05 sysNtpTime: SNTP not synchronized. 3 [ ] [ Ethernet 428-48T ] [ ]

Enter text, press <Return> or <Enter> when complete. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

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Table 49 describes the System Characteristics screen fields


Table 49 System Characteristics screen fields
Field Operation Mode Description Read-only field that indicates the operation mode of the unit, for example: When the unit is part of a stack configuration, the (read-only) field indicates the unit is operational in a stack, and lists the current unit number of this switch. In this example (see Figure 81 on page 221), the current unit number is Unit 2. When the unit is not part of a stack configuration (operating standalone), the read-only field indicates the unit is operating as a switch. When in this operation mode, the Size of Stack and Base Unit fields (see following description) do not appear. This read-only field only appears when the switch is participating in a stack configuration. This field indicates the number of units configured in the stack configuration (1 to 8 units maximum). This read-only field only appears when the switch is participating in a stack configuration. This field indicates the unit number of the switch that is currently operating as the base unit. The MAC address of the switch or, when the switch is participating in a stack configuration, the MAC address of the stack configuration. A read-only field that indicates the number of resets since the operational firmware was first loaded on the switch. Default Value Range Last Reset Type 1 0 to 232 -1 (4,294,967,295)

Size of Stack

Base Unit

MAC Address Reset Count

A read-only field that indicates the last type of reset. Default Value Range Power Cycle Power Cycle, Software Download, Management Reset, Management Factory Reset

Power Status

A read-only field that indicates the current power source (primary, RPSU, or both). Default Value Range Primary Power Primary Power, Redundant Power, Primary and Redundant Power

Local GBIC Type sysDescr sysObjectID sysUpTime

A read-only field that indicates the GBIC type that is configured in this unit. (This field is applicable only to the Ethernet Switch 425). A read-only field that specifies hardware and software versions. A read-only field that provides a unique identification of the switch, which contains the vendors private enterprise number. A read-only field that shows the length of time since the last reset. Note that this field is updated when the screen is redisplayed.

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Field sysServices sysContact Description

223

A read-only field that indicates the switchs physical and data link layer functionality. The name and phone number of the person responsible for the switch. Default Value Range Zero-length string Any ASCII string of up to 56 printable characters1

sysName

A name that uniquely identifies the switch. Default Value Range Zero-length string Any ASCII string of up to 56 printable characters1

sysLocation

The physical location of the switch. Default Value Range Zero-length string Any ASCII string of up to 56 printable characters

1 Although this field can be set to up to 255 characters from a Network Management Station (NMS), only 56 characters are displayed on the console terminal.

Console/Comm Port Configuration screen


The Console/Comm Port Configuration screen (Figure 82) allows you to configure and modify the console/comm port parameters and security features of a standalone switch or any participating switch in a stack configuration. To open the Console/Comm Port Configuration screen:

Choose Console/Comm Port Configuration (or press o) from the main


menu.

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Figure 82 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen


Console/Comm Port Configuration Comm Port Data Bits: Comm Port Parity: Comm Port Stop Bits: Console Port Speed: Console Switch Password Type: Console Stack Password Type: Telnet/WEB Switch Password Type: Telnet/WEB Stack Password Type: Console Console Console Console Read-Only Switch Password: Read-Write Switch Password: Read-Only Stack Password: Read-Write Stack Password: 8 Data Bits No Parity 1 Stop Bit [ 9600 Baud [ [ [ [ [ [ [ [ None None None None user ] secure ] user ] secure ]

] ] ] ] ]

Primary RADIUS Server: Secondary RADIUS Server: UDP RADIUS Port: RADIUS Shared Secret:

[ 0.0.0.0 ] [ 0.0.0.0 ] [ 1645 ] [ ]

Use space bar to display choices, press <Return> or <Enter> to select choice. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Note: Release 3.6 software supports a security enhancement that provides usernames in addition to passwords for switch access. If you set a password in the Console/Comm Port Configuration screen, the next time you log in to the switch, you are prompted to enter a valid username (see Figure 83 on page 231). Therefore, ensure you are aware of the valid usernames (default RW and RO) before you change passwords. For information about modifying existing usernames, see Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A).

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Table 50 describes the Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields.


Table 50 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields
Field Comm Port Data Bits Comm Port Parity Comm Port Stop Bits Console Port Speed Description A read-only field that indicates the current console/comm port data bit setting. A read-only field that indicates the current console/comm port parity setting. A read-only field that indicates the current console/comm port stop bit setting. Allows you to set the console/comm port baud rate to match the baud rate of the console terminal. Default Value: Range: 9600 Baud 2400 Baud, 4800 Baud, 9600 Baud, 19200 Baud, 38400 Baud

Caution: If you choose a baud rate that does not match your console terminal baud rate, you can lose communication with the configuration interface when you press Enter. If communication is lost, set your console terminal to match the new service port setting. Achtung: Bei Auswahl einer Baud rate, die nicht mit der Baudrate des Konsolenterminals bereinstimmt, geht die Kommunikation mit der Konsolenschnittstelle verloren, wenn Sie die Eingabetaste drcken. Stellen Sie in diesem Fall das Konsolenterminal so ein, da es mit der neuen Einstellung der Service-Schnittstelle bereinstimmt. Attention: Si vous slectionnez un dbit diffrent de celui de votre terminal, vous perdrez le contact avec l'interface de votre console ds que vous appuierez sur [Entre]. Pour restaurer la communication, alignez le dbit de votre terminal sur le nouveau dbit de votre port de service. Precaucin: Si selecciona una velocidad de transmisin que no coincide con la velocidad de transmisin del terminal de la consola, perder la comunicacin con el interfaz de la consola al pulsar [Intro]. Si se pierde la comunicacin, ajuste el terminal de la consola para que coincida con el nuevo valor del puerto de servicio. Attenzione: Nel caso in cui si scelga una velocit di trasmissione non corrispondente a quella del terminale della console, la comunicazione con l'interfaccia della console cadr premendo il tasto [Invio]. Se la comunicazione cade, impostare il terminale della console in modo tale che corrisponda alla nuova impostazione della porta di servizio.
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Table 50 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields (continued)


Field Description

Console Switch Password Type

Enables password protection for accessing the console interface (CI) of a standalone switch through a console terminal. If you set this field to Local Password, you can use the Logout option to restrict access to the CI. Thereafter, you must specify the correct password at the console-terminal prompt. See Console Read-Only Switch Password and Console Read-Write Switch Password for more information. Default Value Range None None, Local Password, RADIUS Authentication

Console Stack Password Type

Enables password protection for accessing the console interface (CI) of any participating switch in a stack configuration through a console terminal. If you set this field to Required, you can use the Logout option to restrict access to the CI of any stack unit. Thereafter, you must specify the correct password at the console-terminal prompt when accessing the stack. See Console Read-Only Stack Password and Console Read-Write Stack Password for more information. Default Value Range None None, Local Password, RADIUS Authentication

TELNET/WEB Switch Password Type

Enables password protection for accessing the console interface (CI) of a standalone switch through a Telnet/WEB session. If you set this field to Required, you can use the Logout option to restrict access to the CI. Thereafter, you must specify the correct password at the console-terminal prompt. See Console Read-Only Switch Password and Console Read-Write Switch Password descriptions for more information. Default Value Range None None, Local Password, RADIUS Authentication

TELNET/WEB Stack Password Type

Enables password protection for accessing the console interface (CI) of any participating switch in a stack configuration, through a Telnet/WEB session. If you set this field to Required, you can use the Logout option to restrict access to the CI of any stack unit. Thereafter, you must specify the correct password at the console-terminal prompt when accessing the stack. See Console Read-Only Stack Password and Console Read-Write Stack Password for more information. Default Value Range None None, Local Password, RADIUS Authentication

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Field Console Read-Only Switch Password Description

227

When the Console Switch Password field is set to Required (for Telnet, for Console, or for Both), this field allows read-only password access to the CI of a standalone switch. Users can access the CI using the correct password (see default), but cannot change parameters or use the Reset option or Reset to Default option. Default Value Range user An ASCII string of up to 15 printable characters

Console Read-Write Switch Password

When the Console Switch Password field is set to Required (for Telnet, for Console, or for Both), this field allows read-write password access to the CI of a standalone switch. Users can log in to the CI using the correct password (see default) and can change any parameter, except the stack passwords. You can change the default passwords for read-only access and read-write access to a private password. Default Value: Range: secure Any ASCII string of up to 15 printable characters Caution: If you change the system-supplied default passwords, be sure to write the new passwords down and keep them in a safe place. If you forget the new passwords, you cannot access the console interface. In that case, contact Nortel for help. Achtung: Wenn Sie die fr das System standardmig eingestellten Pawrter ndern, notieren Sie sich die neuen Pawrter, und bewahren Sie sie an einem sicheren Ort auf. Falls Sie die neuen Pawrter vergessen, knnen Sie nicht mehr auf die Konsolenschnittstelle zugreifen. Wenden Sie sich in diesem Fall an Nortel, um Untersttzung zu erhalten. Attention: Si vous changez les mots de passe par dfaut du systme, assurez-vous de bien noter vos nouveaux mots de passe et de les conserver dans un endroit sr. Si vous perdez vos nouveaux mots de passe, vous ne pourrez plus accder votre interface. Le cas chant, veuillez contacter Nortel. Precaucin: Si modifica las contraseas predeterminadas asignadas por el sistema, asegrese de anotar las nuevas contraseas y gurdelas en un lugar seguro. Si olvida las nuevas contraseas, no podr acceder al interfaz de la consola. En ese caso, pngase en contacto con Nortel para obtener ayuda al respecto. Attenzione: In caso di modifica delle password predefinite nel sistema, assicurarsi di annotare le nuove password e di conservarle in un luogo sicuro. Nel caso in cui le nuove password vengano dimenticate, non sar possibile accedere all'interfaccia della console. In tal caso, contattare la Nortel per avere assistenza.

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Table 50 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields (continued)


Field Description

Console Read-Only Stack Password

When the Console Switch Password field is set to Required (for Telnet, for Console, or for Both), this field allows read-only password access to the CI of any participating switch in a stack configuration. Users can access the CI using the correct password (see default), but cannot change any parameters or use the Reset option or Reset to Default option. Default Value Range user An ASCII string of up to 15 printable characters

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Field Console Read-Write Stack Password Description

229

When the Console Switch Password field is set to Local Password (for Telnet, for Console, or for Both), this field allows read-write password access to the CI of any participating switch in a stack configuration. Users can log in to the CI using the correct password (see default), and can change any parameter, except the switch password. You can change the default passwords for read-only access and read-write access to a private password. Default Value: Range: secure Any ASCII string of up to 15 printable characters Caution: When you change the system-supplied default passwords, be sure to write the new passwords down and keep them in a safe place. If you forget the new passwords, you cannot access the console interface. In that case, contact Nortel for help. Achtung: Wenn Sie die fr das System standardmig eingestellten Pawrter ndern, notieren Sie sich die neuen Pawrter, und bewahren Sie sie an einem sicheren Ort auf. Falls Sie die neuen Pawrter vergessen, knnen Sie nicht mehr auf die Konsolenschnittstelle zugreifen. Wenden Sie sich in diesem Fall an Nortel, um Untersttzung zu erhalten. Attention: Si vous changez les mots de passe par dfaut du systme, assurez-vous de bien noter vos nouveaux mots de passe et de les conserver dans un endroit sr. Si vous perdez vos nouveaux mots de passe, vous ne pourrez plus accder votre interface. Le cas chant, veuillez contacter Nortel. Precaucin: Si modifica las contraseas predeterminadas asignadas por el sistema, asegrese de anotar las nuevas contraseas y gurdelas en un lugar seguro. Si olvida las nuevas contraseas, no podr acceder al interfaz de la consola. En ese caso, pngase en contacto con Nortel para obtener ayuda al respecto. Attenzione: In caso di modifica delle password predefinite nel sistema, assicurarsi di annotare le nuove password e di conservarle in un luogo sicuro. Nel caso in cui le nuove password vengano dimenticate, non sar possibile accedere all'interfaccia della console. In tal caso, contattare la Nortel per avere assistenza.

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Table 50 Console/Comm Port Configuration screen fields (continued)


Field Description

Primary RADIUS Server The IP address of the Primary RADIUS server. Default Range Secondary RADIUS Server 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point

The IP address of the Secondary RADIUS server. Default Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point

RADIUS UPD Port

The user datagram protocol (UDP) port for the RADIUS server. Default Range 1645 0 to 65536

RADIUS Shared Secret

Your special switch security code that provides authentication to the RADIUS server. Default Range Null string (which is not authenticated) Any contiguous ASCII string that contains at least 1 printable character, up to a maximum of 35

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Logging in
If you set a password in the Console/Comm Port Configuration screen (Figure 82 on page 224), the next time you access the switch, you are prompted for a username and password as shown in Figure 83 (default usernames are RW and RO).
Figure 83 Login screen
Ethernet Switch 425-48T HW:0C FW 3.5.0.2 SW 3.6.0

Username: Password:

[ RW ] [ *************** ]

Enter Password: ********

Enter text, press <Return> or <Enter> when complete.

Enter a valid username and password and press Enter. You are then directed to the Console Interface main menu. For information about modifying the existing usernames, see Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A).

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Renumber Stack Units screen


The Renumber Stack Units screen (Figure 75) allows you to renumber the units configured in the stack. When selected, this option identifies the unit number of each unit in the stack configuration by lighting the corresponding number of (100 Mb/s port) LEDs on each unit for approximately 10 seconds. For example, unit 3 displays three LEDs. Note: This menu option and screen appears only when the switch is participating in a stack configuration. To open the Renumber Stack Units screen:

Choose Renumber Stack Units (or press n) from the main menu.
Figure 84 Renumber Stack Units screen.
Renumber Stack Units Current Unit Number ------------------[ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ] MAC Address ---------------------------00-60-fd-77-a6-0c 00-60-fd-77-a5-f0 00-60-fd-77-a4-4c 00-60-fd-77-ab-84 New Unit Number --------------[ 1 ] [ 2 ] [ 3 ] [ 4 ]

Renumbering stack units will cause an automatic Reset to Current Settings to occur across the entire stack. The current configuration will be adapted to the new numbering scheme. Check the stack configuration after the reset to confirm the desired configuration is set. Are you sure you want to renumber switches with the new settings? [ No ]

Use space bar to display choices, press <Return> or <Enter> to select choice. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

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Table 51 describes the Renumber Stack Units screen fields.


Table 51 Renumber Stack Units screen fields
Field Current Unit Number Description Read-only field which lists the current unit number of each of the configured stack units. The entries in this column are displayed in order of their current physical cabling with respect to the base unit, and can show nonconsecutive unit numbering if one or more units were previously moved or modified. The entries can also include unit numbers of units that are no longer participating in the stack (not currently active). Read-only field listing the MAC address of the corresponding unit listed in the Current Unit Number field. Allows you to set the current unit number of each unit in the stack. You can change any of the fields, as required. You can also delete entries by typing zero (0) or using the space bar to clear the field. Default Value Range Renumber units with new setting? Current stack order 1 to 8

MAC Address New Unit Number

Specifies whether to start the renumbering process (default is No). Use the spacebar to toggle the selection to Yes. Renumbering resets the switch with the current configuration values. When you select this option, the switch resets, runs a self-test, then displays the Nortel logo screen. After you press Ctrl+Y at the screen prompt, the console screen temporarily displays the (standalone) Ethernet Switch 325/425 main menu. Then, within 20 seconds, the console screen refreshes and displays the main menu screen for the stack configuration. The Unit LEDs display the new numbering order. Default Value Range No No, Yes

Hardware Unit Information screen


The Hardware Unit Information screen (Figure 85) lists the switch models, including any installed GBICs that are configured in your standalone or stack configuration. To open the Hardware Unit Information screen.

Choose Display Hardware Units (or press h) from the main menu.

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Figure 85 Hardware Unit Information screen


Hardware Unit Information

Unit# Switch Model

GBIC1 Model

GBIC2 Model

SW Version

----- ---------------- ---------------- ---------------- ------------1 425-48T None None v3.6.0

Press Ctrl-N to display next screen. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu.

Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen


The TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen (Figure 86) allows a user at a remote console terminal to communicate with the Ethernet Switch 325/ 425 as if the console terminal were directly connected to it. You can have up to four active Telnet sessions at one time. To open the TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen

Choose TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration (or press t) from the


main menu.

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Chapter 6 System configuration using the Console Interface Figure 86 TELNET Configuration screen
TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration TELNET: Login Timeout :[ Login Retries :[ Inactivity Timeout:[ Event Logging :[ # -1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 | | | | | Access: TELNET: [ Enabled SNMP : [ Enabled WEB : [ Enabled Use List: [ Yes ] [ Yes ] [ Yes ]

235

1 minute ] 3 ] 15 minutes ] All ]

] ] ]

Allowed Source IP Address ------------------------[ 0.0.0.0 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ]

Allowed Source Mask ------------------------[ 0.0.0.0 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ] [ 255.255.255.255 ]

Enter number, press <Return> or <Enter> when complete. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Table 52 describes the TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen fields.


Table 52 TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen fields
Field Description

TELNET Access Allows a user remote access to the CI through a Telnet session. Default value Range SNMP Access Enabled Enabled, Disabled

Specifies if SNMP access is allowed and only to those on the list. (SNMP access includes the DM system.) Default value Range Access: Enabled; Use List: Yes Access: Enabled, Disabled; Use List: Yes, No

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Table 52 TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen fields (continued)


Field WEB Access Description Specifies if access to the Web-based management system is allowed and only to those on the list. Default value Range Login Timeout Access: Enabled; Use List: Yes Access: Enabled, Disabled; Use List: Yes, No

Specifies the amount of time a user has to enter the correct password at the console-terminal prompt. Default value Range 1 minute 0 to 10 minutes (0 indicates no timeout)

Login Retries

Specifies the number of times a user can enter an incorrect password at the console-terminal prompt before terminating the session. Default value Range 3 1 to 100

Inactivity Timeout

Specifies the amount of time the session can be inactive before it is terminated. Default value Range 15 minutes 0 to 60 minutes (0 indicates no timeout)

Event Logging

Specifies the types of events that are displayed in the Event Log screen (see System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A). Default value Range Description All All, None, Accesses, Failures All: Logs the following Telnet events to the Event Log screen: TELNET connect: Indicates the IP address and access mode of a Telnet session. TELNET disconnect: Indicates the IP address of the remote host and the access mode, due to either a logout or inactivity. Failed TELNET connection attempts: Indicates the IP address of the remote host whose IP address is not on the list of allowed addresses, or indicates the IP address of the remote host that did not supply the correct password.

None: Indicates that no Telnet events are logged in the Event Log screen. Accesses: Logs only Telnet connect and disconnect events in the Event Log screen. Failures: Logs only failed Telnet connection attempts in the Event Log screen.

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Field Description

237

Allowed Source Specifies up to 10 user-assigned host IP addresses that are allowed Telnet access to the IP Address CI. Default value Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point

Allowed Source Specifies up to 10 user-assigned allowed source address masks. The remote IP address Mask is masked with the Allowed Source Mask and, if the resulting value equals the Allowed Source IP address, the connection is allowed. For example, a connection would be allowed with the following settings: Remote IP address = 192.0.1.5 Allowed Source IP Address = 192.0.1.0 Allowed Source Mask = 255.255.255.0 Default value Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP mask assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point

Software Download screen


The Software Download screens (Figure 87 and Figure 89) allow you to revise the Ethernet Switch 325/425 software image and diagnostics image that are located in nonvolatile flash memory. Caution: Do not interrupt power to the device during the software download process. If the power is interrupted, the firmware image can become corrupted.

Achtung: Unterbrechen Sie die Stromzufuhr zum Gert nicht, whrend die Software heruntergeladen wird. Bei Unterbrechung der Stromzufuhr kann das Firmware-Image beschdigt werden.

Attention: Ne pas couper l'alimentation de l'appareil pendant le chargement du logiciel. En cas d'interruption, le programme rsident peut tre endommag.

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Precaucin: No interrumpa la alimentacin del dispositivo durante el proceso de descarga del software. Si lo hace, puede alterar la imagen de la programacin (firmware).

Attenzione: Non interrompere l'alimentazione elettrica al dispositivo durante il processo di scaricamento del software. In caso di interruzione, l'immagine firmware potrebbe danneggiarsi.

To download the software image, you need a properly configured Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server in your network, and an IP address for the switch (or stack, if configured). To learn how to configure the switch or stack IP address, refer to IP Configuration/Setup screen on page 214. To open the Software Download screen:

Choose Software Download (or press f) from the main menu.


You can monitor the software download process by observing the LEDs (see LED Indications during the download process on page 240).

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Software Download

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Software Image Filename: Diagnostics Image Filename: TFTP Server IP Address: Start TFTP Load of New Image:

[ docu/hummingbird_360.img ] [ ] [ 198.202.188.174 ] [ No ]

Enter text, press <Return> or <Enter> when complete. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Table 53 describes the Software Download screen fields.


Table 53 Software Download screen fields
Field Description

Image Filename The Ethernet Switch 325/425 software image load file name. Note: Certain software releases may require you to download two images: the boot code image and the agent image. For proper operation of the switch, the new boot code image must be downloaded before the agent image is downloaded. Default value Range Diagnostics Filename Zero-length string An ASCII string of up to 30 printable characters

The Ethernet Switch 325/425 diagnostics file name. Default value Range Zero-length string An ASCII string of up to 30 printable characters

TFTP Server IP Address

The IP address of your TFTP load host. Default value Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point

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Table 53 Software Download screen fields (continued)


Field Description

Start TFTP Load Specifies whether to start the download of the switch software image (default is No). of New Image Use the spacebar to toggle the selection to Yes. Press Enter to initiate the software download process. Note: The software download process can take up to 60 seconds to complete (or more if the load host path is congested or there is a high volume of network traffic). To ensure that the download process is not interrupted, do not power down the switch for approximately 10 minutes. Default value Range No No, Software Image, Diagnostics, Software Image If Newer, Download image without reset, Download diag without reset.

LED Indications during the download process


The software download process automatically completes without user intervention. The process erases the contents of flash memory and replaces it with a new software image. Be careful not to interrupt the download process until after it runs to completion (the process can take up to 10 minutes, depending on network conditions). Note: If problems occur during the software download process, the Software Download screen displays error codes that define the problem. The error codes are described in Chapter 13, Troubleshooting, on page 405.

Configuration File Download/Upload screen


The Configuration Management feature allows you to store and retrieve the configuration parameters of an Ethernet Switch 325/425 or a stack to a TFTP server. This feature supports two different methods for managing the system's configuration files: Binary configuration file management ASCII configuration file management

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The Configuration File Download/Upload screen (Figure 89) allows you to store and retrieve your switch/stack configuration parameters on a TFTP server. It also allows you to enable and disable the autosave feature.

Binary configuration download


You can retrieve the configuration parameters of a standalone switch or an entire stack and use the retrieved parameters to automatically configure a replacement switch or stack. Certain requirements apply when automatically configuring a switch or stack using this feature (see Requirements on page 243). You must set up the file on your TFTP server and set the filename read/write permission to enabled before you can save the configuration parameters. Although most configuration parameters are saved to the configuration file, certain parameters are not saved (see Table 55 on page 244). To view the Configuration File Menu (Figure 88):

Choose Configuration File (or press g) from the main menu.


Figure 88 Configuration File menu
Configuration File Menu Configuration File Download/Upload... Ascii Configuration File Download... Autosave Configuration... Return to Main Menu

Use arrow keys to highlight option, press <Return> or <Enter> to select option. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

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To open the Configuration File Download/Upload screen (Figure 89):

Choose Configuration File Download/Upload (or press c) from the main


menu
Figure 89 Configuration File Download/Upload screen
Configuration File Download/Upload

Configuration Image Filename: TFTP Server IP Address: Copy Configuration Image to Server: Retrieve Configuration Image from Server:

[ ] [ 198.202.188.174 ] [ No ] [ No ]

Enter text, press <Return> or <Enter> when complete. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Table 54 describes the Configuration File Download/Upload screen fields.


Table 54 Configuration File Download/Upload screen fields
Field Configuration Image Filename Description The file name you have chosen for the configuration file. Choose a meaningful file name that allows you to identify the file for retrieval when required. The file must already exist on your TFTP server and must be read/ write enabled. Default value Range TFTP Server IP Address Zero-length string An ASCII string of up to 30 printable characters

The IP address of your TFTP load host. Default value Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point

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Field Copy Configuration Image to Server Description

243

Specifies whether to copy the presently configured switch/stack parameters to the specified TFTP server (default is No). Use the spacebar to toggle the selection to Yes. Press Enter to initiate the process. Default Value Range No Yes, No

Retrieve Configuration Image from Server

Specifies whether to retrieve the stored switch/stack configuration parameters from the specified TFTP server (default is No). If you choose Yes, the download process begins immediately and, when completed, causes the switch/stack to reset with the new configuration parameters. Use the spacebar to toggle the selection to Yes. Press Enter to initiate the process. Default Value Range No Yes, No

Requirements
The following requirements apply to the Configuration File feature: The Configuration File feature can only be used to copy standalone switch configuration parameters to other standalone switches or to copy stack configuration parameters to other stack configurations. For example, you cannot duplicate the configuration parameters of a unit in a stack configuration and use it to configure a standalone switch. A configuration file obtained from a standalone switch can only be used to configure other standalone switches that have the same firmware revision and model type as the donor standalone switch. A configuration file obtained from a stack unit can only be used to configure other stacks that have the same number of switches, firmware version, model types, and physical IDs as the stack the donor stack unit resides in. Reconfigured stacks are configured according to the unit order number of the donor unit. For example, the configuration file parameters from a donor unit with physical ID x are used to reconfigure the unit with physical ID x.

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Table 55 describes configuration file parameter information.


Table 55 Parameters not saved to the configuration file
These parameters are not saved In-Band Stack IP Address In-Band Switch IP Address In-Band Subnet Mask Default Gateway Console Read-Only Switch Password Console Read-Write Switch Password Console Read-Only Stack Password Console Read-Write Stack Password Configuration Image Filename TFTP Server IP Address Configuration File Download/Upload 240 Console/Comm Port Configuration 223 Used in this screen IP Configuration/Setup See page 214

ASCII Configuration file Download


The ASCII Configuration File Download screen (Figure 90) allows you to download an ASCII configuration file containing CLI commands from a TFTP server to configure the switch or stack. To view the ASCII Configuration File Download screen

Choose ASCII Configuration File Download (or press a) from the


Configuration File Menu to open the ASCII Configuration File Download screen.

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ASCII Configuration File Download

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ASCII Configuration Filename: TFTP Server IP Address: Retrieve Configuration File from Server: Last Manual Configuration Status: Last Auto Configuration Status: Auto Configuration on Reset:

[ ] [ 0.0.0.0 ] [ No ] Passed Passed [ Disabled

Enter text, press <Return> or <Enter> when complete. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Table 56 describes the fields available on the ASCII Configuration File Download screen.
Table 56 ASCII Configuration File Download/Upload screen fields
Field ASCII Configuration Filename Description Enter the file name of the ASCII configuration file you want to download to the switch. Specify a file name that allows you to identify the file for retrieval. The ASCII configuration file must already exist on the TFTP server. It must also be read/write enabled. Default value Range TFTP Server IP Address Zero-length string An ASCII string of up to 30 printable characters

Specify the IP address of your TFTP server. Default value Range 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Four-octet dotted-decimal notation, where each octet is represented as a decimal value, separated by a decimal point.

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Table 56 ASCII Configuration File Download/Upload screen fields


Field Retrieve Configuration File from Server Description This field specifies whether to retrieve the stored ASCII configuration file from the specified TFTP server (default value is No). If you choose Yes, the download process begins immediately and, when the download is completed, the switch/stack will be configured based on the CLI commands in the ASCII configuration file. Use the spacebar to toggle the selection to Yes. Press Enter to initiate the download process. Default value Range Last Manual Configuration Status No Yes, No

The system displays the status of the last manual configuration. Default value Range Passed Passed, Failed

Last Auto Configuration Status

The system displays the status of the last automatic configuration. Default value Range Passed Passed, Failed

Auto Configuration on Reset

This field allows you to select the option of automatically configuring the switch or stack every time the switch or the stack is reset. The values that can be assigned to this field are: Disabled Auto configuration on reset is disabled. Use Configured Use manually configured ASCII configuration file name and TFTP server address for auto configuration on reset. Use BootP Retrieve ASCII configuration file name, and optionally server address, using BootP, when BootP is enabled, and perform auto configuration on reset using these parameters. Note: Refer to Appendix D, Sample BootP configuration file, on page 443 for a sample BootP configuration file. Default value Range Disabled Disabled, Use Configured, Use BootP

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Enabling and disabling autosave


The Autosave Configuration screen (Figure 91) allows you to enable and disable the autosave feature on the switch or stack. To view the Autosave Configuration screen:

From the Configuration File Menu, choose Autosave Configuration (or


press s).
Figure 91 Autosave Configuration screen
Autosave Configuration

Autosave

Enabled

Use space bar to display choices, press <Return> or <Enter> to select choice. Press Ctrl-R to return to previous menu. Press Ctrl-C to return to Main Menu.

Table 57 describes the fields available in the Autosave Configuration screen.


Table 57 Autosave Configuration screen fields
Field Autosave Description Enables or disables the autosave feature.

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Using SNTP
The Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) feature synchronizes the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) to an accuracy within 1 second. This feature adheres to the IEEE RFC 2030 (MIB is the s5agent). With this feature, the system can obtain the time from any RFC 2030-compliant NTP/SNTP server. Note: If you have trouble using this feature, try other NTP servers. Some NTP servers may be overloaded or currently inoperable. The system attempts to connect to the NTP server at least three times, with five minutes duration between each retry. If the connection fails after three attempts, the system waits for the next synchronization time (the default is 24 hours) and begins the process again. SNTP provides a real-time timestamp for the software, shown as Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). If SNTP is enabled (the default value is disabled), the system synchronizes with the configured NTP server at boot-up and at user-configurable periods thereafter (the default sync interval is 24 hours). The first synchronization is not performed until network connectivity is established. SNTP supports primary and secondary NTP servers. The system tries the secondary NTP server only if the primary NTP server is unresponsive.

Configuring with CLI


You can use the CLI to configure the SNTP feature, ensuring that you complete the following steps: 1 2 3 4 Set the primary and secondary NTP server. Enable SNTP. Display the UTC time. Optionally, to ensure the synchronization happens immediately, force a synchronization.

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Setting local time zone


SNTP uses Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) for all time synchronizations so it is not affected by different time zones. In order for the switch report the correct time for your local time zone and daylight savings time, you must use the following commands: clock time-zone on page 294 no clock time-zone on page 295 clock summer-time on page 295 no clock summer-time on page 296 show clock time-zone on page 296 show clock summer-time on page 296

Using DNS to ping and Telnet


Using the DNS client, you can ping or Telnet to a host server or to a host by name. To use this feature, you must configure at least one Domain Name Server (DNS); You may also configure a default domain name. If you configure a default domain name, that name is appended to host names that do not contain a dot. The default domain name and addresses are saved in NVRAM. The host names for ping and Telnet cannot be longer than 63 alphanumeric characters, and the default DNS domain name cannot be longer than 255 characters.

Configuring with CLI


Use the CLI to configure the DNS client. Following are the commands used to configure the DNS client using the CLI. show ip dns command ping command ip name-server command no ip name-server command
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ip domain-name command no ip domain-name command default ip domain-name command

For more information on these commands, see System configuration using the CLI on page 251.

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In the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, the Command Line Interface (CLI) commands allows you to display and modify the switch configuration while the switch is operating. This chapter includes information about general switch maintenance, such as setting up access parameters, upgrading the software, and setting the speed. This chapter covers the following topics: Configuring the switch IP address, subnet mask and default gateway on page 252 Using DNS to ping and telnet on page 261 Configuration Management on page 266 Customizing your system on page 270 Displaying the ARP table on page 282 Displaying interfaces on page 282 Saving the configuration to NVRAM on page 285 Enabling and disabling autosave on page 287 Setting time on network elements using Simple Network Time Protocol on page 289 Enabling Autopology on page 297 Configuring LEDs on the display panel on page 312 Upgrading software on page 315

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Configuring the switch IP address, subnet mask and default gateway


IP notation
To enter IP addresses and subnet masks in the CLI, enter both the IP address and the subnet mask in dotted decimal notation (XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX).

Assigning and clearing IP addresses


Using the CLI, you can assign IP addresses and Gateway addresses, clear these addresses, and view configured IP addresses. This section covers these topics: ip address command no ip address command on page 253 ip default-gateway command on page 254 no ip default-gateway command on page 254 show ip command on page 255

ip address command
The ip address command sets the IP address and subnet mask for the switch or a stack. The syntax for the ip address command is:
ip address [stack|switch|unit] <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX> [netmask <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>]

The ip address command is in the config command mode. If you do not enter either the stack or switch parameter, the system automatically modifies the stack IP address when in stack mode and modifies the switch IP address when in standalone mode.

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Table 58 describes the parameters and variables for the ip address command.
Table 58 ip address command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables stack|switch unit Description Sets the stack the IP address and subnet mask or the switch IP address and netmask. Sets the IP address of another unit in a stack.

XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX Enter IP address in dotted decimal notation; netmask is optional. netmask Set the IP subnet mask for the stack or switch.

Note: When you change the IP address or subnet mask, you may lose connection to Telnet and the Web.

no ip address command
The no ip address command clears the IP address and subnet mask. This command sets the IP address and subnet mask for a switch or a stack to all zeros (0). The syntax for the no ip address command is:
no ip address {stack|switch}

The no ip address command is in the config command mode. Table 59 describes the parameters and variables for the no ip address command.
Table 59 no ip address command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables stack|switch unit Description Zeroes out the stack IP address and subnet mask for the switch IP address and subnet mask. Sets the IP address of another unit in a stack.

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Note: When you change the IP address or subnet mask, you may lose connection to Telnet and the Web. You also disable any new Telnet connection, and you must connect to the serial console port to configure a new IP address.

ip default-gateway command
The ip default-gateway command sets the IP default gateway address for a switch or a stack. The syntax for the ip default-gateway command is:
ip default-gateway <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>

The ip default-gateway command is in the config command mode. Table 60 describes the parameters and variables for the ip default-gateway command.
Table 60 ip default-gateway command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables Description

XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX Enter the dotted-decimal IP address of the default IP gateway.

Note: When you change the IP gateway, you may lose connection to Telnet and the Web.

no ip default-gateway command
The no ip default-gateway command sets the IP default gateway address to zeros (0). The syntax for the no ip default-gateway command is:
no ip default-gateway

The no ip default-gateway command is in the config command mode.

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The no ip default-gateway command has no parameters or variables. Note: When you change the IP gateway address, you may lose connection to Telnet and the Web. You also may disable any new Telnet connection required to connect to the serial console port to configure a new IP Gateway address.

show ip command
The show ip command displays the IP configurations, specifically BootP mode, stack address, switch address, subnet mask, and gateway address. This command displays the these parameters for what is configured, what is in use, and the last BootP. The syntax for the show ip command is:
show ip [bootp] [default-gateway] [address [stack|switch]] [dns]

The show ip command is in the exec command mode. If you do not enter any parameters, this command displays all the IP-related configuration information. Table 61 describes the parameters and variables for the show ip command.
Table 61 show ip command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables bootp default-gateway address stack|switch dns Description Displays BootP-related IP information. Displays the IP address of the default gateway. Displays the current IP address. Specifies current IP address of the stack or the switch. Displays DNS configuration.

Figure 92 displays a sample output of the show ip command.

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425-48T(config-if)#show ip BootP Mode: BootP Disabled Configured --------------Stack IP Address: 0.0.0.0 Switch IP Address: 192.168.151.175 Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0 Default Gateway: 192.168.151.1 425-48T(config-if)# In Use Last BootP --------------- --------------0.0.0.0 192.168.151.175 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.151.1 0.0.0.0

show ip address command


The show ip address command displays the IP configurations, stack address, switch address, subnet mask, and gateway address, when the Ethernet Switch 425-24T Switch is in the stack mode. The syntax for the show ip address command is:
show ip address [address [stack|switch|unit]]

The show ip address command is in the exec command mode. Table 62 describes the parameters and variables for the show ip address command.
Table 62 show ip address command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables address stack|switch unit Description Displays the current IP address. Specifies current IP address of the stack or the switch. Displays the IP address of another unit in a stack.

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Figure 93 displays a sample output of the show ip address command.


Figure 93 show ip address command output
425-24T(config)#show ip address unit 1 Configured In Use Last BootP --------------- --------------- --------------0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 192.168.151.1 192.168.151.1 0.0.0.0

Stack IP Address: Default Gateway:

Assigning and clearing IP addresses for specific units


You can assign IP addresses for specific units within a stack. This section covers these topics: ip address unit command no ip address unit command on page 258 default ip address unit command on page 258

ip address unit command


The ip address unit command sets the IP address and subnet mask for a specific unit in the stack. The syntax for the ip address unit command is:
ip address unit <1-8> A.B.C.D

The ip address unit command is in the config command mode. Table 63 describes the parameters and variables for the ip address unit command.
Table 63 ip address unit command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables unit <1-8> A.B.C.D Description Sets the unit you are assigning an IP address. Enter IP address in dotted decimal notation.

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Note: When you change the IP address or subnet mask, you may lose connection to Telnet and the Web.

no ip address unit command


The no ip address unit command sets the IP address for the specified unit in a stack to all zeros (0). The syntax for the no ip address unit command is:
no ip address unit <1-8>

The no ip address unit command is in the config command mode. Table 64 describes the parameters and variables for the no ip address unit command.
Table 64 no ip address unit command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables unit <1-8> Description Zeroes out the IP address for the specified unit.

Note: When you change the IP address or subnet mask, you may lose connection to Telnet and the Web.You also disable any new Telnet connection, and you must connect to the serial console port to configure a new IP address.

default ip address unit command


The default ip address unit command sets the IP address for the specified unit in a stack to all zeros (0). The syntax for the default ip address unit command is:
default ip address unit <1-8>

The default ip address unit command is in the config command mode.

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Table 65 describes the parameters and variables for the default ip address unit command.
Table 65 default ip address unit command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables unit <1-8> Description Zeroes out the IP address for the specified unit.

Note: When you change the IP gateway, you may lose connection to Telnet and the Web.

Pinging
To ensure that the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 has connectivity to the network, ping a device you know is connected to this network.

ping command
The ping command tests the network connection to another network device. The command sends an Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) packet from the switch to the target device. The local IP address must be set before issuing the ping command. Refer to Assigning and clearing IP addresses on page 252 for information on setting IP addresses. The syntax for the ping command is:
ping <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX> [datasize <64-4096>] [{count <1-9999>} | continuous] [{timeout | -t} <1-120>] [interval <1-60>] [debug]

The ping command is in the exec command mode.

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Table 66 describes the parameters and variables for the ping command.
Table 66 ping command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX Description Specify the IP address of the target device in dotted-decimal notation. Specifies the size of the ICMP packet to be sent. The data size range is from 64 to 4096 bytes. Sets the number of ICMP packets to be sent. The continuous mode sets the ping running until the user interrupts it by entering Ctrl-C. Set the timeout using either the timeout or -t parameter followed by the number of seconds the switch must wait before timing out. Specifies the number of seconds between transmitted packets. Provides additional output information such as ICMP sequence number and trip time.

datasize <64-4096> {count <1-9999>} | continuous {timeout | -t} <1-120> interval <1-60> debug

If the device receives the packet, it sends a ping reply. When the switch receives the reply, it displays a message indicating that the specified IP address is being used. If no reply is received, a message indicates that the address is not responding. Figure 94 shows sample ping responses.
Figure 94 ping command responses
425-48T>ping 192.168.151.174 Reply from 192.168.151.174: 64 bytes time=16 ms Host is reachable 425-48T>

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Resetting the switch to default configuration


The restore factory-default command resets the switch or stack to its default configuration. The syntax for the restore factory-default command is:
restore factory-default [ -y ]

where the [ -y ] parameter instructs the switch not to prompt for confirmation. If the [ -y ] parameter is not included in the command, the following message appears:
Warning the switch/stack will be reset to factory default configuration Do you wish to continue (y/n) ?

Enter y to restore the switch to default. The restore factory-default command is in the privExec command mode.

Using DNS to ping and telnet


Using the Domain Name Server (DNS) client, you can ping or telnet to a host server or to a host by name. To use this feature, you must configure at least one DNS; you may also configure a default domain name. If you configure a default domain name, that name is appended to hostnames that do not contain a dot. The default domain name and addresses are saved in NVRAM. The hostnames for ping and telnet cannot be longer than 63 alphanumeric characters, and the default DNS domain name cannot be longer than 255 characters. This section covers these commands: show ip dns command on page 262 ping command on page 262 ip name-server command on page 263 no ip name-server command on page 264
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ip domain-name command on page 265 no ip domain-name command on page 265 default ip domain-name command on page 265

show ip dns command


The show ip dns command displays the DNS domain name, as well as any configured DNS servers. The syntax for the show ip dns command is:
show ip dns

The show ip dns command is in the exec command mode. The show ip dns command has no parameters or variables. Figure 95 displays sample output from the show ip dns command.
Figure 95 show ip dns command output
425-48T(config)#show ip dns DNS Default Domain name: None DNS Servers ----------0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 425-48T(config)#

ping command
The ping command tests the network connection to another network device. The command sends an Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) packet from the switch to the target device. The local IP address must be set before issuing the ping command. You can ping a host using either its IP address or hostname.

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The syntax for the ping command is:


ping <A.B.C.D or Hostname>

The ping command is in the exec command mode. Table 67 describes the parameters and variables for the ping command.
Table 67 ping command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables <A.B.C.D or Hostname> Description Specify: the IP address of the target device in dotted-decimal notation the hostname of the device to ping (The hostname can be a simple name, such as fred; in this case the DNS domain name, if set, is appended. Or the hostname can be a full hostname, such as fred.ca.nortel.com.)

If the device receives the packet, it sends a ping reply. When the switch receives the reply, it displays a message indicating that the specified IP address is being used. If no reply is received, a message indicates that the address is not responding. Figure 96 displays sample ping responses.
Figure 96 ping command responses
425-48T#ping 10.10.40.29 Host is reachable 425-48T#

There is no default value for this command.

ip name-server command
The ip name-server command adds one or more DNS servers IP addresses. The syntax for the ip name-server command is:
ip name-server <A.B.C.D>

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The ip name-server command is in the config command mode. Note: You can add up to 3 servers; adding one at a time.

Table 68 describes the parameters and variables for the ip name-server command.
Table 68 ip name-server command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables <A.B.C.D> Description Enter the IP address of a DNS server.

The default value is 0.0.0.0.

no ip name-server command
The no ip name-server command removes one or more DNS servers IP addresses. The syntax for the no ip name-server command is:
no ip name-server <A.B.C.D>

The no ip name-server command is in the config command mode. Table 69 describes the parameters and variables for the no ip name-server command.
Table 69 no ip name-server command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables <A.B.C.D> Description Enter the IP address of a DNS server.

The default value is 0.0.0.0.

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ip domain-name command
The ip domain-name command sets the systems DNS domain name. The syntax for the ip domain-name command is:
ip domain-name [<LINE>]

The ip domain-name command is in the config command mode. Table 70 describes the parameters and variables for the ip domain-name command.
Table 70 ip domain-name command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables <LINE> Description Enter a DNS domain name.

The default value for this command is an empty string.

no ip domain-name command
The no ip domain-name command clears the systems DNS domain name (sets it to an empty string). The syntax for the no ip domain-name command is:
no ip domain-name

The no ip domain-name command is in the config command mode. The no ip domain-name command has no parameters or variables.

default ip domain-name command


The default ip domain-name command clears the systems DNS domain name (set it to an empty string). The syntax for the default ip domain-name command is:
default ip domain-name

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The default ip domain-name command is in the config command mode. The default ip domain-name command has no parameters or variables.

Configuration Management
This section covers the following topics: Automatically loading Configuration file on page 266 ASCII Configuration Generator on page 268

Automatically loading Configuration file


This section discusses how to download a configuration file when the system boots. You use standard CLI commands to modify the configuration file you want to download. This section covers these commands: configure network command show config-network command on page 267

configure network command


The configure network command allows you to load and execute a script immediately and to configure parameters to automatically download a configuration file when you reboot the switch or stack. The syntax for the configure network command is:
configure network [load-on-boot {disable|use-bootp|use-config}] [filename <WORD>] [address <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>]

The configure network command is in the exec mode. Note: When you enter configure network with no parameters, the system prompts you for the script file name and TFTP server address and then downloads the script.

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Table 71 describes the parameters and variables for the configure network command.
Table 71 configure network command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables load-on-boot {disable|use-bootp|use-config Description Specifies the settings for automatically loading a configuration file when the system boots: disabledisables the automatic loading of config file use-bootspecifies using the BootP file as the automatically loaded config file use-configspecifies using the ASCII configuration file as the automatically loaded config file Note: If you omit this parameter, the system immediately downloads and runs the ASCII config file. filename <WORD> Specifies the file name. Note: If you omit this parameter and do not specify BootP, the system uses the configured file name. address <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX> Specifies the TFTP server from which to load the file. Enter the IP address in dotted-decimal notation. Note: If you omit this parameter and do not specify BootP, the system uses the configured address.

Note: When you specify the file name or address, these parameters will be changed at the next reboot, even if you do not specify load-on-boot.

show config-network command


The show config-network command displays information regarding the automatic loading of the configuration file, including the current status of this feature, the file name, the TFTP server address, and the status of the previous automatic configuration command. The syntax for the show config-network command is:
show config-network

The show config-network command is in the privExec mode.


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The show config-network command has no parameters or values. Figure 97 shows the output for the show config-network command.
Figure 97 show config-network command
425-48T(config-if)#show config-network Auto-Load Configuration On Boot: Disabled Configuration Filename: TFTP Server IP Address: 198.202.188.174 Last Auto Configuration Status: Passed Last Manual Configuration Status: Passed

ASCII Configuration Generator


The primary goal of the ASCII Configuration Generator (ACG) is to provide the users of the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 with a tool that allows them to easily modify configuration of a particular switch or a stack. ACG generates an ASCII configuration file which reproduces the behavior of the current binary configuration file. The user can also rely on this function to maintain backup configurations, as well as use it as a reliable method for debugging the current configuration of a switch. The Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 can download an editable ASCII configuration file from the TFTP server. You can load the ASCII configuration file automatically at boot time or on demand using console menus or CLI. Once downloaded, the configuration file automatically configures the switch or stack according to the Command Line Interface (CLI) commands in the file. The maximum size for an ASCII configuration file is 100 KBs; larger configuration files must be split into multiple files. For more information on loading the ASCII configuration file automatically, see Automatically loading Configuration file on page 266. The commands that are associated with ACG are:
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show running-config command


This command displays the current configuration of switch or a stack as a series of CLI commands. This command must be executed in the configuration mode and has no parameters or variables. The syntax of this command is:
show running-config

Figure 98 shows the output of the show running-config command


Figure 98 Output of the show running-config command
425-48T(config-if)#show running-config ! Embedded ASCII Configuration Generator Script ! Model = Ethernet Switch 425-48T ! Software version = v3.6.0 enable configure terminal ! ! *** CORE *** ! mac-address-table aging-time 300 autotopology no radius-server radius-server host 0.0.0.0 radius-server secondary-host 0.0.0.0 radius-server port 1645 ! radius-server key ******** telnet-access login-timeout 1 telnet-access retry 3 telnet-access inactive-timeout 15 telnet-access logging all cli password switch serial none cli password switch telnet none ! cli password switch read-only "********" 425-48T(config-if)#

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copy running-config tftp command


This command copies contents of the current configuration file to another file on the TFTP server. The syntax of the command is
copy running-config tftp {<address> <filename>}

This command can be executed in the config mode. Table 72 describes the parameters and variables of this command.
Table 72 copy running-config tftp command parameters and variables
Parameter address filename Description Signifies the IP address of the TFTP server Denotes the filename to store configuration commands on the TFTP server

Customizing your system


You can customize your system using the CLI commands described in this section. This section covers the following topics: Setting the terminal on page 270 Displaying system information on page 273 Setting boot parameters on page 274 Setting TFTP parameters on page 276 Setting the default management interface on page 279 Customizing the opening banner on page 280 Setting the default management interface on page 279

Setting the terminal


You can view the terminal settings, set them to default settings, or customize the terminal settings. This sections covers:

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show terminal command terminal command on page 271

show terminal command


The show terminal command displays the current serial port information, which includes connection speed, as well as the terminal width and length in number of characters. The syntax for the show terminal command is:
show terminal

The show terminal command is in the exec command mode. The show terminal command has no parameters or variables. Figure 99 shows the output from the show terminal command.
Figure 99 show terminal command output
425-48T(config-if)#show terminal Terminal speed: 9600 Terminal width: 79 Terminal length: 23 425-48T(config-if)#

terminal command
The terminal command configures the settings for the terminal. These settings are transmit and receive speeds, terminal length, and terminal width. The syntax of the terminal command is:
terminal speed {2400|4800|9600|19200|38400}|length <1-132>|width <1-132>

The terminal command is in the exec mode.

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Table 73 describes the parameters and variables for the terminal command.
Table 73 terminal command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables Description

speed Sets the transmit and receive baud rates for the terminal. You can {2400|4800|9600| set the speed at one of the five options shown; default is 9600. 19200|38400} length width Sets the length of the terminal display in characters; default is 24. Sets the width of the terminal displaying characters; default 79.

show cli command


The show cli command displays the current CLI settings. The syntax for the show cli command is:
show cli [info|mode|password]

The show cli command is in the exec command mode. Table 74 describes the parameters and variables for the show cli command.
Table 74 show cli command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables Description Displays general CLI settings. Displays CLI mode. Displays CLI usernames and passwords.

info mode password

Figure 100 displays the output from the show cli command.

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Chapter 7 System configuration using the CLI 273 Figure 100 show cli command output
425-48T(config)#show cli info Inactivity Timeout: 15 minute(s) Login Timeout: 1 minute(s) Login Retries: 3 More: True Screen Lines: 23 425-48T(config)#RW RW *************** RO RO *************** 425-48T#

Displaying system information


The show sys-info command displays the current system characteristics. Note: You must have SNTP enabled and configured to display GMT time. The syntax for the show sys-info command is:
show sys-info

The show sys-info command is in the privExec command mode. The show sys-info command has no parameters or variables. Figure 101 displays sample output from the show sys-info command.

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425-48T(config-if)#show sys-info Operation Mode: Switch MAC Address: 00-0F-CD-BF-1E-80 Reset Count: 35 Last Reset Type: Management Reset Power Status: Primary Power Autotopology: Enabled Local GBIC Type: (port 49) GBIC is missing Local GBIC Type: (port 50) GBIC is missing sysDescr: Ethernet Switch 425-48T HW:00 FW:3.5.0.2 SW:v3.6.0 Mfg Date: 05122004 Serial #: SACC2600E5 Operational State:Normal sysObjectID: 1.3.6.1.4.1.45.3.57.1 sysUpTime: 0 days, 00:38:44 sysNtpTime: SNTP not synchronized. sysServices: 3 sysContact: c sysName: Ethernet 425-48T sysLocation: 425-48T(config-if)#

Setting boot parameters


You can reboot the switch or stack and configure BootP. The topics covered in this section are: boot command ip bootp server command on page 275 no ip bootp server command on page 276 default ip bootp server command on page 276

boot command
The boot command performs a soft-boot of the switch or stack. The syntax for the boot command is:
boot [default]

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The boot command is in the privExec command mode. Table 75 describes the parameters and variables for the boot command.
Table 75 boot command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables default Description Restores switch or stack to factory-default settings after rebooting.

Note: When you reset to factory defaults, the stack operational mode, last reset count, and reason for last reset will not be set to factory defaults.

ip bootp server command


The ip bootp server command configures BootP on the current instance of the switch or server. The syntax for the ip bootp server command is:
ip bootp server {last|needed|disable|always}

The ip bootp server command is in the config command mode. Table 76 describes the parameters and variables for the ip bootp server command.
Table 76 ip bootp server command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables last|needed|disable| always Description Specifies when to use BootP: lastuse BootP or the last known address neededuse BootP only when needed disablenever use BootP alwaysAlways use BootP

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no ip bootp server command


The no ip bootp server command disables the BootP server. The syntax for the no ip bootp server command is:
no ip bootp server

The no ip bootp server command is in the config command mode. The no ip bootp server command has no parameters or values.

default ip bootp server command


The default ip bootp server command sets the BootP server status to BootP when needed. The syntax for the default ip bootp server command is:
default ip bootp server

The default ip bootp server command is in the config command mode. The default ip bootp server command has no parameters or values.

Setting TFTP parameters


You can display the IP address of the TFTP server, assign an IP address you want to use for a TFTP server, copy a configuration file to the TFTP server, or copy a configuration file from the TFTP server to the switch to use to configure the switch. This section covers: show tftp-server command on page 277 tftp-server command on page 277 no tftp-server command on page 278 copy config tftp command on page 278 copy tftp config command on page 278

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show tftp-server command


The show tftp-server command displays the IP address of the server used for all TFTP-related transfers. The syntax for the show tftp-server command is:
show tftp-server

The show tftp-server command is in the privExec command mode. The show tftp-server command has no parameters or variables. Figure 102 shows a sample output of the show tftp-server command.
Figure 102 show tftp-server command output
425-48T(config-if)#show tftp-server TFTP Server IP address : 198.202.188.174 425-48T(config-if)#

tftp-server command
The tftp-server command assigns the address for the stack or switch to use for TFTP services. The syntax of the tftp-server command is:
tftp-server <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>

The tftp-server command is in the config command mode. Table 77 describes the parameters and variables for the tftp-server command.
Table 77 tftp-server command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX Description Enter the dotted-decimal IP address of the server you want to use for TFTP services.

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no tftp-server command
The no tftp-server command clears the TFTP server IP address to 0.0.0.0. The syntax of the no tftp-server command is:
no tftp-server

The no tftp-server command is in the config command mode. The no tftp-server command has no parameters or values.

copy config tftp command


The copy config tftp command copies the current configuration file onto the TFTP server. The syntax for the copy config tftp command is:
copy config tftp [address <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>] filename <WORD>

The copy config tftp command is in the privExec command mode. Table 78 describes the parameters and variables for the copy config tftp command.
Table 78 copy config tftp command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables address <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX> filename <WORD> Description Specifies the TFTP server IP address; enter in dotted-decimal notation. Specifies filename that you want to copy the configuration file onto the TFTP server. Enter the name you want the configuration file to have on the TFTP server.

copy tftp config command


The copy tftp config command retrieves the system configuration file from the TFTP server and uses the retrieved information as the current configuration on the system.The syntax for the copy tftp config command is:
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The copy tftp config command is in the privExec command mode. Table 79 describes the parameters and variables for the copy tftp config command.
Table 79 copy tftp config command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables address <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX> filename <WORD> Description Specifies the TFTP server IP address; enter in dotted-decimal notation. Enter the name of the configuration file you want to copy from the TFTP server.

Setting the default management interface


You can use cmd-interface command to set the default management interface when you connect to Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 through console port or Telnet. This selection is stored in NVRAM and propagated to all units in a stack configuration. On startup, the switch or stack displays the banner and prompts the user to press [Ctrl}+y. After entering these characters, the system displays either a menu or the Nortel Command Line Interface (NCLI) prompt, depending on which is set using this command. When using the console port, you must logout for the new mode to display. When using Telnet, all subsequent Telnet sessions display the selection.

cmd-interface command
The cmd-interface command allows you to set the default management interface when you use the console port or Telnet. The syntax for the cmd-interface command is:
cmd-interface {cli|menu}

The cmd-interface command is in the privExec command mode.

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Table 80 describes the parameters and variables for the cmd-interface command.
Table 80 cmd-interface command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables cli | menu Description Allows you to set the default management system when using console port or Telnet: clithe system automatically enters the CLI mode and displays the CLI prompt after you enter Crtl+Y menuthe system automatically enters the CI menu mode and displays the menus after you enter Ctrl+Y.

Customizing the opening banner


You can customize the banner that appears when you connect to the Ethernet Switch 325/425. You can customize the text that reads NORTEL. However you cannot customize the second line that reads Enter [Ctrl]+y to begin. The Banner Control feature provides an option to specify the banner text. If you choose not to display the banner, the system enters the command mode through the default command interface. You do not have to press the Ctrl+y keys. The Banner display that you select is used for subsequent console sessions. For executing the new mode in the console, you must logout. For Telnet access, all subsequent sessions use the selected mode. This section covers the following commands: banner command for displaying banner show banner command on page 281 no banner command on page 281

banner command for displaying banner


The banner command for displaying banner specifies the banner displayed at startup; either static or custom. The syntax for the banner command to display banner is:
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The banner command for displaying banner is in the config mode. Table 81 describes the parameters for the banner command.
Table 81 banner command parameters
Parameters static custom disabled <1-15> LINE Description Displays the default agent-banner. Displays the custom agent-banner. Skips the agent-banner display. Fills the Nth line of the custom banner (1<N<15) with the text specified in LINE.

show banner command


The show banner command displays the banner. The syntax for the show banner command is:
show banner [ custom | static ]

The show banner command is in the config mode. Table 82 describes the parameters for the banner command.
Table 82 show banner command parameters
Parameters static custom (if empty) Description Displays default banner Displays custom banner Displays static, custom or disabled status if parameter is not entered.

no banner command
The no banner command allows you to clear all lines of a previously stored custom banner. The syntax for the no banner command is:
no banner

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The no banner command is in the config mode.

Displaying the ARP table


The show arp-table command displays the arp table of the device. The syntax for the show arp-table command is:
show arp-table

The show arp-table command is in the exec command mode. The show arp-table command has no parameters or variables. Figure 103 displays a sample output of the show arp-table command.
Figure 103 show arp-table command output
425-48T#show arp-table Port IP Address MAC Address ---- --------------- ----------------37 192.168.151.1 00:80:2D:6E:47:82 425-48T#

Displaying interfaces
You can view the status of all interfaces on the switch or stack, including MultiLink Trunk membership, link status, autonegotiation, and speed. This section covers: show interfaces command show interfaces config command

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show interfaces command


The show interfaces command displays the current configuration and status of all interfaces. The syntax for the show interfaces command is:
show interfaces [names] [<portlist>]

The show interfaces command is in the exec command mode. Table 83 describes the parameters and variables for the show interfaces command.
Table 83 show interfaces command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables names <portlist> Description Displays the interface names; enter specific ports if you want to see only those.

Figure 104 displays a sample output of the show interfaces names command.
Figure 104 show interfaces names command output
425_48T SW 1.1 in SC2-02 LAB>show interfaces names 1-3 Port Name ---- ---------------------------------------------------------------1 LabBldg4 2 Testing 3 Floor1Bldg2 425_48T#

Figure 105 Shows a sample output of the show interfaces command without the names variable.

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425-48T(config-if)#show Status Port Trunk Admin Oper ---- ----- ------- ---1 Enable Down 2 Enable Down 3 Enable Down 4 Enable Down 5 Enable Down 6 Enable Down 7 Enable Down 8 Enable Down 9 Enable Down 10 Enable Down 11 Enable Down 12 Enable Down 13 Enable Down 14 Enable Down 15 Enable Down 16 Enable Down 17 Enable Down 18 Enable Down 19 Enable Down 425-48T(config-if)# interfaces Link ---Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down Down LinkTrap -------Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Auto Flow Negotiation Speed Duplex Control ----------- -------- ------ ------Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Custom Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled

show interfaces config command


The show interfaces config command displays the current operational status of interfaces and provides supplementary information about the current port settings for Spanning Tree Protocol. The syntax for the show interfaces config command is:
show interfaces [<portlist>] config

The show interfaces config command is in the privExec command mode.

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Table 83 describes the parameters and variables for the show interfaces config command.
Table 84 show interfaces config command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables <portlist> Description Enter the ports you want to display.

Figure 104 displays a sample output of the show interfaces config command.
Figure 106 show interfaces config command output
425 (config)#show interfaces 1/1,1/2 config Status Auto Flow Port Trunk Admin Oper Link LinkTrap Negotiation Speed Duplex Control --------- ----- ------ --- --- ------- ---------- ----- ------ -----1 Enable Down Down Enabled Enabled *****Spanning-tree port configurations***** Port Role State STP Status Oper Status ---- ---------- ---------- ---------- ----------1 Root Forwarding Enabled Enabled

Saving the configuration to NVRAM


You can save your configuration parameters to Non-Volatile RAM (NVRAM) using any of the following CLI commands: copy config nvram command on page 285 write memory command on page 286 save config command on page 286

copy config nvram command


The copy config nvram command copies the current configuration to NVRAM. The syntax for the copy config nvram command is:
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The copy config nvram command is in the privExec command mode. The copy config nvram command has no parameters or variables. Note: The system automatically issues the copy config nvram command periodically. See Enabling and disabling autosave on page 287 for details.

write memory command


The write memory command copies the current configuration to NVRAM. The syntax for the write memory command is:
write memory

The write memory command is in the privExec command mode. The write memory command has no parameters or variables.

save config command


The save config command copies the current configuration to NVRAM. The syntax for the save config command is:
save config

The save config command is in the privExec command mode. The save config command has no parameters or variables.

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Enabling and disabling autosave


The Ethernet Switch 325/425 performs a check every sixty seconds to detect changes in the configuration file or a new log message in the non-volatile storage. If any of these two events occurs, the switch automatically saves its configuration and the non-volatile log to flash memory. Autosave also automatically saves your configuration information across reboots. You can enable or disable this feature. When you disable autosave, changes in the configuration file are not saved to the flash memory. This section covers the following commands: show autosave command autosave enable command on page 288 no autosave enable command on page 288 default autosave enable command on page 288 Note: You can use the CLI command copy config nvram to force a manual save of the configuration when autosave is disabled.

show autosave command


The show autosave command displays the status of the autosave feature, either enabled or disabled. The syntax for the show autosave command is:
show autosave

The show autosave command is in the privExec command mode. The show autosave command has no parameters or variables. Figure 107 displays sample output from the show autosave command.

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425-48T(config-if)#show autosave Auto Save: Enabled 425-48T(config-if)#

autosave enable command


The autosave enable command enables the autosave feature. The syntax for the autosave enable command is:
autosave enable

The autosave enable command is in the config command mode. The autosave enable command has no parameters or variables.

no autosave enable command


The no autosave enable command disables the autosave feature. The syntax for the no autosave enable command is:
no autosave enable

The no autosave enable command is in the config command mode. The no autosave enable command has no parameters or variables.

default autosave enable command


The default autosave enable command defaults the autosave feature to the default value of enabled. The syntax for the default autosave enable command is:
default autosave enable

The default autosave enable command is in the config command mode. The default autosave enable command has no parameters or variables.
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Setting time on network elements using Simple Network Time Protocol


The Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) feature synchronizes the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) to an accuracy within 1 second. This feature adheres to the IEEE RFC 2030 (MIB is the s5agent). With this feature, the system can obtain the time from any RFC 2030-compliant NTP/SNTP server. Note: If you have trouble using this feature, try various NTP servers. Some NTP servers may be overloaded or currently inoperable. show sntp command Displaying system information on page 273 sntp enable command on page 290 no sntp enable command on page 290 sntp server primary address command on page 291 sntp server secondary address command on page 291 no sntp server command on page 292 sntp sync-now command on page 293 sntp sync-interval command on page 293

show sntp command


The show sntp command displays the SNTP information, as well as the configured NTP servers. The syntax for the show sntp command is:
show sntp

The show sntp command is in the privExec command mode. The show sntp command has no parameters or variables. Figure 108 displays sample output from the show sntp command.

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425-48T(config-if)#show sntp SNTP Status: Primary server address: Secondary server address: Sync interval: Last sync source: Primary server sync failures: Secondary server sync failures: Last sync time: Next sync time: Current time: 425-48T(config-if)#

Disabled 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 24 hours 0.0.0.0 0 0 Not Set Not Set Not Set

sntp enable command


Note: The default setting for SNTP is disabled.

The sntp enable command enables SNTP. The syntax for the sntp enable command is:
sntp enable

The sntp enable command is in the config command mode. The sntp enable command has no parameters or variables.

no sntp enable command


The no sntp enable command disables SNTP. The syntax for the no sntp enable command is:
no sntp enable

The no sntp enable command is in the config command mode. The no sntp enable command has no parameters or variables.

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sntp server primary address command


The sntp server primary address command specifies the IP addresses of the primary NTP server. The syntax for the sntp server primary address command is:
sntp server primary address <A.B.C.D>

The sntp server primary address command is in the config command mode. Table 85 describes the parameters and variables for the sntp server primary address command.
Table 85 sntp server primary address command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables <A.B.C.D> Description Enter the IP address of the primary NTP server.

The default is 0.0.0.0.

sntp server secondary address command


The sntp server secondary address command specifies the IP addresses of the secondary NTP server. The syntax for the sntp server secondary address command is:
sntp server secondary address <A.B.C.D>

The sntp server secondary address command is in the config command mode.

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Table 86 describes the parameters and variables for the sntp server secondary address command.
Table 86 sntp server secondary address command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables <A.B.C.D> Description Enter the IP address of the secondary NTP server.

The default is 0.0.0.0.

no sntp server command


The no sntp server command clears the NTP server IP addresses. The syntax for the no sntp server command is:
no sntp server <primary|secondary>

The no sntp server command is in the config command mode. Table 87 describes the parameters and variables for the no sntp server command.
Table 87 no sntp server command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables <primary|secondary> Description Enter the NTP server you want to clear: primaryclears the IP address for the primary NTP server secondaryclears the IP address for the secondary NTP server

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sntp sync-now command


The sntp sync-now command forces a manual synchronization with the NTP server. Note: You must have SNTP enabled before this command can take effect. The syntax for the sntp sync-now command is:
sntp sync-now

The sntp sync-now command is in the config command mode. The sntp sync-now command has no parameters or variables.

sntp sync-interval command


The sntp sync-interval command specifies recurring synchronization with the NTP server in hours relative to initial synchronization. The syntax for the sntp sync-interval command is:
sntp sync-interval <0-168>

The sntp sync-interval command is in the config command mode. Table 88 describes the parameters and variables for the sntp sync-interval command.
Table 88 sntp sync-interval command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables <0-168> Description Enter the number of hours you want for periodic synchronization with the NTP server. Note: 0 is boot-time only, and 168 is once a week; the default value is 24 hours.

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Setting local time zone


SNTP uses Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) for all time synchronizations so it is not affected by different time zones. In order for the switch report the correct time for your local time zone and daylight savings time, you must use the following commands: clock time-zone on page 294 no clock time-zone on page 295 clock summer-time on page 295 no clock summer-time on page 296 show clock time-zone on page 296 show clock summer-time on page 296

clock time-zone
The clock time-zone command sets the local time zone relative to Universal Coordinated Time (UTC). The syntax for the clock time-zone command is:
clock time-zone <zone> <hours> <minutes>

The clock time-zone command is in the config command mode. Table 89 describes the parameters and variables for the clock time-zone command.
Table 89 clock time-zone command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables zone hours minutes Description Time zone acronym that can be displayed when showing system time (Range: Up to 4 characters) Hours difference from UTC. (Valid Range: 12 to +12) Optional minutes difference from UTC. (Range: 059)

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no clock time-zone
The no clock time-zone command disables the clock time zone feature. The syntax for the no clock time-zone command is:
no clock time-zone

The no clock time-zone command is in the config command mode. The no clock time-zone command has no parameters or variables.

clock summer-time
The clock summer-time command sets the daylight savings time with start and end dates. The syntax for the clock summer-time command is:
clock summer-time <zone> [date {<day> <month> <year> <hh:mm>} {<day> <month> <year> <hh:mm>}] [<offset>]

The clock summer-time command is in the config command mode. Table 90 describes the parameters and variables for the clock summer- time command.
Table 90 clock summer-time command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables zone Description The acronym to display when summer time is in effect. If unspecified default to the time zone acronym. (Range: up to 4 characters) The first date specifies when summer time should start and the second date specifies when summer time should end. day: day of the month (Range: 1 to 31) month: month (Range: first three letters by name) hh:mm: time in military format, in hours and minutes Note: <day> <month> parameters can also be entered in order: <month> <day>. Number of minutes to add during summer time (Range: 1 to 1440).

date {<day> <month> <year> <hh:mm>} {<day> <month> <year> <hh:mm>}

offset

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no clock summer-time
The no clock summer-time command disables the daylight savings time feature. The syntax for the no clock summer-time command is:
no clock summer-time

The no clock summer-time command is in the config command mode. The no clock time-zone command has no parameters or variables.

show clock time-zone


The show clock time-zone command displays the local time zone settings. The syntax for the show clock time-zone command is:
show clock time-zone

The show clock time-zone command is in the config command mode. The show clock time-zone command has no parameters or variables. Figure 109 displays sample output from the show clock time-zone command.
Figure 109 show clock time-zone output
425 (config)#show clock time-zone Time Zone is set to 'PDT', offset from UTC is -08:00

show clock summer-time


The show clock summer-time command displays the daylight savings time settings. The syntax for the show clock summer-time command is:
show clock summer-time

The show clock summer-time command is in the config command mode.

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The show clock summer-time command has no parameters or variables. Figure 110 displays sample output from the show clock summer-time command.
Figure 110 show clock summer-time
425(config)#show clock summer-time Summer time is set to: start: 1 April 2006 at 12:00 end: 1 October 2006 at 12:00 Offset: 60 minutes. Timezone will be 'DST'

Enabling Autopology
You can enable the Optivity* Autopology* protocol using the CLI. Refer to www.nortel.com/support for information on Autopology. (The product family for Optivity and Autotopology is Data and Internet.). This section covers the following commands: autotopology command no autotopology command on page 298 default autotopology command on page 298

autotopology command
The autotopology command enables the Autotopology protocol. The syntax for the autotopology command is:
autotopology

The autotopology command is in the config command mode. The autotopology command has no parameters or values.

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no autotopology command
The no autotopology command disables the Autotopology protocol. The syntax for the no autotopology command is:
no autotopology

The no autotopology command is in the config command mode. The no autotopology command has no parameters or values.

default autotopology command


The default autotopology command enables the Autotopology protocol. The syntax for the default autotopology command is:
default autotopology

The default autotopology command is in the config command mode. The default autotopology command has no parameters or values.

show autotopology settings


The show autotopology settings command displays information on the Autotopology configuration. The syntax for the show autotopology settings command is:
show autotopology settings

The show autotopology settings command is in the privExec mode. The show autotopology settings command has no parameters or variables. Figure 111 displays a sample output of the show autotopology settings command.

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Chapter 7 System configuration using the CLI 299 Figure 111 show autotopology settings command output
425-48T#show autotopology settings Autotopology: Enabled Last NMM Table Change: 1 days, 01:08:24 Maximum NMM Table Entries: 100 Current NMM Table Entries: 7 425-48T#

show autotopology nmm-table


The show autotopology nmm-table command displays information about the network management module (NMM) table. The syntax for the show autotopology nmm-table command is:
show autotopology nmm-table

The show autotopology nmm-table command is in the privExec mode. The show autotopology nmm-table command has no parameters or variables. Figure 112 displays a sample output of the show autotopology nmm-table command.
Figure 112 show autotopology nmm-table command output
425-48T#show autotopology nmm-table LSlot LPort IP Addr Seg ID MAC Addr ----- --------------- -------- -----------0/ 0 192.168.151.175 0x000000 000FCDBF1E81 1/37 192.168.151.1 0x00030d 00802D6E4738 1/37 192.168.151.170 0x000115 000CF8610001 1/37 192.168.151.171 0x000115 000F6A822EC1 1/37 192.168.151.172 0x000115 0009978982C1 1/37 192.168.151.174 0x000113 000F6A823621 1/37 192.168.151.176 0x000107 000F3DE52801

Chassis Type ---------------425-48T 1100 5510-24T 325-24G 460-24T-PWR 325-24T 3510-24T

BT -12 12 12 12 12 12 12

LS --Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

CS ---HTBT HTBT HTBT HTBT HTBT HTBT HTBT

RSlot RPort ----NA 3/13 1/21 1/21 1/21 1/19 1/ 7

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Configuring LLDP using the CLI


You can enable the LLDP using the CLI. For more information about LLDP, see Link Layer Discovery Protocol (IEEE 802.1ab) on page 40. This section covers the following commands: lldp command default lldp command on page 301 lldp port config notification command on page 302 no lldp port config notification command on page 302 default lldp port config notification command on page 303 lldp tx-tlv command on page 303 no lldp tx-tlv command on page 304 default lldp tx-tlv command on page 305 lldp port status command on page 305 no lldp port status command on page 306 default lldp port status command on page 306 show lldp command on page 307 show lldp port command on page 309

lldp command
The lldp command sets the LLDP transmission parameters. The syntax for the lldp command is:
lldp [tx-interval <5-327698>] [tx-hold-multiplier <2-10>] [reinit-delay <1-10>] [tx-delay <1-8192>] [notification-interval <5-3600>]

The lldp command is in the config command mode.

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Table 58 describes the parameters and variables for the lldp command.
Table 91 lldp command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables Description Sets the interval between successive transmission cycles. Sets the multiplier for tx-interval used to compute the Time To Live value for the TTL TLV. Sets the delay for re-initialization attempt if the adminStatus is disabled. Sets the minimum delay between successive LLDP frame transmissions. Sets the interval between successive transmissions of LLDP notifications.

tx-interval <5-327698>
tx-hold-multiplier <2-10> reinit-delay <1-10> tx-delay <1-8192> notification-interval <5-3600>

default lldp command


The default lldp command sets the LLDP transmission parameters to their default values. The syntax for the default lldp command is:
default lldp [tx-interval] [tx-hold-multiplier] [reinit-delay] [tx-delay] [notification-interval]

If no parameters are specified, the default lldp command sets all parameters to their default values. The default lldp command is in the config command mode. Table 92 describes the parameters and variables for the default lldp command.
Table 92 default lldp command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables Description Sets retransmit interval to the default value (30). Sets transmission multiplier to the default value (4).

tx-interval
tx-hold-multiplier

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Parameters and variables reinit-delay tx-delay notification-interval Description Sets reinitialize delay to the default value (2). Sets transmission delay to the default value (2). Sets notification interval to the default value (5).

lldp port config notification command


The lldp port config notification command enables notification when new neighbor information is stored or when existing information is removed. The syntax for the lldp port config notification command is:
lldp port <portlist> config notification

The lldp port config notification command is in the config-if command mode. Table 93 describes the parameters and variables for the lldp port config notification command.
Table 93 lldp port config notification command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the ports affected by the command.

no lldp port config notification command


The no lldp port config notification command disables config notification. The syntax for the no lldp port config notification command is:
no lldp port <portlist> config notification

The no lldp port config notification command is in the config-if command mode.
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Table 94 describes the parameters and variables for the no lldp port config notification command.
Table 94 no lldp port config notification command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the ports affected by the command.

default lldp port config notification command


The default lldp port config notification command sets config notification to its default value (disabled). The syntax for the default lldp port config notification command is:
default lldp port <portlist> config notification

The default lldp port config notification command is in the config-if command mode. Table 94 describes the parameters and variables for the default lldp port config notification command.
Table 95 no lldp port config notification command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the ports affected by the command.

lldp tx-tlv command


The lldp tx-tlv command specifies the optional TLVs to include in the transmitted LLDPDUs. The syntax for the lldp tx-tlv command is:
lldp tx-tlv [port <portlist>] [port-desc] [sys-name] [sys-desc] [sys-cap] [local-mgmt-addr]

The lldp tx-tlv command is in the config-if command mode.

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Table 96 describes the parameters and variables for the lldp tx-tlv command.
Table 96 lldp tx-tlv command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> port-desc sys-name sys-desc sys-cap local-mgmt-addr Description Specifies the ports affected by the command. Port description TLV System name TLV System description TLV System capabilities TLV Local management address TLV

no lldp tx-tlv command


The no lldp tx-tlv command specifies the optional TLVs not to include in the transmitted LLDPDUs. The syntax for the lldp tx-tlv command is:
no lldp tx-tlv [port <portlist>] [port-desc] [sys-name] [sys-desc] [sys-cap] [local-mgmt-addr]

The no lldp tx-tlv command is in the config-if command mode. Table 97 describes the parameters and variables for the no lldp tx-tlv command.
Table 97 no lldp tx-tlv command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> port-desc sys-name sys-desc sys-cap local-mgmt-addr Description Specifies the ports affected by the command. Port description TLV. System name TLV System description TLV System capabilities TLV Local management address TLV

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default lldp tx-tlv command


The default lldp tx-tlv command specifies the optional TLVs not to include in the transmitted LLDPDUs (by default, the optional TLVs are not included in LLDPDUs). The syntax for the default lldp tx-tlv command is:
default lldp tx-tlv [port <portlist>] [port-desc] [sys-name] [sys-desc] [sys-cap] [local-mgmt-addr]

The default lldp tx-tlv command is in the config-if command mode. Table 97 describes the parameters and variables for the default lldp tx-tlv command.
Table 98 default lldp tx-tlv command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> port-desc sys-name sys-desc sys-cap local-mgmt-addr Description Specifies the ports affected by the command. Port description TLV. (default value is false: not included) System name TLV (default value is false: not included) System description TLV (default value is false: not included) System capabilities TLV (default value is false: not included) Local management address TLV (default value is false: not included)

lldp port status command


The lldp port status command sets the LLDPU transmit and receive status on ports. The syntax for the lldp port status command is:
lldp port <portlist> status [rxOnly | txAndRx | txOnly]

The lldp port status command is in the config-if command mode.

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Table 99 describes the parameters and variables for the lldp port status command.
Table 99 lldp port status command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the ports affected by the command. Enables LLDPU receive only. Enables LLDPU transmit and receive. Enables LLDPU transmit only.

rxOnly txAndRx txOnly

no lldp port status command


The no lldp port status command disables 802.1ab on ports. The syntax for the no lldp port status command is:
no lldp port <portlist> status

The no lldp port status command is in the config-if command mode. Table 100 describes the parameters and variables for the no lldp port status command.
Table 100 no lldp port status command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the ports affected by the command.

default lldp port status command


The default lldp port status command sets the LLDPU transmit and receive status on specified ports to its default value (txAndRx). The syntax for the default lldp port status command is:
default lldp port <portlist> status

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The default lldp port status command is in the config-if command mode. Table 101 describes the parameters and variables for the default lldp port status command.
Table 101 default lldp port status command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the ports affected by the command.

show lldp command


The show lldp command displays configuration data for LLDP. The syntax for the show lldp command is:
show lldp [local-sys-data] [mgmt-sys-data] [stats]

The show lldp command is in the exec command mode. Table 102 describes the parameters and variables for the show lldp command.
Table 102 show lldp command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables local-sys-data mgmt-sys-data stats Description Displays local LLDP system data. Displays LLDP management data. Displays LLDP statistics.

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Figure 113 displays the output from the show lldp local-sys-data command.
Figure 113 show lldp local-sys-data command output
425>show lldp local-sys-data ------------------------------------------------------------------------LLDP local-sys-data chassis ------------------------------------------------------------------------ChassisIdSubtype ChassisId SysName SysCap Supported Enabled SysDesc ------------------------------------------------------------------------MAC address 00:0b:8c:6d:cc:dd 425 B B Ethernet Switch 425-48T HW:0C FW:3.5.0.2 SW:v3.6.0 ------------------------------------------------------------------------LLDP local-sys-data port ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Num PortIdSubtype PortId PortDesc -----------------------------------------------------------------------1/1 MAC address 00:0b:8c:6d:cc:00 port1 1/2 MAC address 00:0b:8c:6d:cc:01 port2 1/3 MAC address 00:0b:8c:6d:cc:02 port3 1/4 MAC address 00:0b:8c:6d:cc:03 port4 1/5 MAC address 00:0b:8c:6d:cc:04 port5 1/6 MAC address 00:0b:8c:6d:cc:05 port6 1/7 MAC address 00:0b:8c:6d:cc:06 port7 ----More (q=Quit, space/return=Continue)---Sys capability: O-Other; R-Repeater; B-Bridge; W-WLAN accesspoint; r-Router; T-Telephone; D-DOCSIS cable device; S-Station only.

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Figure 114 displays the output from the show lldp mgmt-sys-data command.
Figure 114 show lldp mgmt-sys-data command output
425>show lldp mgmt-sys-data ------------------------------------------------------------------------lldp mgmt-sys-data ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------MgmtAddr MgmtIfId MgmtAddrOID ------------------------------------------------------------------------ipV4 10.128.100.100 0 1.3.6.1.4.1.45.3.57.1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------

Figure 115 displays the output from the show lldp stats command.
Figure 115 show lldp stats command output
425>show lldp stats ------------------------------------------------------------------------lldp stats ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------LastChange RemTable RemTable RemTable RemTable Time Inserts Deletes Drops Ageouts ------------------------------------------------------------------------00:01:18.00 1 0 0 0 -------------------------------------------------------------------------

show lldp port command


The show lldp port command displays configuration data for LLDP ports. The syntax for the show lldp port command is:
show lldp [port <portlist>] [neighbor] [neighbor-mgmt-addr] [rx-stats] [tx-stats] [tx-tlv]

The show lldp port command is in the exec command mode.

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Table 102 describes the parameters and variables for the show lldp port command.
Table 103 show lldp port command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> neighbor Description Specifies the ports affected by the command. Displays LLDP neighbors.

neighbor-mgmt-addr Displays LLDP management addresses for neighbors. rx-stats tx-stats tx-tlv Displays LLDP receive statistics. Displays LLDP transmit statistics. Displays LLDP transmit TLVs.

Figure 116 displays the output from the show lldp port neighbor command.
Figure 116 show lldp port neighbor command output
425>show lldp port 1/1 neighbor -----------------------------------------------------------------------lldp neighbor ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Port Time Index ChassisIdSubtype ChassisId SysCap Supported Enabled -----------------------------------------------------------------------SysName PortIdSubtype PortId PortDesc -----------------------------------------------------------------------SysDesc -----------------------------------------------------------------------3/1 78 1 MAC address 00:09:68:b2:9d:60 B B 425 stacks v360 MAC address 00:09:68:b2:9d:82 port24 Ethernet Switch 425-24T HW:0B FW:3.5.0.2 SW:v3.6.0 -----------------------------------------------------------------------Sys capability: O-Other; R-Repeater; B-Bridge; W-WLAN accesspoint; r-Router; T-Telephone; D-DOCSIS cable device; S-Station only.

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Figure 117 displays the output from the show lldp port
neighbor-mgmt-addr command. Figure 117 show lldp port neighbor-mgmt-addr command output
425>show lldp port 1/1 neighbor-mgmt-addr -----------------------------------------------------------------------lldp neighbor-mgmt-addr ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Port Time Index ChassisIdSubtype ChassisId PortIdSubtype PortId MgmtAddr MgmtIfId MgmtAddrOID -----------------------------------------------------------------------1/1 439194 5 MAC address 00:09:97:a2:9d:80 MAC address 00:09:97:a2:9d:98 ipV4 10.128.100.13 0 1.3.6.1.4.1.45.3.57.2 ------------------------------------------------------------------------

Figure 118 displays the output from the show lldp rx-stats command.
Figure 118 show lldp port rx-stats command output
425>show lldp port 1/1 rx-stats -----------------------------------------------------------------------lldp rx-stats ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Port Frames Frames Frames TLVs TLVs AgeOuts Num Discarded Errors Total Discarded Unrecognized -----------------------------------------------------------------------1/1 0 105 0 0 0 ------------------------------------------------------------------------

Figure 119 displays the output from the show lldp tx-stats command.

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425>show lldp port 1/1 tx-stats ------------------------------------------------------------------------lldp tx-stats ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Port Frames ------------------------------------------------------------------------1/1 123 -------------------------------------------------------------------------

Figure 120 displays the output from the show lldp stats command.
Figure 120 show lldp port tx-tlv command output
425>show lldp port 1/1 tx-tlv -----------------------------------------------------------------------lldp port tlvs ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Port PortDesc SysName SysDesc SysCap MgmtAddr -----------------------------------------------------------------------1/1 true true true true false

Configuring LEDs on the display panel


The blink-leds command allows you to configure the LEDs on the display panel to identify the unit. The syntax of the blink-leds command is:
blink-leds <off> <stop> <unit>

The blink-leds command is in the enable mode.

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Table 104 describes the parameters for the blink-leds command.


Table 104 blink-leds command parameters and variables
Parameters and Variables off time unit Description Sets the LEDs to stop blinking. Indicates the duration for the LEDs to blink in order to identify the unit. Specifies the unit number to which the command is applied.

Configuring UI button
ui-button enable command
The ui-button enable command enables the UI button. The syntax for the ui-button enable command is:
ui-button enable

The ui-button enable command is in the privExec mode. The ui-button enable command has no parameters or variables. Figure 121 displays a sample output of the ui-button enable command.
Figure 121 ui-button enable command output
425-48T(config)#ui-button enable 425-48T(config)#

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ui-button unit command


The ui-button unit command enables UI button on selected unit in the range of <1-8>. Note: This command is specific to stacking mode only.

The syntax for the ui-button unit command is:


ui-button unit <unit #>

The ui-button unit command is in the config command mode. The ui-button unit command has no parameters or variables.

show ui-button
You can check if the UI button is enabled or disabled using the show ui button command. The syntax for the show ui-button command is:
show ui-button

The show ui-button command is in the privExec command mode. The show ui-button command has no parameters or variables. Figure 122 displays sample output from the show ui-button command.
Figure 122 show ui-button command output
425-48T#show ui-button Unit # Button Mode ------ ------------1 Enabled 425-48T#

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default ui-button command


The default ui-button command restores UI button to its default configuration. The syntax for the default ui-button command is:
default ui-button

The default ui-button command is in the config command mode. The default ui-button command has no parameters or values.

no ui-button command
The no ui-button command disables the UI button. The syntax for the no ui-button command is:
no ui-button

The no ui-button command is in the config command mode. The no ui-button command has no parameters or values.

Upgrading software
You can download the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 software image that is located in non-volatile flash memory. To download the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 software image, a properly configured Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server must be present in your network, and the policy switch must have an IP address. To learn how to configure the switch or stack IP address, refer to Assigning and clearing IP addresses on page 252. Caution: Do not interrupt power to the device during the software download process. A power interruption can corrupt the firmware image. This section covers:

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download command

download command
The download command upgrades the software for the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425. You can upgrade both the software image and the diagnostics image. If you upgrade to a stack configuration, the entire stack will be upgraded, and the new image is loaded onto every unit of the stack. Note: The system resets after downloading a new image.

The syntax for the download command is:


download [address <ip>] {image <image-name>|image-if-newer <image-name>|diag <filename>} [no-reset]

The download command is in the privExec command mode. Note: You can use the download command without parameters. The system displays the most recently used TFTP serve IP address and file name; if you still want to use these, press Enter You can also change these. Table 105 describes the parameters and variables for the download command.
Table 105 download command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables address <ip> Description Specifies the IP address of the TFTP server you want to use. Note: If this parameter is omitted, the system goes to the server specified by the tftp-server command. Enter the name of the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 software image you want to download. Enter the name of the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 software image of the newer version you want to download.

image <image-name> image-if-newer <image-name>

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Parameters and variables diag <filename> no-reset Description Enter the name of the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 diagnostics image you want to download. Download the specified software without resetting the unit.

The software download process automatically completes without user intervention. The process erases the contents of flash memory and replaces it with a new software image. Take care not to interrupt the download process until after it runs to completion (the process can take up to 10 minutes, depending on network conditions). When the download process is complete, the switch automatically resets and the new software image initiates a self-test. The system returns a message after successfully downloading a new image. Figure 123 shows a sample output of the download command.
Figure 123 download message for Ethernet Switch 425-48T
Download Image [/] Saving Image [-] Finishing Upgrading Image

During the download process, the Ethernet Switches 325 and 425 is not operational. You can monitor the progress of the download process by observing the LED indications.

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Chapter 8 Ethernet port management using the CLI


This chapter describes how to enable a port, name a port and enable rate limiting. This chapter covers the following topics: Enabling or disabling a port Naming ports on page 321 Setting port speed on page 323 Enabling flow control on page 326 Enabling rate-limiting on page 329 Enabling Custom Autonegotiation Advertisements (CANA) on page 331

Enabling or disabling a port


You can enable or disable a port using the CLI. This section covers the following commands: shutdown command for the port no shutdown command on page 320

shutdown command for the port


The shutdown [port <portlist>] command disables the port. The syntax for the shutdown [port <portlist>] command is:
shutdown [port <portlist>]

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Table 106 describes the parameters and variables for the shutdown [port <portlist>] command.
Table 106 shutdown [port <portlist>] command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to shut down or disable. Enter the port numbers you want to disable. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command.

The shutdown [port <portlist>] command is in the config-if command mode. Figure 124 displays sample output from the shutdown [port <portlist>] command.
Figure 124 shutdown [port <portlist>] command output
425-48T(config-if)#shutdown port 2 425-48T(config-if)#

no shutdown command
The no shutdown command enables the port. The syntax for the no shutdown command is:
no shutdown [port <portlist>]

The no shutdown command is in the config-if command mode.

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Table 107 describes the parameters and variables for the no shutdown command.
Table 107 no shutdown command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to enable. Enter the port numbers you want to disable. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command.

Naming ports
You can name a port using the CLI. This section covers the following commands: name command no name command on page 322 default name command on page 322

name command
The name command allows you to name ports or to change the name. The syntax for the name command is:
name [port <portlist>] <LINE>

The name command is in the config-if command mode.

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Table 108 describes the parameters and variables for the name command.
Table 108 name command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to name. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command. <LINE> Enter up to 26 alphanumeric characters.

no name command
The no name command clears the port names; it resets the field to an empty string. The syntax for the no name command is:
no name [port <portlist>]

The no name command is in the config-if command mode. Table 109 describes the parameters and variables for the no name command.
Table 109 no name command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to clear of names. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command.

default name command


The default name command clears the port names; it resets the field to an empty string. The syntax for the default name command is:
default name [port <portlist>]

The default name command is in the config-if command mode.


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Table 110 describes the parameters and variables for the default name command.
Table 110 default name command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to clear of names. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command.

Setting port speed


You can set the speed and duplex mode for a port. This section covers: speed command default speed command on page 324 duplex command on page 325 default duplex command on page 326

speed command
The speed command sets the speed of the port. The syntax for the speed command is:
speed [port <portlist>] {10|100|1000|auto}

The speed command is in the config-if command mode.

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Table 111 describes the parameters and variables for the speed command.
Table 111 speed command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to configure the speed. Enter the port numbers you want to configure. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command. 10|100|1000|auto Sets speed to: 1010 Mb/s 100100 Mb/s 10001000 Mb/s or 1 GB/s autoautonegotiation

Note: When you set the port speed for autonegotiation, ensure that the other side of the link is also set for autonegotiation.

default speed command


The default speed command sets the speed of the port to the factory default speed. The syntax for the default speed command is:
default speed [port <portlist>]

The default speed command is in the config-if command mode.

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Table 112 describes the parameters and variables for the default speed command.
Table 112 default speed command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to set the speed to factory default. Enter the port numbers you want to set. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command.

duplex command
The duplex command specifies the duplex operation for a port. The syntax for the duplex command is:
duplex [port <portlist>] {full|half|auto}

The duplex command is in the config-if command mode. Table 113 describes the parameters and variables for the duplex command.
Table 113 duplex command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port number to configure the duplex mode. Enter the port number you want to configure, or all to configure all ports simultaneously. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command. full|half|auto Sets duplex to: fullfull-duplex mode halfhalf-duplex mode autoautonegotiation

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Note: When you set the duplex mode for autonegotiation, ensure that the other side of the link is also set for autonegotiation.

default duplex command


The default duplex command sets the duplex operation for a port to the factory default duplex value. The syntax for the default duplex command is:
default duplex [port <portlist>]

The default duplex command is in the config-if command mode. Table 114 describes the parameters and variables for the default duplex command.
Table 114 default duplex command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to reset the duplex mode to factory default values. Enter the port numbers you want to configure, or all to configure all ports simultaneously. The default value is autonegotiation. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command.

Enabling flow control


If you use a Gigabit Ethernet with the Ethernet Switch 425, you control traffic on this port using the flowcontrol command. This section covers the following commands: flowcontrol command on page 327 no flowcontrol command on page 327 default flowcontrol command on page 328

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flowcontrol command
The flowcontrol command is used only on Gigabit Ethernet ports and controls the traffic rates during congestion. The syntax for the flowcontrol command is:
flowcontrol [port <portlist>] {asymmetric|symmetric|auto|disable}

The flowcontrol command is in the config-if mode. Table 115 describes the parameters and variables for the flowcontrol command.
Table 115 flowcontrol command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to configure for flow control. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command. asymmetric|symmetric| Sets the mode for flow control: auto|disable asymmetricenables the local port to perform flow control on the remote port symmetricenables the local port to perform flow control autosets the port to automatically determine the flow control mode (default) disabledisables flow control on the port

no flowcontrol command
The no flowcontrol command is used only on Gigabit Ethernet ports and disables flow control. The syntax for the no flowcontrol command is:
no flowcontrol [port <portlist>]

The no flowcontrol command is in the config-if mode.

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Table 116 describes the parameters and variables for the no flowcontrol command.
Table 116 no flowcontrol command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to disable flow control. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command.

default flowcontrol command


The default flowcontrol command is used only on Gigabit Ethernet ports and sets the flow control to auto, which automatically detects the flow control. The syntax for the default flowcontrol command is:
default flowcontrol [port <portlist>]

The default flowcontrol command is in the config-if mode. Table 117 describes the parameters and variables for the default flowcontrol command.
Table 117 default flowcontrol command parameters and variables
Parameters and variables port <portlist> Description Specifies the port numbers to default to auto flow control. Note: If you omit this parameter, the system uses the port number you specified in the interface command.

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Enabling rate-limiting
You can limit the percentage of multicast traffic, or broadcast traffic, or both using the CLI. For more information about rate-limiting, refer to Rate Limiting Configuration screen on page 115. This section covers: show rate-limit command rate-limit command on page 330 no rate-limit command on page 330 default rate-limit command on page 331

show rate-limit command


The show rate-limit command displays the rate-limiting settings and statistics. The syntax for the show rate-limit command is:
show rate-limit

The show rate-limit command is in the privExec command mode. The show rate-limit command has no parameters or variables. Figure 125 displays sample output from the show rate-limit command.
Figure 125 show rate-limit command output
425-48T#show rate-limit Packet Type Limit ----------- ----Both 0 pps 425-48T#

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rate-limit command
The rate-limit command configures rate-limiting on the switch. The syntax for the rate-limit command is:
rate-limit [multicast <pct>] [broadcast <pct>] [both <pct>]

The rate-limit command is in the config-if command mode. Table 118 describes the parameters and variables for the rate-limit command.
Table 118 rate-limit command parameters and variables
Parameters and values Description Applies rate-limiting to the type of traffic. Enter an integer between 1 and 10 to set the rate-limiting percentage: multicastapplies rate-limiting to multicast packets broadcastapplies rate-limiting to broadcast packets bothapplies rate-limiting to both multicast and broadcast packets

multicast <pct>| broadcast <pct>|both <pct>

no rate-limit command
The no rate-limit command disables rate-limiting on the switch. The syntax for the no rate-limit command is:
no rate-limit

The no rate-limit command is in the config-if command mode.

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default rate-limit command


The default rate-limit command restores the rate-limiting value for the switch to the default setting. The syntax for the default rate-limit command is:
default rate-limit

The default rate-limit command is in the config-if command mode.

Enabling Custom Autonegotiation Advertisements (CANA)


You can control the capabilities that are advertised by the Ethernet switch as part of the auto-negotiation process using the Custom Autonegotiation Advertisements (CANA) feature. When auto-negotiation is disabled, the hardware is configured for a single (fixed) speed and duplex value. When auto-negotiation is enabled, the advertisement made by the switch is a constant value based upon all speed and duplex modes supported by the hardware. When auto-negotiating, the switch selects the highest common operating mode supported between it and its link partner. This section covers: show auto-negotiation-advertisements command show auto-negotiation-capabilities command on page 332 auto-negotiation-advertisements command on page 333 no auto-negotiation-advertisements command on page 334 default auto-negotiation-advertisements command on page 335

show auto-negotiation-advertisements command


The show auto-negotiation-advertisements command displays the current autonegotiation advertisements. The syntax for the show auto-negotiation-advertisements command is:
show auto-negotiation-advertisements [port <portlist>] System Configuration Guide

332 Chapter 8 Ethernet port management using the CLI

The show auto-negotiation-advertisements command is in the userExec command mode. Table 119 describes the parameters and variables for the show auto-negotiation-advertisements command.
Table 119 show auto-negotiation-advertisements command
Parameters and values Description Enter ports for which you want the current autonegotiation advertisements displayed.

port <portlist>

Figure 126 displays sample output from the show auto-negotiation-advertisements command.
Figure 126 show auto-negotiation-advertisements command output
425-48T(config-if)#show auto-negotiation-advertisements port 4,8,10 Port Autonegotiation Advertised Capabilities ---- ---------------------------------------------------------------4 10Full 8 10Full 10 10Full 425-48T(config-if)#

show auto-negotiation-capabilities command


The show auto-negotiation-capabilities command displays the hardware advertisement capabilities for the switch. The syntax for the show auto-negotiation-capabilities command is:
show auto-negotiation-capabilities [port <portlist>]

The show auto-negotiation-capabilities command is in the userExec command mode.

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Table 120 describes the parameters and variables for the show auto-negotiation-capabilities command.
Table 120 show auto-negotiation-capabilities command
Parameters and values Description Enter ports for which you want the autonegotiation capabilities displayed.

port <portlist>

Figure 127 displays sample output from the show auto-negotiation-capabilities command.
Figure 127 show auto-negotiation-capabilities command output
425-48T(config-if)#show auto-negotiation-capabilities port 5,6,10 Port Autonegotiation Capabilities ---- ---------------------------------------------------------------5 10Full 10Half 100Full 100Half 6 10Full 10Half 100Full 100Half 10 10Full 10Half 100Full 100Half 425-48T(config-if)#

auto-negotiation-advertisements command
The auto-negotiation-advertisements command configures advertisements for the switch. The syntax for the auto-negotiation-advertisements command is:
auto-negotiation-advertisements [port <portlist>] [10-full] [10-half] [100-full] [100-half] [1000-full] [1000-half] [asymm-pause-frame] [pause-frame] [none]

The auto-negotiation-advertisements command is in the interface configuration command mode.

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Table 121 describes the parameters and variables for the auto-negotiation-advertisements command.
Table 121 auto-negotiation-advertisements command
Parameters and values Description Enter ports for which you want to configure advertisements. These are speed-duplex-pause settings. Any combination of these settings is allowed, but parameters must be given in the order shown.

port <portlist> [10-full] [10-half] [100-full] [100-half] [1000-full] [1000-half] [asymm-pause-frame] [pause-frame] none

Do not advertise any settings during auto-negotiation.

no auto-negotiation-advertisements command
The no auto-negotiation-advertisements command clears all advertisements for the switch. This command is used for testing. The syntax for the no auto-negotiation-advertisements command is:
no auto-negotiation-advertisements [port <portlist>]

Note: The use of this command affects traffic and brings down the link.

The no auto-negotiation-advertisements command is in the interface configuration command mode. Table 122 describes the parameters and variables for the no auto-negotiation-advertisements command.
Table 122 no auto-negotiation-advertisements command
Parameters and values Description Enter ports for which you want to clear all advertisements.

port <portlist>

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default auto-negotiation-advertisements command


The default auto-negotiation-advertisements command sets default advertisements for the switch. The syntax for the default auto-negotiation-advertisements command is:
default auto-negotiation-advertisements [port <portlist>]

The default auto-negotiation-advertisements command is in the interface configuration command mode. Table 123 describes the parameters and variables for the default auto-negotiation-advertisements command.
Table 123 default auto-negotiation-advertisements command
Parameters and values Description Enter ports for which you want to set default advertisements.

port <portlist>

This feature allows you to customize the capabilities that you advertise. It also allows you to control the capabilities that are advertised by the Ethernet switch as part of the auto-negotiation process.

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Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager


The first four sections of this chapter describe how you can use Device Manager to configure your switch, manage SNTP, and display topology information. The chapter includes the following information: Viewing Unit information Viewing switch IP information on page 339 Editing the chassis configuration on page 343 Working with configuration files on page 358 Working with SNTP on page 362 Displaying topology information using Device Manager on page 364

Viewing Unit information


You can view unit information by using the Unit dialog box. To open the Unit dialog box: 1 2 Double-click on a single unit or select the units you want to edit. Do one of the following: From the shortcut menu, choose Edit. From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > Unit. On the toolbar, click Edit.

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The following sections provide a description of the tabs in the Edit > Unit dialog box and details about each item on the tab.

Unit tab
To open the Unit tab:

From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > Unit.
The Unit dialog box (Figure 128) opens with the Unit tab displayed.
Figure 128 Unit dialog box

Table 124 describes the Unit tab fields.


Table 124 Unit tab fields
Field Type Descr Ver Sernum Description Specifies the type number. Specifies the type of switch. Specifies the hardware version number of the switch. Specifies the serial number of the switch.

Rate Limit tab


To open the Rate Limit tab:

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From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > Unit. The Unit dialog box opens with the Unit tab displayed (Figure 128 on page 338).

Click the Rate Limit tab. The Rate limit tab opens (Figure 129).

Figure 129 Rate Limit tab

Table 125 describes the Rate Limit tab fields.


Table 125 Rate Limit tab fields
Field Traffic Type AllowedRatePps Description Specifies the traffic type. Allowed traffic rate packets per second. It is in the range of 0-262143 (0-3FFFFh). Note: Rate Limiting feature is disabled when AllowedRatePps equals to 0. When Enable is set to True, the TrafficType can either be multicast, broadcast, or both. Note: You can not set the Enabled field for both multicast and broadcast TrafficeType to False at the same time. This is illegal configuration.

Enable

Viewing switch IP information


You can view the switch IP information using the IP dialog box.
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To open the IP dialog box:

From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > IP.
The Edit IP dialog box opens with the Globals tab displayed. The following sections provide a description of the tabs in the Edit > IP dialog box and details about each item on the tab.

Globals tab
To open the Globals tab:

From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > IP.
The IP dialog box opens (Figure 130) with the Globals tab displayed.
Figure 130 Globals tab

Table 126 describes the Globals tab fields.


Table 126 Globals tab fields
Field and MIB association DefaultTTL Description Default value inserted into the Time-To-Live field of the IP header of datagrams originated by the switch, whenever a TTL value is not supplied by the transport layer protocol. Default value is 64. Maximum number of seconds that received fragments are held while they are awaiting reassembly by the switch. Default value is 60.

ReasmTimeout

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Addresses tab
The Addresses tab shows the IP address information for the device. To open the Addresses tab: 1 From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > IP. The IP dialog box opens with the Globals tab displayed (Figure 130 on page 340). 2 Click the Addresses tab. The Addresses tab opens (Figure 131).
Figure 131 Edit IP dialog box IP Address tab

Table 127 describes the Address tab fields.


Table 127 Addresses tab fields
Field Addr NetMask BcastAddr Description The device IP address. The subnet mask address. The value of the least-significant bit in the IP broadcast address used for sending datagrams on the (logical) interface associated with the IP address of this entry. For example, when the Internet standard all-ones broadcast address is used, the value will be 1. This value applies to both the subnet and network broadcasts addresses used by the entity on this (logical) interface. The size of the largest IP datagram that this entity can reassemble from incoming IP fragmented datagrams received on this interface.

ReasmMaxSize

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ARP tab
The ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) tab shows the MAC addresses and the associated IP addresses for the switch. To open the ARP tab: 1 From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > IP. The IP dialog box opens with the Globals tab displayed (Figure 130 on page 340). 2 Click the ARP tab. The ARP tab opens (Figure 132).
Figure 132 Edit IP dialog box ARP tab

Table 128 describes the ARP tab fields.


Table 128 ARP tab fields
Field Interface MacAddress IpAddress Type Description The unit and port number. The unique hardware address of the device. The Internet Protocol address of the device used to represent a point of attachment in a TCP/IP internetwork. The type of mapping.

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Editing the chassis configuration


You can edit a chassis configuration from the Edit Chassis dialog box. To open the Chassis dialog box: 1 2 Select the chassis. Do one of the following: From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > Chassis. On the toolbar, click Edit.

The following sections provide a description of the tabs in the Edit > Chassis dialog box and details about each field on the tab.

System tab
You can use the System tab to specify tracking information for a device, device descriptions, and so on. To open the System tab: 1 2 Select the chassis. From the shortcut menu, choose Edit > Chassis. The Chassis dialog box opens with the System tab displayed (Figure 133).

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Table 129 describes the System tab fields.


Table 129 System tab fields
Field sysDescr sysUpTime sysContact sysName sysLocation Description The assigned system name. The time since the system was last booted. Type the contact information (in this case, an e-mail address) for the system administrator. Type the name of this device. Type the physical location of this device.

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Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager 345 Table 129 System tab fields (continued)
Field AuthenticationTraps Description Click to enable or disable. When you enable, SNMP traps are sent to trap receivers for all SNMP access authentication. When you disable, no traps are received. To view traps, click the Trap toolbar button.

ReBoot AutoPVID NextBootMgmtProtocol CurrentMgmtProtocol BootMode

By default, the switch will be in the Running mode. The reboot command initiates a hardware reset. Click to enable or disable. When you enable, AutoPVID is activated. When you disable, AutoPVID is inactivated. The transport protocol(s) to use after the next boot of the agent. The current transport protocol(s) that the agent supports. This setting determines how the management interface of the switch will be assigned an IP address, the next time the switch boots. The four BootMode options are: local - use the IP address contained in the configuration file. net - always attempt to get an IP address from the network. netWhenNeeded - attempt to get an IP address from the network only when one is not contained in the configuration file. netOrLastAddress - attempt to get an IP address from the network and if that fails use the IP address that was in use on this switch before the last reboot. The source from which the agent image is loaded at the next boot. The version number of the agent image that is currently used on the switch.

ImageLoadMode CurrentImageVersion

LocalStorageImageVersion The version number of the agent image that is stored in flash memory on the switch. NextBootDefaultGateway CurrentDefaultGateway The IP address of the default gateway for the agent to use after the next time the switch is booted. The IP address of the default gateway that is currently in use.

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Field NextBootLoadProtocol LastLoadProtocol Description The transport protocol to be used by the agent to load the configuration information and the image at the next boot. The transport protocol last used to load the image and configuration information on the switch.

Base Unit Info tab


The Base Unit Info tab provides read-only information about the operating status of the hardware and whether or not the default factory settings are being used. To open the Base Unit Info tab: 1 2 Select the chassis. From the shortcut menu, choose Edit > Chassis. The Chassis dialog box opens with the System tab displayed (Figure 133 on page 344). 3 Click the Base Unit Info tab. The Base Unit Info tab opens (Figure 134).
Figure 134 Edit Chassis dialog box Base Unit Info tab

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Table 130 describes the Base Unit Info tab fields.


Table 130 Base Unit Info tab fields
Field Type Descr Ver SerNum LstChng Description The switch type. A description of the switch hardware, including number of ports and transmission speed. The switch hardware version number. The switch serial number. The value of sysUpTime at the time the interface entered its current operational state. If the current state was entered prior to the last reinitialization of the local network management subsystem, the value is zero. The operational state of the switch. Type the physical location of the switch.

OperState Location

Stack Info tab


Similar to the Base Unit Info tab, the Stack Info tab provides information about the operating status of the stacked switches and whether or not the default factory settings are being used. This tab is enabled for the stacking configuration only. To open the Stack Info tab: 1 2 Select the chassis. From the shortcut menu, choose Edit > Chassis. The Chassis dialog box opens with the System tab displayed (Figure 133 on page 344). 3 Click the Stack Info tab. The Stack Info tab opens (Figure 135).

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Table 131 describes the Stack Info tab fields.


Table 131 Stack Info tab fields
Field Descr Location Description A description of the component or subcomponent. If not available, the value is a zero length string. The geographic location of a component in a system modeled as a chassis, but possibly physically implemented with geographically separate devices connected together to exchange managment information. Chassis modeled in this manner are sometimes referred to as virtual chassis. An example value is: '4th flr wiring closet in blg A'. Note: 1. This object is applicable only to components that can be found in either the Board or Unit groups. If the information is unavailable, for example, the chassis is not modeling a virtual chassis or component is not in Board or Unit group, the value is a zero length string. 2. If this object is applicable and is not assigned a value through a SNMP SET PDU when the row is created, the value will default to the value of the object s5ChasComSerNum. The value of sysUpTime when it was detected that the component/ sub-component was added to the chassis. If this has not occurred since the cold/warm start of the agent, then the value is zero.

LstChng

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Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager 349 Table 131 Stack Info tab fields (continued)
Field OperState Description The current operational state of the component. The possible values are: othersome other state notAvailstate not available removedcomponent removed disabledoperation disabled normalnormal operation resetInProgreset in progress testingdoing a self test warningoperating at warning level nonFatalErroperating at error level fatalErrerror stopped operation The allowable (and meaningful) values are determined by the component type. The version number of the component or subcomponent. If not available, the value is a zero length string. The serial number of the component or subcomponent. If not available, the value is a zero length string.

Ver SerNum

Agent tab
The Agent tab provides read-only information about the addresses that the agent software uses to identify the switch. To open the Agent tab: 1 2 Select the chassis. From the shortcut menu, choose Edit > Chassis. The Chassis dialog box opens (Figure 133 on page 344) with the System tab displayed. 3 Click the Agent tab. The Agent tab opens (Figure 136).

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350 Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager Figure 136 Edit Chassis dialog box Agent tab

Table 132 describes the Agent tab fields.


Table 132 Agent tab fields
Field NextBootIpAddr NextBootNetMask LoadServerAddr ImageFileName Description The IP address to be used the next time the switch is booted. The subnet mask to be used the next time the switch is booted. The IP address of the load server for the configuration file and/or the image file. If not used, then the value is 0.0.0.0. Name of the image file(s) currently associated with the interface. When the object is not used, the value is a zero length string. Indicates if the configuration and/or image file(s) were downloaded from this interface and if the file names have not been changed. The IP address of the boot router for the configuration file and/ or the image file. The MAC address of the switch.

ValidFlag

BootRouterAddr MacAddr

PowerSupply tab
The PowerSupply tab provides read-only information about the operating status of the switch power supplies. To open the PowerSupply tab: 1 2
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Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager 351

The Chassis dialog box opens (Figure 133 on page 344) with the System tab displayed. 3 Click the PowerSupply tab. The PowerSupply tab opens (Figure 137).
Figure 137 Edit Chassis dialog box Power Supply tab

Table 133 describes the PowerSupply tab fields.


Table 133 Power Supply tab fields
Field Desc OperStat Description The power supply type. The operational state of the power supply. Possible values include: other: Some other state. notAvail: State not available. removed: Component was removed. disabled: Operation disabled. normal: State is in normal operation. resetInProg: There is a reset in progress. testing: System is doing a self test. warning: System is operating at a warning level. nonFatalErr: System is operating at error level. fatalErr: A fatal error stopped operation. notConfig: A module needs to be configured. The allowable values are determined by the component type.

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Fan tab
The Fan tab provides read-only information about the operating status of the switch fans. To open the Fan tab: 1 2 Select the chassis. From the shortcut menu, choose Edit > Chassis. The Chassis dialog box opens (Figure 133 on page 344) with the System tab displayed. 3 Click the Fan tab. The Fan tab opens (Figure 138).
Figure 138 Edit Chassis dialog box Fan tab

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Table 134 describes the Fan tab fields.


Table 134 Fan tab fields
Field Desc OperStat Description The fan type. The operational state of the fan. Values include: other: Some other state. notAvail: This state is not available. removed: Fan was removed. disabled: Fan is disabled. normal: Fan is operating in normal operation. resetInProg: A reset of the fan is in progress. testing: Fan is doing a self test. warning: Fan is operating at a warning level. nonFatalErr: Fan is operating at error level. fatalErr: An error stopped the fan operation notConfig: Fan needs to be configured. The allowable values are determined by the component type.

Banner tab
The Banner tab allows you to specify banner display in TELNET. You can specify either the default banner or a custom banner. To open the Banner tab: 1 2 Select the chassis. From the main menu, choose Edit > Chassis. The Chassis dialog box opens (Figure 133 on page 344) with the System tab displayed. 3 Click the Banner tab. The Banner tab opens (Figure 139).

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To set the default banner: 1 In the Banner tab, click on the static radio button, and then click Apply. This resets the banner in Telnet to the default banner.

To check that the default banner is set in Telnet: 2 In the Main Menu, click on Device > Telnet. The Telnet window opens (Figure 139) with the default banner displayed.

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Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager 355 Figure 140 Telnet window with default banner
### ### ########### ########## ############# ########### ### #### ### ############# ############ ############# ########### ### ##### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ###### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ############ ### ######### ### ### ### ### ### ### ########### ### ######### ### ### ###### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ##### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### ### #### ############# ### ### ### ########### ########### ### ### ########### ### ### ### ########### ###########

Enter Ctrl-Y to begin. *************************************************************** *** Ethernet Switch 425-24T *** *** Nortel *** *** Copyright (c) 1996-2005, All Rights Reserved *** *** Release 3.6 *** *** HW:0A FW:3.5.0.2 SW:v3.6.0 *** ***************************************************************

To disable the banner:

In the Banner tab, click on the disabled radio button, and then click Apply.
To check that the banner is disabled:

In the Main Menu, click on Device > Telnet.


The Telnet window opens without the banner.

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Ethernet Switch 425-24T Main Menu IP Configuration/Setup... SNMP Configuration... System Characteristics... Switch Configuration... Console/Comm Port Configuration... Spanning Tree Configuration... TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration... Software Download... Configuration File... Display System Log... Reset... Reset to Default Settings... Shutdown Command... Command Line Interface... Logout...

Use arrow keys to highlight option, press <Return> or <Enter> to select option

Custom Banner tab


The Custom Banner tab allows you to specify the display for a custom banner in Telnet. To open the Custom Banner tab: 1 2 Select the chassis. From the main menu, choose Edit > Chassis. The Chassis dialog box opens (Figure 133 on page 344) with the System tab displayed. 3 Click the Custom Banner tab. The Custom Banner tab opens (Figure 142).

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Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager 357 Figure 142 Edit Chassis dialog box Custom Banner tab

To create a Custom Banner: 1 2 3 In the Banner tab, click on the custom radio button, and then click Apply. Click on the Custom Banner tab (Figure 142). In the Custom Banner tab, make the changes to the lines of the banner that you want to create, and click Apply. The custom banner is 15 lines high and can be up to 80 characters long.

To check that the custom banner is set in Telnet: 1 In the Main menu, click on Device > Telnet. The Telnet window opens (Figure 143) with the custom banner displayed.

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****************************************************************************** Ethernet Switches 325/425 ******************************************************************************

Enter Ctrl-Y to begin. *************************************************************** *** Ethernet Switch 425-24T *** *** Nortel *** *** Copyright (c) 1996-2005, All Rights Reserved *** *** Release 3.6 *** *** HW:0A FW:3.5.0.2 SW:v3.6.0 *** ***************************************************************

To disable the banner:

In the Banner tab, click the disabled radio button, and then click Apply.
To check that the banner is disabled:

In the Main Menu, click on Device > Telnet.


The Telnet window opens without the banner.

Working with configuration files


This chapter describes how you can view information and upload or download the configuration and image files.

FileSystem dialog box


To open the Edit FileSystem dialog box:
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From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > File System.
The FileSystem dialog box opens (Figure 144) and displays the Config/ Image/Diag tab.
Figure 144 FileSystem - Config/Image/Diag File tab dialog box

Table 135 describes the FileSystem Config/Image/Diag file dialog box fields.
Table 135 FileSystem Config/Image/Diag file dialog box fields
Field LoadServerAddr Description The IP address of the load server for the configuration file and/or the image file. If not used, then the value is 0.0.0.0.

BinaryConfigFile Name of the configuration file currently associated with the interface. Name When not used, the value is a zero length string. ImageFileName FwFileName (Diag) Name of the image file(s) currently associated with the interface. When the object is not used, the value is a zero length string. Specifies the FWFileName.

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Field Action Description This object is used to download or upload a config file, an image file or diag firmware file. In read operation, if there is no action taken since the boot up, it will return with a value of other. Otherwise, it will return the latest action. In a write operation, the values that can be written are: dnldConfig dnldImg upIdConfig dnldFw dnldImgIfNewer dnldImgNoReset dnldFwNoReset The newly downloaded config, image or diag file will not take effect until the next boot cycle of the device.

Status

This object is used to get the status of the latest action as shown by s5AgInfoFileAction. The values that can be read are: other if no action taken since the boot up inProgress the operation is in progress success the operation succeeds fail the operation failed

ASCII config file


To display the ASCII Config file tab:

In the File System dialog box, click on the ASCII Config File tab.
The ASCII Config File tab (Figure 145) opens.

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Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager 361 Figure 145 File system - ASCII Config File dialog box

Table 136 describes the ASCII Config File tab fields.


Table 136 ASCII Config File tab fields
Field LoadServerAddr ASCIIConfigFileName ASCIIConfigAutoDownload ASCIIConfigAutodldStatus ASCIIConfigManualDownload ASCIIConfigManualdldStatus ASCIIConfigManualUpload ASCIIConfigManualUpldStatus Description The IP address of the load server for the ASCII configuration file. If not used, then the value is 0.0.0.0. Name of the ASCII configuration file currently associated with the interface. When not used, the value is a zero length string. Specifies automatic ASCII configuration download. Specifies the current status of the ASCII configuration file download. Specifies manual download of an ASCII configuration file. Specifies the current status of the manual download of an ASCII configuration file. Specifies manual upload of an ASCII configuration file. Specifies the current status of the manual upload of an ASCII configuration file.

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Working with SNTP


The Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) feature synchronizes the Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) to an accuracy within 1 second. This feature adheres to the IEEE RFC 2030 (MIB is the s5agent). With this feature, the system can obtain the time from any RFC 2030-compliant NTP/SNTP server. The system retries connecting with the NTP server a maximum of 3 times, with 5 minutes between each retry. If the connection fails after the 3 attempts, the system waits for the next synchronization time (the default is 24 hours) and begins the process again.

Configuring SNTP
The SNTP dialog box contains the parameters for configuring Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP). To open the SNTP dialog box: 1 From the Main Menu, choose Edit > SNTP. The SNTP dialog box opens (Figure 146).

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Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager 363 Figure 146 SNTP dialog box

Table 137 describes the SNTP dialog box fields.


Table 137 SNTP dialog box fields
Field PrimaryServer Address SecondaryServer Address State Description The IP address of the primary SNTP server. The IP address of the secondary SNTP server. Controls whether the device uses the Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP), to synchronize the device's clock to the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). If the value is disabled, the device will not synchronize it's clock using SNTP. If the value is unicast, the device will synchronize shortly after boot time when network access becomes available, and periodically thereafter. Controls the frequency, in hours, that the device will attempt to synchronize with the NTP servers Specifies that the device to immediately attempt to synchronize with the NTP servers.

SyncInterval ManualSync Request

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Field LastSyncTime LastSyncSource NextSyncTime PrimaryServer SynchFailures SecondaryServer SynchFailures CurrentTime Description Specifies the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) when the device last synchronized with an NTP server. Specifies the IP source address of the NTP server with which this device last synchronized Specifies the the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) at which the next synchronization is scheduled. Specifies the number of times the switch failed to synchronize with the primary server address. However, synchronization with the secondary server address may still occur. Specifies the number of times the switch failed to synchronize with the secondary server address, Specifies the switch's current Coordinated Universal Time (UTC).

Note: In order to clear out the PrimaryServerAddress and SecondaryServerAddress, you must first set the State to disabled.

Displaying topology information using Device Manager


This chapter describes diagnostic information available in Device Manager on the following tabs: Topology tab Topology Table tab on page 365

Topology tab
To view topology information:

From the Device Manager menu bar, select Edit > Diagnostics.
The Diagnostics dialog box opens with the Topology tab displayed (Figure 147).

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Chapter 9 Configuring the switch using Device Manager 365 Figure 147 Diagnostics dialog box Topology tab

Table 138 describes the Topology tab fields.


Table 138 Topology tab fields
Field IpAddr Status Description The IP address of the device. Whether Nortel topology is on (topOn) or off (topOff) for the device. The default value is topOn. The value of sysUpTime the last time an entry in the network management MIB (NMM) topology table was added, deleted, or modified. If the table has not changed since the last cold or warm start of the agent. The maximum number of entries in the NMM topology table. The current number of entries in the NMM topology table.

NmmLstChg

NmmMaxNum NmmCurNum

Topology Table tab


To view more topology information: 1 From the Device Manager menu bar, choose Edit > Diagnostics. The Diagnostics dialog box opens with the Topology tab displayed (Figure 147 on page 365). 2 Click the Topology Table tab.
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The Topology Table tab opens (Figure 148).


Figure 148 Diagnostics dialog box Topology Table tab

Table 139 describes the Topology Table tab fields.


Table 139 Topology Table tab fields
Field Slot Port IpAddr SegId Description The slot number in the chassis in which the topology message was received. The port on which the topology message was received. The IP address of the sender of the topology message. The segment identifier of the segment from which the remote agent sent the topology message. This value is extracted from the message. The MAC address of the sender of the topology message. The chassis type of the device that sent the topology message. The backplane type of the device that sent the topology message. Indicates if the sender of the topology message is on the same Ethernet segment as the reporting agent. The current state of the sender of the topology message. The choices are: topChanged Topology information has recently changed. heartbeat Topology information is unchanged. new The sending agent is in a new state.

MacAddr ChassisType BkplType LocalSeg CurState

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This chapter describes how to use Device Manager to configure ports on an Ethernet Switch 325/425. The windows displayed when you configure a single port differ from the ones displayed when you configure multiple ports. However, the options are similar. This section covers: Viewing and editing a single port configuration Viewing and editing multiple port configurations on page 371

Viewing and editing a single port configuration


To view or edit the configuration of a single port:

Do one of the following:


Double-click on a single port. From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > Port. From the shortcut menu, choose Edit. From the toolbar, click Edit.

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Note: When you edit a single port, tabs that are not applicable are not available for you to select. When you edit multiple ports, some tabs are not available, and some tabs are available even though the options are not applicable. When the option does not apply for a given port, NoSuchObject is displayed. The following sections provide a description of the Edit Port dialog box, and details about the fields in the Interface tab: Interface tab for a single port Interface tab for multiple ports on page 372

Interface tab for a single port


The Interface tab shows the basic configuration and status of a single port. To view the Interface tab: 1 2 Select the port you want to edit. Do one of the following: Double-click on the selected port. From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > Port. From the shortcut menu, choose Edit. From the toolbar, click Edit.

The Port dialog box for a single port opens with the Interface tab displayed (Figure 149).

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Chapter 10 Configuring ports using Device Manager 369 Figure 149 Port dialog box Interface tab

Note: 10/100BASE-TX ports may not autonegotiate correctly with older 10/100BASE-TX equipment. In some cases, the older devices can be upgraded with new firmware or driver revisions. If an upgrade does not allow autonegotiation to correctly identify the link speed and duplex settings, you can manually configure the settings for the link in question.

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Table 140 describes the Interface tab fields for a single port.
Table 140 Interface tab fields for a single port
Field Index Name Descr Type Mtu PhysAddress AdminStatus Description A unique value assigned to each interface. The value ranges between 1 and 512. Specifies a name for the port. The type of switch and number of ports. The media type of this interface. The size of the largest packet, in octets, that can be sent or received on the interface. The MAC address assigned to a particular interface. The current administrative state of the device, which can be one of the following: up down When a managed system is initialized, all interfaces start with AdminStatus in the up state. AdminStatus changes to the down state (or remains in the up state) as a result of either management action or the configuration information available to the managed system. The current operational state of the interface, which can be one of the following: up down testing If AdminStatus is up, then OperStatus should be up if the interface is ready to transmit and receive network traffic. If AdminStatus is down, then OperStatus should be down. It should remain in the down state if and only if there is a fault that prevents it from going to the up state. The testing state indicates that no operational packets can be passed. The value of sysUpTime at the time the interface entered its current operational state. If the current state was entered prior to the last reinitialization of the local network management subsystem, the value is zero. Specifies whether linkUp/linkDown traps should be generated for this interface Current speed. Indicates whether this port is enabled for autonegotiation or not. The current administrative duplex mode of the port (half or full). The current mode of the port (half duplex or full duplex).

OperStatus

LastChange

LinkTrap Speed AutoNegotiate AdminDuplex OperDuplex

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Field AdminSpeed OperSpeed AutoNegotiationCapability AutoNegotiationAdvertisments MltId IsPortShared Description Set the ports speed. The current operating speed of the port. Specifies the port speed and duplex capabilities that a switch can support on a port, and that may be advertised by the port using auto-negotiation Specifies the port speed and duplex abilities to be advertised during link negotiation. The MultiLink Trunk to which the port is assigned (if any). Specifies whether a port is shared. Multiple ports that are logically represented as a single port are shared. Only one shared port may be active at a time. Specifies the physical port components that are active for a shared port.

PortActiveComponent

Viewing and editing multiple port configurations


To view or edit the configurations of multiple ports: 1 Select the ports you want to edit. Press Ctrl+left click the ports you want to view or configure. A yellow outline appears around the selected ports. 2 Do one of the following: From the shortcut menu, choose Edit. From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > Port. From the shortcut menu, choose Edit. From the toolbar, click Edit.

Note: When you edit multiple ports, some tabs are not available, and
some tabs are available even though the options are not applicable. When the option does not apply for a given port, NoSuchObject is displayed.

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Interface tab for multiple ports


The Interface tab shows the basic configuration and status of the selected ports. To view or edit the Interface tab for multiple ports: 1 Select the ports that you want to edit. Press Ctrl+left-click the ports that you want to configure. A yellow outline appears around the selected ports. 2 Do one of the following: From the shortcut menu, choose Edit. From the Device Manager main menu, choose Edit > Port.

The Interface tab shows port interface statistics.


Figure 150 Interface tab fields for multiple ports

Table 141 describes the Interface tab fields for multiple ports.
Table 141 Interface tab fields for multiple ports
Field Index Port Name Descr Type Description A unique value assigned to each interface. The value ranges between 1 and 512. Number of Unit and Port Number. Allows you to enter a character string to name the port Type of switch and number of ports. Media type for this interface.

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Field Mtu PhysAddress AdminStatus Description Size of the largest packet, in octets, that can be sent or received on the interface. MAC address assigned to a particular interface. Current administrative state of the device, which can be one of the following: up down When a managed system is initialized, all interfaces start with AdminStatus in the up state. AdminStatus changes to the down state (or remains in the up state) as a result of either management action or the configuration information available to the managed system. Current operational state of the interface, which can be one of the following: up down testing If AdminStatus is up, then OperStatus should be up if the interface is ready to transmit and receive network traffic. If AdminStatus is down, then OperStatus should be down. It should remain in the down state if and only if there is a fault that prevents it from going to the up state. The testing state indicates that no operational packets can be passed. Value of the time the interface entered its current operational state. If the current state was entered prior to the last reinitialization of the local network management subsystem, the value is zero. Specifies whether linkUp/linkDown traps should be generated for this interface The estimate bandwidth of the interface in bits per second (bps). For interfaces that do not vary in bandwidth or have no way to estimate the bandwidth, this object should contain the nominal bandwidth. If the bandwidth of the interface is greater than the maximum value reported by the object, then the object displays its maximum value (4,294,967,295). For a sub-layer that has no concept of bandwidth, the object should be zero. Indicates whether the port is enabled (checked) for autonegotiation or not. The current administrative duplex mode of the port (half or full). Indicate current duplex value of the port. Set the speed of a port: none, mbps10, and mbps100 The current operating speed of the port.

OperStatus

LastChange

LinkTrap Speed

AutoNegotiate AdminDuplex OperDuplex AdminSpeed OperSpeed

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Field Description

AutoNegotiation Specifies the port speed and duplex capabilities that a switch can Capability support on a port, and that may be advertised by the port using auto-negotiation AutoNegotiation Specifies the port speed and duplex abilities to be advertised during Advertisments link negotiation. MltId IsPortShared The MultiLink Trunk to which the port is assigned (if any). Specifies whether a port is shared. Multiple ports that are logically represented as a single port are shared. Only one shared port may be active at a time.

PortActiveComp Specifies the physical port components that are active for a shared onent port.

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The administrative options available to you are: Viewing system information Quick Start on page 377 Configuring system security on page 379 Rebooting the Ethernet Switch 325/425 on page 379 Changing the Ethernet Switch 325/425 to system defaults on page 381 Logging out of the management interface on page 382

Viewing system information


You can view an image of the Ethernet Switch 325/425 or an image of your entire stack configuration, information about the host device (or stack) and, if provided, the contact person or manager for the switch. The System Information page is also the Web-based management interface home page. To view system information:

From the main menu, choose Administration > System Information.


The System Information page opens (Figure 151). Note: You may create or modify existing system information parameters using the System page. For more information on configuring system information, see Modifying system settings on page 389.

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Chapter 11 Administering the switch using Web-based management Figure 151 System Information page

Table 142 describes the items on the System Information page.


Table 142 System Information page items
Item sysDescription sysUpTime sysName sysLocation sysContact Description The default description of the Ethernet Switch 325/425. The elapsed time since the last network management portion of the system was last re-initialized. The name created by the network administrator to identify the switch, for example, Finance Group. The location name created by the network administrator to identify the switch location, for example, first floor. The name, email, address, and telephone number of the person to contact about switch operation.

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Quick Start
The Quick Start feature allows the administrator of the Ethernet Switch 325/425 to make the initial setup by consolidating multiple setup pages into a single page. The Quick Start screen will allow the administrator to configure the following information: Switch/Stack IP address Subnet mask Default gateway SNMP Read community SNMP Write community SNMP Trap IP addresses and communities (up to four) New default VLAN

During the initial setup mode, all ports in the switch or stack are assigned to the new default VLAN. A port-based Quick Start VLAN is created if the new default VLAN does not exist. All ports are removed from the current default VLAN and assigned to the Quick Start VLAN. The PVIDs for all ports are changed to the Quick Start VLAN. The Quick Start VLAN is also designated as the management VLAN. To configure the initial settings using the Quick Start feature: 1 From the main menu, select Administration > Quick Start. The Quick Start page is displayed (Figure 152).

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Chapter 11 Administering the switch using Web-based management Figure 152 Quick Start page

Click on the Submit button after making the required settings.

Table 143 describes the items on the Quick Start page.


Table 143 Items on the Quick Start page
Section IP Item In-Band Switch IP Address In-Band Subnet Mask Default Gateway Description Specify a new IP address for the switch. Enter a new subnet mask. Specify an IP address for the default gateway.

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Chapter 11 Administering the switch using Web-based management Table 143 Items on the Quick Start page
Section Community String Item Read-Only Community String Description Specify a character string to identify the community string for the SNMPv1 Read-Only community, for example, public or private. The default value is public. Specify a character string to identify the community string for the SNMPv1 Read-Write community, for example, public or private. The default value is private. Select the number of the Trap Receiver to create or modify. Specify the network address for the SNMP Manager that is to receive the specified Trap. Type the Community String for the specified Trap Receiver. Specify the IP of the port-based Quick Start VLAN.

379

Read-Write Community String

Trap Receiver

Index IP address Community

VLAN

Quick Start VLAN

Configuring system security


For information on configuring system security, please refer to Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)

Rebooting the Ethernet Switch 325/425


You can reboot a standalone switch or an entire stack without erasing any configured switch parameters. While rebooting, the switch initiates a self-test that comprises various diagnostic routines and subtests. The LEDs display various patterns to indicate that the subtests are in progress. To reboot the Ethernet Switch 325/425 without making changes (since your last Submit request):

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From the main menu, choose Administration > Reset. The reset warning message displays (Figure 153).

Figure 153 Reset page message

Click OK.

To reboot the Ethernet Switch 425-24T in its stack mode without making changes (since your last Submit request): 1 From the main menu, choose Administration > Reset. The Reset page opens (Figure 154).
Figure 154 Reset page

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Click Submit. If you do not click Submit, any changes you make will be lost. Note: If you have not configured system password security, a reset returns you to the home page, as shown in Figure 72 on page 200. If you have configured system password security, a reset returns you to a log on page (for details on configuring management passwords, see Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)).

Changing the Ethernet Switch 325/425 to system defaults


You can change a standalone switch, a specific unit in a stack configuration, or an entire stack, replacing all configured switch parameters with the factory default values. Caution: If you choose change to default settings, all configured settings are replaced with factory default settings when you click Submit. For more information about factory default settings, see Appendix C, Default settings, on page 431. During the process of changing to default settings, the switch initiates a self-test that comprises various diagnostic routines and subtests. The LEDs display various patterns to indicate that the subtests are in progress. To change the Ethernet Switch 325/425 to system defaults: 1 From the main menu, choose Administration > Reset to Default. The reset to default warning message displays (Figure 155).
Figure 155 Reset to Default page message

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Click OK.

To change the Ethernet Switch 425 in its stacking mode to system defaults: 1 From the main menu, choose Administration > Reset to Default. The Reset to Default page opens (Figure 156).
Figure 156 Reset to Default page

Click Submit.

Logging out of the management interface


To log out of the Web-based management user interface: 1 From the main menu, choose Administration > Logout. A logout message displays.
Figure 157 Logout message

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Click OK to log out. Click Cancel to return to the Web-based management interface home page. Note: If you have not configured system password security, a reset returns you to the home page, as shown in Figure 72 on page 200. If you have configured system password security, a reset returns you to a log on page (for details on configuring management passwords, see Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)).

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The switch configuration options available to you are: Configuring BootP, IP, and gateway settings Modifying system settings on page 389 Configuring switch port autonegotiation speed on page 390 Configuring high speed flow control on page 393 Downloading switch images on page 394 Downloading ASCII configuration files on page 396 Storing and retrieving a switch configuration file from a TFTP server on page 397 Enabling and disabling autosave on page 400 Configuring port communication speed on page 400 Configuring Rate Limiting on page 402

Configuring BootP, IP, and gateway settings


You can configure the BootP mode settings, create and modify the In-band stack and In-band switch IP addresses and In-band subnet mask parameters, and configure the IP address of your default gateway. Note: Settings take effect immediately when you click Submit.

To configure BootP, IP, and gateway settings:

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From the main menu, choose Configuration > IP. The IP page opens (Figure 158).

Figure 158 IP page

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Table 144 describes the items on the IP page.


Table 144 IP page items
Section Boot Mode Setting Item BootP Request Mode Range BootP When Needed (default) Description Choose this mode to inform the switch to send a BootP request when the switch IP address stored in nonvolatile memory is the factory default value. If the stored IP address differs from the factory default value, the switch uses the stored network parameters. If the switch cannot find a BootP server, it tries five more times to find one and then defaults to the factory settings Choose this mode to inform the switch to ignore any stored network parameters and send a BootP request, each time it boots. If the BootP request fails, the switch boots with the factory default IP configuration. This setting disables remote management if no BootP server is set up for the switch, but allows the switch to boot normally. Choose this mode to inform the switch to use the IP configuration parameters stored in non-volatile memory, each time the switch boots. If a BootP configuration is in progress when you issue this command, the BootP configuration stops.

BootP Always

BootP Disabled

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Table 144 IP page items (continued)


Section Item Range BootP or Last Address Description Choose this mode to inform the switch at each startup, to obtain its IP configuration using BootP. If the BootP request fails, the switch uses the network parameters stored in its non-volatile memory. Note: Valid parameters obtained in using BootP always replace current information stored in the non-volatile memory. Note: Whenever the switch is broadcasting BootP requests, the BootP process times out if a reply is not received within 7 minutes (approximately). When the process times out, the BootP request mode automatically changes to BootP Disabled mode. To restart the BootP process, change the BootP request mode to any of the three following modes: BootP When Needed, BootP Always, or to BootP or Last Address. IP Setting In-Band Stack IP Address In-Band Switch IP Address XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX Type a new stack IP address in the appropriate format. Type a new switch IP address in the appropriate format. Note: When the IP address is entered in the In-Band IP Address field, and the In-Band Subnet Mask field value is not present, the software provides an in-use default value for the In-Band Subnet Mask field that is based on the class of the IP address entered in the In-Band IP Address field. In-Band Subnet Mast Gateway Setting Default Gateway XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX Type a new subnet mask in the appropriate format. Type an IP address for the default gateway in the appropriate format.

XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX

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Click Submit.

Modifying system settings


You can create or modify the system name, system location, and network manager contact information. Note: The configurable parameters on the System page are displayed in a read only format on the System Information home page. To configure system settings: 1 From the main menu, choose Configuration > System. The System page opens (Figure 159).
Figure 159 System page

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Table 145 describes the items on the System page.


Table 145 System page items
Item System Description System Object ID System Up Time Range Description The factory set description of the hardware and software versions. The character string that the vendor created to uniquely identify this device. The elapsed time since the last network management portion of the system was last re-initialized. Note: This field is updated only when the screen is redisplayed. System Name System Location System Contact 1..255 1..255 1..255 Type a character string to create a name to identify the switch, for example Finance Group. Type a character string to create a name for the switch location, for example, First Floor. Type a character string to create the contact information for the network manager or the selected person to contact regarding switch operation, for example, mcarlson@company.com Note: To operate correctly with the Web interface, the system contact should be an e-mail address.

2 3

Type information in the text boxes. Click Submit.

Configuring switch port autonegotiation speed


You can configure a specific switch port or all switch ports to autonegotiate for the highest available speed of the connected station or you can set the speed for selected switch ports (autonegotiation is not supported on 1000 Mb/s fiber optic ports). To configure a switch ports autonegotiation speed: 1 From the main menu, choose Configuration > Port Management. The Port Management page opens (Figure 160).
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Table 146 describes the items on the Port Management page.


Table 146 Port Management page items
Item Port Range Description The switch port number of the corresponding row. The values that you set in each switch row affect all switch ports and, when the switch is part of a stack, the values that set in the stack row affect all ports in the entire stack (except the GBIC port or fiber optic ports when installed). The trunk group that the switch port belongs to as specified in the Trunk Member fields on the MultiLink Trunk page. (1) Enabled (2) Disabled Choose to enable or disable the port. You can also use this field to control access to any switch port. The default setting is Enabled.

Trunk

Status

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Table 146 Port Management page items


Item Link Range Description The current link state of the corresponding port as follows: Up: The port is connected and operational Down: The port is not connected or is not operational. (1) On (2) Off Choose to control whether link up/down traps are sent to the configured trap receiver from the switch. The default setting is On. Autonegotiation (1) Enabled (2) Disabled Choose to enable or disable the autonegotiation feature. Choosing to enable autonegotiation sets the corresponding port speed to match the best service provided by the connected station, up to 100Mb/s in full-duplex mode. Note: Autonegotiation also enables auto sensing on 10/ 100 ports. The default setting is Enabled. Speed / Duplex (1) 10Mbs / Half (2) 10Mbs / Full (3) 100Mbs / Half (4) 100Mbs / Full (5) 1000Mbs / Full Choose the Ethernet speed you want the port to support. The default setting is 10 Mbs/Half when autonegotiation is disabled and 1000 Mb/s full-duplex for gigabit ports only.

Link Trap

In the upper-left corner, click on the unit number of the Ethernet Switch 425 stack to manage. The page is updated with the information for the selected switch.

3 4

In the port row of your choice, select from the lists. Click Submit.

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Configuring high speed flow control


You can view the High Speed Flow Control parameters for Ethernet Switch 325/ 425 in this page. To configure high speed flow control: 1 From the main menu, choose Configuration > High Speed Flow Control. The High Speed Flow Control page opens (Figure 161).
Figure 161 High Speed Flow Control page

Table 147 describes the items on the High Speed Flow Control page.
Table 147 High Speed Flow Control page items
Item Port Autonegotiation (1) Enabled (2) Disabled Range Description The switch port number of the corresponding row. Displays if the autonegotiation feature is enabled or disabled. When enabled, the port advertises support only for 1000Mb/s operation in full-duplex mode. Flow Control (1) Enabled (2) Symmetric (3) Asymmetric Displays current settings of flow control.

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In the upper-left corner, click on the unit number for viewing the GBIC configuration.

Downloading switch images


You can download the Ethernet Switch 325/425 software image to non-volatile flash memory. To download the Ethernet Switch 325/425 software image, a properly configured Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server must be present in your network, and the policy switch must have an IP address. To learn how to configure the switch or stack IP address, refer to Configuring BootP, IP, and gateway settings on page 385. Caution: Do not interrupt power to the device during the software download process. A power interruption can corrupt the firmware image. To download a switch image: 1 From the main menu, choose Configuration > Software Download. The Software Download page opens (Figure 162).
Figure 162 Software Download page

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Table 148 describes the fields on the Software Download page.


Table 148 Software Download page fields
Fields Current Running Version Local Store Version Diagnostics Filename TFTP Server IP Address Download Option 1..30 XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX (1) No (2) Image (3) Diagnostics Range Description The version of the current running software. The local version of the software in the flash memory. Type the diagnostics filename. Type the IP address of your TFTP load host. Choose the software image to load.

2 3

Type information in the text boxes, or select from a list. Click Submit. The software download process automatically completes without user intervention. The process erases the contents of flash memory and replaces it with a new software image. Take care not to interrupt the download process until after it runs to completion (the process can take up to ten minutes, depending on network conditions). When the download process is complete, the switch automatically resets and the new software image initiates a self-test. During the download process, the Ethernet Switch 325/425 will not be operational. You can monitor the progress of the download process by observing the LED indications.

Table 149 describes the LED indications displayed during the software download process. Note: The LED indications described in Table 149 apply to a 24-port switch model. Although a 48-port switch provides similar LED indications, the LED indication sequence is associated within the 48-port range.

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Table 149 LED Indications during the software download process


Phase 1 Description LED Indications

The switch downloads the new 100 Mb/s port status LEDs (ports 18 to 24 only): The software image and programs it. LEDs begin to turn on in succession on each ASIC as follows: ASIC 1 from port 1 to port 12 and return, ASIC 2 from with port 24 to port 13 and return, ASIC 3 from port 25 to port 36 and return, ASIC 4 from port 48 to port 37 and return. The switch resets automatically. After the reset completes, the new software image initiates the switch self-test, which comprises various diagnostic routines and subtests. Note: The LEDs display various patterns to indicate that the subtests are in progress.

Downloading ASCII configuration files


The ASCII Config Download feature allows you to upload an ASCII configuration file from a personal computer to the Ethernet Switch 325/425. In the current implementation, you will require a TFTP server to upload an ASCII configuration file to the Ethernet Switch 325/425. But with this feature the requirement of a TFTP server is eliminated. This feature allows you to upload an ASCII configuration file using the HTTP protocol. To download the ASCII configuration file to the Ethernet Switch 325/425. 1 2 From the main menu, choose Configuration > Ascii Config Download. The Ascii Configuration File Download page opens (Figure 163).

Figure 163 Ascii Configuration file download page

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Table 150 describes the items displayed on the ASCII Configuration File Download page.
Table 150 Ascii Configuration file download page items
Item Ascii Configuration File Last Manual Configuration Status Submit Description Allows you to select the ASCII config file located on a personal computer. Displays the status of the download. Click on this button to upload the ASCII configuration file from the personal computer to the Ethernet Switch 325/425.

Storing and retrieving a switch configuration file from a TFTP server


You can store switch and stack configuration parameters on a Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server. You can retrieve the configuration parameters of a standalone switch or an entire stack and use the retrieved parameters to automatically configure a replacement switch or stack. To store a switch or stack configuration, you must set up the file on your TFTP server and set the filename read/write permission to enabled. To download the Ethernet Switch 325/425 configuration file, a properly configured TFTP server must be present in your network, and the Ethernet Switch 325/425 must have an IP address. To learn how to configure the switch or stack IP address, refer to Configuring BootP, IP, and gateway settings on page 385. To store or retrieve a switch or stack configuration file: 1 From the main menu, choose Configuration > Configuration File. The Configuration File Download/Upload page opens (Figure 164).

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Chapter 12 Configuring the switch using Web-based management Figure 164 Configuration File Download/Upload page

Table 151 describes the Configuration File Setting items on the Configuration File Download/Upload page.
Table 151 Configuration File Setting items
Item Configuration Image Filename Range 1..32 Description Type the configuration file name. Type the IP address of the TFTP load host. Choose whether or not to copy the configuration image to the server. Choose whether or not to retrieve the configuration image from a server. If you choose Yes, the download process begins immediately and, when completed, causes the switch or stack to reset with the new configuration parameters.

TFTP Server IP Address XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX Copy Configuration Image to Server Retrieve Configuration Image from Server (1) Yes (2) No (1) Yes (2) No

2 3
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Type information in the text boxes, or select from a list. Click Submit.

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Requirements for storing and retrieving configuration parameters on a TFTP server


The following requirements apply when storing and retrieving configuration parameters on a TFTP server: The Configuration File feature can only be used to copy standalone switch configuration parameters to other standalone switches or to copy stack configuration parameters to other stack configurations. For example, you cannot duplicate the configuration parameters of a unit in a stack configuration and use it to configure a standalone switch. A configuration file obtained from a standalone switch can only be used to configure other standalone switches that have the same firmware revision and model type as the donor standalone switch. A configuration file obtained from a stack unit can only be used to configure other stacks that have the same number of switches, firmware version, model types, and physical IDs as the stack the donor stack unit resides in. Reconfigured stacks are configured according to the unit order number of the donor unit. For example, the configuration file parameters from a donor unit with physical ID x are used to reconfigure the unit with physical ID x. The configuration file also duplicates any settings that exist for any GBIC that is installed in the donor switch. If you use the configuration file to configure another switch that has the same GBIC model installed, the configuration file settings will also apply to and override the existing GBIC settings.

Table 152 describes the parameters that are not saved to the configuration file.
Table 152 Parameters not saved to the configuration file
These parameters are not saved: In-Band Stack IP Address In-Band Switch IP Address In-Band Subnet Mask Default Gateway Configuration Image Filename TFTP Server IP Address Configuration File Download/Upload 397 Used in this screen: IP Configuration/Setup See page: 385

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Table 152 Parameters not saved to the configuration file


These parameters are not saved: Console Read-Only Switch Password Console Read-Write Switch Password Console Read-Only Stack Password Console Read-Write Stack Password Used in this screen: Console/Comm Port Configuration See page: 400

Enabling and disabling autosave


The Configuration File Download/Upload page (Figure 164) also allows you to enable and disable the autosave feature on the switch or stack. To enable or disable autosave: 1 From the main menu, choose Configuration > Configuration File. The Configuration File Download/Upload page opens (Figure 164). 2 3 Under Autosave Configuration, choose Enabled or Disabled from the drop-down list. Click Submit.

Configuring port communication speed


You can view the current console/communication port settings and configure the console port baud rate to match the baud rate of the console terminal. To view current console/communication port settings and configure console port speed: 1 From the main menu, choose Configuration > Console/Comm Port. The Console/Communication Port page opens (Figure 165).

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Table 153 describes the items on the Console/Communication Port page.


Table 153 Console/Communication Port page items
Item Comm Port Data Bits Comm Port Parity Comm Port Stop Bits Console Port Speed 2400 4800 9600 19200 38400 Range Description The current console communication port data bit setting. The current console communication port parity setting. The current console communication port stop bit setting. Choose the console port speed baud rate. Note: The default setting is 9600.

Caution: If you choose a baud rate that does not match your console terminal baud rate, you will lose communication with the configuration interface when you click Submit.

2 3

Select from the list. Click Submit.

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Configuring Rate Limiting


Broadcast Rate Limiting is a box-oriented feature which allows you to configure threshold limits for either broadcast or multicast packets ingressing on a port for a given time interval (in packets per second). If the configured threshold exceeds on a port, the switch will drop extra packets received. No SNMP trap or syslog is generated in case of congestion.

Configuring Rate Limiting


To configure Rate Limiting using the Web-based management system: 1 From the main menu, choose Application > Rate Limiting. The Rate Limiting page opens (Figure 166).
Figure 166 Rate Limiting page

Table 154 describes the items on the Rate Limiting page.


Table 154 Rate Limiting page items
Section Port Unit Description The port number that corresponds to the selected switch. The number of the unit in the stack.

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Chapter 12 Configuring the switch using Web-based management Table 154 Rate Limiting page items (continued)
Section Packet Type Limit Description Select the type of packet. Configure the threshold limit for the selected type of packet.

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2 3

On the Rate Limiting page, type information in the text boxes, or select from a list. Click Submit.

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Chapter 13 Troubleshooting
This chapter describes how to isolate and diagnose problems with your Ethernet Switch 325/425 and covers the following topics: Interpreting the LEDs Diagnosing and correcting problems on page 405 Normal power-up sequence Port connection problems

Interpreting the LEDs


For information on interpreting the LEDs for the Ethernet Switch 325, refer to Figure 4 on page 60. For information on interpreting the LEDs for the Ethernet Switch 425, refer to Figure 8 on page 76.

Diagnosing and correcting problems


Before you execute the problem-solving steps described in this section, cycle the power to the Ethernet Switch 325/425 (disconnect and then reconnect the AC power cord); then verify that the switch follows the normal power-up sequence.

Warning: To avoid injury from hazardous electrical current, do not remove the top cover of the device. There are no user-serviceable components inside.

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Vorsicht: Um Verletzungsgefahr durch einen elektrischen Stromschlag auszuschlieen, nehmen Sie niemals die obere Abdeckung vom Gert ab. Im Gerteinnern befinden sich keine Komponenten, die vom Benutzer gewartet werden knnen.

Avertissement: Pour viter tout risque d'lectrocution, ne jamais retirer le capot de l'appareil. Cet appareil ne contient aucune pice accessible par l'utilisateur.

Advertencia: A fin de evitar daos personales por corrientes elctricas peligrosas, no desmonte nunca la cubierta superior de este dispositivo. Los componentes internos no son reparables por el usuario.

Avvertenza: Per evitare lesioni fisiche dovute a scariche pericolose di corrente, non rimuovere mai il coperchio superiore del dispositivo. I componenti interni non possono essere manipolati dall'utente.

Normal power-up sequence


In a normal power-up sequence, the LEDs appear as follows: 1 2 3 After power is applied to the switch, the Pwr (Power) LED turns on within 5 seconds. The switch initiates a self-test, during which the port LEDs display various patterns to indicate the progress of the self-test. After the self-test, the remaining port LEDs indicate their operational status, as described in Table 155.

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Chapter 13 Troubleshooting Table 155 Corrective actions


Symptom All LEDs are off. Probable cause Corrective action

407

The switch is not receiving AC Verify that the AC power cord is fastened securely power. at both ends and that power is available at the AC power outlet. The fans are not operating or Verify that there is sufficient space for adequate the airflow is blocked, causing airflow on both sides of the switch. the unit to overheat. Note: Operating temperature for the switch must not exceed 40C (104F). Do not place the switch in areas where it can be exposed to direct sunlight or near warm air exhausts or heaters.

The Activity LED for a connected port is off or does not blink (and you have reason to believe that traffic is present).

The switch is experiencing a port connection problem. The switchs link partner is not autonegotiating properly.

See Port connection problems.

Port connection problems


You can usually trace port connection problems to either a poor cable connection or an improper connection of the port cables at either end of the link. To remedy these types of problems, make sure that the cable connections are secure and that the cables connect to the correct ports at both ends of the link. Port connection problems are also traceable to the autonegotiation mode or the port interface.

Autonegotiation modes
Port connection problems can occur when a port (or station) is connected to another port (or station) that is not operating in a compatible mode (for example, connecting a full-duplex port on one station to a half-duplex port on another station). The Ethernet Switch 325/425 negotiates port speeds according to the IEEE 802.3u autonegotiating standard. The switch adjusts (autonegotiates) its port speed and duplex mode to match the best service provided by the connected station, up to 100 Mb/s in full-duplex mode as follows:
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If the connected station uses a form of autonegotiation that is not compatible with the IEEE 802.3u autonegotiating standard, the Ethernet Switch 325/425 cannot negotiate a compatible mode for correct operation. If the autonegotiation feature is not present or not enabled at the connected station, the Ethernet Switch 325/425 may not be able to determine the correct duplex modes.

In both situations, the Ethernet Switch 325/425 autosenses the speed of the connected station and, by default, reverts to half-duplex mode. If the connected station is operating in full-duplex mode, it cannot communicate with the switch. To correct this mode mismatch problem: 1 2 Use the Port Configuration screen to disable autonegotiation for the suspect port (see Port Configuration screen on page 109). Manually set the Speed/Duplex field to match the speed/duplex mode of the connected station. You may have to try several settings before you find the correct speed/duplex mode of the connected station. If the problem persists: 1 2 Disable the autonegotiation feature at the connected station. Manually set the speed/duplex mode of the connected station to the same speed/duplex mode you have manually set for the Ethernet Switch 325/425 port.

Port interface
Ensure that the devices are connected using the appropriate crossover or straight-through cable (see Appendix B, Connectors and pin assignments, on page 425), or that autonegotiation is active.

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Appendix A Installing an SFP Transceiver


SFPs are hot-swappable input and output enhancement products that allow Gigabit Ethernet ports to link to Short Wavelength (SX), Long Wave length (LX), and Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexed (CWDM) fiber optic networks. The Ethernet Switch 425 has two front-panel ports. They are port numbers 25 and 26 on the Ethernet Switch 425-24T and port numbers 49 and 50 on the Ethernet Switch 425-48T. If you insert an SFP GBIC into one on these ports, that port handles gigabit Ethernet speed only. If there are no optional SFPs inserted in to these ports, they function at 10/100/1000 Mbps ports. This appendix describes technical specifications and installation instructions on Small Form Factor Pluggable (SFP) transceivers, which includes the includes Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexed (CWDM) SFPs, that are supported by the Ethernet Switch 425.

Note: The term SFP is used in this chapter to describe features or technical specifications of an SFP and a CWDM SFP. This chapter includes the following topics: Guidelines on page 410 Product Description on page 410 Installing SFPs on page 414 Technical Specifications on page 416 How to get help on page 423

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Guidelines
Before installing an SFP, read the following guidelines: SFP GBICs are static sensitive. To prevent damage from ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD), follow your normal board and component handling procedures. SFP GBICs, are dust sensitive. When you store an SFP GBIC, or when you disconnect it from a fiber optic cable, always keep the dust cover over the SFP GBIC optical bore. To clean contaminants from the optical bores of a SFP GBIC, use an alcohol swab or equivalent to clean the ferrules of the optical connector. Dispose this product (if necessary) according to all national laws and regulations. Warning: Fiber optic equipment can emit laser or infrared light that can injure your eyes. Never look into an optical fiber or connector port. Always assume that fiber optic cables are connected to a light source.

Product Description
This section describes the SFP and label, and provides a model list for 1000BASE-SX, 1000BASE-LX SFPs. This section also describes the Nortel Coarse Wavelength Division Multiplexed (CWDM) SFPs and provides a CWDM SFP model list. This section includes the following topics: Locking/extractor mechanisms on page 411 SFP labeling on page 411 SFP models on page 412 CWDM SFP models on page 413

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Locking/extractor mechanisms
Depending on the transceiver manufacturer, an SFP transceiver can have various types of locking/extractor mechanisms. Figure 167 on page 411 shows two types of locking/extractor mechanisms used on SFP and XFP transceivers.
Figure 167 Locking/extractor mechanism

SFP labeling
The Nortel label on a typical SFP contains a Nortel serial number, a bar code, a manufacturers code, an interface type, and a part number. See Figure 168 on page 412.

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Installing an SFP Transceiver Figure 168 Nortel SFP label

SFP models
SFPs are hot-swappable input/output enhancement components designed for use with Nortel products to allow Gigabit Ethernet ports to link with other Gigabit Ethernet ports over various media types. Table 156 lists and describes the Nortel SFP models that are supported by the Ethernet Switch 425.
Table 156 1000BASE-SFP models
Model number 1000Base-SX SFP GBIC (mini-GBIC, connector type: LC). Product Number AA1419013 Description Small Form Factor Pluggable, short wavelength 550 m Small Form Factor Pluggable, short wavelength 550 m Small Form Factor Pluggable, long wavelength 5 km

1-port 1000Base-SX SFP AA1419014 GBIC (mini-GBIC, connector type: MT-RJ). 1-port 1000Base-LX SFP AA1419015 GBIC (mini-GBIC, connector type: LC).

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Note: The cable distance may vary depending on the quality of fiber optic cable used.

CWDM SFP models


CWDM SFPs are transceivers that link Gigabit Ethernet ports with fiber optic networks. WDM technology consolidates multiple optical channels, using specific wavelengths to expand available bandwidth, on a common optical fiber. CWDM SFPs are components in the optical routing system, designed to support high speed data communications for Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs). The system uses a grid of eight CWDM optical wavelengths in both ring and point-to-point configurations. All components are color-coded by wavelength. Table 157 lists the Nortel CWDM SFPs and describes their wavelengths, color codes, part numbers, and cable lengths.
Table 157 Nortel CWDM SFP transceiver list
CWDM SFP 1470nm/Gray 1490nm/Violet 1510nm/Blue 1530nm/Green 1550nm/Yellow 1570nm/Orange Product number AA1419025A A1419033 AA1419026 AA1419034 AA1419027 AA1419035 AA1419028 AA1419036 AA1419029 AA1419037 AA1419030 AA1419038 Cable length 40 KM 70 KM 40 KM 70 KM 40 KM 70 KM 40 KM 70 KM 40 KM 70 KM 40 KM 70 KM

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Installing an SFP Transceiver Table 157 Nortel CWDM SFP transceiver list (continued)
CWDM SFP 1590nm/Red 1610nm/Brown Product number AA1419031 AA1419039 AA1419032 AA1419040 Cable length 40 KM 70 KM 40 KM 70 KM

Note: The cable distance may vary depending on the quality of fiber optic cable used.

Installing SFPs
Caution: SFPs are keyed to prevent incorrect insertion. If an SFP resists pressure, do not force it; turn it over, and reinsert it. To install an SFP: 1 2 3 4 Remove the SFP from its protective packaging. Verify that the SFP is the correct model for your network configuration. See Table 156 on page 412 for information on the SFPs models supported. Grasp the SFP between your thumb and forefinger. Insert the SFP into the SFP slot on the module. See Figure 169 on page 415. Apply light pressure to the SFP until the device clicks and locks into position in the module.

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Installing an SFP Transceiver Figure 169 Inserting an SFP

415

Removing an SFP
To remove an SFP 1 2 Disconnect the network fiber cable from the SFP connector. Depending on your SFP model, press the locking/extractor mechanism on the SFP to release the SFP. Note: Your SFP locking/extractor mechanism may be different than the models shown.

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Installing an SFP Transceiver Figure 170 Removing an SFP

3 4 5

Slide the SFP out of the module SFP slot. If the SFP does not slide easily from the module slot, use a gentle side-to-side rocking motion while firmly pulling the SFP from the slot. Attach a dust cover over the fiber optic bores and store the SFP in a safe place until needed. Note: If you are discarding the SFP, be sure to dispose the SFP according to national laws and regulations.

Technical Specifications
This section includes the following topics: SFP specifications on page 417 CWDM SFP specifications on page 421

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SFP specifications
This section provides technical specifications for the SFP models and includes the following topics: SFP physical specifications 1000BASE-SX (LC Type) specifications on page 418 1000BASE-LX (LC Type) specifications on page 418 1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type) specifications on page 420

SFP physical specifications


This section provides technical specifications for the following SFP models: Table 158 describes general specifications for 1000BASE-SX, and 1000BASE-LX SFPs.
Table 158 Technical specifications for 1000BASE-SX, and 1000BASE-LX SFPs
Specification Dimensions (H x W x D) Connectors Description 0.53 x 0.33 x 2.22 inches(13.4 x 8.5 x 56.4 mm) Multimode fiber optic: LC or MT-RJ Single-mode fiber optic: LC or MT-RJ Single-fiber LC fiber optic connector

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1000BASE-SX (LC Type) specifications


The Model 1000BASE-SX SFP provides 1000BASE-SX (850 nm, short wavelength, Gigabit Ethernet) connectivity using LC duplex multimode fiber connectors. The Model 1000BASE-SX SFP supports full-duplex operation only. Table 159 describes standards, connectors, cabling, and distance for the Model 1000BASE-SX SFP.
Table 159 1000BASE-SX SFP specifications
Type Standards Connectors Cabling Distance Specification Conforms to the following standards: 802.3z, 1000BASE-SX Duplex LC fiber optic connector Wavelength Optical budget 62.5 m MMF optic cable 50 m MMF optic cable 902 ft. (275 m) using 62.5 m MMF optic cable 1804 ft. (550 m) using 50 m MMF optic cable

850 nm 7 dB

Laser Transmitter characteristics Minimum launch power Maximum launch power Receiver characteristics Minimum receiver sensitivity -17 dBm Maximum power input 0 dBm -10 dBm -4 dBm

1000BASE-LX (LC Type) specifications


The Model 1000BASE-LX SFP provides 1000BASE-LX (1310 nm, long wavelength, Gigabit Ethernet) connectivity using LC duplex fiber connectors. The long wavelength optical transceivers used in the LX model provide variable distance ranges using both multimode and single-mode fiber optic cabling. The Model 1000BASE-LX supports full-duplex operation only.

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Table 160 describes standards, connectors, cabling, and distance for the Model 1000BASE-LX SFPs.
Table 160 1000BASE-LX SFP specifications
Type Standards Connectors Cabling Specification Conforms to the following standards: 802.3z, 1000BASE-LX Duplex LC fiber optic connector Wavelength Optical budget 62.5 m MMF optic cable 50 m MMF optic cable 10 m SMF optic cable 1804 ft. (550 m) using 62.5 m MMF optic cable 1804 ft. (550 m) using 50 m MMF optic cable 16405 ft. (5 km) using 10 m SMF optic cable

Distance

1310 nm 10.5 dB

Laser Transmitter characteristics Minimum launch power Maximum launch power Receiver characteristics Minimum receiver sensitivity -20.0 dBm Maximum power input -3.0 dBm -9.5 dB -3.0 dB

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1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type) specifications


The Model 1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type) SFP GBIC provides Gigabit Ethernet connectivity using MT-RJ multi-mode fiber connectors. Table 161 describes standards, connectors, cabling, and distance for the Model 1000BASE-SX (MT-RJ Type) SFP GBIC.
Table 161 1000BASE-SX SFP specifications
Type Standards Connectors Cabling Distance Specification Conforms to the following standards: 802.3z, Ethernet full duplex Duplex MT-RJ fiber optic connector Laser Transmitter characteristics Wavelength Maximum spectral width Minimum launch power Maximum launch power Receiver characteristics Minimum receiver sensitivity -17.0 dBm Maximum power input 0 dBm 850 nm 0.85 nm -9.5 dB -4.0 dB 62.5 m MMF optic cable 50 m MMF optic cable 902 ft. (275 m) using 62.5 m MMF optic cable 1804 ft. (550 m) using 50 m MMF optic cable

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CWDM SFP specifications


Table 162 describes CWDM SFP (70 km) specifications.
Table 162 CWDM SFP (70 km) specifications
Item Physical dimensions Connectors Cabling Data rate Average launch power Optical budget Operating temperature range Regulatory Receiver Characteristics Minimum receiver sensitivity -23 dBm Maximum input power -3 dBm Specification 0.457 X .604 X 2.18 inches (11.6 X 15.3 X 55.43 mm) Duplex LC fiber optic SMF, 9 m Nominal range: 1.0625 to 1250 Mbaud minimum: -3 dBm maximum: +2 dBm 20 dBm 0oC to 60oC Class 1 devices per FDA/CDRH and 1EC8251 Laser Safety Regulations

Note: A minimum attenuation of 5 dBm must be present between the transmitter and receiver. To avoid receiver saturation, you must insert a minimum attenuation of 5 dBm when: testing the CWDM SFP in loopback mode. using short runs of fiber with no intermediate CWDM OADM or CWDM OMUX.

To determine the expected signal loss for a CWDM OADM, CWDM OMUX, or fiber length, see Installation and Networking Guidelines for Optical Routing. Given a loss budget of 24 dBm and assuming fiber loss of .25 dB/km, up to 96 km reach is supported with no intermediate CWDM OADM or CWDM OMUX.

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Table 163 describes CWDM SFP (40 km) specifications.


Table 163 CWDM SFP (40 km) specifications
Item Physical dimensions Connectors Cabling Average launch power Data rate Optical budget Operating temperature range Regulatory Receiver Characteristics Minimum receiver sensitivity Maximum input power -21 dBm -3 dBm Specification 0.457 X .604 X 2.18 inches (11.6 X 15.3 X 55.43 mm) Duplex LC fiber optic SMF, 9 m minimum: -4 dBm maximum: +1 dBm Nominal range: 1.0625 to 1250 Mbaud 17 dBm 0oC to 60oC Class 1 devices per FDA/CDRH and IEC60825-1 Laser Safety Regulations

Note: A minimum attenuation of 5 dBm must be present between the transmitter and receiver. To avoid receiver saturation, you must insert a minimum attenuation of 5 dBm when: testing the CWDM SFP in loopback mode. using short runs of fiber with no intermediate CWDM OADM or CWDM OMUX.

To determine the expected signal loss for a CWDM OADM, CWDM OMUX, or fiber length, see Installation and Networking Guidelines for Optical Routing. Given a loss budget of 24 dBm and assuming fiber loss of .25 dB/km, up to 96 km reach is supported with no intermediate CWDM OADM or CWDM OMUX.

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How to get help


If you have purchased a service contract for your Nortel product from a distributor or authorized reseller, contact the technical support staff for that distributor or reseller for assistance. If you have purchased a Nortel service program, contact Nortel Technical Support. To obtain contact information online, go to: www.nortel.com/support. From there, click on Technical Support.From the Technical Support page, you can open a Customer Service Request online or find the telephone number for the nearest Technical Solutions Center.If you are not connected to the Internet, you can call 1-800-4NORTEL (1-800-466-7835) to learn the telephone number for the nearest Technical Solutions Center.

Hard-copy technical manuals


You can print selected technical manuals and release notes free, directly from the Internet. Go to www.nortel.com/support. Find the product for which you need documentation. Then locate the specific category and model or version for your hardware or software product. Use Adobe* Reader* to open the manuals and release notes, search for the sections you need, and print them on most standard printers. Go to Adobe Systems at the www.adobe.com URL to download a free copy of the Adobe Reader.

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Appendix B Connectors and pin assignments


This appendix describes the port connectors and pin assignments for the Ethernet Switch 325/425.

RJ-45 (10BASE-T/100BASE-TX) port connectors


The RJ-45 port connectors (Figure 171) are wired as MDI-X ports to connect end stations without using crossover cables. (See MDI and MDI-X devices on page 426 for information about MDI-X ports.) For 10BASE-T connections, use Category 3 (or higher) UTP cable. For 100BASE-TX connections, use only Category 5 UTP cable.
Figure 171 RJ-45 (8-pin modular) port connector
1 8

616EA

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Connectors and pin assignments

Table 164 lists the RJ-45 (8-pin modular) port connector pin assignments.
Table 164 RJ-45 port connector pin assignments
Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Signal RX+ RXTX+ Not applicable Not applicable TXNot applicable Not applicable Description Receive Data + Receive Data Transmit Data + Not applicable Not applicable Transmit Data Not applicable Not applicable

MDI and MDI-X devices


Media dependent interface (MDI) is the IEEE standard for the interface to unshielded twisted pair (UTP) cable. For two devices to communicate, the transmitter of one device must connect to the receiver of the other device. The connection is established through a crossover function, which can be a crossover cable or a port that implements the crossover function internally. Ports that implement the crossover function internally are known as MDI-X ports, where X refers to the crossover function. Note: For the transmitter of one device to connect to the receiver of another device, the total number of crossovers must always be an odd number. The following sections describe the use of straight-through and crossover cables for connecting MDI and MDI-X devices.

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MDI-X to MDI cable connections


Ethernet Switch 325/425 switches use MDI-X ports that allow you to connect directly to end stations without using crossover cables (Figure 172).
Figure 172 MDI-X to MDI cable connections

MDI-X to MDI-X cable connections


If you are connecting the Ethernet Switch 325/425 to a device that also implements MDI-X ports, use a crossover cable (Figure 173).

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Figure 173 MDI-X to MDI-X cable connections

DB-9 (RS-232-D) Console/Comm Port connector


BayStack 420 Switch

Ethernet 325/425 8 1

Switch or hub 8

1 RX+ T 2 RX3 TX+ 4 R 5 6 TX7 8 MDI-X port

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Crossover cable

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

RX+ RXTX+

1 2 3 4 5 R T

TX-

6 7 8

MDI-X port
BS45057B

The DB-9 Console/Comm Port connector (Figure 174) is configured as a data communications equipment (DCE) connector. The DSR and CTS signal outputs are always asserted; the CD, DTR, RTS, and RI signal inputs are not used. This configuration enables a management station (a PC or console terminal) to connect directly to the switch using a straight-through cable.
Figure 174 DB-9 Console port connector
1 5

9
619EA

Table 165 lists the DB-9 Console port connector pin assignments.

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Table 165 DB-9 Console port connector pin assignments


Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Shell Signal CD TXD RXD DTR GND DSR RTS CTS RI Description Carrier detect (not used) Transmit data (output) Receive data (input) Data terminal ready (not used) Signal ground Not used Request to send (not used) Not used Ring indicator (not used) Chassis ground

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1000Base-T pinouts for the Ethernet Switch 425

Table 166 Pin descriptions for 1000Base-T pinouts

Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

MDI BI_DA+ BI_DA BI_DB+ BI_DC+ BI_DC BI_DB BI_DD+ BI_DD

MDI-X BI_DB+ BI_DB BI_DA+ BI_DD+ BI_DD BI_DA BI_DC+ BI_DC

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Appendix C Default settings


Table 167 lists the factory default settings for the Ethernet Switch 325/425 according to the console interface (CI) screens and fields for the settings.
Table 167 Factory default settings
Field BootP Request Mode In-Band Stack IP Address In-Band Switch IP Address In-Band Subnet Mask Default Gateway Read-Only Community String Read-Write Community String Trap IP Address Community String Autotoplology Authentication Trap Link Up/Down Trap Default setting BootP when needed 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) 0.0.0.0 (no subnet mask assigned) 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) public private 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Zero-length string Enabled Enabled Enabled SNMP Configuration screen on page 219 Appears in this CI screen IP Configuration/Setup screen on page 214

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Default settings

Table 167 Factory default settings (continued)


Field Operation Mode Reset Count Last Reset Type Power Status sysContact sysName sysLocation Default setting Stack 1 Power Cycle Primary Power Zero-length string Zero-length string Zero-length string Appears in this CI screen System Characteristics screen on page 221

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Default settings Table 167 Factory default settings (continued)


Field Aging Time Find an Address Default setting 300 seconds 00-00-00-00-00-00 (no MAC address assigned) Disabled Disabled Disabled 0 seconds (the value 0 indicates forever) Disabled Appears in this CI screen MAC Address Table screen (see

433

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A))
MAC Address Security Configuration Menu screen (see Configuring and

MAC Address Security MAC Address Security SNMP-Locked Partition Port on Intrusion Detected Partition Time DA Filtering on Intrusion Detected

Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A))

Generate SNMP Trap on Intrusion Disabled Clear by Ports Learn by Ports Current Learning Mode Trunk Security NONE NONE Not Learning blank field Disabled MAC Address Security Port Configuration screen (see

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A))
MAC Address Security Port Lists screens (see Configuring and

Port List

Blank field

Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A))
Find an Address MAC Address Allowed Source Display/Create MAC Address Blank field Blank field (no address assigned) Blank field 00-00-00-00-00-00 MAC Address Security Table screens (see Configuring and Managing

Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A))

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Default settings

Table 167 Factory default settings (continued)


Field EAPOL Administrative Stat Initialize Operational Status Administrative Traffic Control Operational Traffic Control Re-authenticate Now Re-authentication Re-authentication period Quiet Period Transmit Period Supplicant Timeout Server Timeout Maximum Requests Create VLAN Delete VLAN VLAN Name Management VLAN VLAN State Port Membership Default setting Disabled No Authorized Incoming and Outgoing Incoming and Outgoing No Enabled 3600 seconds 60 seconds 30 Seconds 30 Seconds 30 Seconds 2 attempts 1 blank field VLAN # (VLAN number) Yes, VLAN #1 Inactive Default (all ports assigned as untagged members of VLAN 1) 1 1 No Unit 1, Port 1 1 Untagged Access 1 1 1 (read only) Unit 1, Port 1 (read only) VLAN Display by Port screen (see VLAN Port Configuration screen (see VLAN Configuration screen (see Appears in this CI screen EAPoL Security Configuration Screen (see Configuring and Managing

Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A))

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

Unit Port Filter Untagged Frames Port Name PVID Tagging Unit Port PVID Port Name

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

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Default settings Table 167 Factory default settings (continued)


Field Unit Status LnkTrap Autonegotiation Speed/Duplex Autonegotiation Speed/Duplex Flow Control Trunk Trunk Members (Unit/Port) STP Learning Trunk Mode Trunk Status Trunk Name Traffic Type Default setting 1 Enabled (for all ports) On Enabled (for all ports) 100Mbs/Half (when Autonegotiation is Disabled) Enabled 100Mbs/Half (when Autonegotiation is Disabled) Disabled 1 to 6 (depending on configuration status) Blank field Normal Basic Disabled Trunk #1 to Trunk #6 Rx and Tx MultiLink Trunk Configuration Menu screen (see Configuring VLANs, High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen on page 112 Appears in this CI screen Port Configuration screen on page 109.

435

Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

MultiLink Trunk Utilization screen (see

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

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Default settings

Table 167 Factory default settings (continued)


Field Monitoring Mode Monitor/Unit Port Unit/Port X Limit Packet Type Snooping VLAN Proxy Robust Value Query Time Set Router Ports Static Router Ports Unit Port Display Messages From Display configuration complete? Clear Messages From Default setting Disabled Zero-length string Zero-length string 0 pps Both Disabled 1 Disabled 2 125 seconds Version 1 Blank 1 1 Volatile No None Port Statistics screen (see System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)) System Log screen (see System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)) Appears in this CI screen Port Mirroring Configuration screen (see System Monitoring Guide for

Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A))
Rate Limiting Configuration screen on page 115 IGMP Configuration Menu screen (see

Configuring IP Multicast for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320990-A))

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Default settings Table 167 Factory default settings (continued)


Field Console Port Speed Console Switch Password Console Stack Password TELNET/WEB Switch Password Type TELNET/WEB Stack Password Type Console Read-Only Switch Password Console Read-Write Switch Password Console Read-Only Stack Password Console Read-Write Stack Password Primary RADIUS Server Secondary RADIUS Server RADIUS UPD Port RADIUS Shared Secret Default setting 9600 Baud Not Required Not Required None None user secure user secure 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 1645 Null String Appears in this CI screen Console/Comm Port Configuration screen on page 223

437

Note: The following two fields appear only when the switch is part of a stack configuration. New Unit Number Renumber Units with new setting STP Mode Bridge Priority Bridge Hello Time Bridge Max. Age Time Bridge Forward Delay Time Bridge Max. Age Time Bridge Forward Delay Time Current stack order No IEEE 802.1s 8000 in Hex. 2 seconds 20 seconds 15 seconds 20 seconds 15 seconds Renumber Stack Units screen on page 232 Spanning Tree Group Configuration screen in STPG mode (see

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

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Default settings

Table 167 Factory default settings (continued)


Field Participation Priority Path Cost State Bridge Priority Root Path Cost Maximum Age Time Forward Delay Bridge Maximum Age Time Bridge Priority Bridge Hello Time Bridge Max. Age Time Bridge Forward Delay Time Default Path Cost Type Default setting Normal Learning 128 10 or 100 Topology dependent 0x0000 - 0xF000 0 20 seconds 15 seconds 15 seconds 0x8000 20 seconds 20 seconds 15 seconds Priority Path Cost 32 bits in MSTP/RSTP mode 16 bits in legacy STP mode Not supported in STPG mode Appears in this CI screen Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen in STPG mode (see

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))
Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen in STPG mode (see

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))
Spanning Tree Group Configuration screen in RSTP mode (see

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

128 10 or 100 (1 for Gigabit port) Path Cost = 1000/LAN speed (in Mb/s)

Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen in RSTP mode (see

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

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Default settings Table 167 Factory default settings (continued)


Field Bridge Priority Root Port Root Path Cost Maximum Age Time Forward Delay Bridge Hello Time Bridge Max. Age Time Bridge Forward Delay Time Create STP Group Delete STP Group Bridge Priority Bridge Hello Time Bridge Maximum Age Time Bridge Forward Delay Time Add VLAN membership Delete VLAN Membership STP Group State Participation Priority Path Cost Default setting 0x8000 0 0 20 seconds 15 seconds 20 seconds 20 seconds 15 seconds 1 Blank 0x8000 2 seconds 20 seconds 15 seconds 1 Blank Active for CIST; InActive for MSTIs 2 to 7. Normal Learning 128 200000 (20 000 for Gigabit port) Path Cost = 2*1010/(Number of Kilobits/link) Topology dependent Spanning Tree Port Configuration screen in MSTP mode (see Spanning Tree Group Configuration screen in MSTP mode (see Appears in this CI screen

439

Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen in RSTP mode (see

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

State

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Default settings

Table 167 Factory default settings (continued)


Field Bridge Priority Bridge Priority Root Port Root Path Cost Maximum Age Time Forward Delay Bridge Forward Delay Tx Hold Count Hop Count (Max) Default Path Cost Type Default setting HEX: 0x0000 - 0xF000 HEX: 0x0000 - 0xF000 0 0 20 seconds 15 seconds 15 seconds 3 2000 Region Name TELNET Access SNMP Access Web Access Login Timeout Login Retries Inactivity Timeout Event Logging Allowed Source IP Address (10 user-configurable fields) 32 bits in MSTP/RSTP mode 16 bits in legacy STP802.1d mode Not supported in STP802.1d mode Appears in this CI screen Spanning Tree Switch Settings screen in MSTP mode (see

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A))

MAC address of the device Enabled Enabled Enabled, Yes 1 minute 3 15 minutes All First field: 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Remaining nine fields: 255.255.255.255 (any address is allowed) TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen on page 234

Allowed Source Mask (10 user-configurable fields)

First field: 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) Remaining nine fields: 255.255.255.255 (any address is allowed)

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Default settings Table 167 Factory default settings (continued)


Field Image Filename Diagnostics Filename TFTP Server IP Address Start TFTP Load of New Image Configuration Image Filename TFTP Server IP Address Copy Configuration Image to Server Default setting Zero-length string Zero-length string 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) No Zero-length string 0.0.0.0 (no IP address assigned) No Configuration File Download/Upload screen on page 240 Appears in this CI screen Software Download screen on page 237

441

Retrieve Configuration Image from No Server ASCII Configuration Filename TFTP Server IP Address Retrieve Configuration File from Server Last Manual Configuration Status Last Auto Configuration Status Auto Configuration on Reset Zero-length string 0.0.0.0 No Passed Passed Disabled ASCII Configuration file Download on page 244

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Default settings

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443

Appendix D Sample BootP configuration file


This appendix provides a sample BootP configuration file. The BootP server searches for this file, called bootptab (or BOOTPTAB.TXT, depending on your operating system), which contains the site-specific information (including IP addresses) needed to perform the software download and configuration. You can modify this sample BootP configuration file or create one of your own. A sample BootP configuration file follows:

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444

Sample BootP configuration file

# The following is a sample of a BootP configuration file that was extracted # from a Nortel EZ LAN network management application. Note that other BootP daemons can use a configuration file with a different format. # # Before using your switch BootP facility, you must customize your BootP # configuration file with the appropriate data. # # Blank lines and lines beginning with '#' are ignored. # # Legend: # # first field -- hostname # ht -- hardware type # ha -- host hardware address # tc -- template host (points to similar host entry) # ip -- host IP address # hd -- bootfile home directory # bf -- bootfile # EZ dt -- device type # EZ fv -- firmware version # EZ av -- agent version # # Fields are separated with a pipe (|) symbol. Forward slashes (/) are # required to indicate that an entry is continued to the next line. #

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Sample BootP configuration file

445

# Caution # # Omitting a Forward slash (/) when the entry is continued to the next # line, can cause the interruption of the booting process or the # incorrect image file to download. Always include forward slashes # where needed. # # Important Note: # # If a leading zero (0) is used in the IP address it is calculated as an # octal number. If the leading character is "x" (upper or lower case), # it is calculated as a hexadecimal number. For example, if an IP address # with a base 10 number of 45 is written as .045 in the BOOTPTAB.TXT file, # the Bootp protocol assigns .037 to the client. # # Global entries are defined that specify the parameters used by every device. # Note that hardware type (ht) is specified first in the global entry. # # The following global entry is defined for an Ethernet device. Note that this # is where a client's subnet mask (sm) and default gateway (gw) are defined. # global1|/ |ht=ethernet|/ |hd=c:\opt\images|/ |sm=255.255.255.0|/ |gw=192.0.1.0| # # The following sample entry describes a BootP client:
bay1|ht=ethernet|ha=0060fd000000|ip=192.0.0.1|hd=c:\ezlan\images|bf=bps2000_100.img BS425-24T_100.img

# Where: # host name: # hardware type: # MAC address: # IP address: # home directory of boot file: # boot file:

bay1 Ethernet 00-60-FD-00-00-00 192.0.0.0 c:\ezlan\images bps2000_100.img

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Sample BootP configuration file

global1|/ |ht=ethernet|/ |hd=c:\opt\images|/ |sm=255.255.255.0|/ |gw=192.0.1.0| # # The following sample entry describes a BootP client: bay1|ht=ethernet|ha=0060fd000000|ip=192.0.0.1 |hd=c:\ezlan\images|bf=Hummingbird_3.5_100.img # Where: # host name: bay1 # hardware type: Ethernet # MAC address: 00-60-FD-00-00-00 # IP address: 192.0.0.0 # home directory of boot file: c:\ezlan\images # boot file: hummingbird_3.5_100.img

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447

Appendix E Command List


This appendix provides the complete CLI command list in alphabetical order, with approximate page references for the beginning pages of further explanations. Note: This information is presented for reference only and should not be considered to be an exact representation.

Table 168 CLI command list


Command auto-negotiation-advertisements [port <portlist>] [10-full] [10-half] [100-full] [100-half] [1000-full] [1000-half] [asymm-pause-frame] [pause-frame] [none] auto-negotiation-capabilities auto-pvid Page No. page 333

page 332

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
page 297 page 288 page 280 page 312 page 274

autotopology autosave enable banner [ custom | static | disabled | <1-15> LINE | clear ] blink-leds <off> <stop> boot [default] clear logging [nv]

clear-stats [port<portlist>]

System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)

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448

Command List

Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command cli-password {switch|stack} {ro|rw} <WORD> <WORD> cli-password {switch|stack} {serial|telnet} {none|local|radius} clock summer-time <zone> [date {<day> <month> <year> <hh:mm>} {<day> <month> <year> <hh:mm>}] [<offset>] clock time-zone <zone> <hours> <minutes> cmd-interface {cli|menu} configure {terminal|network} configure network [load-on-boot {disable|use-bootp|use-config}] configure network [filename <FILENAME>] configure network [address <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>] configure command Configuring CANA using the CLI copy config nvram copy config tftp [address <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>] filename <WORD> copy tftp config [address <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>] filename <WORD> copy running-config tftp {<IP Address> <filename>} default auto-negotiation-advertisements [port <portlist>] default autotopology default autosave enable default command default duplex [port <portlist>] default eapol guest-vlan Page No.

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page 295

page 294 page 279 page 132 page 266

page 132 page 331 page 285 page 278 page 278 page 270 page 335 page 298 page 288 page 131 page 326

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 328

default flowcontrol [port <portlist>] default http-port

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)

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Command List 449 Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command default ip address unit <1-8> default ip bootp server default ip domain-name default lacp aggregation [port <portlist>] enable Page No. page 258 page 276 page 265

default lacp mode [port <portlist>]

default lacp priority [port <portlist>]

default lacp system-priority

default lacp timeout-time [port <portlist>]

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
page 303 page 306 page 301 page 305

default lldp port <portlist> config notification default lldp port <portlist> status default lldp [tx-interval] [tx-hold-multiplier] [reinit-delay] [tx-delay] [notification-interval] default lldp tx-tlv [port <portlist>] [port-desc] [sys-name] [sys-desc] [sys-cap] default logging

System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)
page 146 page 322

default mac-address-table aging-time default name [port <port.ist>] default radius-server

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page 331

default rate-limit [port <portlist>] default logging remote level

System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)
System Configuration Guide

450

Command List

Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command default snmp-server authentication-trap Page No.

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) default snmp-server community [ro|rw] Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) default snmp-server contact Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) default snmp-server host Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) default snmp-server location Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) default snmp-server name Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) default snmp trap link-status [port <portlist>] Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) default spanning-tree [port <portlist>] [stp] [learning] Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and [cost] [priority] MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
default speed [port <portlist>] default ssh [dsa-auth|pass-auth|port|timeout] page 324

default telnet-access

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 315

default ui-button default vlan igmp <1-4094> | unknown-mcast-no-flood default vlan mgmt

Configuring IP Multicast for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320990-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)

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Command List 451 Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command disable download [address <ip>] {image <image-name>| image-if-newer <image-name> | diag <filename>} [no-reset] duplex [port <portlist>] {full|half|auto} eapol {disable|enable} Page No. page 133 page 316

page 323

eapol guest-vlan [vid <1-4094> | enable]

eapol [port <portlist>] [init] [status authorized|unauthorized|auto] [traffic-control in-out|in] [re-authentication enable|disable] [re-authentication-period <1-604800>] [re-authenticate] [quiet-interval <num>] [transmit-interval <num>] [supplicant-timeout <num>] [server-timeout <num>][max-request <num>] enable command Enabling CANA end command exit flowcontrol [port <portlist>] {asymmetric|symmetrid|auto|disable} help http-port <1024-65535>

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)

page 132 page 331 page 134 page 134 page 326 page 130

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 133 page 257 page 252 page 275 page 265 page 254

interface FastEthernet {<portlist>} ip address unit <1-8> A.B.C.D ip address[stack|switch] <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX> [netmask <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>] ip bootp server {last|needed|disable|always} ip domain-name [<LINE>] ip default-gateway <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>

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Command List

Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command ip name-server <A.B.C.D> ipmgr {source-ip <1-10> <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>[mask <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>]} ipmgr {telnet|snmp|http} [source-ip <1-10> <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX> [mask <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>]] lacp aggregation [port <portlist>] enable Page No. page 263

lacp key [port <portlist>] <1-4095>

lacp mode [port <portlist>] {off | passive | active}

lacp priority [port <portlist>] <0-255>

lacp system-priority [0-65535]

lacp timeout-time [port <portlist>] {short | long}

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
page 302

lldp port <portlist> config notification

lldp port <portlist> status [rxOnly | txAndRx | txOnly] page 305 lldp [tx-interval <5-327698>] [tx-hold-multiplier <2-10>] [reinit-delay <1-10>] [tx-delay <1-8192>] [notification-interval <5-3600>] lldp tx-tlv [port <portlist>] [port-desc] [sys-name] [sys-desc] [sys-cap] logging [enable|disable] [level critical|serious|informational] [nv-level critical|serious|informational|none] page 300

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Command List 453 Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command logging remote address <A.B.C.D> Page No.

logging remote enable

logging remote level {critical|informational|serious|none} logout mac-address-table aging-time <time> mac-security [disable|enable] [filtering {enable|disable}] [intrusion-detect {enable|disable|forever}] [intrusion-timer <1-65535>] [learning-ports <portlist>] [learning {enable|disable}]|mac-address-table|mac-da-filter|s ecurity list [snmp-lock {enable|disable}] [snmp-trap {enable|disable}] mac-security [port <portlist>] {disable|enable|learning}

System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)
page 132 page 145

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) mac-security mac-address-table address <H.H.H.> Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel {port <portlist>|security-list <1-32>} Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) mac-security mac-da-filter Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) mac-security security-list <1-32> Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software mac-security security-list <portlist> Release 3.6 (320988-A) mlt <id> [name <trunkname>] [enable|disable] Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and [member <portlist>][learning {disable|fast|normal}] MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches [bpdu{all-ports|single-port}] 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
name [port <portlist>] <LINE> no auto-pvid page 321

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)

no auto-negotiation-advertisements [port <portlist>] page 334

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Command List

Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command no autosave enable no autotopology no-banner no clock summer-time no clock time-zone no command no eapol guest-vlan [enable] Page No. page 288 page 298 page 281 page 296 page 295 page 131

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 298 page 253 page 258 page 276 page 254 page 265 page 264

no flowcontrol [port <portlist>] no ip address {stack|switch} no ip address unit <1-8> no ip bootp server no ip default-gateway no ip domain-name no ip name-server <A.B.C.D> no ipmgr {source-ip [<1-10>]}

no ipmgr {telnet|snmp|http}

no lacp aggregation [port <portlist>] enable

no lacp system-priority

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
page 302 page 306 page 304

no lldp port <portlist> config notification no lldp port <portlist> status no lldp tx-tlv [port <portlist>] [port-desc] [sys-name] [sys-desc] [sys-cap] no logging

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Command List 455 Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command no logging remote address Page No.

System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) no logging remote enable System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) no logging remote level System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) no mac-security Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) no mac-security mac-address-table {address Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel <H.H.H>|port <portlist>|security-list <1-32>] Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) no mac-security mac-da-filter {add|delete}<H.H.H.> Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) no mac-security security-list <1-32> Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) no mlt [<id>] Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
no name [port <portlist>] no port-mirroring page 322

no radius-server

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page 330

no rate-limit [port <portlist>] no rmon alarm [<1-65535>]

no rmon event

System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)
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Command List

Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command no rmon history [<1-65535>] Page No.

no rmon stats [<1-65535>]

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page 320

no shutdown [port <portlist>] no snmp server [authentication-trap|community [ro|rw] contact|host [<host-ip> <community-string>] [location|name] no snmp-server

no snmp-server authentication-trap

no snmp-server community [ro|rw] <community-string> no snmp-server contact

no snmp-server host [<host-ip>] [<community-string>] no snmp-server host <host-ip> {v1|v2c|v3}

no snmp-server location <text>

no snmp-server name <text>

no snmp-server user <username>

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)

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Command List 457 Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command no snmp-server view <viewname> Page No.

no snmp trap link-status [port <portlist>]

no ssh

no ssh dsa-auth

no ssh dsa-host-key

no ssh pass-auth

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 290 page 292

no sntp enable no sntp server <primary|secondary> no spanning-tree mstp msti <1 - 7> [port <portlist>]

no spanning-tree [port <portlist>]

no telnet-access [source-ip [<1-10>]]

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 278 page 315

no tftp-server no ui-button no vlan <1-4094>

no web-server

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)

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Command List

Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command ping <A.B.C.D or Hostname> ping <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX> [datasize <64-4096>] [{count <1-9999>} | continuous] [{timeout | -t} <1-120>] [interval <1-60>] [debug] port-mirroring mode {disable | Xrx monitor-port <portlist> mirror-port-X <portlist> qos egressmap ds <0-63> 1p <0-7> qos egressmap enable radius-server host <address> [secondary-host <address>] port <num> key <string> radius-server password fallback Page No. page 262 page 259

System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) Configuring QoS for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320987-A) Configuring QoS for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320987-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)

rate-limit [port <portlist>] {multicast <pct>| broadcast page 330 <pct>| both <pct>} reload [force] [minutes-to-wait <1-60>] [cancel] renumber unit restore factory-default [ -y ] rmon alarm <1-65535> <WORD> <1-2147483647> {absolute|delta} rising threshold <-2147483648-2147483647> [<1-65535>] falling-threshold <-2147483648-2147483647> [<1-65535>] [owner <LINE>] rmon event <1-65535> [log] [trap] [description <LINE>] [owner <LINE>] rmon history <1-65535> <LINE> <1-65535> <1-3600> [owner <LINE>] rmon stats <1-65535> <port> [owner <LINE>] page 136 page 143 page 261

System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)

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Command List 459 Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command save config show arp-table show auto-negotiation-advertisements [port <portlist>] show auto-negotiation-capabilities [port <portlist>] show autosave show autotopology nmm-table show autotopology settings show banner [ custom | static ] show config-network show cli [info|mode|password] show clock summer-time show clock time-zone show eapol Page No. page 286 page 282 page 331 page 332 page 287 page 299 page 298 page 281 page 267 page 272 page 296 page 296

show eapol guest-vlan

show http-port

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 283 page 284 page 256 page 255 page 262

show interfaces [names] [<portlist>] show interfaces [<portlist>] config show ip address [address [stack|switch]] show ip [bootp] [default-gateway] [address [stack|switch]] show ip dns show ipmgr

show lacp debug member [portlist]

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)

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Command List

Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command show lacp port [<portlist>] Page No.

show lacp stats [port <portlist>]

show lacp system

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
page 307 page 309

show lldp [local-sys-data] [mgmt-sys-data] [stats] show lldp [port <portlist>] [neighbor] [neighbor-mgmt-addr] [rx-stats] [tx-stats] [tx-tlv] show logging [config] [critical] [informational] [serious] [sort-reverse]

System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A)

show mac-address-table [vid <1-4094>] [aging-time] page 144 [address <H.H.H>] [port <LINE>] [include/exclude <pattern>] show mac-security {config|mac-address-table [address <macaddr>]|port|security-lists|mac-da-filter} show mlt [utilization <1-6>]

show port-mirroring

show port-statistics [port <portlist>]

show qos egressmap ds <1-63> show qos egressmap status show radius-server

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) System Monitoring Guide for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320989-A) Configuring QoS for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320987-A) Configuring QoS for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320987-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 329

show rate-limit

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Command List 461 Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command show rmon alarm Page No.

show rmon event

show rmon history

show rmon stats

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show running-config show snmp-server community

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show sntp show spanning-tree {config|port}

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) show spanning-tree mstp config Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) show spanning-tree mstp msti config <1 - 7> Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) show spanning-tree mstp msti port config <1 - 7> Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and [<portlist>] MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) show spanning-tree mstp msti port statistics <1 - 7> Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and [<portlist>] MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) show spanning-tree mstp msti statistics <1 - 7> Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) show spanning-tree mstp port config [<portlist>] Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
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Command List

Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command show spanning-tree mstp port statistics [<portlist>] Page No.

show spanning-tree mstp statistics

show spanning-tree mstp status

show spanning-tree rstp config

show spanning-tree rstp port config [<portlist>]

show spanning-tree rstp port statistics [<portlist>]

show spanning-tree rstp port status [<portlist>]

show spanning-tree rstp statistics

show spanning-tree rstp status

show ssh download-auth-key

show ssh global

show ssh session

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 141 page 138

show stack-info show sys-info

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Command List 463 Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command show tech show telnet-access Page No. page 139

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 271 page 277 page 314

show terminal show tftp-server show ui-button show vlan configcontrol

show vlan igmp <1-4094>

show vlan interface info [<portlist>]

show vlan interface vids [<portlist>]

show vlan multicast membership <1-4094>

show vlan vid <1-4094>

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring IP Multicast for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320990-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring IP Multicast for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320990-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
page 134 page 319

shutdown [force] [minutes-to-wait <1-60>] [cancel] shutdown [port <portlist>] snmp-server {enable|disable}

snmp-server authentication-trap {enable|disable}

snmp-server bootstrap <minimum-secure> | <semi-secure> |<very-secure>

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)

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Command List

Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command snmp-server community <community-string> [ro|rw] Page No.

snmp-server community <community-string> {read-view <view-name>|write-view <view-name>| notify-view <view-name>} snmp-server contact <text>

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)

snmp-server host <host-ip> [port <1-65535>] <community-string> snmp-server host <host-ip> [port <1-65535>] {<community-string>|v2c <community-string>| v3 {auth|no-auth|auth-priv} <username>} snmp-server location <text>

snmp-server name <text>

snmp-server user <username> [read-view <view-name>] [write-view <view-name>] [notify-view <view-name>] [{md5|sha} <password>[read-view <view-name>] [write-view <view-name>][notify-view <view-name>] [{3des|aes|des} <password> [read-view <view-name>] [write-view <view-name>][notify-view <view-name>] snmp-server view <view-name> <OID> [<OID> [<OID> [<OID> [<OID> [<OID> [<OID> [<OID> [<OID> [<OID>]]]]]]]]] snmp trap link-status [port <portlist>]

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 290 page 291

sntp enable sntp server primary address <A.B.C.D>

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Command List 465 Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command sntp server secondary address <A.B.C.D> sntp sync-interval <0-168> sntp sync-now spanning-tree mstp [max-hop <600 - 4000>] [forward-time <4 - 30>] [max-age <6 - 40>] [pathcost-type {bits16 | bits32}][priority {0000 | 10000 | 20000 | | F0000}] [tx-hold count <1 - 10>] [version {stp-compatible | rstp| mstp}] [add-vlan <1-4094>] [remove-vlan <1-4094>] [msti <1-7>] [region {config-id-sel|region-name|region-version}] spanning-tree mstp msti <1 - 7> [port <portlist>]enable Page No. page 291 page 293 page 293

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) spanning-tree mstp msti <1 - 7> [port Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and <portlist>]disable MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) spanning-tree mstp msti <1 - 7> [port <portlist>] Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and [cost <1 - 200000000>][learning {disable | MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches enable}][priority {00 | 10 | | F0}] 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) spanning-tree mstp msti<1 Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and 7>[priority{0000|1000||F000}] [add-vlan MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches <vid>][remove-vlan <vid>][enable] 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) spanning-tree mstp [port <portlist>] [cost <1 Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and 200000000>][edge-port {false | true}][hello-time <1 - MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 10>] [learning {disable | enable}][p2p {auto | 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A)
force-false | force-true}][priority {00 | 10 | | F0}] [protocol-migration {false | true}]

Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) spanning-tree [port <portlist>] [learning Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and {disable|normal|fast}] [cost <1-65535>] [priority MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches <0-255>] 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) spanning-tree rstp[forward-time<4 - 30>] [hello-time Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and <1 - 10>][max-age <6 - 40>] MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) [pathcost-type{ bits16 | bits32}]
spanning-tree mstp region [config-id-sell <0 - 255>] [region-name <1 - 32 chars>][region-version <0 65535>] [priority{0000|10000|20000| | F0000}] [tx-holdcount<1 - 10>] [version stp-compatible|rstp}]

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Command List

Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command spanning-tree rstp [port <portlist>] [cost <1 200000000>] [edge-port {false | true}] [learning {disable | enable}] [p2p {auto | force-false | force-true}][priority {00 | 10 | | F0}] [protocol-migration {false | true}] speed [port <portlist>] {10|100|1000|auto} ssh Page No.

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page 323

ssh download-auth-key [address <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>] [key-name <file>] ssh dsa-auth

ssh dsa-host-key

ssh pass-auth

ssh port <1-65535>

ssh secure

ssh timeout <1-120>

telnet-access [enable|disable] [login-timeout <1-10>] [retry <1-100>] [inactive-timeout <0-60>] [logging {none|access|failures|all}] [source-ip <1-10> <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX> [mask <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>]] terminal speed {2400|4800|9600|19200|38400}|length <1-132>|width <1-132> tftp-server <XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX>

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)

page 271

page 277

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Command List 467 Table 168 CLI command list (continued)


Command ui-button enable ui-button unit <unit #> username <username> <password> [ro|rw] Page No. page 313 page 314

vlan configcontrol <vcc_option>

vlan create <1-4094>

vlan delete <1-4094>

vlan igmp {<1-4094> [snooping {enable|disable}] [proxy {enable|disable}] [robust-value <value>] [query-interval <time>] [v1-members <portlist>] [v2-members <portlist>] vlan igmp unknown-mcast-no-flood

Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring IP Multicast for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320990-A) Configuring IP Multicast for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320990-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring VLANs, Spanning Tree, and MultiLink Trunking for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320986-A) Configuring and Managing Security for Nortel Ethernet Switches 325 and 425, Software Release 3.6 (320988-A)
page 286

vlan members [add|remove] <1-4094> <portlist>

vlan mgmt <1-4094>

vlan name <1-4094> <line>

vlan ports [<portlist>] [tagging {enable|disable|tagAll|untagAll|tagPvidOnly| untagPvidOnly}] [pvid <1-4094>] [filter-untagged-frame {enable|disable}] [priority <0-7>] [name <line>] web-server{enable|disable}

write memory

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Command List

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469

Appendix F Technical specifications


This appendix provides technical specifications for the Ethernet Switch 325/425.

Environmental specifications
Table 169 lists environmental specifications for the Ethernet Switch 325/425.
Table 169 Environmental specifications
Parameter Temperature Humidity Altitude Operating specification 0 to 40C (32 to 104F) Storage specification -25 to 70C (-13 to 158F)

85% maximum relative humidity, 95% maximum relative humidity, noncondensing noncondensing 3024 m (10,000 ft) 3024 m (10,000 ft)

Electrical parameters
Table 170 lists power electrical parameters for the Ethernet Switch 325/425.
Table 170 Electrical parameters
Parameter Input Voltage Input Power Consumption Input Volt Amperes Rating Electrical specification 100 to 240 VAC @ 47 to 63 Hz 46 W maximum (Ethernet Switch 325) 50 W maximum (Ethernet Switch 425) 65 VA maximum

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Technical specifications Table 170 Electrical parameters (continued)


Parameter Input current Electrical specification Ethernet Switch 325: 2 A @ 120 VAC 1 A @ 240 VAC Ethernet Switch 425 1 A @ 100 VAC 0.5 A @ 240 VAC

Maximum thermal 75 BTU/hr (Ethernet Switch 325) output 250 BTU/hr (Ethernet Switch 425)

Physical dimensions
Table 171 lists physical dimensions for the Ethernet Switch 325
Table 171 Physical dimensions of the Ethernet Switch 325
Parameter Height Width Depth Weight Specifications 2 in (4.37 cm) 17.125 in (43.5 cm) 9.02 in (22.91 cm) 6.2 lb (2.82 kg)

Table 172 lists physical dimensions for the Ethernet Switch 425.
Table 172 Physical dimensions of the Ethernet Switch 425
Parameter Height Width Depth Weight Specifications 1.75 in (4.5 cm) 17.125 in (43.5 cm) 8.0 in (20.32 cm) 6.2 lb (2.82 kg)

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Performance specifications
Table 173 lists performance specifications for the Ethernet Switch 325.
Table 173 Performance specifications of the Ethernet Switch 325
Parameter Frame Forward Rate (64-byte packets) Port Forwarding/Filtering Performance (64-byte packets) Address Database Size Addressing Frame Length Specifications 3.6 Million packets per second (Mpps) for the Ethernet Switch 325-24T, and 6.6 Mpps for the Ethernet Switch 325-24G. For 10 Mb/s: 14,880 pps maximum For 100 Mb/s: 148,810 pps maximum

8,000 entries at line rate 48-bit MAC address 64 to 1518 bytes (IEEE 802.1Q Untagged) 68 to 1522 bytes (IEEE 802.1Q Tagged)

Table 174 lists performance specifications for the Ethernet Switch 425.
Table 174 Performance specifications of the Ethernet Switch 425
Parameter Frame Forward Rate (64-byte packets) Port Forwarding/Filtering Performance (64-byte packets) Address Database Size Addressing Frame Length Specifications Up to 3.2 million packets per second (pps) maximum, learned unicast traffic; 5.1 million packets per second (pps) in a stack configuration For 10 Mb/s: 14,880 pps maximum For 100 Mb/s: 148,810 pps maximum

8,000 entries at line rate 48-bit MAC address 64 to 1518 bytes (IEEE 802.1Q Untagged) 68 to 1522 bytes (IEEE 802.1Q Tagged)

Data rate
The data rate is 10 Mb/s Manchester encoded or 100 Mb/s 4B/5B encoded.

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Technical specifications

Network protocol and standards compatibility


The following are protocols and standards used by the Ethernet Switch 425-24T: IEEE 802.3 10BASE-T (ISO/IEC 8802-3, Clause 14) IEEE 802.3u 100BASE-TX (ISO/IEC 8802-3, Clause 25) IEEE 802.1Q (VLAN Tagging) IEEE 802.1z (Gigabit) IEEE 802.1d (Spanning tree protocol) IEEE 802.1p (Prioritizing) IEEE 802.3ad (static only)

Safety agency certification


The safety certifications follow for the Ethernet Switch 425-24T: UL Listed (UL 1950) IEC 950/EN60950 (CB report) with all national deviations C22.2 No. 950 (CUL) UL-94-V1 flammability requirements for PC board NOM (NOM-019)

Electromagnetic emissions
The electromagnetic emission standards for the Ethernet Switch 425-24T: US. CFR47, Part 15, Subpart B, Class A Canada. ICES-003, Issue 2, Class A Australia/New Zealand. AS/NZS 3548:1995, Class A Japan. V-3/97.04:1997, Class A Taiwan. CNS 13438, Class A EN55022:1995, Class A EN61000-3-2:1995 EN61000-3-3:1994

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Technical specifications

473

Electromagnetic immunity
The Ethernet Switch 325/425 meets the EN50082-1:1997 standard.

System Configuration Guide

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Technical specifications

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475

Index
A
AbsoluteValue statistics 187 access 125 access levels 175 accessing the CLI 125 Action field 360 Actions menu 178 Addr field 341 Addresses tab 341 AdminDuplex field 370, 373 administrative options logging out 382 resetting the switch/stack 379 resetting to system defaults 381 security, configuring passwords 379 AdminSpeed field 371, 373 AdminStatus field 370, 373 Agent tab 349, 350 age-out time 143 Alarm Manager button 179 Allowed Source IP Address field 237 Allowed Source Mask field 237 AllowedRatePps field 339 alphabetical list of commands 447 Area Chart button 193 area graph example 188 ARP tab 342 ASCII Config file dialog box 360 ASCII Configuration File Download page 396 System Configuration Guide ASCII Configuration File Download screen 244 ASCII Configuration Filename field 245 ASCIIConfigAutodldStatus field 361 ASCIIConfigAutoDownload field 361 ASCIIConfigFileName field 361 ASCIIConfigManualdldStatus field 361 ASCIIConfigManualDownload field 361 Authentication Trap field 220 AuthenticationTraps field 345 Auto Configuration on Reset field 246 AutoNegotiate field 370, 373 autonegotiation 283, 323 description 54 modes 407 troubleshooting 407 Autonegotiation field 112, 114 auto-negotiation-advertisements command 333 AutoNegotiationAdvertisments field 371, 374 AutoNegotiationCapability field 371, 374 AutoPVID field 345 autosave enabling and disabling 400 Autosave Configuration screen 247 autosave enable command 288 autosense description 54 autotopology command 297 Autotopology field 220 Average statistics 187

476

Index configuration, editing 343 ChassisType field 366 check boxes, about 204 CI Main Menu 126 Clear All Port Statistics option 105 CLI 125 CLI command list, alphabetical 447 clock summer-time command 295 clock time-zone command 294 cmd_interface command 279 color-coded ports 182 Comm Port Data Bits field 225 Comm Port Parity field 225 Comm Port Stop Bits field 225 Command Line Interface option 100 command modes 120, 132, 133 communication parameters, setting for Device Manager 172 Community String field 220 community strings default for Device Manager 175 entering 176 ConfigFileName field 359 Configurable field 215 configuration downloading 358 Configuration File Download/Upload page 397 Configuration File Download/Upload screen 240 Configuration Image Filename field 242 configure command 132 configure network command 266 Confirm row deletion field 174 connectivity 262 connectors 425 DB-9 console/comm port connector 428 RJ-45 port connector 425

B
banner command for displaying banner 280 Banner display control 280 Banner tab 353 Bar Chart button 193 Base Unit Info Tab 346 Base Unit Info tab 346, 347 BcastAddr field 341 BkplType field 366 blinking LEDs 182 blink-leds command 312 boot command 274 Boot Mode Setting field 387 booting the switch 274 BootMode field 345 BootP 255, 274 Always mode 217 BOOTPTAB.TXT file 443 Bootstrap Protocol choosing a request mode 216 Disabled 218 Last Address setting 218 Last BootP field 215 modes 275 Request Mode field 215 sample configuration file 443 When Needed mode 217 bootP configuring 385 request modes 387 BootRouterAddr tab 350 Broadcast Rate Limiting 115 buttons dialog boxes 185 toolbar 178

C
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Index Console Interface (CI) logging in 231 console interface (CI) main menu 96 menus, using 94 Console Password field 226 console port default settings 94 Console Port Speed field 225 Console Read-Only Password field 227, 228 Console Read-Write Password field 227, 229 console/comm port configuration screen 223 illustration 428 pin assignments 429 Console/Comm Port Configuration options 98 Console/Communication Port page 400 conventions, text 34 Copy button 185 copy config nvram command 285 copy config tftp command 278 copy configuration file 276 Copy Configuration Image to Server field 243 Copy File tab 358 copy running-config tftp command 270 copy tftp config command 278 crossover cable 427 Cumulative statistics 187 Current Unit Number field 210, 233 CurrentDefaultGateway field 345 CurrentImageVersion field 345 CurrentMgmtProtocol field 345 CurrentTime field 364 CurState field 366 Custom Banner tab 356 customer support 36

477

D
data, exporting 191 DB-9 console/comm port connector 428 default access community strings for Device Manager 175 default auto-negotiation-advertisements command 335 default autosave enable command 288 default autotopology command 298 default command 129, 131 default duplex command 326 default flowcontrol command 328 Default Gateway field 216 default ip address unit command 258 default ip domain-name command 265 default ipbootp server command 276 default lldp command 301 default lldp port config notification command 303 default lldp port status command 306 default lldp tx-tlv command 305 default mac-address-table aging-time command 146 default name command 322 default rate-limit command 331 Default read community 174 default settings 431 default speed command 324 Default TTL field 340 default ui-button command 315 Default write community 174 Descr field 338, 347, 348, 351, 353, 370, 372 Device Manager 147 installing on UNIX 160 installing on Windows 149 requirements 147 setting properties 172

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Index

Device Manager window 171, 172 Device menu 178 Device Name field 176 device view, summary 179 device, opening 175 diagnostics 315 Disable command 184 disable command 133 disabled port, color 183 Display Event Log option 99 Display Port Statistics option 105 download command 316 duplex command 325 duplex mode 283, 323

F
Fan tab 352 fiber optic networks linking with Gigabit Ethernet ports 75 File System window 358 FileSystem dialog box 358 flash memory for software image upgrades 54 flow control 326 Flow Control field 114 flowcontrol command 327 format 123, 252 forwarding table 143 FwFileName field 359

E
EAPoL Security Configuration option 104 EAPoL with Guest VLAN 46 Edit command 184 Edit menu 178 Edit Selected button 179 Enable command 184 enable command 132 Enable field 173, 339 enable, name 319 end command 134 Ethernet 325/425 Switch connectors 425 Ethernet Switch 325 front panel 57 Ethernet Switch 425 front panel 67 Event Logging field 236 exit command 134 Export Data button 185, 191

G
gateway 252 gateway addresses, configuring 385 Gateway Setting field 388 GBIC 75 General CLI commands 251 Gigabit Ethernet 326 Gigabit Ethernet ports, linking with fiber optic networks 75 Globals tab 340 graph creating 191 modifying 192 Graph command 184 graph dialog box 192 Graph menu 178 Graph Selected button 179, 191 graph types 187

H
Hardware Unit Information screen 233 help 128, 129

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Index Help button 179 help command 130 Help menu 178 Help, Device Manager 196 High Speed Flow Control Configuration option 104 High Speed Flow Control Configuration screen 112 High Speed Flow Control page 393 high speed flow control, configuring 393 Horizontal button 193 hybrid mode 123 ip address command 252 IP Address tab 341 IP Address to Ping field 216 ip address unit command 257 IP addresses, configuring 385 ip bootp server command 275 IP Configuration option 97 IP Configuration screen 214 ip default-gateway command 254 IP dialog box 339 ip domain-name command 265 ip name-server command 263 IP page 385 IP Setting field 388 IpAddr field 365, 366 IPAddress field 342 IsPortShared field 371, 374

479

I
icons, about 205 Identify Unit Numbers page 211 IEEE 802.3u standard 54 IGMP Configuration option 105 image file 358 ImageFileName field 350, 359, 361 ImageLoadMode field 345 In Use field 215 Inactivity Timeout field 236 In-Band IP Address field 215 In-Band Subnet Mask field 216 Index field 370, 372 Insert button 185 installing the Device Manager software 149 interface command 133 Interface item, ARP 342 Interface tab for a single port 368 Interface tab for multiple ports 372 interfaces 133 IP 252 IP address 252, 253, 257, 258 per unit 257

L
Last Auto Configuration Status field 246 Last Manual Configuration Status field 246 LastChange field 370, 373 LastLoadProtocol field 346 LastSyncSource field 364 LastSyncTime field 364 LastValue statistics 187 LEDs descriptions 60, 76 display panel 59, 76 LEDs in device view 182 legend, port color 178, 183 Limit field 118 Line Chart button 193 Link field 112 Link Layer Discovery Protocol 40 link status 319 System Configuration Guide

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Index icons 203, 205 main menu, console interface 96 ManualSyncRequest field 363 Max Traps in Log field 174 Maximum statistics 187 MDA viewing 181 MDAs 326 MDI-X to MDI cable connections 427 MDI-X to MDI-X cable connections 427 menu bar, Device Manager 177 menus 177 Microsoft Internet Explorer, software version requirements 199 Minimum statistics 187 MLT 283 MltId field 371, 374 Mtu field 370, 373 MultiLink Trunk Configuration option 105 multiple objects, selecting 181 multiple ports editing 371

link, lacking, color 183 LinkTrap field 370, 373 Listen for Syslogs 174 Listen for Traps 174 LLDP 40 TLVs 42 lldp command 300 lldp port config notification command 302 lldp port status command 305 lldp tx-tlv command 303 LnkTrap field 112 LoadServerAddr field 350, 359, 361 LocalSeg field 366 LocalStorageImageVersion field 345 Location field 347, 348 Log Scale button 193 logging 248, 289 logging out 382 logging out of Web-based management 382 Login Retries field 236 Login Timeout field 236 logout command 132 Logout option 100 LstChng field 347, 348

N
name command 321 Name field 370, 372 naming ports 321 netmask 252, 257 NetMask field 341 Netscape Navigator, software version requirements 199 network administrator contact information 389, 390 network configuration configuring power workgroups and a shared media hub 87 network protocol/standards compatibility 472

M
MAC address 138, 139, 143 MAC Address field 233 MAC address forwarding database table 143 MAC Address Security Configuration option 104 MAC Address Table option 104 MacAddr field 350, 366 MacAddress field 342 mac-address-table aging-time command 145 main menu headings and options 202 320985-A

Index network security, protecting system integrity 201 new features 39 new table entry, creating 185 New Unit Number field 210, 233 NextBootDefaultGateway field 345 NextBootLoadProtocol field 346 NextBootMgmtProtocol field 345 NextBootNetMask field 350 NextBootpAddr field 350 NextSyncTime field 364 NmmCurNum field 365 NmmLstChg field 365 NmmMaxNum field 365 no auto-negotiation-advertisements command 334 no autosave enable command 288 no autotopology command 298 no banner command 281 no clock summer-time command 296 no clock time-zone command 295 no command 129, 131 no flowcontrol command 327 no ip address command 253 no ip address unit command 258 no ip bootp server command 276 no ip default-gateway 254 no ip domain-name command 265 no ip name-server command 264 no lldp port config notification command 302 no lldp port status command 306 no lldp tx-tlv command 304 no name command 322 no rate-limit command 330 no shutdown command 320 no sntp enable command 290 no sntp server command 292 no tftp-server command 278 no ui-button command 315 NoSuchObject error message 368, 371

481

O
object types 180 objects editing 186 selecting 180 online Help 178, 196 Open Device button 175, 179 Open Device dialog box 175 operating port, color 183 OperDuplex field 370 OperSpeed field 371, 373 OperState field 347, 349, 351, 353 OperStatus field 370, 373 options Clear All Port Statistics 105 Console/Comm Port Configuration 98 Display Event Log 99 Display Port Statistics 105 IP Configuration 97 Logout 100 MAC Address Table 104 MultiLink Trunk Configuration 105 Port Configuration 104 Port Mirroring Configuration 105 Reset 97, 99 Reset to Default Settings 99 SNMP Configuration 97 Software Download 98 Spanning Tree Configuration 98 Switch Configuration 98 System Characteristics 98 TELNET Configuration 98 VLAN Configuration 104

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Index Primary RADIUS Server field 230 PrimaryServer Address field 363 PrimaryServer SynchFailures field 364 Print button 185 product support 36 Properties dialog box 172, 173 Hotswap Poll Interval field 173 If Traps, Status Interval ) field 173 Status Poll Interval field 173 publications related 54

P
Packet Type field 117 passwords 127 Paste button 185 PhysAddress field 370, 373 ping command 259, 262 polling interval 191 port 319 port autonegotiation speed, configuring 390 port color legend 183 port communication speed, configuring 400 Port Configuration option 104 Port Configuration screen 109 port connections, troubleshooting 407 Port field 111, 113, 366, 372 Port Management page 390 Port Mirroring Configuration option 105 port mirroring configuration rules 53 port number and port list 123 port shortcut menu 184 port, enabling or disabling 319 PortActiveComponent field 371, 374 portlist 123 portnum 123 ports 323 color-coded 182 controlling 367 disabled 183 editing 367, 371 naming 283, 321 selecting 181 viewing 367, 371 power cord warnings (multilingual) 63, 80 power cords 62, 79 Power Supply tab 350, 351 power-up sequence 406

Q
QoS 178 Quick Start 377 Quick Start page 377 quit 132

R
RADIUS password fallback 45 RADIUS Shared Secret field 230 RADIUS UPD Port field 230 Rate Limit tab 338 Rate Limiting 402 Rate Limiting Configuration option 105 Rate Limiting Configuration screen 115 Rate Limiting page 402 rate-limit command 330 Read Community field 176 Read Community, SNMP 176 Read Community, SNMP field 176 Read-Only Community String field 220 Read-Write Community String field 220 Read-Write-All access 176, 185 ReasmMaxSize field 341

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Index ReasmTimeout field 340 reboot 379 ReBoot field 345 Refresh Device Status button 179 Register for Traps 174 release notes, obtaining 201 reload command 136 Renumber Stack Units screen 232 renumber unit command 143 Renumber units with new setting? field 233 request mode, choosing 216 requirements 125 accessing the CLI 125 Device Manager 147 power cords 62, 79 terminal 125 UNIX installation of Device Manager 160 Windows installation of Device Manager 149 reset 379 Reset Changes button 185 Reset page 380 Reset to Default Settings option 99 Reset to Defaults page 381, 382 resetting the switch/stack 379 resetting the switch/stack, to system defaults 381 restore factory-default command 261 Retrieve Configuration File from Server field 246 Retrieve Configuration Image from Server field 243 Retry Count field 174 RFC 54 RJ-45 port connector illustration 425 pin assignments 426 Rmon menu 178

483

S
save config command 286 scripts 119, 132, 133 Secondary RADIUS Server field 230 SecondaryServer Address field 363 SecondaryServer SynchFailures field 364 Secure Shell 194 security, configuring passwords 379 SegId field 366 serial port 125 SerNum field 347, 349 Sernum field 338 setting usernames and passwords 127 settings, default 431 SFP GBIC 75 SFP GBIC Support 53 shortcut menus port 184 switch unit 183 show arp-table command 282 show auto-negotiation-advertisements command 331 show auto-negotiation-capabilities command 332 show autosave command 287 show autotopology nmm-table command 299 show autotopology settings command 298 show banner command 281 show cli command 272 show clock summer-time command 296 show clock time-zone command 296 show config-network command 267 show interfaces command 283 show interfaces config command 284 show ip address command 256 show ip command 255 System Configuration Guide

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Index LED indication descriptions 396 process 317, 394, 395 Software Download option 98 Software Download page 394 Software Download screens 237 software installation UNIX 160 Windows 149 software version requirements Microsoft Internet Explorer 199 Netscape Navigator 199 software versions 138 software, downloading 315 Spanning Tree Configuration option 98 speed 283, 323 speed command 323 Speed field 370, 373 Speed/Duplex field 112, 114 SSH 194 SSH button 179 SSH session 179 stack 283 Stack field 117, 118 Stack Info tab 348 stack information 141 Stack Information field 208 Stack Information page 207 stack information, viewing 207 Stack Inventory field 209 stack MAC address 89 Stack Numbering page 209 stack numbering, configuring 209 stack up/down configurations 89 Stacked button 193 stacking 44 cascade up and down connectors 78 considerations 92

show ip dns command 262 show lldp command 307 show lldp port command 309 show mac-address-table command 144 show rate-limit command 329 show running-config command 269 show sntp command 289 show stack-info command 141 show sys-info command 138, 273 show tech command 139 show terminal command 271, 272 show tftp-server command 277 show ui-button command 314 shutdown command 319 shutdown command for the unit 134 Shutdown option 100 Simple Network Time Protocol 248 single object, selecting 180 Slot field 366 SNMP Access field 235 SNMP Configuration option 97 SNMP Configuration screen 219 SNMP trap port 46 SNMP traps 195 SNTP 248, 289, 363 local time zone 249 SNTP dialog box 362 sntp enable command 290 sntp server primary address command 291 sntp server secondary address command 291 sntp sync-interval command 293 sntp sync-now command 293 software download process 240 image upgrades 54 software download 320985-A

Index initial installation 88 overview 87 stack MAC address 89 stacking considerations 89 standalone mode 123 standards 55 Start Ping field 216 Start TFTP Load of New Image field 240 State field 363 statistics for a single object 190 for multiple objects 191 graphing 186 single port 190 types 187 statistics dialog box multiple objects 190 statistics dialog boxes 178 Status field 112, 360, 365 Stop button 185 subnet mask 252, 257 summary options changing stack numbering 209 identifying unit numbers 211 viewing stack information 207 switch information 206 Support heading 201 support, Nortel Networks 36 switch configuration files not-saved parameters 399 retrieving from a TFTP server 397 storing on a TFTP server 397 Switch Configuration Menu 103 options 104 Switch Configuration option 98 switch configuration options bootP settings 385 gateway settings 385 high speed flow control 393 IP settings 385 network manager contact 389 port autonegotiation speed 390 port communication speed 400 retrieving from a TFTP server 397 storing on a TFTP server 397 switch images, downloading 394 system location 389 system name 389 Switch field 118 switch images, downloading 394 switch information viewing 206 Switch Information page 206 switch port autonegotiation speed, configuring 390 switch stack, selecting 181 switch unit shortcut menu 183 switch, selecting 180 switches supported 33 SyncInterval field 363 sysContact field 344, 376 sysDescr field 344 sysLocation field 344, 376 sysName field 344, 376 System Characteristics option 98 System Characteristics screen 100, 221 System Characteristics screen fields Base Unit 101, 222 Last Reset Type 102, 222 Local MDA Type 102, 222 MAC Address 102, 222 Operational Mode 101, 222 Power Status 102, 222 Reset Count 102, 222 Size of Stack 101, 222 sysContact 102, 223 sysDescr 102, 222 sysLocation 102, 223

485

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Index terminal 132 requirements 125 settings 270 terminal command 271 text conventions 34 TFTP 276 TFTP Server IP Address field 239, 242, 245 tftp-server command 277 time zone, setting 249 Timeout field 174 timestamps 248, 289 toolbar, Device Manager 178 tooltip 184 topology 364 Topology Table tab 365 Trace field 174 traffic Gigabit Ethernet 326 Traffic Type field 339 Trap IP Address fields 220 trap log 195 Trap Log button 179 Trap Port field 174 Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) software download 238 troubleshooting 252 access 132, 253, 258 locations of Help files 196 ping 259, 262 port interface 407 port numbers 123 ports 133 power-up sequence 406 receiving traps 196 SNTP 248, 289 stack 143 timestamps 248, 289 Trunk field 111

sysName 102, 223 sysObjectID 102, 222 sysServices 102, 223 sysUpTime 102, 222 system default settings, resetting to 381 System Description field 390 system information 138, 139 System Information page 375 System Location field 390 system location, naming 389 system name, configuring 389 System Object ID field 390 System page 389 system settings modifying 389 system contact 390 system location 390 system name 390 System tab 343, 344 System Up Time field 390 sysUpTime field 344, 376

T
Tab key navigation 129 tables and input forms, about 204 technical specifications 469 technical support 36 Telnet 125 TELNET Access field 235 Telnet button 179, 193 Telnet session 179, 193 TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration option 98 TELNET/SNMP/Web Access Configuration screen 234 TELNET/WEB Stack Password Type field 226 TELNET/WEB Switch Password Type field 226 320985-A

Index Type field 338, 342, 347, 370, 372 types of objects 180 Web quick start 377 Web-based management opening from Device Manager 194 Web-based management interface home page, graphic 195, 200 logging in 200 main menu, icons 203, 205 management page 204 navigating the menu 201 requirements to use 199 window, Device Manager 177 Windows installing Device Manager 149 Write Community field 176 Write Community, SNMP 176 write memory command 286

487

U
UI button 68 ui-button enable command 313 ui-button unit command 314 Unit field 111, 113, 117 unit numbers, identifying 211 Unit tab 338 UNIX installing Device Manager 160 receiving traps 196 upgrading diagnostics 315 upgrading software 315 User Interface button 68 usernames and passwords 127 Using DNS to ping and Telnet 249

V
ValidFlag tab 350 value, changed 186 Ver field 338, 347, 349 Viewing 367 VLAN Configuration Control 52 VLAN field 379 VLAN menu 178 VLAN port tagging 51 VLANs Configuration option 104

W
Web Access field 236 Web browser, requirements 199 Web Help file, accessing 201 Web Quick Start 377 System Configuration Guide

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Index

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