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transportation

a journal of the architects regional council asia (ARCASIA) issue 2 april / may / june 2011

Kengo Kuma Hoshakuji Station HINTAN Associates Sdn Bhd Senai Airport Landside Expansion WOHA Stadium MRT Station Aedas Limited Sunny Bay Station Morphogenesis Marble Arch ASA Forum 2011

ISSN 1675-6886

ARCASIA MEMBER INSTITUTES


Institute of Architects Bangladesh (IAB) House 11 Road 4 Dhanmondi R/A Dhaka 1205 Bangladesh T/F +00 8802 8611454 E iab@truebd.com W www.iabnet.org President: Mubasshar Hussain The Architectural Society of China (ASC) 9 Sanlihe Road Beijing China 100835 T +00 86 10 8808 2236 F +00 86 10 8808 2222 E asc@mail.cin.gov.cn President: Chunhua Song The Hong Kong Institute of Architects (HKIA) 19th Floor One Hysan Avenue Causeway Bay P O Box 20334 Hennessy Road Post Office Hong Kong T +00 852 2511 6323 F +00 852 2519 6011 E hkiasec@hkia.org.hk W www.hkia.org.hk President: Dominic K. K. Lam The Indian Institute of Architects (IIA) Prospect Chambers Annexe 5th Floor Dr D N Road Fort Mumbai 400 001 India T +00 91 22 204 6972 F +00 91 22 283 2516 E iia@vsnl.com W www.iia-india.org President: Prafulla Karkhanis Ikatan Arsitek Indonesia (IAI) Kantor Pusat IAI Gedung Jakarta Design Center Lt 7 Jalan Jend Gatot Subroto Kav 53 Jakarta 10260 Indonesia T +62 21 5305715 F +62 21 5304722 E iai-nasional@cbn.net.id President: Endy Subijono Japan Institute of Architects (JIA) Kenchikuka Kaikan 2-3-18 Jingumae Shibuya-Ku Tokyo 150 0001 Japan T +00 81 3 3408 7125 F +00 81 3 3408 7129 E myasuda@jia.or.jp W www.jia.or.jp President: Taro Ashihara Korea Institute of Registered Architects (KIRA) 1603-55 Seocho1 dong Seocho-gu Seoul 137-877 Korea T +00 82 2 581 5711 F +00 82 2 586 8823 E secretary@kira.or.kr W www.kira.or.kr President: Choi Young-jip Architects Association of Macau (AAM) Avenida Coronel de Mesquita 2F P O Box 3091 Macau T +00 853 703 458 F +00 853 704 089 E macauaam@macau.ctm.net President: Leong Chong In Pertubuhan Akitek Malaysia (PAM) 4 & 6 Jalan Tangsi 50480 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia T +603 2698 4136 F +603 2692 8782 E info@pam.org.my President: Boon Che Wee The Union of Mongolian Architects (UMA) P O Box 59 Ulaanbataar-210620a Mongolia T +00 9761 1321 610 F +00 9761 1310 638 E uma_gc@magicnet.mn President: Khurelbaatar Erdenesaikhan The Institute of Architects Pakistan (IAP) ST 1/A Block 2 Kehkashan Clifton Karachi 75600 Pakistan T +00 9221 588 3865 F +00 9221 588 5060 E info@iap.com.pk W mail@dgp.com.pk President: Shahab Ghani Khan United Architects of The Philippines (UAP) 53 Scout Rallos Quezon City 1103 Philippines T +00 63 2 412 6364 F +00 63 2 372 1796 E uapnational@yahoo.com W www.united-architects.org President: Ramon Mendoza Singapore Institute of Architects (SIA) 79 Neil Road Singapore 088904 T +65 6226 2668 F +65 6226 2663 E info@sia.org.sg President: Ashvinkumar s/o Kantilal Sri Lanka Institute of Architects (SLIA) 120/7 Vidya Mawanta Off Wijerama Mawanta Colombo 7 Sri Lanka T +00 94 1 697109 / 691710 F +00 94 1 682757 E sliagen@sltnet.lk W www.slia.com President: Ranjan Nadesapillai The Association of Siamese Architects (ASA) Under Royal Patronage 248/1 Soi Rong Rian Yepun Rama IX Road HuayKwang Bangkok 10320 Thailand T +00 66 2 319 4124 F +00 66 2 319 6419 E foreign affair@asa.or.th W www.asa.or.th President: Thaweejit Chandrasakha Vietnam Association of Architects (VAA) 23 Dinh Tien Hoang Street Hoan Kiem District Hanoi Vietnam T +00 84 4 825 3648 F +00 84 4 934 0262 E hoiktsvn@hn.vnn.vn President: Nguyen Tan Van Society of Nepalese Architects (SONA) Jung Hem Hirnya Complex Tripureshawor G P O Box 20461 Kathmandu Nepal T +00 977 1 426 2252 E sona@htp.com.np President: Binod Neupane

Hongdae Project by Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects + Unsangdong Architects

Sunny Bay Station by Aedas Limited

a journal of the architects regional council asia (ARCASIA) which is an international council of presidents of 17 national institutes of architects in the asian region Front Cover HOSHAKUJI STATION
BY KENGO KUMA & ASSOCIATES ARCASIA OFFICE BEARERS 2011 President George Kunihiro Zone A Deputy President Kalim Siddiqui Zone B Deputy President Sathirut Nui Zone C Deputy President Anna Kwong Honorary Secretary Marco Corbella Honorary Treasurer Junichi Ito Immediate Past President Mubashar Hussain Advisers Kun-Chang Yi Yolanda Reyes CHAIRMEN OF ARCASIA COMMITTEES Chairman ACPP (professional practice) Balbir Verma Chairman ACGSA (green and sustainable architecture) Ashvinkumar Kantilal Chairman, ACAE (architectural education) Abu Sayeed Chairman Fellowship Committee Nela De Zoysa PUBLISHER Pusat Binaan Sdn Bhd A wholly-owned company of Pertubuhan Akitek Malaysia (PAM) on behalf of ARCASIA 4 & 6 Jalan Tangsi 50480 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia T +603 2693 2843 F +603 2693 2849 E p.binaan@streamyx.com Printer Percetakan Zanders Sdn Bhd THE ARCHITECTURE ASIA TEAM Editorial Board Lee Chor Wah Boon Che Wee Saifuddin Ahmad Abu Zarim Abu Bakar Adele Chong Advisers Kun-Chang Yi Dr Tan Loke Mun Editor-in-Chief Lee Chor Wah Projects Editor Adele Chong adele@pam.org.my Designers Imaya Wong Lim Siew Fong www.grainstudio.asia Corresponding Editors Zakia Rahman Bangladesh (IAB) Wang Xiaojing China (ASC) Chairman of Media Resource & Publication Committee Hong Kong (HKIA) Vijay Garg India (IIA) Andra Matin Indonesia (IAI) Takayuki Matsuura Japan (JIA) Chun G Shin Korea (KIRA) Rui Leao Macau (MAA) Lee Chor Wah Malaysia (PAM) E Purev Erdene E Tuya Mongolia (UMA) Bishnu Panthee Nepal (SONA) Arshad Faruqui Pakistan (IAP) Michael T Ang Philippines (UAP) Ow Chin Cheow Singapore (SIA) Prasanna Silva Sri Lanka (SLIA) Veerachat (Jop) Thailand (ASA) Nguyen Van Tat Vietnam (VAA)

Architecture Asia is published quarterly. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission from the Publisher is strictly prohibited. Architecture Asia cannot be held responsible for any unsolicited submission materials. Submission materials (manuscripts, photographs, drawings, CDs etc.) will not be returned unless submitted with a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Although every effort has been made to ensure accuracy in the preparation of each publication, the Publisher, Printer, and editorial staff accept no responsibilities from any effects arising from errors or omissions.

The Breathing Factory by Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates

CONTENTS ISSUE 2 April / May / June 2011


16

Editorial
6

Projects
JAPAN 10 Hoshakuji Station Kengo Kuma & Associates 40 The Breathing Factory Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates KOREA / JAPAN 26 Hongdae Project Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects + Unsangdong Architects BANGLADESH 16 South Water Caress Housing Rafiq Azam HONG KONG 30 Wong Shek Public Pier Ivanho Architect Limited 74 Sunny Bay Station Aedas Limited INDIA 32 Marble Arch Housing Morphogenesis MALAYSIA 36 Senai Airport Landside Commercial Expansion HINTAN Associates Sdn Bhd 70 Ipoh Train Station Rehabilitation VERITAS Architects Sdn Bhd THAILAND 48 Shophouse Transformation all (zone) SINGAPORE 56 Stadium MRT Station WOHA SRI LANKA 64 Canteen Recreation Chinthaka Wickramage Associates

74

Events
8 ASA Forum 2011

Profiles
20 Interview with Rafiq Azam 54 Interview with Prof Dr Goh Chong Chia Treasurer, UIA

Article
22 Interface of the Urban Arterial System with the National Highway No.5: A Case Study of Bhubaneswar, India

10

Books
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4 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 contents

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EDITORS NOTE transportation

The idea of going places means something different to everyone and indeed, to architects who have tried their hand at interpreting the idea of embarking on a journey through their own built forms. In the past few decades our means of travel has been obliged to evolve, reinforced by a number of crucial factors, including a heightened emphasis on international security measures, the Internet and not to mention the proliferation of globalisation. Studies have shown that well-designed transport infrastructures, public spaces and buildings contribute significantly to the development of better, more livable environment. Bearing this in mind, in what ways can architecture, a medium so conventionally personifying solidity and permanence, be accurately reflective of the fluctuating forces of travel that consistently govern our everyday activities? The Transportation issue of Architecture Asia delves into how major modes of travel be it air, sea, road or rail have been edified and re-imagined by Asian architects in the past little while. Architecture may be a journey onto itself, but how can it assist global inhabitants when it comes to our own respective voyages through the landscape of daily living? How can design help us explore uncharted terrain while simultaneously getting us from Point A to Point B in the most effective, safe, comfortable, and enjoyable way possible? The projects featured in the upcoming pages reveal themselves as particularly eloquent answers to such questions.

Adele Chong Projects Editor

6 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 editors note

clockwise from top left

ASA Fair; Li Xiaodong; Syed Zainol Abidin Idid; Q&A with Francis Kr; Laretna Adishakti; Alessandro Scandurra; ASA booth

up his sleeves and literally making his buildings with his own bare hands for the people of Africa that he loved and cared so deeply. Hailed from Africa, but now teaches in Berlin, Francis Kr literally stomp the stage with this opening lecture by showing how he mobilized the people to flatten the floor by stamping and beating the ground with music. In his effort not to make the poor dependent on aids, Kr had empowered the locals to appreciate their traditional clay construction versus modern concrete and corrugated iron sheets while building them with their own talented hands and feet. Li Xiaodong of China was critical of the development of modern Chinese architecture and the mindless rapid development in China, which had basically aped the West. His is a regional practice operating within a global context without losing ones root through thinking and designing with the climate. Li also loves teaching because in the academia, there is no client. 12 cases or scenarios formed the train of Alessandro Scandurra from Milans lecture. Scandurra has developed a unique and sophisticated design process through stacks of cards of seemingly unrelated images and texts. They forced him to methodically investigate and discover a variety of ideas that generate questions rather than provide answers. In answering an observation from the audience that his projects appeared not to be solving the problems at hand but just posing more questions. Scandurra countered that if there were no questions; there would be no solutions. MVRDV s Fokke Moerel presented a number of projects in support of the idea that small things make a difference. Each project is posited to answer questions like, When does something make a difference? and, What are these things? The Blue Village on the roof of a Rotterdam apartment is a testament to small densification for a large citys problem. The Brussel based office of Kersten Greers and David Van Severen posed the question, How can you re-write the language/grammar of architecture? They believed that you didnt have to make extraordinary shapes so as to shout about your buildings. The works should speak for themselves. Good advice to both the iconic-building-seeking developers and

ASA Forum 2011


Reported by Lee Chor Wah

BOTTOM UP: small things for changing the world is the theme for ASA Forum 2011 which was held from 9 to 13 February in Bangkoks Impact Exhibition and Convention Centre. The Forums working team had brought together four main streams of lecture series, namely Thai Young Generation Series, Thai Keynote Sessions, International Sessions, ASA Seminars, and ASA Conservation Forum all under one big umbrella event in conjunction with their annual building materials and products exhibition the ASA Fair. The provocative theme, bottom up suggests working from the bottom or from the ground up. It also suggests working from first principles, from the lowest denominator, from the poor and the weak, from the fundamental, the essentials, and the most basic human needs towards higher ideals. In Asian parlance, bottoms up connote another meaning of yum seng, i.e. drinking in one full gulp as a means of celebration thus the Forum is also a celebration on the works of the impressive line-up of local as well as international speakers whose works have gotten to the bottom of human needs, theoretical investigations, social interventions, technological advances, etc. Some of who such as Francis Kr, would roll

8 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 events

EVENTS
students. They saw their practice as dwelling into the bottom of absolute architecture in coming up with contents that are formed by strong theoretical basis. To them, the ideal architecture education is to physically make something in the workshop for model making. Helena Sandman of Hollmen Reuter Sandman from Finland presented 3 projects in Africa. In the process, she worked closely with the locals by understanding their cultures; building with local stone or self-made concrete vent blocks. Seeing her architecture changing the lives of is more rewarding than monetary rewards. Francine Holman of Mecanoo looked for identity in a world of globalization through creating unforgettable and collective spaces, innovative combination of modernity with tradition, while generating new public spaces by combining architecture, urbanism, and landscape. Momoyo Kajima of Atelier Bow-Wow of Made in Tokyo and Pet Architecture fame used their analytical approach to show how Tokyo could excel as a sensible city into an urban village through the exploration of the potentiality of gap spaces. They have traced the urban development patterns of Japanese houses and came up with creative solutions that solved the problem yet offered new ways of working. The ASA Conservation Forum featured a number of academicians as well as practitioners who shared passionately about their projects and case studies. Dr Yongtanit Pimonsathien of Thammasat Universtiy who is also the President of ICOMOS Thailand opened the Forum with Think with heart: when hands can talk. She opined that when we think with our hearts on conservation, there would be less politics. And when the hands can talk, meaning when there are dialogues at grass-root level, i.e. bottom up versus top down approach conservation would be most effective and lasting in the community. Associate Professor Syed Zainol Abidin Idid from Malaysia expounded the notion of community participation in conservation with the slogan, know your town, love your town, quoting a Malay proverb, Jika tak kenal, maka tak cinta (if you dont know, therefore you dont love). Idid presented a Malaysian initiative to conserve Taiping as a heritage town a town with many firsts in Malaysia : first prison, first museum, first

police station, first market, and above all, the first British planned town in the then Malaya with another slogan, I love Taiping; let me show you my town. Laretna Adishati of Indonesia showcased the conservation effort on Mount Merapi one of the 100 in the list of most endangered sites. Debashish Nayak from India talked about the conservation of the walled city Ahmedabad, an old city settlement dating back to the 10th century town of Ashaval. Lee Soo Khoon from Singapore shared the process of conserving and extending the National Museum as an urban connector and museum in the park. Nuno Soares showed how architecture heritage was being used as a tool for urban renewal in Macau while Anna Kwong expounded on the revitalization of salt pen in Yin Tin Tsai, Hong Kong, underpinned by the ideal of take away nothing, add nothing. Japans Naoto Nakajima outlined a residentsdriven urban conservation and regeneration initiative to revitalize the declining town of Tomo, west of Japan. From China, we were told that even though the Wali Village was destroyed to make way for the Olympic construction, the homes had never really disappeared. The old temples, landmark buildings, gateways, wedding ceremonies, childhoods, pets, etcstill lingered in the minds of the former residents. An old tree was even conserved in the new Olympic Park for the former residents to have reunions to perpetuate the memories of their vanished village. The Thai Young Generation Series featured five up-and-coming young Thai practices founded within the last 5 to 10 years. This energetic, questioning, experimental crop of young blood included the like of Architect Kidd, IDIN Architects, Supermachine Studio, Onion, and Plankrich. While in the Thai Keynote Sessions, local visionary architects Suriya Umpansiriratana and Boonlert

Hemvijitraphan took the audience by awe with their philosophical approach to richly detailed, well crafted, regionally rooted yet contemporary architecture. In this fast-changing time of digital architecture, bottom up: small things for changing the world Forum has certainly stirred many hearts in relooking at the small things whatever it may be that could have dramatic ramifications for the world.

In this fastchanging time of digital architecture, bottom up: small things for changing the world Forum has certainly stirred many hearts in relooking at the small things whatever it may be that could have dramatic ramifications for the world.

a common link

Despite tight budget constraints, Kengo Kumas dramatic reworking of a railway station in the north of Toyko offers commuters a refreshing take on a perceivably ordinary terminal.

PROJECTS

Architect Kengo Kuma & Associates Japan

Hoshakuji Station

PROJECTS HOSHAKUJI STATION KENGO KUMA & ASSOCIATES

For Kengo Kuma, the starting point of the Hoshakuji Station project was in opening up the east exit of the station, perpetuated by the objective to connect the west and east sides of the station, which remained divided by the railway tracks; it was important to establish a clear link between the west and the east of the town of Takanezawa, and between the station, Chokkura Plaza and nearby shelters, which Kuma also designed in the east exit area. According to the Japanese architect, the finished structure should not be thought of a design of a station as a box, but rather as an aperture which begins at the neighbouring Chokkura Plaza. To start, the design team first settled on a decision to preserve the old warehouse of oya stone that had existed in the area. They later took advantage of pores in oya stone, and used them in the new structural system, culminating in the sturdy but unlikely diagonal combination of steel frame and oya stone. Emulating the design of Chokkura Plaza, the diagonal skin was extended to the other pore or aperture, namely, the station itself. Via a meticulous process of extending and connecting, the team attempted to link not only the stations west exit with the east exit, but also the station with its given location. In order to reduce the weight, lauan-made plywood was later introduced as the main material for the structure instead of oya stone. By using wood, the idea was to revive a humane and warm atmosphere that was once common to conventional station buildings in Japan. The predominant diamond motif, a significant feature of the design, reportedly drew inspiration from the diagrid engineering of the bridge that spanned above and over the tracks. The atmosphere of this station building also has a direct association with the landscape of paddy fields and the wooden houses found in the town of Takanezawa. In essence, the concept behind Kumas design symbolically revolved around the notion of creating pores or more specifically, disparate elements becoming interlinked with the intention of restoring a community that had been fragmented for far too long.

The predominant diamond motif, a significant feature of the design, reportedly drew inspiration from the diagrid engineering of the bridge that spanned above and over the tracks.

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14 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS HOSHAKUJI STATION KENGO KUMA & ASSOCIATES


1 HOSHAKUJI STATION 2 PROJECTED STATION 3 CHOKKURA HALL (WAREHOUSE IN EXISTENCE) 4 CHOKKURA PLAZA 5 MULTIPURPOSE EXHIBITION HALL 6 BUS TERMINAL 7 GREEN SHELTER 8 PARK IN FRONT OF HOSHAKUJI STATION 9 ANTEROOM 10 BATHROOM 11 STORAGE 12 LAVATORY FOR PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED PEOPLE 13 BAMBOO GROVE 14 MACHINE ROOM

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MULTIPURPOSE EXHIBITION HALL WEST ELEVATION CHOKKURA HALL WEST ELEVATION 9 5 9 5 9 5

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Architect Kengo Kuma & Associates Location Takanazawa Tochigi Prefecture Japan Planning and Designing Period August 2005 to March 2006 Construction Period September 2006 to March 2008 Principal Use Station building and passageway Site Area 5529 sqm Total Floor Area 862 sqm

Stories 2 stories above the ground Design KKAA and JR East Design Corporation Structural Engineers JR East and Oak Structural Engineering Construction Totetsu Kogyo Co Ltd Structure Main structure / steel-frame Stake and foundation / concrete

a touch of nature
Conceived as a kind of vertical garden, Rafiq Azams concept for a residential development was largely inspired by a public need for greener areas within the bustling city of Dhaka. Architect SHATOTTO Bangladesh

South Water Caress Residential Development

Text Dr Afroza Akhter

16 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS SOUTH WATER CARESS RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT SHATOTTO

Spanning over 500 square miles, Dhaka has, over time, become an area fraught with complete urban mayhem. In a city where not more than five percent of the city is green, it was considered a luxury to implement a lake and a narrow patch of green on the rear (west-side) of the plot. With the South Water Caress, a residential development, located at United Nations Road, a deal was struck between the landowner and the developer to divide the 7,500 square feet plot in two even parts with the objective of constructing two six-storey buildings consisting of 2,800 square feet area on each floor. Utilising 75 percent of the plot area, as per rule, was a strong requirement from the clients; however, this need to maximise the built area became a challenge in light of designing an open green space. The design solution was, thus, to procure a combined area of 40 square feet from the two divided parts, place an eight-foot gap between the two buildings and a five-foot road set back, as per rule, in order to give rise to 200 square feet of green space and a body of water in front of the building on the east road. This arrangement was also accompanied by a no-boundary wall notion as well as small benches installed as a token of respect for passersby and the community at large. The two developed buildings are almost identical with respect to ground floor plans, parking area and in accordance to the basic plan of four houses per building. The simple interior has been thoughtfully devised, allowing residents to enjoy the tranquil connection between the lake and large trees to the west, facilitating ventilation via the southeast summer breeze and ample sunlight during the day. The use of exposed concrete as cast structural beam and column exterior with terracotta brick infill is also a simple response to the subtropical climate of Dhaka. The scheme also meant developing the two rooftops of the buildings into a communal green area complete with lawns, rain-court (for the collection of rain water) and bushes around a small pavilion in essence, a transformed subtropical architectural vocabulary aptly addressing concerns surrounding the shortage of green and open space within Dhaka.

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 17

The simple interior has been thoughtfully devised, allowing residents to enjoy the tranquil connection between the lake and large trees to the west, facilitating ventilation via the southeast summer breeze and ample sunlight during the day.

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PROJECTS SOUTH WATER CARESS RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT SHATOTTO

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Location Dhaka Bangaldesh Land Area 697 sqm Built Area 3122 sqm Client South Breeze Housing Ltd Principal Architect Md Rafiq Azam Project Architect Shakir Azaimullah Structural Engineer Abdullah Al Hossain Chowdhury

Mechanical Design Md Mofizur Rahman Khan Electrical Engineer South Breeze Housing Ltd Landscape Design Shatotto and Shakh Enterprise Photographs Md Rafiq Azam Ahsan Khan Daniele Domenicali Year of Completion 2009 Cost of Project USD 576 000
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1 VER 2 F.LIVING 3 DINING 4 DRESS 5 TOILET 6 KITCHEN 7 UTILITY 8 STORE 9 PANTRY 10 FOYER 11 LIVING 12 LIFT 13 LOBBY 14 GARDEN 15 WATER BODY 16 TERRACE 17 GREEN 18 LAWN 19 PAVED AREA 20 PAVILION 21 MACHINE ROOM

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architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 19

interview with Rafiq Azam

Background Rafiq Azam, Founder and principal architect of Shattoto for green architecture is collaborating with ArchiCentre on some projects in Malaysia. Lee Chor Wah had a chat with him during one of his recent trips to Kuala Lumpur. Since we last met in Dhaka then at Datum:KL, I have learned from your fellow Bangladeshi colleagues that you are now very active in the international lecture circuit. Perhaps you could update us on your recent lectures? My most recent lecture was in Kerala, India while not too long ago, in PAMs Design Lecture Series to share my recent works. After speaking at Datum:KL, I understand you were invited to do a project in Malaysia, what is the progress of that project? Yes, I was invited to design a low-cost housing of 500 sq ft per unit in Kuching. Perhaps due to economic downturn at that time, the project was stopped. Its a pity. I would have loved to see them built. As a foreign architect, what did you find special or unique in Malaysia. In Malaysia, your land is resourceful and nature is abundant. You have a much smaller population compared with Bangladesh. Here when I look out of the window, I see beautiful undulating landscape, whereas in Dhaka, I see other buildings. It is amazing to see round-the-year rain and sunshine. Its so fresh. In Dhaka, we create our own oasis within the building. But here, nature from outside could intertwine with the inside. What are the projects you are working in Malaysia with ArchiCentre. I am working on a 10-storey corporate headquarters and some villas with Dr Tan Loke Mun. The corporate tower is tropical with a huge parasol roof yet it is very formal. It is symmetrical harking back to the Greek and Roman colonnaded architecture. The sense of citadel reminds me of

the corporation taking care of the entire development. I am also designing some very large villas of 20,000 to 30,000 sq ft. You shared with me earlier that you were doing affordable housing for the poor, and now you have become a brand promoted by developer and well sought after by the purchasers; how do you feel about your stature in the Bangladeshi architectural scene now? Every year, I still set aside some time to do at least one housing project for the poor for free or at a minimal cost. I never thought of branding architecture. Whatever I do, I do it honestly. I do it passionately. So, fame and branding is not important to me. The important thing is to create architecture and environment that people could enjoy. You are now also designing bigger and more luxurious private houses. Do you now have to compromise your architectural ideals to suit this new breed of clientele or are the clients coming to you because they genuinely appreciate the simplicity of your architecture, and are changing their lifestyle to live in your buildings? Sometimes its not possible to get 100% my ways with the wealthy clients. What I try is to fill in a missing link; bridge the gap in the society. I take it as a challenge to make architecture communal and egalitarian. I think architecture needs co-operation not compromise. Going back to your roots a little, looking back, who were the major influences in your work when you first started out? And have you discovered any new heroes in the past few years. Many people, through their works, writings, philosophy, have influenced me. For example, Mazharul Islam, Louis I. Kahn and Glenn Murcutt. I like the works of Calatrava, Chipperfield, WOHA, Seksan, and Kevin Low.

20 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 profile

PROFILE

When you last spoke at Datum:KL, you opened your lecture by saying that you were first an artist, and an architect second. Are you still active in your painting? And what kind of painting do you do? More importantly, are there direct relationships between your architecture and your paintings? I am active as and when I can manage some time to painting. I mean, I do water colour paintings whenever I have the time. It took me awhile to understand the relationships between paintings and architecture. I think water colour and painting has great influence on my thoughts and works to bring out architecture. The transparency of water colour connects layers of understanding while the accident in it reminds me of the spontaneity of architecture. Its all about discovery, exploration, understanding psychology, and sociology of human living. Arcasia is very proud to see you gaining increasing recognition internationally as an Asian architect. What do you think is/are the secret/s of your success? And what advice do you have for other young Asian architects in getting international recognition? I never awaited success. For me, success is not something to wait for, its something I work for. First and foremost I believe I am citizen of this world and sky is the limit. Believing in oneself is important. You just have to continue to work on what you believe in. I am still working, sharing my works with other people, and learning from other people. I am an architect.

ARTICLE
The gross density of the city has been increasing from 638 persons per sq.km in 1951 to 5,272 persons per sq.km in 2001. Aim of the Study The aim of this study is to analyze the problems that occur in the major intersections connected with the National Highway No-5 from the traffic conflict point of view. Location of Bhubaneswar Bhubaneswar, the new capital of Orissa is located between 200-13N latitude 850-50E longitude and it comes at a height of about 140 feet above the Mean Sea level. The city is found almost at the middle portion of the State on its eastern side and it falls in the districts of Khurda.

Interface of the urban arterial system with the National Highway No.5: A Case study of Bhubaneswar, India
Dr Mayarani Praharaj College of Engineering and Technology, Bhubaneswar, Orissa
Location of Orissa in India & Bhubaneswar in Orissa

Introduction The road traffic worldwide becomes more crowded and less safe every day. In the past, the transport was not a very big problem due to the small number of vehicles that were on the roads. Now-a-days the number of vehicles has increased tremendously thus causing traffic problems in the cities. Bhubaneswar is one of these cities that is the subject of this study. Bhubaneswar was a temple town up to 1948 with development surrounding the Lord Lingaraja Temple. The town was characterized by ribbon-type development with a mixed landuse pattern. The original plan was prepared by the international acclaimed urban planner, Otto H. Koenigsbarger in 1948 as the Capital City of Orissa. Plan envisaged horizontal development to accommodate about 40,000 persons with administrative as the primary function. City developed on neighbourhood principles.

Master plan, Bhubaneswar The Master plan of Bhubaneswar was prepared in 1948 for a population of 40,000 over an area of 16.48 km2 with a density of 10 to 12 families per acre. Plan envisaged horizontal development with administrative and services as the primary functions. Although the city was created to function as the administrative centre as the primary function, light industries and manufacturing activities were added after 1980. Population Growth Bhubaneswar was a small sacred town in 1921 with population of 8,110 only; later on it became a class IV town and retained the same status until 1951. In 1951 the population increased to 16,512. The population further increased to 38,211 in 1961 due to shift of capital from Cuttack to Bhubaneswar in 1954. The population further increased to 105,491 and 219,211 in 1971 and 1981. In 1991 the population was 411,542 and in 2001 the population increased to 657,477. Bhubaneswar got the NAC status in 1952. It became a Class III town in the

22 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 article

(NH-5) which runs through the city is a big problem for the traffic condition of the city. Transportation development and land use controls are powerful tools for guiding the quality and quantity of growth along desired lines. In Bhubaneswar the main mode of transportation is vehicular circulation routes. The National Highway No-5 passes through the city. All the major roads connect to the national highway. Bhubaneswar is connected to Cuttack via NH-5 which further extends itself to link Kolkata, Ranchi, Tata, AsansolDurgapur and the rest of North India via Balasore and Kharagpur. Most of the interaction between Cuttack and Bhubaneswar takes place along this link. Stretches along NH-5, from Rasulgarh SQ to Khandagiri, exhibit critical conditions. Traffic crossings at Vanivihar, Acharyavihar and CRP square are highly congested during the office hours. The city of Bhubaneswar has grown ten folds of what was projected at the time of planning the city. This is the basic reason for the traffic problems in the city. Most of the roads, though wide enough are still not able to sustain the traffic load of the city. Encroachments on both sides of the roads further reduced their width at some places. In many cases there is no proper alignment of roads and footpaths near intersections. Road Accident and Safety Huge volume of regional traffic pass through the Bhubaneswar town which leads to significant conflict between slow moving and fast moving vehicles. Mixing of slow and fast moving vehicles not only slow the movement along the regional corridors but also increases the risks of accident.
From left: Fig.1; Fig.2; Fig.3

next Census (1961) and a Class I city with municipality status in 1971, depending on its population strength and other urban characteristics. The city was declared a Municipal Corporation in the year 1994 and according to the 2001 Census it accommodates 648,032 people in the main city area of 135 sq km. The sudden growth of population put enormous pressure on traffic and transportation system of the city. Density of Population During 50 years from 1951 to 2001, the municipality has increased from 26.09 Km2 to 137.7 Km2 and the overall density of population per square kilometer in 1951 was only 633. This has gone up to 3,300 in 1999 to 4,800 in 2001 and 5,555 in 2005. Transportation system in Bhubaneswar Bhubaneswar City traffic is mainly heterogeneous in character. It includes not only fast moving motor traffic but also slow moving cycles and cycle rickshaws. Pedestrian traffic is also very high along the main streets and major intersections. The National Highway No. 5

Conflict points at intersections Conflict points define the situations where a crossing vehicle interrupts the progress of another vehicle, but the vehicles only interact at a specific point in space. Conflict lines describe the situations where two vehicles interact in the same lane for a period of time. In the area of intersection, a road user may either proceed in the same direction as he was traveling across earlier thereby necessarily crossing the traffic flow across, or change from the route he was following to another route. In this process of changing from one flow to the other or continuing in the same flow, there are three elemental maneuvres: diverging, merging and crossing. In all these maneuvres there is a potential conflict between two or more road users. These are shown in Fig-1 for rotary in which there are 8 conflict points, Fig.2 for a common four-way intersection in which there are 32 conflict points, 8 of diverging type, another 8 of merging type and the rest of crossing type. If one of the streams is removed to make a T-intersection, there are only 9 conflict points of which only three are crossing (Fig-3) Conflict can be separated by designing the intersection properly.

Experimental Investigation and analysis As part of the investigation twenty intersections were selected in Bhubaneswar City. These intersections are situated on five important stretches of Bhubaneswar City (Fig.4). Spot speeds were determined in the middle of two intersections. Traffic volume counts were carried out at various legs of the intersections. Parking studies, sight distance and geometric design studies were also carried out on all these stretches. All these details have been presented in a tabular form (Table 2A to 2E). These studies are very much useful to understand the traffic flow characteristics of the road. Highway capacity and level of service The capacity of a given section of roadway, either in one direction or in both directions for a two-lane or three-lane roadway, may be defined as the maximum hourly rate at which vehicles can reasonably be expected to traverse a point or uniform section of a lane or roadway during a given period of time. Although the maximum number of vehicles that can be accommodated remains fixed under similar roadway and traffic conditions, there is a range of lesser volumes that can be handled under differing operating conditions. If the traffic volume and congestion decreases there is an improvement in the level of service. Level of service is a qualitative measure that describes operational conditions within a traffic stream and their perception by drivers or passengers. Six levels of service, A to F, define the full range of driving conditions from best to worst in that order.
LEVEL OF SERVICE Stopped Delay per Vehicle(Sec) A Less than 5.0 B 5.1 to 15.0 C 15.1 to 25.0 D 25.1 to 40.0 E 40.1 to 60.0 F Greater than 60.0 Table-1 Level of service criteria for signalised intersections

Case study of intersections: Bhubaneswar

Fig.4 Road Map of Bhubaneswar showing Stretch 1 to 5

Table 2A (Note: T Intersection, FAIFour Arm Intersection, and O dor rotary.)


SL NO . 1 2 3 4 5 Locations And Types of Intersection Airport Chowk at forest Park (T) Capital Hospital Chowk (T) Siripur Chowk (FAI) Trinath Mandir chowk (FAI) Fire station SQ. (FAI) Parking Provisions Space not Available Space not Available Space not Available Space not Available Space not Available Sight Distance Not adequate Not adequate Not adequate Not adequate Not adequate Conflict Points 9 9 32 32 32 Avg Lane width(m) 7 10.5 7 6 6.5 Shoulder width (m) 2.5 3.0 1.5 1.0 2.0 Level of service (A E to F) D F F E

Table 2B
SL NO . 6 7 8 9 Locations And Types of Intersection CRP Square (FAI) Acharya Vihar Square (FAI) Vanivihar Square (FAI) Rasulgarh Chowk (O) Parking Provisions Space not Adequate Space not Adequate Space not Adequate Space not Adequate Sight Distance adequate adequate adequate Not adequate Conflict Points 32 32 32 9 Avg Lane width (m) 7 7 7 7 Shoulder width (m) 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 Level of service (A to F) F F F E

The capacity of a signalized intersection is not only dependent on the type of signal control being used but also on the physical geometry of the roadway. The highway capacity manual therefore recommends that separate analysis be used to determine the capacity and level of service for a signalized intersection. The level of service for signalized intersections is defined in terms of delay. Specifically, level of service is based on the average stopped delay per vehicle for a 15-min analysis period has been given in Table-2. The stretches selected for the investigation are 1. Stretch from Airport Chowk (Forest Park) to Fire Station Square (SL NO -1-5) 2. Stretch from Fire Station Square to Rasulgarh Square along NH-5 (SL NO -5-9) 3. Stretch from Governor House Square to Damana Square through Jayadev Vihar Square (SL NO -10-13) 4. Stretch from AG Square to Acharya Vihar Square (SL NO -14-16 ) 5. Stretch from Kalpana Square to Ramamandir Square through Rajamal Square (SL NO -17-20)

Table 2C
SL NO . 10 11 12 13 Locations And Types of Intersection Governor House SQ (O) Power House Square (FAI) Kalinga Hospital Square (FAI) Damana Square (FAI) Parking Provisions Space not Adequate Space not Adequate Space not Adequate Space not Adequate Sight Distance adequate Not at all Not adequate Not adequate Conflict Points 32 32 32 32 Avg Lane width (m) 7 7 7 7 Shoulder width (m) 2.5 2.5 2.5 2.5 Level of service (A to F) B E E F

Table 2D
SL NO . 14 15 16 Locations And Types of Intersection AG Square (FAI) PMG Square (FAI) Housing Board Chakk (T) Parking Provisions Space not Adequate Space not Adequate Space not Adequate Sight Distance adequate Not adequate Not adequate Conflict Points 32 32 9 Avg Lane width (m) 10.5 10.5 7 Shoulder width (m) 2.5 2.5 2.5 Level of service (Ato F) F F F

Table 2E
SL NO . 17 18 19 20 Locations And Types of Intersection Kalpana Square (T) Rajamahal Square (FAI) Master Canteen Square (O) Ramandir Chawk (T) Parking Provision s Space not Available Space not Available Space not Adequate Space not Adequate Sight Distance adequate adequate adequate Not adequate Conflict Points 9 32 32 9 Avg Lane width (m) 7 7 7 6

0 Shoulder width (m)


2.5 2.5 9 2.5

Level of service (A to F) F F F F

m 2.5

It is concluded from the studies that the various transportation planning and traffic engineering measures should immediately be implemented to reduce the road accident and make Bhubaneswar a zero accident city.
Intersection Analysis The summary of intersection analysis has been carried out for 20 selected intersections. This provides a comparative understanding of the traffic characteristics in terms of parking provision, sight distance, conflict points and level of service. A large number of the intersections along NH-5 have very high share of freight vehicles. Moreover the share of slow moving traffic is also very high in the links with considerable fast moving traffic. The pedestrian count in many intersections is very high coupled with high approaching vehicular traffic volume. Conclusions and recommendations From the analysis it is found out that in maximum cases the level of service at selected intersections has fallen to E and F (A- Best and F Worst). The absence of adequate flyovers, access roads and pedestrian crossing resulted in reducing the level of service (LOS) which may cause road accidents. It is proposed to widen the major roads from (2 to 4 / 4 to 6 w / service lanes) and Flyovers, Subways and pedestrian subways at main intersections.

ARTICLE

The National Highways Authority of India (NHAI) has decided to build five flyovers, a number of underpasses for vehicles and pedestrians as well as service lanes in Bhubaneswar. The work has started on the flyovers at Rasulgarh and Fire Station and for the construction similar projects at CRPF Square, Acharya Vihar and Vani Vihar will commence soon. These upcoming flyovers will have controlled access to the highway. Commuters will have to take turns at the respecting connecting roads to reach their destinations. This will reduce road accidents on important intersection and also on National highway. Safety should be given special attention at the initial design stage of any road or Intersection. It will often be possible at the initial design stage to develop traffic planning and design to reduce accident risks substantially. The speed of a vehicle travelling along a road will vary with vehicle type and condition, road geometry and the presence of the other road users and speed controls. Geometric features presented to a driver should be consistent. The consistency is usually achieved through the concept of design speed. In most current standards, the speeds used for the estimation of design parameters, such as sight distance, are closely related to actual speeds. Therefore horizontal curves should be designed so that they can be negotiated safely by approaching vehicles. Tight horizontal curves can lead to accidents. Pedestrian zones, parking facilities, signage and proper traffic management are also proposed for improving the traffic and transportation system and reduce road accidents in Bhubaneswar.

References: 1. P.K. Sahoo, Dr. S.K. Rao and V.M. Kumar A study of Traffic Flow Characteristics on two stretches of National Highway No. 5, April, 1996 Indian Highways 2. L.R. Kadiyali, traffic Engineering and Transportation Planning, 1987, Khanna Publishers 3. Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, (2008) Draft Proposal: Comprehensive Devel opment Plan for Bhubaneswar Development Plan Area (BDPA): Traffic and Transportation 4. USAID FIRE (D III) Project, Preparation of city development plan for Bhubaneswar, 2006 5. Pedestrian Safety at Intersections, U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, April, 2004 6. Ariadna, Janos, Daniel, Corneliu, Study Concerning the Conflict Points within an Urban Signalized Intersection, Conference Proceedings of TEHNONAV 2008, ISBN 978-973614-447-9 7. Preparation of city development plan: Bhubaneswar, Orissa (http://jnnurm.nic.in)

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 article 25

diamond in the rough


A collaborative project between Japans Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects and Korean firm Unsangdong Architects, the aptly dubbed Yellow Diamond building radiates with the creative energy of the thriving Seoul district it inhabits.

Architect Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects + Unsangdong Architects Japan / Korea

Hongdae Project

PROJECTS HONGDAE PROJECT JUN MITSUI & ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS + UNSANGDONG ARCHITECTS

Situated in the heart of one of the most dynamic and creative districts in Seoul, the triangular site of the Hongdae Project or The Yellow Diamond shares a locale with several universities. Inspired by the youthful energy and impending sense of possibility that presently defines the area, Japanese architect Jun Mitsui, principal of Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects, envisioned a large-scale structure that would promote artistic expression while celebrating the creativity of the tenants who would occupy it in the future. In collaboration with Korean firm Unsangdong Architects, Mitsui devised a multipurpose centre which would accommodate emerging artists with the impetus of helping them develop their respective practices. To convey positivity and a sense of playfulness, the design team opted to incorporate a dynamic combination of bright colours and play up spatial rhythms with respect to the buildings exterior. For maximum impact, angled planes of gold-yellow, fritpattern glass were fitted to give off the impression of a sparkling gem embedded within the raw urban landscape of the district. The effect sees the building changing dramatically depending on the position of the onlooker. A public passageway through the building draws pedestrians inside, heightening the curiosity to interact with the interior spaces.

PROJECTS HONGDAE PROJECT JUN MITSUI & ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS + UNSANGDONG ARCHITECTS
ROOF TOP ROOF TOP RFL RF 5F 4F 5FL 3F 2F 7 4 3 2 2 6 8 9 1 2 5 5

4FL

3FL

1F B1F

2 10 10 10 11 12

5 10 5 5 15

2FL B2F 1FL B3F ELEVATION 1 ROOF TOP RFL SECTION 1 5FL ROOF TOP RF 3FL 5F 4F 2FL 3F 2F 1FL ELEVATION 2 4 B4F

11

13

14

14

4FL

3 2 2 2 2 7

4 2 2 9

1F B1F 17 10 B2F B3F 18 15

16 15

2 10 10 10 10

ROOF TOP RFL

5FL

4FL

3FL

2FL

1FL ELEVATION 3

ROOF TOP RFL

5FL

4FL

3FL

2FL

1FL ELEVATION 4

0 1

15m

1 ROOF 2 RETAIL 3 DECK 4 BALCONY 5 HALL 6 LOBBY 7 STREET 8 ELEVATOR 9 GREEN 10 PIT 11 WAITING ROOM 12 EVENT SPACE 13 PARKING 14 STORAGE 15 PASS 16 MDF 17 TOILET 18 SHOWER ROOM 19 ADJUSTMENT ROOM 20 STAGE 21 WATER PURIFYING TANK CONTROL ROOM 22 WATER PURIFYING TANK 23 WATER TANK 24 MACHINE ROOM 25 PS 26 DISASTER PREVENTION ROOM

15 19 12 20 13 23 24

15

17 21

15

15

B4F

22

SECTION 2

ROOF TOP RF 5F 4F 3F 2F 2517 2517 17 2517 17 2517 17 2517 17 25 26

1F B1F

B2F 5 B3F 14 B4F 24

25 25

11 11 24

SECTION 3

0 1

15m

Location 357-4-5 Seogyo-dong Mapo-gu Seoul South Korea Building Use Shop/ Office/ Hall Design Architects Jun Mitsui & Associates Architects + Unsangdong Architects Project Team JMA: Jun Mitsui Nicolai Kruger Ray Wu Minsu Kim Yoshie Shinbo Unsangdong: Jang Yoon Gyoo Shin Chang Hoon Lee Joon Phyo Moon Sang Ho Kim Se Jin Kim Bong Gyun Kang Soon Hyung

Structure RC structure Mechanical Engineer Yo Woon Dong Mechanical Engineers Structural Engineer Harmony Structure Engineering Contractor Sangji Construction Total Floor Area 4 317 sqm Site Area 972 sqm Duration of Project August 2007 to June 2010 Photographs E-Jae-seong

5 FLOOR PLAN

5 5 8 8

2 FLOOR PLAN

4 FLOOR PLAN

2 2 2

5 8 8

1 FLOOR PLAN

0 1

15m

3 FLOOR PLAN

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 29

ample coverage
Architect Ivanho Architect Limited Hong Kong

Wong Shek Public Pier

Hong Kong firm Ivanho Architect Limited ventured beyond the traditional functions of shelter, creating a roof design which exemplifies both functionality and aesthetics.

30 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS WONG SHEK PUBLIC PIER IVANHO ARCHITECT LIMITED

1 2 3

Surrounded by the tranquility of a natural setting, Wong Shek Public Pier is a landmark architectural feature for promoting ecotourism. Shunning conventional continuous shelter design, Ivanho Architect Limited devised a series of shelters varying in height, shape and angle. The overlapping roofs provide shelter from rain, simultaneously enabling a free flow of hot air. The resulting design illustrates contemporary urban chic while achieving a harmonious link with nature. The three-dimensional roofs of the pier are supported by slim, tilting columns, posing a significant challenge to the engineers. The final design succeeded in meeting the high standards required for Environmental Impact Assessment and Ports Work Design Standards. The roof design by Ivanho is the first of its kind in the Northeast New Territories Region. Prefabricated steel structure was selected for the roof due to its light weight and minimal environmental impact during construction. The latter in particular was a prime consideration because of the need to preserve the surrounding natural environment and protect the eco-system under the sea. The four roofs were prefabricated in a workshop in Mainland China and delivered to the pier one by one via ship. The roofs have been fitted with skylights to allow for the presence of natural daylight on the pier deck. Photo sensors were also installed to correspond with the pier lighting. Lastly, colour-modes were implemented into the lighting system to give the pier a kind of fourth dimension by referencing its relationship with time. In 2006, the New Wong Shek Public Pier was awarded the Presidents Prize at the HKIA Annual Awards in the innovative design with limited budget category.

4 1 PAK TAM ROAD 2 WONG SHEK PIER 3 SITE BOUNDARY 4 PARKING 5 SAI KUNG EAST COUNTRY PARK 6 BARBEQUE AREA

4 6

SITE PLAN

10

20

30

50m

SOUTHWEST ELEVATION

NORTHWEST ELEVATION

Location Hong Kong Client Civil Engineering & Development Department, The Government of HKSAR Project Team Ivan M Y Ho (Project Director) Donna Y M Hsiung (Project Chief Architect) Structural Engineer Victor Li & Associates Ltd M&E Engineers Twin Way Consulting Engineering Ltd Photographer Ivanho Architect Limited

NORTHEAST ELEVATION

SOUTHEAST ELEVATION

2.5

7.5

12.5m

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 31

where landscape and community meet


A recently built housing development by young Indian architects Morphogenesis sets a bold new benchmark for contemporary housing in the city of Chandigarh.

Architect Morphogenesis India

Marble Arch Housing

PROJECTS MARBLE ARCH MORPHOGENESIS

Marble Arch is a housing development located in Chandigarh on a 5.4 acre site along the periphery of the city. The objective of the project was to develop a new prototype for housing in Chandigarh as an entity to address issues of liveability, spatial configuration, environmental and social issues, while shifting away from the archetypal morphology of high specification residential modules and equipment crammed into an undersized apartment. The clients brief called for the generation of maximum built-up area for residential accommodation. Working with imposed constraints, Morphogenesis was tasked with constructing a communal environment which would be versatile enough to accommodate the needs of each inhabitant. The spatial planning was generated by creating a pedestrian field for the apartments at the centre of the site whereby all vehicular movement was isolated to the periphery. The pedestrian field is then laid out with strips of defined functions in relation to residential facilities, services, and recreation areas flowing from the east to the west, enabling each apartment to be developed in alignment with optimum north-south orientation. This layout also allows for ample natural daylight and ventilation. The built volumes of the residential strips are sculpted with a play of volumes, giving way to terraces and open areas at each level. The service areas of all apartments are kept along the service strip, an area which has been segmented to give way to service courtyards. As per the development control norms, basement parking is contained within the building periphery, dictating the configuration of the development in the form of linear strips. The development has been configured as a set of nine blocks of five stories each, including four apartments with attached service courtyards. With 168 units in total, the development comprises a combination of three- to four-bedroom apartments and penthouses on the top floors. Along with these dwelling units, ancillary facilities such as a health club, gymnasium, amphitheatre, swimming pool, tot lots, basketball court, and social areas are provided. Each block within the development boasts an atrium lobby devised to exude a sense of community. A low-rise development, terraces have been allocated on each level to establish a relationship with the ground level. The project is an achievement with respect to the uniqueness of its scale which retains a crucial relationship between vertical and horizontal distances, thus generating a viable form of interaction with the landscape. The outward expression of Marble Arch relies on a varied use of materials which have been carefully chosen to enhance the individuality of the spaces within the development. The design employs the use of grids in terms of the overall scheme, both in the case of the buildings, where subdivision occurs to generate spaces within apartments, as well as the landscape via pedestrian linkages and green areas.

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 33

The project is an achievement with respect to the uniqueness of its scale which retains a crucial relationship between vertical and horizontal distances, thus generating a viable form of interaction with the landscape.

PROJECTS MARBLE ARCH MORPHOGENESIS

SITE PLAN

Architect Morphogenesis Location Chandigarh India Site Area 5.4 Acre Blocks 9 Stories 5 per block Client Uppal Group Housing Year of Completion 2010

10

20

50m

SECTION

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 35

PROJECTS

After several years in the making, the Senai international Airport reopens with a refreshed perspective on the passenger experience thanks to Malaysian architect Hin Tan.

Architect HINTAN Associates Sdn Bhd Malaysia

Senai Airport Landside Commercial Expansion

taking flight
36 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

Situated in Johor Bahru, Malaysia, Senai Airport began its life in the seventies in the form of a humble rectangular concrete framed building. In the mid-eighties, it was remodeled into a terminal with a calculated capacity of three million passengers per year. A massive curved roof covered the two-storey building, draping over its frontage to create a covered drop off point. Privatised in 2004, plans were soon under way to modernise the airports facilities. The arrival of AirAsia, a budget regional airline, provided the impetus to embark on growth. By 2007, the airport was running out of commercial areas, initiating plans to enlarge the terminal. The current plan reflects the response to the architectural and planning challenges posed by the site. The old building consisted of an arrivals exit and a departures entrance at opposite ends of the building which shared the same traffic lanes outside. The unique shape of the expansion was derived from combining the two entrances into one, so that all passengers moving in either direction had to pass through this newly formed market hall and out through one exit. By bringing the typically long terminal frontage to a point, two outdoor areas were created on either side of the curved walls. Adjoining the terminal, these areas have been molded into outdoor piazzas designed to evoke the atmosphere typical of a dynamic evening lifestyle. As extensions of the internal commercial areas, the faade is now broken down into openings and alcoves and removed from the hermetic faades of typical airports, introducing an essence of street life into the airport. Passengers enter the terminal through a 25m wide, fully glazed front fitted with three doorways via a network of covered walkways. The space inside immediately sweeps open with shops on both sides, taking one through the massive roof-lit hall and onto another frontage of shops near the old terminal. There is a strong delineation between the old and new and this is deliberately done for structural reasons. This new addition has the hallmarks of a commercial mall. Designed for small-sized units, an anchor tenant, food and beverage units and the display-promotional court, the passenger experience is the reverse of the airport diagram whereby the market hall is placed after passport control. The clients aim is to not only serve passengers but also the surrounding community in dire need of a shopping facility. All that remains is to craft the form that Hin Tan is apt to do, in steelwork consisting of beautifully detailed connections, shapes and forms. Computer technology played a major role in connecting the parts together from the main commercial wing with its delta shaped roof to the curved roof of the west wing which joins onto the angular section of the air-conditioned link. Concrete to steel, and vice versa was explored and detailed in three dimensions before being finalised as tender drawings. The globalisation of technology does not, however, mean the same solutions globally; context is still an important consideration. With respect to this project, the solution addresses the massive rainfall and the discharge of the voluminous water, the shading of glass surfaces with large overhangs, and the facilitating of ample daylight with low E coated double glazing to nullify the onset of heat. This low-energy approach is marked by the elimination of artificial lighting during daylight hours, a service-free ceiling, well-insulated walls and minimised air-conditioning. The notable incorporation of light wood-coloured cladding both internally and externally anoints Aeromall with a truly local ambiance that is aptly reminiscent of traditional Malaysian wooden architecture.

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 37

38 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS SENAI AIRPORT LANDSIDE COMMERCIAL EXPANSION HINTAN ASSOCIATES SDN BHD

EXISTING TERMINAL LOADING/ SERVICE BAY

CENTRAL UTILITY BUILDING

SITE PLAN

ROOF PLAN

0 5 10

25

50m

The unique shape of the expansion was derived from combining the two entrances into one, so that all passengers moving in either direction had to pass through this newly formed market hall and out through one exit.
Architect HINTAN Associates Sdn Bhd Location Johor Malaysia Contractor IJM Construction Sdn Bhd C&S Engineers Perunding GSTC (M) Sdn Bhd M&E Engineers BK Associates Sdn Bhd Quantity Surveyor ARH Jurukur Bahan Sdn Bhd Landscape Architect Landarc Sdn Bhd Year of Completion 2010 Period of Design Inception 2007 to 2010 Client Senai Airport Terminal Service Sdn Bhd

SECTION 1

SECTION 2

0 5

10

25

50m

infusion of the new


Poetically called The Breathing Factory, Takashi Yamaguchis thoughtful redesign of an uncharacteristic factory in Osaka gives new life to a previously unremarkable structure.

PROJECTS

Architect Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates Japan

The Breathing Factory

PROJECTS THE BREATHING FACTORY TAKASHI YAMAGUCHI & ASSOCIATES

The client is a company owner whose business revolves around the safety of medicine and the development of medical tools and equipment. Following the brief, Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates set about reconstructing the clients factory by beginning work on the existing part of the building before delving into the intricacies of the overall programme and design. The site consists of an eclectic gathering of small to medium-sized structures, including factories, warehouses, trade facilities and housing. The first floor is divided into conference room, reception, management office and warehouse. The second and the third floor comprises a gathering of functional spaces, such as production spaces, the fabrication department and development department which are vertically joined as a rift system that breaks up the frontier between the two floors. Meanwhile, the fourth floor is largely devoted to a large meeting space utilised for design research, development as well as various seminars and meetings. The building body is covered with a delicate membrane constituted of aluminum louvres in order to shield internal pipes from sight. For easy maintenance, the louvres aperture ratio and the excess of space behind the louvres offer ample access to the system of pipes. For the design team, the reconstruction was also an experimental attempt to reduce the impact of the intimidating volume of the structure on the neighbourhood itself. To attain to this, the angle and direction of the louvres are skewed in accordance to randomised mathematical calculations. Some of the horizontally directed louvres reflect the moving clouds above or the lights emanating from the street at night. In obscuring the point of view by way of the vertically directed louvres, the perception of the neighborhood becomes increasingly segmented. Meanwhile, a feeling of human presence is preserved. The same principle applies for the light court void linking the relaxation spaces on the third and fourth floors. By way of the glass screen inserted into the vertical and horizontal openings, an essence of nature is breathed into the building, bringing a sort of virtual image of everyday life from the outside into the monotonous inner space of the factory.

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 43

PROJECTS THE BREATHING FACTORY TAKASHI YAMAGUCHI & ASSOCIATES

In obscuring the point of view by way of the vertically directed louvres, the perception of the neighborhood becomes increasingly segmented. Meanwhile, a feeling of human presence is preserved.

Function Office/ Showroom/ Warehouse Location Osaka Japan Architect Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates Structure Steel Frame Site Area 1819 sqm Architectural Area 658 sqm Total Floor Area 2288 sqm Date of Completion September 2009 Structure Soutaro Hayashi Client Nagano Science Co LTD Contractor Makoto Construction Co Photography Takashi Yamaguchi & Associates

1 ENTRANCE HALL 2 FOYER 3 OFFICE 4 CONFERENCE ROOM 5 UTILITY 6 WORKPLACE 7 TERRACE 8 STORAGE 9 MULTIPURPOSE HALL

R 79

ELEVATED ROAD PLANT AREA

OLD BUILDING NEW BUILDING

TO KYOTO

ENTRY

JR RAILWAY TO OSAKA R 79

LOCATION PLAN

30m

SITE PLAN

10

20m

46 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS THE BREATHING FACTORY TAKASHI YAMAGUCHI & ASSOCIATES

WEST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

10

20m

SECTION 1

SECTION 2

7 9 5 6 8 2 7 3 4 7 8 5 8 2

2F FLOOR PLAN

4F FLOOR PLAN

6 2 3

5 6 6

7 5 4 1 3F FLOOR PLAN 8

7 8

1F FLOOR PLAN

10

20m

urban revival
Bangkok-based firm (all) zones stunning refurbishment of an unused shophouse gives the structure a whole new lease on life.

48 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS

Architect (all) zone with Stefano Mirti Thailand

Shophouse Transformation

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 49

PROJECTS SHOPHOUSE TRANSFORMATION (ALL) ZONE WITH STEFANO MIRTI

PROJECTS SHOPHOUSE TRANSFORMATION (ALL) ZONE WITH STEFANO MIRTI

Acknowledged as the most common building typology of Bangkok when a period of rapid urbanisation engulfed Thailands capital city in the past century, the conventional shophouse is fast becoming obsolete due to the influx of new building styles that have came about as byproducts of the citys transformation. A new project by local design firm all (zone) sought to experiment with an atypical approach to the shophouses typology by reworking the layout of two unutilised units situated in a crowded area of Bangkok. In the shophouse transformation, every floor has been converted into a live/ work unit, a new typology for a small business or a live-in studio spatial scenarios that are quite rare in Bangkok. The ground level, meanwhile, is completely open for parking and plant-life. The architects themselves have moved into the fourth and fifth floors. The most distinguishing features of the newly revamped structure are the addition of new facades, made from prefabricated concrete blocks, on both the front and the back of the building. As the most common and inexpensive construction materials found in the market, the blocks also make way for a kind of sunshade, a curtain for privacy as well as a deterring component of the building for potential thieves. With respect to ventilation, the facades also create breathing space; the space between the big windows and concrete blocks prove to be an ideal multipurpose area for smoking, basking in the outdoors and nurturing plants.

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 51

In the shophouse transformation, every floor has been converted into a live/ work unit, a new typology for a small business or a live-in studio spatial scenarios that are quite rare in Bangkok.

52 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS SHOPHOUSE TRANSFORMATION (ALL) ZONE WITH STEFANO MIRTI

15

4000

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1125 ROOF PLAN

3880

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1 PARKING 2 ENTRANCE HALL 3 MECHANICAL 4 GARDEN 5 STORAGE 6 WORKING 7 MODEL ROOM 8 MEETING 9 SECRETARY 10 PANTRY 11 DINING 12 LIVING 13 LIBRARY LIVING 14 BEDROOM 15 ROOF TERRACE

Location Bangkok Total Area 650 sqm Project Team Rachaporn Choochuey Sorawit Klaimak Sara Chanpoldee Namkhang Anomarisi Tharit Tossanaitada Engineer cm one co ltd Contractor Terdsak Tassayarn Photographs Piyawut Srisakul
4000 ELEVATION 4000

W. 15

R. 4000 11 12 13 14 625 4

2125 SECTION

3880

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1 9 8 4000 10 1125 3880 4000 3880 1400 4TH FLOOR PLAN


0 1 3 6m

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3880

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1ST FLOOR PLAN

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eople round the orld are al nique

PROFILE

Interview with Prof Dr Goh Chong Chia Treasurer, UIA


Background Lee Chor Wah recently caught up with Prof Dr Goh Chong Chia, the current Treasurer of UIA (International Union of Architects) who is also a past president of the Singapore Institute of Architects. You are now the Treasurer of UIA. Are you the first Asian elected as anoffice bearer in the UIA Council? No. There was Mr Jai Bhalla from the Indian Institute of Architects who was the President before. What spurred you into the international architectural arena in the first place? When I completed my 3 terms as the President of SIA, I felt the need to broaden my contribution. I was appointed by the President of the Republic as a Nominated Member of Parliament in 1999 and 2001. After which I thought I should contribute beyond my national boundary. First, I was elected to the Royal Institute of British Architects Council in 2005, and then in 2008 I was elected as Treasurer in UIA. How do you feel being the Treasurer of UIA? I had been on the UIA Council for 6 years before my election as its Treasurer. I feel proud to be able to provide an Asian input into the UIA which is the only International Architectural Organization. People around the world are all unique, we need to understand each others cultural diversity, social aspirations and national dreams. An opportunity to experiencing these through interactions with Architects from around the world through UIA is very exciting. With the current UIA President, Louise Cox from Australasia, has there been a visible emphasis by the UIA on Asia? The President of UIA must represent the Architects of the world. She cannot just focus on a single region. What did you set out to do? As an Asian architect practicing in the region, I hope to bring a developing economys approach to architecture, To diversify the views within UIA which had often been predominantly Eurocentric. To work with Member Sections and support their desires to move up the value chain. How was UIAs financial position when you first took over the portfolio? The finance of the UIA had been almost hand to mouth. The aspiration of the UIA is to be able to diversify its finance away from membership subscriptions. It is not wrong but its administrative policy and procedure does not have the structure nor personel to explore the entrepreneur potentials of an organisation like UIA. What are the frustrations? The UIA Secretariat have their nistrative duties and the UIA funds nor extra personnel to department. Members tend to global outlook.

hands full on purely admidoes not have either the develop an entrepreneurial have a national instead of

What are your hopes for UIA? I hope to see UIA lending more support to Members Sections National and Regional Programmes. The hardship of our Members Section due to the world economic crisis had required UIA to prudently cut the expenses at the Secretariat. The reduced budget had curtailed many of our programmes. The quick decision not to increase our members dues coupled by cut in expenses should return the UIA accounts to theblack bythe end of this triennial.

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 profile 55

PROJECTS

Architect WOHA Singapore

Stadium MRT Station

56 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

a departure from the everyday


Inspired by the monumental art of Richard Serra, Singapores award-winning Stadium MRT Station by local firm WOHA brings a touch of style and old-school grandeur to humdrum inner-city travel.

The building in context with the stadium

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 57

58 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS STADIUM MRT STATION WOHA

Commissioned through the Marina Line Architectural Design Competition and jointly organised by the Singapore Land Transport Authority and the Singapore Institute of Architects, the Stadium MRT Station emerged from an open, anonymous competition that has long been acknowledged by the industry as one of the best run competitions in Singapore to date. The brief revolved around two main objectives: to enhance the urban quality of the surrounding areas and provide world-class transport facilities. Located at Stadium Boulevard, Stadium MRT Station will serve the surrounding entertainment and leisure facilities as well as the nearby East Coast condominiums by way of the pedestrian bridge across the Kallang River. The design has been shaped by the need to accommodate surge crowds from the Singapore Indoor Stadium, Kallang Theatre and the National Stadium. The introduction of the MRT system into the area will change the nature of the precinct from a primarily vehicular area to a pedestrian place, forming a strong armature in the area, which future developments can be plugged into and organised around. An open-air concourse and plaza has been incorporated into the design to accommodate large ground-level crowds, simultaneously creating opportunities for surrounding, inward-facing developments in generating external, ground-level activities. The openair concourse, crucially, prevents crushing and panic situations from occurring within the confined, below-ground areas. The recreational and residential aspects of the area is further enhanced by the inclusion of trees, benches and meeting places around the MRT plaza. To further establish a connection with future ground-level developments, the station has been purposely kept open-ended. The design of the station takes its cue from landscape forms; the overall form is derived from the flow of crowds into the station and accentuated by the massive, curved forms of the stadium, dramatically juxtaposing a linear element against a curved one. Meanwhile, geological forms are abstracted within the stations interior, giving off the semblance of a shimmering, glassy grotto when glimpsed from the massive opaque elements above. Perception of the space is played up by visitor movement, facilitated by escalators below the curve which transport commuters from the concourse at grade to the platform at basement 2. The vast expanse of space introduced via the stations design adds an element of splendor to the monotonous routine of daily commutes. A central skylight gives way to an attractive, day-lit platform, further heightening the experience of traveling on public transport. Openings in the above-ground forms allow views of the platform below from the ground-level plaza. The ribbed aluminium cladding system was custom designed by the architects to create an ambiguous material; sometimes soft like fabric, sometimes hard like stone, sometimes metallic, the material changes in accordance with the quality of light and the time of day. A single extrusion can be orientated four ways to create endless variation in the relationship of the panels. The grey, stepped, curved forms preserve a memory of the soon-to-be demolished Singapores National Stadium.
architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 59

Sculptural volume between rectilinear and curved forms

PROJECTS STADIUM MRT STATION WOHA

from left

The day-lit platform at basement 2; Ground floor level enhanced with natural and artificial lighting

The design of the station takes its cue from landscape forms; the overall form is derived from the flow of crowds into the station and accentuated by the massive, curved forms of the stadium, dramatically juxtaposing a rectilinear element against a curved one.

The west entrance, in context with the National Stadium

1 8

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PROJECTS STADIUM MRT STATION WOHA


Size Gross Floor Area 9204 sqm Size Plot Area 10431 sqm Client/ Project Manager/ Quantity Surveyor Land Transport Authority Project Architectural Team WOHA: Richard Hassell Wong Mun Summ Dharmaraj Subramaniam Esther Soh Gerry Richardson Jose Nixon Sicat Pearl Chee Main Contractor Nishimatsu Construction/ Lum Chang J V Consultant Team Structural Engineer Maunsell Consultants (Singapore) Pte Ltd
ELEVATION

Mechanical & Electrical Engineer Meinhardt (Singapore) Pte Ltd Landscape Architect Cicada Private Limited Acoustic Consultants Acviron Acoustic Consultants Pte Ltd Architectural Works Sub-contractors Lum Chang Building Cladding and Faade Works Sub-contractors Kao Lee Aluminium Construction Pte Ltd Project Cost S$ 40 million Design Inception 2000 Start of Construction 2001 Photography Patrick Bingham-Hall

9 ELEVATION

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1 NATIONAL STADIUM 2 STADIUM ROAD 3 STADIUM STATION 4 INDOOR STADIUM 5 STADIUM WALK 6 KALLANG THEATRE 7 LEISURE PARK 8 STADIUM BOULEVARD 9 ENTRANCE 10 UNPAID LINK

11 CONCOURSE (UNPAID) 12 CONCOURSE (PAID) 13 PAID LINK TO LIFT 14 PASSENGER SERVICE CENTRE 15 LIFT 16 PLATFORM AREA 17 VOID (PLATFORM BELOW) 18 PUBLIC TOILET 19 COMMERCIAL SPACE

18 18 GROUND/ CONCOURSE LEVEL PLAN

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a brief respite
Anointed with an air of minimalist chic, architect Chinthaka Wickramages pared down design for a canteen in a Sri Lankan factory building offers weary workers a place to recuperate from the tensions of the workday. Architect Chinthaka Wickramage Associates Sri Lanka

Canteen Recreation

Text Nileeka Senarath

64 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS

PROJECTS CANTEEN RECREATION CHINTHAKA WICKRAMAGE ASSOCIATES

In designing a place for tea in a factory, architect Chinthaka Wickramage blends industrial sophistication with simple finishes ... The project was to design a canteen, recreation and changing room building for Royal Ceramics Lanka Ltd, within the premises of their tile manufacturing facility, in Horana. A canteen in a factory is a place for workers to relax, be themselves, laugh and be human away from the production lines, machines and programmed actions. The brief called for a sympathetic approach to address the feelings of the factory worker, apart from being functional. The shape of the site with two medium high walls on either side along its length, with a cluster of trees at front, determined the laying out of the building. Space constraints to fit the functional requirements necessitated the building to be two storied, to which the designer responded by capturing the architectural idiom of the factory itself. The steel prefabricated canteen building has an industrial minimalist aesthetic feel, merging seamlessly with the rest of the buildings in the factory complex and sitting comfortably on site. The four-column grids are designed in line with the row of trees on site. The corridor wraps the dining areas amidst it thus mediating the relationship of outside and inside. The layout is open and transparent from the front through to the rear, allowing breeze to blow right across. A few walls in the building create essential personal spaces. While not being permanent barriers, these are built as soft screens with semi permeable cement louvre blocks or low walls up to a minimum required height of 8-0. The tent like form of the building, its mezzanine floor, the double-height space and monitor roof, all contribute to effective cross ventilation, making the spaces cool despite the use of exposed steel for the structure and roof. Simple and down-to-earth finishes have not only added beauty in contrast to its steel framed structure, but also captured the mind frame of its end users within a familiar atmosphere to relax. A few minutes sitting in this building, under a roof, next to mature trees, away from the heat, noise and dust of the machines, sipping a cup of tea or reading a paper would surely make any work-weary man relaxed and ready for another round at the production lines.

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 67

PROJECTS CANTEEN RECREATION CHINTHAKA WICKRAMAGE ASSOCIATES

The four-column grids are designed in line with the row of trees on site. The corridor wraps the dining areas amidst it thus mediating the relationship of outside and inside.
Architect Chinthaka Wickramage AIA (SL) Client Royal Ceramics Lanka Ltd. Civil Contractor Pasalka Builders & Decorators Steel Contractor Amalgamated Building Systems Project Period 2006 September to 2007 April Area 4350 sqft Photography Waruna Gomis

SECTION

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 69

colonial revival
Architect VERITAS Architects Sdn Bhd Malaysia

Ipoh Train Station Rehabilitation

Built during the 1930s, a historic train station in Ipoh, Malaysia gets a fresh, modern update thanks to Kuala Lumpur-based firm VERITAS Architects.
70 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS IPOH TRAIN STATION REHABILITATION VERITAS ARCHITECTS SDN BHD

Originally a three-storey historical structure fraught with Neo-Classical and Moorish influences, the Ipoh Train Station, one of the earliest train stations in the country, was built in 1935 during the British colonisation of Malaya. The upper levels of the original structure house a hotel, whereas the station facilities were confined to the floors below. The design intent was to rehabilitate the existing structure with minimal intervention whilst upgrading the main station platform. An extension of the station platform is inserted adjacent to the old structure. Employing the language of modular lattice masts and skeletal frames, the new structure by VERITAS conveys a language of velocity and lightness, a counterpoint to the weight and gravitas of the old structure. The roof form is a soaring hyperbole punctuated by steel masts at every wave-crest. The roof embraces the structure but barely touches it, linking the present to the past in one single, elegant gesture.

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 71

PROJECTS IPOH TRAIN STATION REHABILITATION VERITAS ARCHITECTS SDN BHD

The design intent was to rehabilitate the existing structure with minimal intervention whilst upgrading the main station platform. An extension of the station platform is inserted adjacent to the old structure.

SOUTH ELEVATION

SITE PLAN

0 5 10 15 20m

NORTH ELEVATION

Location Ipoh Malaysia Architect VERITAS Architects Sdn Bhd Main Contractor UEM Construction Sdn Bhd Sub-Contractors IJM Corporation Berhad Eversendai Engineering Group Project Manager Konsortium Kinta Samudra OPUS C&S Engineer Minconsult Sdn Bhd & Ranhill Bersekutu Sdn Bhd M&E Engineer Minconsult Sdn Bhd & Ranhill Bersekutu Sdn Bhd Town Planner Atira Rancang Runding Sdn Bhd Ground Floor Area 6120 sqm (new platform area) Total Combined Floor Area 6120 sqm [including basement(s), groundfloor(s) and all upper floors] Commission January 2001 Design Period January 2001 to June 2002 Construction Period July 2002 to June 2004 Date of Completion June 2004

WEST ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 73

journey to dreamland
Uniquely positioned as an interchange Station with the existing MTR Tung Chung Line, the new MTR Sunny Bay Station by award-winning firm Aedas is also the starting point of a unique railway journey to the Hong Kong Disneyland theme park.

Architect Aedas Limited Hong Kong

Sunny Bay Station

Text Max Connop

74 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS SUNNY BAY STATION AEDAS LIMITED

Although the initial project brief from MTRC called for an open-air project, the Sunny Bay station in Hong Kong boasts the potential of becoming a sealed off, air-conditioned space, should the need ever arise at a future date. Rigorous investigations into air-flow and passenger movement during the feasibility study set the stage for the distinctive form which simultaneously capitalises on the effects of natural air circulation. There was a need to address issues of passenger protection with regards to typhoon rain and winds. Sunny Bay Station is also the worlds first metro line designed to service a Disneyland theme park, as well as the worlds first driverless heavy transit line. It is also the first MTR station to have automatic platform gates installed on the edge of the platform, taking into consideration that many users of this station would be families and young children making their way to the theme park. The station differentiates itself from previous transport projects, not just in its ability to handle large passenger flows, but by providing a sense of drama, excitement and expectation for incoming Disneyland visitors. The design team referenced to the sense of adventure often associated in with 19th century railway stations, to re-create a renaissance in rail travel through the use of modern design, forms and materials. This resulted in a futuristic steel station design which stands in contrast to the Victorian-style design of the Disneyland Resort Station. The intention was to create a feeling of time travel for passengers riding along this line. The most notable feature of Sunny Bay Station is its 20-metre high, gently curving, Teflon-coated (PolyTetraFlouroEthylene) fabric roof. The roof is propped on a lightweight, steel bow string truss roof structure manufactured from circular section steels. In line with ground level and above-ground MTR stations, Sunny Bay and Disneyland Resort Station are not air-conditioned, largely relying on the openness of their architecture for ventilation. Giving off the look and feel of a taut yacht sail, the main fabric was chosen for its selfspanning and self-cleaning properties as well as its ability to facilitate diffused natural light. During hot days, the open platform is ventilated by cool air from the landward side being drawn under the canvas canopy to create a breeze. As the fabric roof negates the need for a suspended ceiling below, all lighting and necessary services have been carefully and thoroughly considered to compliment the design. Directly underneath the fabric roof, a clear and direct cross platform interchange has been designed to transit incoming passengers from Hong Kong onto the Disneyland train. The platform interchange has also been planned to cater for an international ferry terminal within the bay in the future.

architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects 75

The organisation of the plan is deceptively simple. The large interchange hall has two electrical, mechanical and back of house facility buildings, clad in stone, at either end forming bookends to the grand hall. Escalators at the ends of the Hall lead passengers returning from Disneyland Station over the rail tracks to the platform for trains going back to Hong Kong. The design of the opposite platform takes the metal, low blade canopies as its reference and provides a harmonious counterpoint to the Grand Interchange Hall. The impact of the large curved fabric roof, supported with sculptured, arched bow string trusses, is complemented by the dynamic curve of the partially louvred, inclined glazed windscreen. An overall feeling of lightness and spaciousness floods the Interchange Hall. It is clearly an outdoor space that benefits from the effects of the roof form and the natural breeze. However, careful consideration has been given to rain shelter protection at areas which are open to the hall. A clean language of machined materials has been used throughout the station. The electrical, mechanical and back of house bookends, and the stone clad air-intakes on which the roof support steels sit, provide a solid anchor and complement the lightness and delicacy of both the fabric roof and the curved windscreen. In the evening, architectural lighting further enhances the unique experience of traveling to the theme park by rail, illuminating the fabric roof from within. Reinforced by the prominent presence of steel and glass, the station becomes a crystalline beacon for both users and spectators alike.

The station differentiates itself from previous transport projects, not just in its ability to handle large passenger flows, but by providing a sense of drama, excitement and expectation for incoming Disneyland visitors.

76 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 projects

PROJECTS SUNNY BAY STATION AEDAS LIMITED


Location Hong Kong Site Area 17500 sqm Project Team Team Leader: Keith Griffiths Architectural Team Members: David Roberts Max Connop Martin Haskins John Fitzgerald Peter Wilkinson Tim Narey Matt Holder Julia McKenzie Tim Yu Structural Engineer Ove Arup & Partners Hong Kong Limited Mechanical & Electrical Engineer Ove Arup & Partners Hong Kong Limited Quantity Surveyor Widnell Limited Landscape Architect Urbis Limited Main Contractor Maeda Corporation Client MTR Corporation Limited Photographer Marcus Oleniuk

SOUTH ELEVATION

CROSS SECTION

ROOF PLAN

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BOOKS

Anjalendran: Architect of Sri Lanka

Author David Robson Photograhy Waruna Gomis Publisher Tuttle Publishing


A one-time protg and later friend and companion of the late, great Geoffrey Bawa, Anjalendran has successfully made his own mark as one of the most significant Sri Lankan architects of his time. Born into a family of Jaffna Tamils, Anjalendran, like Bawa before him, exhibits a talent for eking pure magic out of the simplest materials and crafting extraordinary structures that play on the beauty of his native countrys natural landscape. His work detail an ongoing obsession with space and an intrinsic desire to create forms based on understated spatial dynamics, culminating in finished projects that speak more about the sparsely sublime atmosphere of Buddhist monasteries than about the ornamental intricacies of South Indian Temple architecture. Authored by notable Bawa expert David Robson and photographed by Waruna Gomis, this intriguing volume on Anjalendrans practice allows the reader a clear insight into the intimate processes that govern the architects signature aesthetic. Whether he is engaging in elegant private homes of some of Sri Lankas most prominent inhabitants or SOS childrens orphanages, each of Anjalendrans works is always thoughtfully shaped by its own individual sense of context and personal story. Available in all leading bookstores for USD49.95.

78 architecture asia april / may / june 2011 books

Edited by Kuala Lumpur-based architect and academic Lim Teng Ngiom and recently launched by the Malaysian Institute of Architects (PAM), Shapers of Modern Malaysia admirably honours the work of the PAM Gold Medalists, collectively acknowledged as the most important pioneers of Malaysian architecture. As per its evocative title, the book gives one an overview of how the modern urban landscape of Malaysia ultimately took shape while taking readers on an unforgettable journey through the countrys rich historical past. The book also traces the beginnings of the PAM Gold Medal Award, an accolade which was

initially instituted in 1988 by then PAM President David Teh, motivated by a desire collectively expressed by the local architectural community to honour Kingston Loo, a prominent personality who until his passing in 2003 had long been thought of as the true voice of Malaysian architecture. The volume also pays homage to architectural heavyweights such as Lim Chong Keat and Hijjas Kasturi, notable practitioners in their own right who respectively strove to emphasise the pertinence and impact of Malaysian architecture on the international scene as well as within the countrys own borders.

Shapers of Modern Malaysia: The Lives and Works of the PAM Gold Medalists
Editor Lim Teng Ngiom Publisher Pertubuhan Akitek Malaysia (PAM)

datum, noun plural data. See also data. 1 a piece of information. an assumption or premise from which inferences may be drawn. 2 a fixed starting point of a scale or operation.

JULY 2011
Its been quite a ride DATUM:KL, which started in 2003, will now be the name of an exciting and ambitious new PAM initiative, the 2011 Kuala Lumpur Architecture Festival. Having grown over the years and now in its ninth year, Datum:KL is restructured and up-cycled as a month long multi-programme platform to be held throughout July 2011. The Festival aims to bring forth wider cultural aspects of the discipline onto the public domain and to invigorate the city of Kuala Lumpur into new and purposeful dialogues. For the month of July, Datum:KL will frame a moment of architectural intensity, propositions and conversations. A comprehensive series of conferences, exhibitions, workshops, forums, events, etc., has been planned with your participation in mind. Watch this space... Ang Chee Cheong Datum:KL Curator

www.datumkl.my

DATUM:KL & NOW IS ORGANISED BY

KUALA LUMPUR ARCHITECTURE FESTIVAL IS SUPPORTED BY

www.facebook.com/datumkl2011
Dewan Bandaraya Kuala Lumpur

www.twitter.com/datumkl2011

The annual conference, previously known as DATUM:KL, remains the principal anchor event for the Festival, but shall from this year onwards be re-conceptualised as the NOW CONFERENCE. NOW implies an immediacy, a moment in the present to define new positions and potentials, an architectural status update! At a time when architecture seeks new directions and new beginnings, the debut conference will seek to examine and describe key trajectories of thinking and practice, and to underline the essential transformative aspects of architecture as a critical instrumentality to engage a continually changing world. NOW CONFERENCE SEASON 1 will feature a series of lectures by a selection of both established and emergent architects and designers with divergent range of approaches and interests from the region and internationally. In addition to introducing a new set of exceptional talent to the Datum community, this year we welcome back some of our original speakers who over the years has also risen in stature and profile alongside Datum. The new conference will also have a refreshed and updated format but will leave intact the things that have worked well. Book NOW to avoid disappointment...

confirmed speakers (in alphabetical order) URBAN THINK TANK

ALFREDO BRILLEMBOURG www.u-tt.com PITUPONG CHAOWAKUL supermachine.wordpress.com


SUPERMACHINE STUDIO

FLORIAN IDENBURG/JING LIU www.soil.org


SOLID OBJECTIVES IDENBURG LIU (SOIL)

ZHANG LI www.teamminus.com
ATELIER TEAM MINUS

JRGENMAYER H. www.jmayerh.de
J. MAYER. H. ARCHITEKTEN

HIROSHI NAKAMURA www.nakam.info


HIROSHI NAKAMURA & NAP

OLE SCHEEREN www.buro-os.com


BRO OLE SCHEEREN

MARC SIMMONS www.frontinc.com


FRONT INC.

ALAN TAY/SEETOH KUM LOON www.formwerkz.com


FORMWERKZ ARCHITECTS *more speakers to be confirmed
All details are correct at time of printing. However PAM reserves the right to make amendments to adjust to circumstances.

a moment in the present...

CONFERENCE SEASON 1
1 & 2 JULY 2011 KUALA LUMPUR CONVENTION CENTRE
Please call 03-2693 2843 or email NOW@datumkl.my for registration or enquiries To download the registration form or for further information, please visit our website
FESTIVAL PARTNER OFFICIAL MAGAZINES OF DATUM:KL ACCREDITED BY [6CPD] DATUM:KL 2011 IS HELD CONCURRENTLY WITH