Weather

134rd Year, No. 167
Rayne Phillips
Sixth grade, Annunciation
High 83 Low 64
Chance t-storm
Full forecast on
page 2A.
Five Questions
1 When a CB radio user asks “What’s
your 20?” what should you tell him?
2 What former frontman of the Jam
played lead guitar on Oasis’s “Cham-
pagne Supernova”?
3 Michael Jordan is now a part owner
of what NBA team?
4 C. S. Lewis’s The Screwtape Letters
are written to what junior devil, Screw-
tape’s nephew?
5 What’s pictured in the painting that
hangs above The Simpsons’ couch?

Answers, 8B
inside
Classifeds 7B
Comics 6B
Obituaries 5A
Opinions 4A
LocaL FoLks
Shasta Dodd works at Waters
Truck and Tractor in Columbus.
caLendar
Today
■ Lincoln symposium: Events
on the Mississippi State campus
include 2:30 and 3:30 p.m.
free talks at Mitchell Memorial
Library on Abraham Lincoln’s
leadership and the 13th Amend-
ment, and a 7:30 p.m. discus-
sion at McCool Hall by historian
Frank Williams about Steven
Spielberg’s movie “Lincoln.”
Saturday, Sept. 28
■ Marker unveiling: As part
of Mississippi’s recognition of
the 150th anniversary of the
Civil War, the public is invited to
a Mississippi Historical Marker
unveiling at 10 a.m. at the cor-
ner of Highway 12 and Louisville
Street (in front of Walgreen’s)
in Starkville, noting Union Gen.
Benjamin Grierson’s raid that
came through Starkville in 1863.
Period music and reenactors
will be on hand afterward at the
Greensboro Center.
Sunday, Sept. 29
■ Book signing: Columbus
author Michael Farris Smith will
read from his novel “Rivers”
and sign books at the Tennes-
see Williams Welcome Center,
300 Main St., from 2-4 p.m.
Refreshments will be served
at this event presented by the
Columbus Cultural Heritage
Foundation.
DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471
established 1879 | Columbus, mississippi
CdispatCh.Com 50 ¢ NewsstaNd | 40 ¢ home deliverY
tuesdaY | september 24, 2013
Downtown
bus stops
removed
Lawrence transit
won’t make pickups
in historic district
BY NATHAN GREGORY
ngregory@cdispatch.com
City offcials
have confrmed
that the planned
bus stops at
the corners of
Fifth and Main
streets have
been deleted
from Lawrence
Transit’s route.
Other areas close to the
intersection but not in the
city’s historic district are be-
ing considered as alternatives
by LTS director of Columbus
operations Dorothy Dowdell,
including a parking lot at Sec-
ond Street and Main Street
and at the Hitching Lot Farm-
er’s Market, city building off-
cial Kenny Weigel said.
Signs posted at Fifth and
Main Streets reading “Need
a ride?” with the company’s
logo were removed last week.
The adjustments come af-
ter a Sept. 5 Columbus Histor-
ic Preservation Commission
meeting that drew downtown
business owners asking for
the stops to be removed or
relocated due to the already
congested intersection. The
commission moved to table a
request to approve stops and
shelters there, fnding that
the exterior appearance of the
proposed shelters did not con-
form to the historic integrity
of the district.
Main Street Columbus
director Barbara Bigelow
said she met last week with
Dowdell and discussed al-
ternative stops that would be
convenient to downtown rid-
私たちはここにいる
Offcials celebrate start of Yokohama construction
BY NATHAN GREGORY
ngregory@cdispatch.com
WEST POINT — “Some
people say Mississippi’s a
club,” Joe Max Higgins said
Monday. “Mississippi is a
family, and we’ve got new
family members in the house today, folks.”
Higgins, the Golden Triangle Development Link
CEO, was referring to Yokohama Tire Manufactur-
ing Mississippi. Company, state and local offcials
broke ground on what will be one of the largest
tire plants in the country during a ceremony at the
Prairie Belt Powersite in Clay County. In about
two years, the facility will open its doors for 500
workers.
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
President of Yokohama Tire Company Hikomitsu Noji shakes hands with Audriana Taylor, a fourth grader at Southside Elementary in
West Point, after she presented him with a magnolia tree to be planted. TOP OF PAGE: President of Yokohama Tire Manufacturing Mis-
sissippi Tadahuru Yamamoto, Gov. Phil Bryant, President of Yokohama Tire Company Hikomitsu Noji, Consul General of Japan in Nash-
ville Motohiko Kato, Link CEO Joe Max Higgins and Sen. Roger Wicker break ground on the new Yokohama plant in Clay County Monday.
InSIDe
■ OUR VIEW: A nice
day for an outdoor wed-
ding. Page 4A
Residents giddy with enthusiasm
over arrival of new industry
BY sARAH fOwlER
sfowler@cdispatch.com
The excitement in the air at Yo-
kohama Tire Manufacturing Missis-
sippi’s ground-breaking ceremony
in Clay County was almost palpable
Monday morning as executives,
lawmakers and Clay County residents
gathered on the hundreds of acres of
farm land that will soon house a boom-
ing tire manufacturer.
Governor Phil Bryant said West
Point would one day
be a “shining city on
the hill.” Yokohama
president Hikomitsu
Noji compared the
merging of the Japanese
industry and the Mis-
sissippi work force to a
marriage with a happy
honeymoon in the near
future and a “baby” — the facility —
born 45 months later.
See YOKOHAMA, 6A
Dowdell
See BUSES, 6A See REACTIONS, 8A
Cox
(“We’re here”)
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 2A Tuesday, sepTember 24, 2013
DiD you hear?
CONTACTING THE DISPATCH
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Five-Day forecast for the Golden Triangle
Almanac Data National Weather
Lake Levels
River Stages
Sun and Moon Solunar table
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W City Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, i-ice, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow
Yesterday 7 a.m. 24-hr.
Lake Capacity yest. change
The solunar
period schedule
allows planning days
so you will be fshing
in good territory or
hunting in good cover
during those times.
Temperature
Precipitation
Tombigbee
Yesterday Flood 7 a.m. 24-hr.
River stage yest. change
Columbus Monday
High/low ..................................... 86°/56°
Normal high/low ......................... 85°/60°
Record high ............................ 96° (1980)
Record low .............................. 44° (1974)
Monday ........................................... 0.00"
Month to date ................................. 3.67"
Normal month to date ...................... 2.73"
Year to date .................................. 49.08"
Normal year to date ....................... 40.60"
Wednesday Thursday
Atlanta 73 63 t 78 62 pc
Boston 65 54 s 65 55 s
Chicago 71 56 s 74 56 s
Dallas 92 67 s 93 70 s
Honolulu 89 72 pc 88 73 pc
Jacksonville 80 71 t 84 69 pc
Memphis 84 66 pc 85 69 pc
84°
64°
Wednesday
A morning shower in
places
83°
64°
Thursday
Partly sunny and
seasonable
84°
61°
Friday
Mostly sunny
84°
59°
Saturday
Mostly sunny, nice
and warm
Aberdeen Dam 188' 163.37' -0.84'
Stennis Dam 166' 137.01' -0.84'
Bevill Dam 136' 136.49' +0.17'
Amory 20' 11.39' -0.46'
Bigbee 14' 5.18' -0.70'
Columbus 15' 5.69' +0.24'
Fulton 20' 9.86' -1.60'
Tupelo 21' 2.70' -0.30'
Full
Oct. 18
First
Oct. 11
New
Oct. 4
Last
Sep. 26
Sunrise ..... 6:43 a.m.
Sunset ...... 6:48 p.m.
Moonrise . 10:19 p.m.
Moonset .. 11:43 a.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013
Major ..... 5:19 a.m.
Minor ... 11:32 a.m.
Major ..... 5:44 p.m.
Minor ... 11:56 p.m.
Major ..... 6:10 a.m.
Minor ... 12:22 p.m.
Major ..... 6:34 p.m.
Minor ................. ----
Wednesday Tuesday
Wednesday Thursday
Nashville 77 60 sh 82 62 pc
Orlando 81 73 r 89 74 pc
Philadelphia 75 56 s 75 56 s
Phoenix 97 75 s 92 69 s
Raleigh 78 59 pc 79 56 pc
Salt Lake City 64 44 c 58 42 sh
Seattle 61 45 pc 64 47 pc
Tonight
Partly cloudy,
showers around
67°
Tuesday
Say What?
“What we’re trying to get is the balance between
awareness and alarmist.”
Dr. Jeanne Conry, president of the American College of Ob-
stetricians and Gynecologists, speaking about the dangers
of environmental chemicals to pregnant women. Story, 5A.
U.S. honors Ray Charles
with limited-edition stamp
The AssociATed Press
ATLANTA — The U.S.
Postal Service is planning
to add soul singer Ray
Charles to its “Music Icons
Forever” stamp series.
Postal offcials say the
agency is releasing a stamp
featuring the Albany, Ga.,
native on Monday along
with one of the artist’s pre-
viously unreleased songs.
Charles was a sing-
er and songwriter who
pioneered the soul and
rhythm-and-blues genres.
He died in 2004.
Events are being
planned in Atlanta and
Los Angeles to celebrate
Charles’ inclusion in the
series.
R&B singer Ashanti and
the Morehouse College
Glee Club are scheduled
to perform at the Atlanta
school’s Ray Charles Per-
forming Arts Center. And
Chaka Khan is headlining
an event at the Grammy
Museum.
The U.S. Postal Service
honors music legends each
year by featuring them on
limited-edition stamps.
AP Photo/The U.S. Postal Service
In this undated photo provided by the The U.S. Postal
Service, a new Postal Service stamp honoring musician
Ray Charles is shown. The stamp is part of the Music
Icons series of stamps.
AP Photo/Alan Diaz
In this Friday, Sept. 20, 2013, fle photo, a sales person pulls out an iPhone 5s for a customer during the open-
ing day of sales of the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5C, in Hialeah, Fla.
By MichAeL LiedTKe
AP Technology Writer
SAN FRANCISCO — Gadget
lovers still can’t resist the iPhone’s
seductive call, even amid a bevy of
enticing lower-priced alternatives
that offer similar features.
In a Monday announcement, Ap-
ple Inc. said it sold 9 million units
of its top-of-the-line iPhone 5S and
less-expensive iPhone 5C during
their frst three days on sale. That
trounced the performance of last
year’s model, the iPhone 5, which
sold 5 million units in its opening
weekend.
The initial sales fgures for Ap-
ple’s latest iPhone models provided
the latest testament to the prod-
uct’s enduring appeal more than
six years after the debut of the frst
iPhone triggered a mobile comput-
ing revolution.
The iPhone 5S and 5C’s quick
start also surpassed analyst fore-
casts that predicted Apple would
sell somewhere from 6 million to
8 million models during the frst
weekend.
“The demand for the new iP-
hones has been incredible,” Apple
CEO Tim Cook crowed in a state-
ment. As part of the company’s ef-
fort to drum up interest in its most
proftable product, Cook made an
early-morning appearance at an
Apple store in Palo Alto, Calif. on
Friday when the new iPhones frst
went on sale.
Monday’s positive news helped
generate more interest in Apple’s
stock. The shares gained $23.23, or
5 percent, to close at $490.64.
Apple’s sales of new
iPhones off to fast start
Company sold 9 million units in frst three days
By roB GiLLies
The Associated Press
TORONTO — Black-
Berry’s largest share-
holder has reached a ten-
tative agreement to pay
$4.7 billion for the trou-
bled smartphone maker,
even as many investors
fret about its potential de-
mise.
BlackBerry Ltd. said
Monday that Fairfax Fi-
nancial Holdings Ltd. has
signed a letter of intent
that “contemplates” buy-
ing the company for $9
per share in cash in a deal
that would take the com-
pany private. The tenta-
tive deal comes just days
after the Canadian com-
pany announced plans to
lay off 40 percent of its
global workforce. The
offer price is below what
BlackBerry was trading
at before the layoff an-
nouncement.
Analysts say that al-
though BlackBerry’s
hardware business is not
worth anything, the com-
pany still owns valuable
patents. Patents on wire-
less technologies have
exploded in value in re-
cent years, as makers of
the iPhone and various
Android devices sue each
other. Having a strong
portfolio of patents allows
phone makers to defend
themselves and work out
deals.
Fairfax reaches tentative deal to buy BlackBerry
AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, File
In this Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, fle photo, Black-
Berry’s employees prepare the launch event for the
company’s new smartphones in London.
The AssociATed Press
QINGDAO, China —
China’s richest man plans
to spend $8.2 billion to
build the country’s ver-
sion of Hollywood in the
northeastern city of Qin-
gdao.
In a glitzy, star-stud-
ded red carpet event Sun-
day, Wang Jianlin said his
company, Dalian Wanda
Group, will build a state-
of-the-art flm studio com-
plex in a bid to dominate
China’s rapidly growing
movie market.
The Qingdao Oriental
Movie Metropolis’s 20
studios will include a per-
manent underwater studio
and a 10,000 square-me-
ter (108,000 square-feet)
stage that Wang said
would be the world’s big-
gest. The facility will also
include an Imax research
and development center,
cinemas and China’s big-
gest flm and celebrity wax
museums. The frst phase
is planned to open in June
2016 and it will be fully op-
erational by June 2017.
A yacht marina, eight
hotels and a theme park
will be built to attract tour-
ists.
The company has
signed a preliminary deal
with “a number of global
flm and television giants
and talent agencies” to
shoot about 30 foreign
flms a year. It did not
name the companies.
Wang also hopes to at-
tract more than 50 Chinese
production companies to
make at least 100 domes-
tic flms and TV shows a
year at the studios, where
sets will simulate locations
from Europe, the Middle
East and China’s Ming
and Qing dynasties.
Dalian Wanda, which
operates cinemas, hotels
and department stores in
China, last year bought
the U.S. cinema chain
AMC for $2.6 billion and
snapped up British yacht
maker Sunseeker in June
this year.
The tycoon’s red carpet
event in Qingdao under-
lined his outsized ambi-
tions for China’s entertain-
ment industry. Nicole
Kidman, Ewan McGregor,
Catherine Zeta-Jones,
John Travolta and Leon-
ardo DiCaprio rubbed el-
bows with Chinese stars
including Zhang Ziyi, Jet
Li and Tony Leung at the
event in Qingdao, best
known for Tsingtao Brew-
ery founded when Ger-
many colonized the city a
century ago.
Wang’s success in at-
tracting the A-list actors to
his launch, held the same
day as the Emmy televi-
sion awards show in Los
Angeles, also highlights
how the center of gravity
in the global flm industry
is shifting to the East.
In an interview, Wang
boasted of his plans to
expand in China’s movie
market, which overtook
Japan to become the
world’s second biggest
after ticket sales rose 36
percent last year to $2.7
billion.
“There’s no single com-
pany in the whole world
that has a big-scale pro-
duction base, and at the
same time has screening
and distribution channels.
Wanda Group is the frst
one in the world,” said
Wang, Wanda’s founder
and chairman.
China’s richest man plans $8 billion Chinese Hollywood
Predicts China’s flm market would
be world’s biggest in fve years
AP Photo
Wanda Chairman Wang
Jianlin speaks during a
press conference after
a launching ceremony of
Qingdao Oriental Movie
Metropolis in Qingdao in
east China’s Shandong
province, Sunday.
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@
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T
h
e

D
is
p
a
t
c
h
By EMILy
WAGSTER PETTUS
The Associated Press
JACKSON — Now
that budget hearings are
over, Mississippi lawmak-
ers face a long process
of deciding how to spend
tax dollars for fscal 2015,
which begins July 1.
The 14 members of the
Joint Legislative Budget
Committee held four days
of public hearings last
week and quizzed agency
leaders about how money
is already being spent on
programs large and small.
“I think that’s the job
we’ve now got — to eval-
uate how they’re spending
their money, what did they
get, what did they spend it
on last year, what do they
plan to spend it on next
year, why is there an in-
crease, what do they want
that money for,” House
Speaker Philip Gunn,
R-Clinton, said after the
hearings ended. “Those
are the kinds of questions
that we now have to eval-
uate and make judgment
calls on.”
In December, the com-
mittee will release a budget
blueprint, and Republican
Gov. Phil Bryant will re-
lease his own separate set
of spending recommenda-
tions. All 122 House mem-
bers and 52 senators will
vote on a fnal budget by
late March or early April, if
they stay on schedule.
Mississippi’s current
budget is about $5.8 billion.
State economist Darrin
Webb predicts Mississippi
will continue to see mod-
est growth, and lawmakers
say the 2015 budget will be
slightly larger.
Agency requests
A few agencies are
seeking budget decreas-
es, but most requested an
increase of about 5 percent
to 25 percent. The Depart-
ment of Revenue request-
ed a 66 percent increase,
with Commissioner Ed
Morgan saying the depart-
ment needs to hire more
employees. He said the
department had answered
only 26 percent of custom-
er calls in the past year.
“It’s unacceptable,”
Morgan said. “It’s an em-
barrassment to us.”
The Department of
Public Safety requested a
45 percent increase, and
lawmakers grilled DPS
executives about pay rais-
es and vehicles. Several
lawmakers said DPS has
not fulflled promises to
replace outdated vehicles
that state
t r o o p e r s
are driving.
C o mmi s -
sioner Al-
bert Santa
Cruz said
the agency
bought 15
vehicles for
one of its divisions, the
Mississippi Bureau of In-
vestigation.
Budget writers also
questioned the Forest-
ry Commission about
multi-year fnancing to
buy radios for a statewide
emergency communica-
tions system, and asked
the director of the state
Wireless Communication
Commission whether lo-
cal governments or other
users should pay fees to be
on the system.
The Department of
Education sought full
funding of the Mississip-
pi Adequate Education
Program, as required by
law. Although lawmakers
were generally cordial
about the request, House
Appropriations Committee
Chairman Herb Frierson,
R-Poplarville, said other
parts of government would
be shortchanged if legisla-
tors pump an additional
$264.5 million into MAEP,
as requested. The formula
is designed to ensure that
schools receive enough
money to meet midlevel
academic standards. It
was put into law in 1997
and phased in over several
years, but has been fully
funded only two years.
Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves,
a Republican who heads
the Budget Committee,
said “the vast majority” of
agency directors present-
ed wish lists that were
“somewhat reasonable and
somewhat rational in size.”
“Now, there were ex-
ceptions, and I think you
all know who they were,”
Reeves said. “But the vast
majority of state agency
directors came in here and
asked for things that they
felt like they needed, but it
wasn’t the kind of unreal-
istic expectations of years
past.
“Last year, just last year,
total increases requested,
that came before the com-
mittee, were in excess of
$1.1 billion. This year, it
was less than $750 mil-
lion,” Reeves said. “Now,
is $750 million a lot of
money? Well, where I grew
up in Florence, yeah, it’s
a whole lot of money. But
there a huge difference
between 1.1 billion and 750
million.”
Miss. lawmakers face long budget writing process
The following arrests
were reported by the
Lowndes County Sher-
iff’s Department and the
Columbus Police Depart-
ment:
n Terry Lee Bradford,
50, of 915 16th St. N., was
arrested at his residence
by CPD Sept. 20 and
charged with domestic vio-
lence/aggravated assault.
He was released the same
day on a $1,500 bond. His
court date is scheduled for
Dec. 5.
n Timothy Dewayne
Standifer, 32, of 470 S.
Frontage Road, was arrest-
ed at 1014 Fifth Ave. N., by
CPD Sept. 19 and charged
with possession of marijua-
na-more than one ounce
and contempt of court. His
court date is scheduled for
Oct. 16.
Standifer Bradford
AREA ARRESTS
House and senate members will vote
on a fnal budget by late March or
early April, if they stay on schedule
Gunn
LOWEST
highEST
2.74
kangaroo
725 Iowa Blvd
Vicksburg
3.47
rockey’s lion
10431 Old US-49
booneVille
2.76
sam’s club
465 Goodman Rd
southaVen
3.37
soco
201 US-278 E
amory
2.78
sam’s club
715 Bonita Dr
meridian
3.37
dee’s oil
1011 N Lamar Blvd
oxford
2.78
sam’s club
10431 Old US-49
gulfport
3.37
houlk’s
201-359 US-45 Alt
West point
columbus
(Out of 24 stations reported)
highEST
3.49
phillips 66
1500A US-45 N
LOWEST
3.04
murphy usa
1913-A US-45 N
By ANDREW TAyLOR
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
House Republicans are far
less ambitious this week in
their demands for spend-
ing cuts to erase new debt
issued to pay the govern-
ment’s bills than they were
during a budget battle two
years ago.
The list of cuts under
consideration now tallies up
to a fraction of the almost $1
trillion in additional borrow-
ing that would be permitted
under a GOP proposal for
enabling the government to
pay its bills through Decem-
ber of next year.
Two years ago, House
Speaker John Boehner,
R-Ohio, insisted on spend-
ing cuts totaling $2.1 trillion
over a decade as the price
to meet President Barack
Obama’s demand for a
like-sized increase in the
government’s borrowing
cap, also known as the debt
ceiling.
Those cuts involved
tighter “caps” on agency
operating budgets as well
as the automatic, across-
the-board cuts known as se-
questration triggered by the
failure of a defcit “super-
committee” to reach a deal.
The problem now is that
there isn’t a roster of big,
politically palatable cuts
ready to go. Instead, Repub-
licans have put together a
grab bag of smaller savings
ideas, like higher pension
contributions for federal
workers, higher premiums
for upper-income Medicare
benefciaries, caps on medi-
cal malpractice verdicts and
reduced payments to hos-
pitals that treat more poor
people than average.
A leading set of propos-
als comes from a House
GOP leadership offce and
was circulating on Wash-
ington’s K Street lobbying
corridor on Monday. It in-
cludes a plan to increase
pension contributions of
federal civilian workers by
up to 5 percentage points
and lowering the federal
match accordingly, which
could help defray the def-
cit by up to $84 billion over
a decade. Another, to block
immigrants in the country
illegally from claiming the
child tax credit would save
just $7 billion over the same
period. Eliminating the So-
cial Services Block Grant, a
fexible funding stream for
states to help with day care,
Meals on Wheels, and drug
treatment facilities, would
save less than $2 billion a
year.
Taken together, these
proposals and others could
cut spending by perhaps
$200 billion over the com-
ing decade. While GOP
aides say details aren’t set,
House leaders are looking
at an increase in the cur-
rent $16.7 trillion debt ceil-
ing suffcient to cover the
government’s bills until the
beginning of 2015. Accord-
ing to calculations by the Bi-
partisan Policy Center think
tank in Washington, that
would require raising the
borrowing cap by almost $1
trillion.
Boehner insists that any
increase in the borrowing
cap be matched by budget
cuts and other reforms to
produce savings of an equal
amount, though not on a
dollar-for-dollar basis over
10 years like in 2011. It’s a
somewhat nebulous stan-
dard because of the diffcul-
ty in quantifying how much
any given “reform” is worth.
Obama says he won’t ne-
gotiate concessions as the
price for authority to contin-
ue borrowing to cover bills
already incurred and prom-
ises already made and has
demanded a “clean” debt
limit increase with no condi-
tions attached.
GOP offers smaller budget cuts on debt measure
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite
House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., smiles as he leaves the foor of the House of Representatives at the
Capitol in Washington, Friday.
Other proposals listed in the GOP
leadership’s list of options:
n Eliminating the authority of the government to charge
a bailout fee to big banks under the Dodd-Frank fnancial over-
sight law. The fee could only be charged it there’s a major bank
failure. The document claims $23 billion in savings.
n Increase Medicare “means testing” to permit higher pre-
miums for Medicare benefciaries, raising $56 billion.
n Cap “pain and suffering” damages in medical malpractice
lawsuits to $250,000 and cap punitive damages at the greater
of $250,000 or twice the economic damages in such suits.
n Reduce a gimmick in which states levy taxes on health
care providers as a way to game the Medicaid system and
receive higher federal payments at a savings of $11 billion.
4A Tuesday, sepTember 24, 2013
Opinion
BIRNEY IMES SR. Editor/Publisher 1922-1947
BIRNEY IMES JR. Editor/Publisher 1947-2003
BIRNEY IMES III Editor/Publisher
PETER IMES General Manager
SLIM SMITH Managing Editor
BETH PROFFITT Advertising Director
MICHAEL FLOYD Circulation/Production Manager
DISPATCH
THE
Letters to editor
our View
Monday was a perfect day
for an outdoor wedding.
That was the day Yokohama
Tire Manufacturing Missis-
sippi broke ground on the
frst phase of its $300-million
facility in Clay County.
The event featured many
of the trappings you typically
expect at ground-breaking
ceremonies. There were the
customary silver shovels and
speeches flled with analogies.
Of all the analogies, we
found the one offered by
Yokohama Tire Company
President Hikomitso Noji, most
appropriate. Noji likened the
day’s festivities to a wedding
and the idea that Monday’s
ground-breaking is symbolic of
a committed relationship built
on mutual trust is especially
appealing.
It is particularly meaningful
that Noji chose the wedding
analogy since, unlike the U.S.
where half of the marriages
end in divorce, marriages
are taken very seriously in
Japan. In Japan, there is a
permanence associated with
marriage that is often lacking
in the U.S.
From Yokohama’s per-
spective, the relationship
between the company and the
community will be built to
last, something Link CEO Joe
Max Higgins stressed early
on in his negotiations with
Yokohama. Higgins told them
that four generations of Clay
County residents had worked
at Sara Lee Corporation before
it closed in 2007 and promised
that four generations would
work at Yokohama should the
company decided to locate
there.
At the risk of extending
the wedding analogy too far,
we suggest that while those
who played a role in bringing
Yokohama to Clay County were
numerous, Higgins stands
apart for his efforts. It was only
natural, then, that Higgins
would perform the ceremony
Monday, a duty he performed
fawlessly.
And what is a marriage
without vows?
That duty was left to Yo-
kohama Tire Manufacturing
Mississippi President Tadahu-
ru Yamamoto.
“We promise to be good
stewards of the resources you
have extended us.” Yamamota
said. “We promise to contrib-
ute to the quality of life of your
citizens through jobs and job
satisfaction. We promise to be
continually involved in your
community now and in the
long term.”
Perhaps as a symbol of com-
mitment, Yokohama offcials
announced that they will plant
trees in the area surrounding
the new facility as part of the
company’s Forever Forest
project, a world-wide commit-
ment to plant 500,000 trees at
Yokohama facilities by 2017.
West Point mayor Robbie Rob-
inson announced that citizens
of the community will donate
and plant 1,000 saplings for
that cause.
As weddings go, it was
a pretty impressive affair,
although there was one distinct
difference between Monday’s
event and your typical wed-
ding: Nobody cried at this
wedding.
Monday was a day for
smiles.
Huckabee endorsement
Recently, the Starkville Dispatch took excep-
tion to my announcement that former Arkansas
Governor and 2008 presidential candidate Mike
Huckabee had endorsed my campaign for Oktib-
beha County Prosecutor.
I respectfully disagree with The Dispatch’s
assessment.
When a person seeks employment, he typi-
cally provides references from one or more of
his former employers.
Gov. Huckabee gave me my frst job out of
college, back in 1998. Since that time, I have
remained close to his family. In 2003, when I
applied to law school, Janet Huckabee submitted
a letter of reference. In 2007, when I wrote my
book, the Governor drafted the foreword. Now,
the Governor is personally endorsing me for this
very important position.
Given my professional history with Gov.
Huckabee, it is altogether ftting and proper that
he should describe my character attributes to
my prospective employers, namely, the voters
of Oktibbeha County. This is exactly what Gov.
Huckabee has done, and I thank him for it.
Matthew Wilson
Starkville
Believes government is out of control
There is a movement underway to take back
control of our government. The project was
founded for the purpose of stopping the runaway
power of the federal government. We believe
Washington D.C. is broken and will not fx
itself. The federal government is spending this
country into the ground, seizing power from the
states and taking liberty from the people.
Under the power of Article V of the Constitu-
tion, the Convention of States seeks to urge and
empower state legislators to call a convention to
propose amendments to curb the abuses of the
federal government.
Please go to the site on the Internet www.
conventionofstates.com and sign up to be
a member. Only through the support of the
American people will this project have a chance
to succeed.
Harriet Vaughn
Columbus
Mississippi Voices
As we approach
what will probably be
the defnitive debate
on the future of the
Affordable Care Act, a
word or two of expla-
nation is in order. This
column will contain a
number of questions,
but very few concrete
answers to those ques-
tions.
The subject today
involves arguably the
most signifcant piece
of social legislation in our life-
time – The Affordable Care Act,
or Obamacare as it has become
known.
With the passage of a bud-
get, or alternately a government
shutdown, and the raising of the
ceiling on the national debt, or by
contrast the default on the nation’s
debt obligations hanging in the
balance, the debate and vote on
funding, or effectively repealing,
Obamacare stands as the fulcrum
upon which these Armaged-
don-like actions hinge.
All have heard the crescendo
of critics decrying each rate in-
crease announced by an insurance
company. While critics attribute
these increases completely to
Obamacare, some questions
need to be asked. To what should
we attribute the more rapid rate
increases and constant reduction
of benefts in the years prior to
the 2009 passage of Obamacare?
These rate increases began their
rapid ascent immediately after the
failure of “Hillary Care” during
the Clinton administration. Had
the insurance and other health
care providers kept their increas-
es in check during that time,
would there have been such a
pressing need for the Congres-
sional action that culminated in
Obamacare?
I received a copy of a letter two
weeks ago from a woman who,
while moving and temporarily
between jobs, became ill with
extremely high blood pressure.
Upon going to work, and after
incurring signifcant expense in
bringing her blood
pressure under control
in the early days of her
new job, she was in-
formed that there was
a 365-day exclusionary
period in the coverage
of this pre-existing
condition. What is the
answer for this hard
working employee and
others like her?
A family friend
who was required
to undergo a radical
mastectomy suffers from the
residual effects of severe lymph-
edema. Fortunately, this employed
person has health coverage and
has had insurance for some 30
years. Unfortunately, the company
raised her monthly premium from
around $500 a month to $1,300
per month. What is the answer for
this employee who has worked for
three decades?
Then there are the uncer-
tain numbers of the uninsured
and marginally insured. Those
numbers range from 500,000
to 600,000 in Mississippi to 50
million nationally. What are the
prospects for those among these
individuals who must deal with
brain tumors, leukemia, chronic
heart disease, and severe or debil-
itating injury? When the fates of
these individuals are raised in the
form of a question, the answers
become vague and run the gamut
ranging from “let them go to the
emergency room” to “we can pray
for them.”
Several months ago, the vow
from one political camp and
indeed from Republican Presiden-
tial Candidate Mitt Romney was
one to “repeal and replace.” It was
a clear call to scrap what Con-
gress had passed in the form of
Obamacare and to put something
more effective at addressing the
signifcant shortcomings in Amer-
ican health care in its place. Now
many Americans, both Democrat
and Republican, would probably
take this deal once all of the key
elements of the new plan were
known. Is there indeed a plan to
replace Obamacare and what are
the key components of that plan?
We then arrive at the most
sensitive subject of all in our
efforts to address the health care
needs of our brothers and sisters.
In the midst of all of the rancorous
conversations between liberals
and conservatives has been the
discussion of the appropriate role
of religion in the nation as a whole
and in a variety of policy debates
ranging from reproductive rights
to health care. Washington Mall
rallies have been held to proclaim
America as a Christian nation.
With the words of Jesus Christ
to his followers that “If you have
done unto the least of these you
have done it unto me” or his
directive to the young lawyer who
prompted the story of the Good
Samaritan to “Go and do likewise”
as backdrop, are we now fnding
that the claim that we are a Chris-
tian nation is too big of a burden
to carry anymore?
Astoundingly, the arrival of
atheist philosopher, the late Ayn
Rand, on the scene seems to have
afforded to anti-government pro-
gram types a welcomed proponent
of individual destiny as opposed
to a civic community. Indeed her
advocates such as Paul Ryan and
others have taken to distributing
her books “Atlas Shrugged” and
“The Fountainhead” much as the
Giddeons distribute Bibles. What
are we to make of it all?
Efforts of opponents of
Obamacare, like those of Sena-
tors Ted Cruz of Texas and Mike
Lee of Utah, have been relent-
less during the August recess.
House Speaker John Boehner has
promised a “whale of a fght.” If
the Oct. 1 signup period witnesses
a large number of takers for this
frst comprehensive attempt at a
national health care program, this
may indeed be the last chance to
head it off. All that is left is one
more question – Where will we be
when the smoke clears?
Wiseman is director of the Sten-
nis Institute at Mississippi State
University. His e-mail address is
marty@sig.msstate.edu.
Defunding Obamacare: the mother
of all debates
Voice of the people
West Point and Yokohama say, ‘I do’
Marty Wiseman
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
West Point Mayor Robbie Robinson, President of Yokohama Rubber Company Hikomitsu Noji and Gov. Phil Bryant during a ceremony
celebrating the ground breaking of the company’s new mega site in Clay County.
Our View: Local Editorials
Local editorials appearing in this space represent
the opinion of the newspaper’s editorial board: Bir-
ney Imes, editor and publisher; Peter Imes, general
manager; Slim Smith, managing editor and senior
newsroom staff. To inquire about a meeting with
the board, please contact Slim Smith at 662-328-
2471, or e-mail voice@cdispatch.com.
COMMERCIAL DISPATCH
OBITUARY POLICY
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service times, are provided
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Luke McCraw
SOUTHAVEN —
Lucas Andrew McCraw,
4, died Sept. 18, 2013, at
LeBonheur Children’s
Hospital in Memphis,
Tenn.
Brantley-Phillips
Funeral Home in Her-
nando was in charge of
cremation. Burial was
in the McCraw Fam-
ily Cemetery in Bay
Springs.
Luke was born June
12, 2009, to Robert and
Christy McCraw of
Southaven.
In addition to his par-
ents, survivors include
his brothers, Austin
and Hunter McCraw of
Southaven.
Gordon Comer
ABERDEEN — Gor-
don Ray Comer, 91,
died Sept. 23, 2013, at
Pioneer Community
Hospital.
Services are today
at 2 p.m. at Aberdeen
First United Methodist
Church with the Rev.
Keith Williams offciat-
ing. Burial will follow in
Oddfellows Rest Cem-
etery. Visitation is two
hours prior to services.
Tisdale-Lann Memo-
rial Funeral Home is
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Mr. Comer was born
Oct. 1, 1921, tot he late
Joseph Sanford Comer
and Virdie Stovall Com-
er. He was a graduate of
Itawamba High School.
He was a member of
Aberdeen First United
Methodist Church and
the Rotary Club. He was
employed with Comer
Packaging.
In addition to his
parents, he was preced-
ed in death by his wife,
Ruth Grimes Comer;
brother, Graden Com-
er; and sisters, Chris-
tine Pate and Tarlene
Weatherford.
Survivors include his
son, Jimmy Comer of
Aberdeen; sister, Wilma
Creely of Fulton; two
grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren.
Pallbearers are Ray
Lacey, David Houston,
George Grimes, John
Bales, Charles Caraway
and Tom Seymer.
Hattie Wilson
PRAIRIE — Hattie
Harrison Wilson, 95,
died Sept. 18, 2013, at
Dugan Nursing Home.
Services are
Wednesday at 11 a.m.
at Northside Christian
Church with the Rev.
Dederick Anderson
Sr. offciating. Burial
will follow in Sykes
Cemetery. Visitation
is today from 5-7 p.m.
at the church. Carter’s
Mortuary Services is
in charge of arrange-
ments.
Mrs. Wilson was
born Sept. 8, 1918, to
the late Joe Harrison
and Minnie Harrison.
She was formerly em-
ployed as a teacher.
In addition to her
parents, she was
preceded in death by
her husband, Mason
Wilson; and brother,
Stillman Harrison.
Survivors include her
sons, Joe Ceafers Wil-
son of Spokane, Wash.,
and Joe Reafers Wilson
of Prairie; daughter,
Vivian Townsend of
Milwaukee; 14 grand-
children and one
great-grandchild.
Rufus Turman
SULLIGENT, Ala. —
Rufus Turman, 81, died
Sept. 22, 2013, at Gilm-
ore Memorial Regional
Center in Amory.
Services are Thurs-
day at 2 p.m. at Otts
Funeral Home Chapel
with Billy Ray Adams
offciating. Burial will
follow in Sulligent City
Cemetery. Visitation
is Wednesday from
6-8 p.m. at the funeral
home.
Mr. Turman was
born June 24, 1932, to
the late Harvey and
Lela Mae Johnson.
He attended Sulligent
Schools and was for-
merly employed with
McCoy Manufacturing
and Turman Garage.
He was a member of
Sulligent First Baptist
Church.
In addition to his
parents, he was pre-
ceded in death by his
brother, William Ken-
neth Turman; and one
grandchild.
Survivors include
his wife, Naomi “Susie”
Turman of Sulligent;
daughter, Brenda S.
Trentham of Sulligent;
brother, Larry Tur-
man of Columbus; two
grandchildren and four
great-grandchildren.
Pallbearers are Gar-
rett Motes, John Mur-
phy, Tray Trentham,
Robert Motes, Justin
Flippo and Tanner
Hamilton.
Ginger Welch
MILLPORT, Ala.
— Ginger Mae Kuhns
Welch, 65, died Sept.
21, 2013, at Salem Nurs-
ing Home in Reform,
Ala.
Services are Thurs-
day at 1 p.m. at Pleasant
Hill Baptist Church
with the Rev. Steve
Lammons and the Rev.
Bill Hurt offciating.
Burial will follow in the
church cemetery. Visi-
tation is one hour prior
to services. Dowdle Fu-
neral Home is in charge
of arrangements.
Mrs. Welch was a
veteran of the U.S. Ma-
rine Corps. and was a
member of Pleasant Hill
Baptist Church.
She was preceded in
death by her parents,
Albert Neal and Geral-
dine Dunford Kuhns.
Survivors include her
husband, Charles Wal-
ter Welch of Millport;
daughter, Amy Marie
McManus of Farming-
ton, Alaska; stepdaugh-
ter, Cheryl Hanslovin or
Oregon; stepsons, Dan
Welch of Oregon and
Don Welch of Orlando,
Fla.; sisters, Dixie May
and Chris, both of Or-
egon and Kelly Sprano
of Washington; brother,
Victor Kuhns of Albany,
Ore.; and six grandchil-
dren.
Pallbearers are Don
Welch, Dane Welch,
Steve Hutcherson, Matt
Hutcherson, Jeremy
McManus and Hunter
McManus.
James Ledbetter Sr.
COLUMBUS —
James Ledbetter Sr., 68,
died Sept. 20, 2013, at
Baptist Memorial Hos-
pital–Golden Triangle.
Services are Wednes-
day at 11 a.m. at Charity
Mission
Full Gos-
pel Baptist
Church
in Craw-
ford with
Bobby L.
McCarter
Sr. offciat-
ing. Burial will follow in
Turner-Hairston Ceme-
tery. Visitation is today
from noon to 5 p.m. at
Carter’s of Columbus.
Mr. Ledbetter was
born Sept. 7, 1945, to
the late Charlie Bush
and Sarah Ledbet-
ter. He was formerly
employed with General
Motors and was a mem-
ber of Charity Mission
Full Gospel Baptist
Church.
In addition to his par-
ents, he was preceded
in death by his siblings,
David Bush, Bill Bush,
Willie Ledbetter, Ola
Smith, Annie Brown,
Mattie Rice and Hamp
Ledbetter.
Survivors include
his children, Jennifer
Engelmann of Ferndale,
Mich., James Ledbetter
Jr. of Flint, Mich., Alli-
son Holden of Apopka,
Fla., Daniel Twigg, Eric
Twigg, Greg Twigg and
Audrey Twigg, all of
Arvada, Colo.; siblings,
Bobby Bush, Pearl
Hankins, Betty Lowery,
Lartha Fulgham and
Ollie Bush, all of Co-
lumbus, Rosie Tucker
of Jonesboro, Ga., and
Johnny Will Ledbetter
of Cleveland, Ohio; and
three grandchildren.
Febbie Neely
STARKVILLE —
Febbie Collier Neely, 74,
died Sept. 17, 2013.
Services are Wednes-
day at 1 p.m. at Good
Hope MB Church with
Gary Wordlaw offciat-
ing. Burial will follow
in Josey Creek Ceme-
tery. Visitation is today
from noon to 1 p.m. at
West Memorial Funeral
Home.
Ms. Neely is survived
by her sons, Nathan-
iel Ellis, Tyrone Ellis,
Sammie Ray Howard
and Jessie Collier, all
of Starkville; daughter,
Bobbie Brown of Baton
Rouge, La.; sisters, Sar-
ah Cooper of Starkville
and Katie Ruth Neely of
Meridian; 25 grandchil-
dren; 31 great-grand-
children and 10
great-great-grandchil-
dren.
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com Tuesday, sepTember 24, 2013 5A
Edwin Knepp
Edwin Jay Knepp went home to be with his
Savior, Jesus Christ, on Sunday, September 22,
2013. He was in declining health in his later
years and died at his home near Macon, Mis-
sissippi.
Edwin was born to the late Samuel and Mar-
tha Knepp on March 18, 1929, in Plain City,
Ohio. He was joined in matrimony to Tressa
Schrock on May 6, 1951, and they had seven
children.
In 1953, at the age of 24, he was ordained to
the call of ministry in the Mennonite Church.
He served there with additional leadership for
six years, before moving to Noxubee County,
Mississippi in 1959. There he served as pas-
tor at the Magnolia Mennonite Church for 34
years. In 1994, Edwin and Tressa moved to
Taylorsville, Mississippi where he served at the
Maranatha Mennonite Church for six years.
They returned to Noxubee County in 2001.
While living in Indiana, Edwin was involved
in dairy farming. After moving to Mississippi,
he joined in partnership with the Ezra Schrock
family in the Macon Ready-Mix Concrete Co.
After retiring from the concrete company in
1983, he built the Sunbelt Meat Company in
Macon.
Survivors include his wife of sixty-two years,
Tressa Schrock Knepp; fve daughters, Sharon
(Dale) Miller, of Severn, NC, Grace (Merlin)
Martin of Conrath, WI, Jewel (Mervin) Miller,
Shirlene (Jay) Hoover and Kathy (the late Tim)
Graber, all of Macon. In addition he leaves two
sons, Gaylord (Kay) Knepp of Canon City, CO
and Phillip (Mary Ellen) Knepp, also of Macon.
He also was blessed with 35 grandchildren and
16 great-grandchildren.
Visitations will be held Wednesday, Septem-
ber 25, from 2 p.m.– 4 p.m. and again from 6:30
p.m.– 9 p.m. at the Magnolia Mennonite Church
in Macon. Funeral services will be held Thurs-
day, September 26 at 10 a.m. at the Magnolia
Mennonite Church. Paul Shirk, Jan Heisey and
Ben Graber will offciate the services. Burial
will follow in the church cemetery. Cockrell
Funeral Home is handling the arrangements.
In lieu of fowers, memorials may be made to
New Horizons Ministries, P.O. Box 1500, Can-
on City, CO 81215.
To sign online guest book, please visit www.
cockrellfuneralhome.com
Paid Obituary-Cockrell Funeral Home
Compliments of
Lowndes Funeral Home
www.lowndesfuneralhome.net
Malinda McCorkle
Malinda Catherine McCorkle, 81, of Colum-
bus, MS passed away Saturday, September 21,
2013, at her residence.
Visitation was Monday, September 23, 2013,
from 6-8 PM at Lowndes Funeral Home, Colum-
bus, MS. Funeral services were Tuesday, Sep-
tember 24, 2013, at 11:00 AM at Bread of Life
Fellowship Church with Bro. Jack Taylor offciat-
ing and Sister Diane Mealer assisting. Interment
was at Beersheba Cemetery, Columbus, MS with
Lowndes Funeral Home directing.
Mrs. McCorkle was born May 24, 1932, in
Columbus, MS to the late John Curtis and Mary
Malinda Catherine House Perrigin. She was a
member of Bread of Life Fellowship Church, Co-
lumbus, MS and her time was flled being a wife,
mother, grandmother and great-grandmother.
In addition to her parents, she was preceded in
death by her husband, Robert Foster McCorkle;
daughters, Bonnie Jane Patino and Connie Juan-
ita Smith; son, Larry Smith; granddaughters,
Kathleen A. Adkins and Sherri Sabine; and 3 sis-
ters and 2 brothers.
Mrs. McCorkle is survived by her children,
Mike (Kathy) Smith, Louisville, KY, Rebecca
Joann (Jay) Campbell and Debra (Max) McCork-
le Porter, both of Columbus, MS; brother, John
Pat Perrigin, Columbus, MS; grandchildren,
David Patino, San Antionio, TX, Bobby Bartley
and Melissa Jenkins both of Columbus, MS, Kev-
in Bartley, Dallas, TX, Chris Smith and Leslie
Klinger, both of Louisville, KY, Ryland Matthews
III, USMC and Jeffrey Matthews, New Bern, NC;
great-grandchildren, Kimberly Adkins, Kalie
Adkins, Nicholas Jenkins, Zaylie Jenkins, Devan
Bartley, Alex Bartley, Cameron Bartley and Em-
iliegh Bartley.
Pallbearers were Christopher Michael Smith,
Robert Bartley, Jr., Kevin Michael J. Bartley, Ry-
land E. Matthews III, Jeffrey Foster Matthews
and Nolan Alexander Bartley.
Honorary pallbearers were Devan Jordan
Bartley, Nicholas Hayes Jenkins, Cameron Fos-
ter Bartley, Bryan Nicholas Jenkins, James W.
Campbell, Max E. Porter, Franklin L. Klinger III,
Michael Adkins, David Patino and Jorge Patino.
Memorials may be made to Bread of Life Fel-
lowship Church, 100 Old New Hope Road, Colum-
bus, MS 39702.
Lowndes
County’s
ONLY
on-site
crematory
1131 Lehmberg Rd. Columbus
662-328-1808
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Elizabeth Thomas
Beautician / Representative
AreA obituAries
By LAURAN NEERGAARD
AP Medical Writer
WASHINGTON — From mercury
to pesticides, Americans are exposed
daily to environmental chemicals that
could harm reproductive health, the
nation’s largest groups of obstetricians
and fertility specialists said Monday.
The report urges doctors to push
for stricter environmental policies to
better identify and reduce exposure to
chemicals that prove truly risky. But
it’s likely to scare pregnant women in
the meantime.
That’s because during the frst
prenatal visit, the American College
of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
wants doctors to ask mothers-to-be
about their exposure to different
chemicals. They’re also supposed to
teach women how to avoid some con-
sidered most worrisome during preg-
nancy.
“What we’re trying to get is the bal-
ance between awareness and alarm-
ist,” said Dr. Jeanne Conry, president
of the American College of Obstetri-
cians and Gynecologists.
Specialists with ACOG and the
American Society for Reproductive
Medicine examined research about in-
dustrial chemicals and pollutants that
people can absorb from the air, wa-
ter, food and everyday products. Few
chemicals hit the market with good
information about safe levels — some-
thing the groups hope to change. But
certain chemicals are linked to infer-
tility, miscarriages, birth defects and
other problems, the committee said.
Report: Environmental
chemicals a pregnancy risk
Ledbetter Sr.
By JOSH LEDERMAN
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The
head of the Environmental
Protection Agency says
the agency will “effective-
ly shut down” unless Con-
gress approves stopgap
funding by Oct. 1.
EPA Administrator
Gina McCarthy says the
agency won’t be able to
pay employees. She says
only a core group of people
will remain on duty in case
the EPA has to respond to
a “signifcant emergency.”
The vast majority of em-
ployees will stay home.
That means that most of
EPA’s functions, like draft-
ing regulations and enforc-
ing laws to protect the envi-
ronment, will likely remain
stalled until government
operations fully resume.
Congress has a week
left to reach a deal to avoid
the frst shutdown since
1996. Lawmakers are at
odds over a Republican
plan to defund President
Barack Obama’s health
care law as part of the stop-
gap measure.
EPA to ‘effectively shut
down’ without budget deal
risks are greatest for
women with high on-
the-job exposure
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 6A Tuesday, sepTember 24, 2013
www.saumchiropractic.com
111 Alabama Street
Columbus, MS
662-327-6586
© The Dispatch
Drs. Saum, Sullivan & Pokorney
One of the most common forms of headache, involving
pain or discomfort in the head, scalp or neck, usually
associated with muscle tightness in these areas.
Tension headaches
result from the
contraction of neck &
scalp muscles and are
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by stress, fatigue, noise,
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TENSION
HEADACHES
Yokohama
continued from Page 1a
The $300 million
investment from the cor-
poration and $70 million
in state general obliga-
tion bonds will become
a one-million square
foot tire-making facility
October 2015. In another
eight years, with another
$900 million investment
by Yokohama, the facility
will have expanded to
115 acres under one roof.
Eight years and more
than 400 megawatts of
power will be available at
the site. It has the capac-
ity to provide 7.5 million
gallons of water and 2.5
gallons of wastewater
treatment per day.
A great partnership
For West Point Mayor
Robbie Robinson, it was
like being “a kid who’s
been waiting for Christ-
mas, and now it’s Christ-
mas morning.”
For Yokohama Tire
Corporation President
Hikomitsu Noji, it was
a red- letter day for the
future of his company.
“I can’t explain just
how much this plant
means to us,” Noji told
the crowd. “Our industry
is conditioned for solid
growth in the future.
We’ll no longer wait and
continue sitting on the
sidelines, not having
our own manufacturing
facility right here in the
United States.”
The next year will be
crucial on Mississippi’s
end to make sure the
plant opens on time.
Georgia-based frm Kaji-
ma Associates/Architects
& Engineers has already
been selected to over-
see the plant’s design,
but basic infrastructure
takes the forefront now.
West Point selectmen will
open bids from contrac-
tors vying for water and
sewer installation. Next
month, Clay County
supervisors will start
the bidding process for
road construction. The
infrastructure itself is
slated to be complete late
next year with plant con-
struction, product testing
and production to follow.
The gravel lot, which
will soon be graded, will
be a city in itself with a
population of sub-con-
tractors and construction
workers.
About 40,000 truck-
loads of dirt will have to
be hauled during the frst
phase of construction
alone. That might cause
some strain on county
roads in the short term,
supervisor Lynn Horton
said, but in a county
whose unemployment
has been the highest in
the state in recent years,
the sacrifce will be
worth it.
“We hope everybody
will understand what’s
about to take place,” he
said. “We’re moving for-
ward and better days are
yet to come.”
A look back
The event also pro-
vided an opportunity to
refect on what took place
behind the scenes to
bring the company to the
Golden Triangle. Hig-
gins was quick to thank
the many organizations,
state and local leaders
involved, including Tom-
bigbee River Valley Water
Management District;
the Mississippi Develop-
ment Authority; 4-County
Power Association; the
Appalachian Regional
Commission; and Deloitte
Consulting, Yokohama’s
advisory frm.
Governor Phil Bryant,
Miss. Sen. Roger Wicker
and Reps. Alan Nunnelee
and Gregg Harper were
all on hand for the event.
The state legislature
was recognized for its
near-unanimous support
of an incentive package
for the company in April.
During a Link lun-
cheon earlier this sum-
mer, Higgins detailed
the events leading to that
day, beginning with Clay
County signing the dot-
ted line to partner with
the Link in April 2012.
Partners were brought
in to review the location
that would become the
megasite. The water
management district
secured grant funding so
the Link could complete
due diligence studies.
In December, Yoko-
hama representatives
visited the site for the
frst time. They stayed
about an hour. Link
offcials had that amount
of time to get their foot in
the door.
In the next two
months, they hosted
more and longer on-site
visits. They boarded a
plane to Asia on Val-
entine’s Day, visiting
corporate headquarters
and plants for a week.
They learned the Monday
after they returned from
the trip that they would
host Yokohama Rubber
Company Chairman and
CEO Tadanobu Nagumo.
He wanted to see West
Point, Starkville, Colum-
bus, Mississippi State
University and meet with
the governor, all in a four-
hour window.
“Pretty tough, huh?”
Higgins said at the lun-
cheon. “How do you do it?
Well, we did.”
They had to rent a he-
licopter. Not one of those
“regular” helicopters,
but one ft for the CEO
of a global corporation.
Higgins talked to Mike
Hainsey, Golden Triangle
Regional Airport Exec-
utive Director. Hainsey
knew where Higgins
could rent a Sikorksy
S-76.
“Anybody know what
that is?” Higgins asked.
“I’ll tell you what it is.
It’s $27,000 a day. I said,
‘We’ll take one.’”
Heavy rain had fallen
in the days before Nagu-
mo was to visit, causing
a logistical problem for
landing the helicopters.
They couldn’t land on the
site itself because they
would sink into the mud.
They would run into pow-
er lines if they tried to
land on East Hazelwood
Road, which runs by the
plant.
4-County CEO Joe
Cade stepped in and
solved that problem,
agreeing to take the pow-
er lines down and replace
them after the visit.
“We re-routed our
power around another
way to feed all the hous-
es. We took two strands
of line down so the
helicopters would come
in and fy where the lines
were and land on the
highway,” Cade said Mon-
day. “That’s what we’re
here for. That’s our job is
to do things like that.”
Cade also had the area
blocked off from traffc
with trucks and signs
indicating utility work
was being done.
“When you see these
guys get off a helicop-
ter, they look just like
you think they’re going
to look,” Higgins said.
“Bad-ass and important.
You know they’re some-
body when they walk in.
We couldn’t have a bunch
of rubberneckers out
there looking.”
No detail was neglect-
ed. The visitors received
warm moist wash cloths
wrapped up for them to
wipe their hands. They
were served Japanese
tea. Each visitor had
custom galoshes with his
name on them. The he-
licopter landed and they
walked into a heated tent
with storyboards telling
them everything great
about the 1,100-acre
megasite. They hopped
on four-wheelers for a
45-minute tour of the
site.
“That, in my opinion,
is where we won the deal
because that was the
day we gave them the
story,” Higgins said. “We
said, ‘ West Point is the
toughest town we know...
It’s there I told the
chairman that this was
a community and a town
that had four generations
working at Sara Lee and
if they only gave us a
chance, we’d have four
generations working at
Yokohama.”
In April, Yokohama of-
fcials came back again,
this time to the gover-
nor’s mansion, where
they announced they had
chosen Mississippi over
two other locations. The
whole process took just
four months.
A look ahead
After Monday’s cere-
mony, MDA executive di-
rector Brent Christensen
said Yokohama’s arrival
will likely bring with it
other economic develop-
ment opportunities for
the area surrounding the
site and for Mississippi in
general.
“It puts you on the
map. It’s a tribute and
testament to the leader-
ship of the community
that they have the band-
width and commitment
to make a project like
this happen,” Chris-
tensen said. “I think it
will pay dividends for
many years to come, not
only for this project but
for others that may be
attracted because of what
they’ve seen in the kind
of business climate and
the kind of service Yoko-
hama has gotten and will
continue to get.”
In echoing that other
opportunities will come,
Bryant said he and state
leaders will work to
make sure the state has
a “business-to-business”
model going forward.
“Generations hence
will look back at this day
and say that is the day
that my opportunity be-
gan, perhaps not only to
be a manufacturer in this
great plant, but to be part
of the leadership team,”
he said.
Counsul-General of
Japan in Nashville Moto-
hiko Kato said the event
marks the forging of a
long-term partnership
that will be pivotal for the
future of both Yokohama
and economic growth in
Mississippi for years to
come.
“By selecting Missis-
sippi for construction of
the frst totally new plant
in the United States,
Yokohama is saying they
have confdence in Mis-
sissippi’s potential,” Kato
said. “I know this plant
will stand as a shining
example of what is possi-
ble here in Mississippi.”
Buses
continued from Page 1a
ers.
“We in no way wanted
to put a stop to the bus
system. That would be so
good for our community.
It was just the locations
of the stops,” Bigelow
said. “She has done a lot
of work and we don’t want
to halt any of her prog-
ress. I’m really glad she’s
here.”
Calls to Dowdell were
not returned, but she
said during a city coun-
cil meeting earlier this
month that she hopes to
have the four-route sys-
tem in operation in Oc-
tober. Lawrence Transit
System is based in Indi-
ana and began operations
there last year. When the
public transportation ser-
vice begins in Columbus,
it will be the company’s
second bus service.
The HPC will meet
again on Oct. 7 at 5:30
p.m.
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
Joe Max Higgins speaks at the groundbreaking ceremony for the Yokohama Tire
Manufacturing Mississippi in Clay County Monday.
THE AssOciATEd PREss
HATTIESBURG —
Hattiesburg residents
head to the polls today
for a rematch in the city’s
mayoral race.
Democratic Hatties-
burg Mayor Johnny
DuPree recorded 37 more
votes than his challenger,
Independent Dave Ware,
in a June 4 election.
The new election was
called by Judge William
Coleman after a mistri-
al was declared in a suit
brought by Ware, chal-
lenging the outcome.
Polls will open at 7 a.m.
and close at 7 p.m. today.
Hattiesburg residents to choose mayor
Get promoted? Win an award? Send us your business brief.
news@cdispatch.com subject: Business brief
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com Tuesday, sepTember 24, 2013 7A
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AP Photo/Riccardo Gangale
A helicopter and birds fy above as a plume of black smoke billows over the Westgate Mall, following large explo-
sions and heavy gunfre, in Nairobi, Kenya, Monday.
The AssociATed Press
NAIROBI, Kenya — Kenyan
security forces battled al-Qaida-
linked terrorists in an upscale mall
for a third day Monday in what they
said was a fnal push to rescue the
last few hostages in a siege that has
left at least 62 people dead.
While the government an-
nounced Sunday that “most” hos-
tages had been released, a security
expert with contacts inside the mall
said at least 10 were still being held
by a band of attackers described as
“a multinational collection from all
over the world.”
Kenyan Foreign Minister Amina
Mohamed said “two or three Amer-
icans” and “one Brit” were among
those who attacked the mall.
She said in an interview with the
PBS “NewsHour” program that the
Americans were 18 to 19 years old,
of Somali or Arab origin and lived
“in Minnesota and one other place”
in the U.S. The attacker from Brit-
ain was a woman who has “done
this many times before,” Mohamed
said.
U.S. offcials said they were look-
ing into whether any Americans
were involved. State Department
spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Mon-
day that the department had “no de-
fnitive evidence of the nationalities
or the identities” of the attackers.
Kenyan offcials claim last
push to end mall siege
Kenyan Foreign Minister says ‘two or three
Americans’ among those who attacked mall
By LoLiTA c. BALdor
The Associated Press
WASHINGTON —
The Washington Navy
Yard shooter lied about a
previous arrest and failed
to disclose thousands
of dollars in debts when
he applied for a security
clearance in the Navy.
Then federal investiga-
tors dismissed the omis-
sions, and made one of
their own — deleting any
reference to Aaron Alexis’
use of a gun in that arrest.
The gaps in his record
eventually allowed him
to work in the secure
Navy building where he
gunned down 12 work-
ers last week, underscor-
ing weaknesses with the
clearance process that
Navy offcials are target-
ing for change.
Navy Secretary Ray
Mabus recommended
Monday that all police re-
ports — not just arrests
or convictions — involv-
ing an individual must
be included when a back-
ground check is done. He
also recommended that
the Navy enhance its man-
agement of sailor evalua-
tions and ftness reports
by assigning more senior
offcers to oversee them.
The Navy, in a report
released Monday, re-
vealed new details about
Alexis’ Navy service, in-
cluding his failure to re-
veal the 2004 arrest over
a parking disagreement in
Seattle. And offcials said
the background report
given to the Navy omitted
the fact that he had shot
out the tires of another
person’s car during that
dispute.
Instead, the report
from the Offce of Per-
sonnel Management said
Alexis “defated” the tires.
Defense offcials have
acknowledged that a lot
of red fags were missed
in Alexis’ background,
allowing him to maintain
a secret-level security
clearance and have access
to a secure Navy facility
despite a string of behav-
ioral problems and brush-
es with the law. Over the
past week, they have been
struggling to determine
what might have been
missed, and what changes
could be made in order to
try and prevent similar vi-
olence in the future.
Report: Shooter lied about previous arrest, debts
AP Photo/Kristi Kinard Suthamtewakul
This undated cell phone
photo shows a smiling
Aaron Alexis in Fort Worth,
Texas.
Navy Secretary Ray Mabus recommended all police
reports must be included with a background check
The AssociATed Press
BOSTON — Lawyers
for Boston Marathon
bombing suspect Dz-
hokhar Tsarnaev will ask
a judge to discuss the
timeline and procedure
for prosecutors to de-
cide whether to seek the
death penalty.
A joint status report
fled in court says the de-
fense wants the court to
address “the death pen-
alty protocol” in federal
court on
Monday.
U.S. At-
torney Gen-
eral Eric
Holder will
u l t i ma t e -
ly make
the deci-
sion about
whether to seek the fed-
eral death penalty, but
the U.S. attorney’s offce
in Boston will make a
recommendation. Tsar-
naev’s attorneys also
have the right to make
the case against the
death penalty.
Tsarnaev, 20, is ac-
cused in twin bombings
that killed three people
and injured more than
260 others at the April
15 marathon. He’s also
accused of killing a Mas-
sachusetts Institute of
Technology police offcer
while on the run three
days later.
Death penalty protocol focus of Mass. bomb hearing
Tsarnaev
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder will
ultimately make the decision about
whether to seek the death penalty
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The excitement was ob-
vious on the faces of law-
makers and executives,
but could not compare to
the emotions that radi-
ated from Clay County
residents: excitement and
dreams flled with hope.
“It’s like it’s been
raining here for several
years and we fnally have
a rainbow to appear,” said
West Point native Ladon-
na Halverson. “Yokohama
is our rainbow.”
The $1.2 billion plant
will sit on 115 acres
and create 2,000 local
job when all phases are
completed in 2023. Clay
County currently has the
highest unemployment
rate in the state at 19
percent.
Roosevelt Cox is
retired but said seeing a
plant like Yokohama open
in Clay County is a sign
of hope for future gener-
ations.
“I think it will be a big
opportunity for people to
get jobs in West Point,”
Cox said. “Since (Sara
Lee) closed down, there’s
nothing for people to do.
Myself, personally, I’m
retired but I’m looking for-
ward to the young people
having something to do
and have a better life than
they have now.”
Edward Houston
echoed Cox’s sentiments
and said with new job
opportunities, younger
generations will have a
chance to dream of a new
way of life, a dream that
was almost impossible
without the new plant.
“We’re trying to get a
new way of life,” Houston
said. “This is an oppor-
tunity for people in the
community. We have the
highest unemployment
rate here in Clay County
and this is an opportunity
that we can move forward,
that they can get their
dreams and go and do
what they need to do in
life.”
The impact the
fve-million square foot
plant will have on future
generations seemed to be
at the forefront of every-
one’s mind Monday.
Jermaine Taylor, prin-
cipal at West Point Middle
School, says all too often
he sees children who
are negatively impacted
when their parents are
unemployed. By hopefully
boosting the local employ-
ment rate, Taylor said he
hopes children’s grades
will be affected as well.
“Financial stability
at home interprets into
better success in school,”
Taylor said. “If they’re
seeing mom being suc-
cessful and less stress on
mom, it’s less stress on
the child.”
Noting the loss of the
Sara Lee plant in 2007,
Taylor said he saw a rise
in people leaving the com-
munity to fnd jobs. By
bringing back industry,
Taylor said he hopes Clay
County will keep people
who may be thinking of
leaving.
“When we lost some
industry here, we saw a
lot of families move away
to fnd work, attendance
went down, our enroll-
ment went down. It’s
going to mean a lot for us.
Our future generations
will have some place to
turn to for employment.
It’s going to be hope for
our children coming
through that they’re going
to have a place of employ-
ment and be able to stay
in the area and not have to
move off to fnd work.”
Gene Perry was stand-
ing back from the crowd
Monday and seemed to
be taking in the scene, a
toothpick in his mouth,
hands on his hips.
“It’s really a big push
for the county and all of
the surrounding coun-
ties,” he said. “It’s going
to be really helpful to
our young people and for
generations to come and
I think it’s one of the best
things that could have
ever happened to Clay
County, Lowndes County,
Oktibbeha and all of the
surrounding counties. It’s
going to be a really big
boost.”
West Point Mayor
Robbie Robinson agreed
and said not only would
West Point be positively
impacted, but surround-
ing counties would be as
well.
“Clay County/West
Point cannot fll 2,000 jobs
so there will be plenty
of jobs to go around,”
Robinson said. “There
will be people from Lown-
des County, Oktibbeha
County, Monroe County,
the surrounding areas.
It’s going to take that to
furnish 2,000 jobs to Yo-
kohama and we pledged
to do that. Locally, it’s just
unbelievable. With the
construction workers that
will be coming in during
the construction phase,
West Point will beneft
from the fact that they’ll
be spending their money
in West Point and we’ll
have sales tax revenue
increasing.”
Luann Little said the
creation of 2,000 jobs
will mean so much to her
beloved hometown.
“It’s amazing. It really
is,” Little said. “West
Point needs jobs so bad,
so bad.”
Little owns land
adjacent to the Yokohama
property and said seeing
the new plant built there
would have meant so
much to her late father.
“Daddy loved his God, his
family and Clay County.
He’d be all for this.”
Jackie Edwards is on
the executive board at the
Golden Triangle Develop-
ment Link and is a lifelong
Clay County resident. Ed-
wards said she has been
involved in the process
since Clay County frst
approached Link CEO Joe
Max Higgins and asked
him to help bring industry
to their area.
“We think this is the
greatest thing that has
happened,” Edwards said.
“I still can’t believe it’s
real. I wake up at night
thinking, ‘when I wake
up it’s all going to be a
dream.’ It’s that big of a
deal for this area.”
She also noted the loss
of Sara Lee, but said the
people of West Point have
weathered the storm.
“We’ve been through
the times when (Sara Lee)
closed and we didn’t close
up and die. We stayed vi-
able, we got to looking for
options and this is going
to save our town.
“It’s literally going to
save our town.”
Taylor Little Perry Houston
BY sARAH fOwlER
sfowler@cdispatch.com
A series of search warrants and
raids led to the seizure of nearly
$40,000 in suspected drug money.
Assistant Commander Archie
Williams with the Lowndes County
Narcotics Division said agents seized
more than $37,000 in cash along with
cocaine and marijuana from three
homes in Lowndes County over the
past week. The search warrants
stemmed from the arrest of a Colum-
bus couple that law enforcement be-
lieves to be cocaine distributors.
“We’re not only looking into not
only dealing with street level dealers
but people we consider distributors,”
Williams said.
Antwon Jordan, 44,
and Latonya Shelton,
28, were arrested last
Monday and charged
with possession of co-
caine with intent to dis-
tribute after they led
narcotics agents and
Lowndes County sher-
iff’s deputies on a high speed chase
through the city. Over an ounce of
cocaine and $8,000 in cash was dis-
covered in the couple’s possession.
Their arrests then lead to the
search warrants of three residences
where the couple allegedly stored
narcotics and manufactured crack
cocaine. The search of
59 Spann Lane, 3865
Military Road and 44
Timber Drive result-
ed in the discovery
of nearly $30,000 in
cash, cocaine, mari-
juana, spice, various
items used to the man-
ufacture of crack co-
caine and a stolen frearm.
Jordan and Shelton are currently
in the custody of the Lowndes Coun-
ty Adult Detention. More charges are
expected against the couple.
Williams said the investigation is
ongoing are more arrests are expect-
ed.
Drug raid leads to seizure of $40K
Jordan Shelton
By AdAm minichino
aminichino@cdispatch.com
Chad Harrison knew
something was wrong with
his All-State player.
The Scott
Central High
School girls
basket bal l
coach waited
until the end
of practice
Monday to
check with
Victoria Viv-
ians to see
what was bothering her.
He quickly realized Viv-
ians had come to a decision
that was going to end a na-
tional recruiting battle.
“I want to go to Missis-
sippi State,” Vivians told
Harrison.
Those seven words
set off a chain reaction of
phone calls, text messag-
es, emails, and tweets that
spread the word that one of
the country’s top prep bas-
ketball players was coming
to Starkville to join coach
Vic Schaefer’s women’s bas-
ketball program.
“She is truly unstoppa-
ble,” Harrison said Monday
night. “She can do any-
thing. She can shoot the ball
from 30 feet, she can post
up around the basket and
score with either hand, she
can fnish in traffc, and can
rebound the ball on one end
and score down at the other
end in three seconds.”
Academy will play in an elimi-
nation game at 11:45 a.m. An-
other game will follow at 1:30
p.m. before the frst champion-
ship game is scheduled for 3:15
p.m. An if-needed champion-
ship game will follow at 5 p.m.
All four teams have qualifed
for the Class AAA overall state
tournament. Today’s action will
determine seedings.
For Heritage Academy and
Starkville Academy, their loss-
es Monday ended their sea-
sons. Magnolia Heights defeat-
ed Starkville Academy 11-1 in
another opening-round game.
By ScoTT WALTERS
swalters@cdispatch.com
Ole Miss football coach
Hugh Freeze isn’t sure
how far the Rebels have
progressed in his one-plus
season at the helm.
However, Freeze feels
like he will know a whole
lot more Saturday after his
team plays defending na-
tional champion and top-
ranked Alabama.
For a second straight
season, the teams will
meet at Bryant-Denny
Stadium in Tuscaloosa.
Kickoff is set for 5:30 p.m.
(ESPN).
“We look forward to the
opportunity to go over,”
Freeze said Monday at
his weekly media gath-
ering. “For several years
now, Alabama has been
the standard to which you
measure yourself in this
conference. That hasn’t
changed. It’s another op-
portunity for us to mea-
sure ourselves and see
where we are. I’m OK with
the results as (long) our
best effort is put forth.”
Off to a 3-0 start for the
frst time since 1989, No.
21 Ole Miss enjoyed its
frst of two open dates this
season Saturday.
“Not playing a game
was a good thing for us,”
By GEoRGE hEnRy
The Associated Press
ATLANTA — Mike Minor
believes he will be sharp in
October even though he hasn’t
won a start since Aug. 25.
“I don’t think it’s been great,
and I think it shows,” he said.
“But it’s one of those things that
I thought I pitched pretty well
all year, but right now I’m kind
of struggling a little bit.”
Minor gave up two home
runs in the Atlanta Braves’ 5-0
loss to the Milwaukee Brewers
on Monday night.
The NL East champion
Braves began the night with
the league’s best record and
are one-half game in front of
St. Louis Cardinals, who beat
Washington 4-3 on Monday.
The Los Angeles Dodgers, who
did not play Monday, moved two
games back.
Atlanta was shut out for the
16th time, second-most in the
NL.
Minor (13-8) allowed eight
hits and three runs and struck
out six in seven innings. The left-
hander, whom manager Fredi
Gonzalez is considering to start
the playoff opener next week, is
winless in his last fve starts.
“What I like is he gave us
every opportunity to win the
game,” Gonzalez said. “Seven
innings, and you hold the oppo-
sition to three runs, you’ve got a
pretty good chance.”
With six games left in the
regular season, the Braves
have the majors’ best home
record at 52-23, but Milwau-
kee led 4-0 in the eighth when
By ScoTT WALTERS
swalters@cdispatch.com
South Lamar High
School junior Holden
Fields always felt like the
Stallions would win a foot-
ball game sooner rather
than later this season.
South Lamar snapped
a 14-game, two-season
losing streak with Fri-
day night’s 42-19 victory
against Lynn. Playing
fullback and middle line-
backer, Fields had a major
hand in the victory. He
ran for 127 yards and two
touchdowns and had six
tackles and two quarter-
back hurries.
For his accomplish-
ments, Fields is The
Dispatch’s Prep Player of
the Week.
“I thought we had a
chance to be a better foot-
ball team this year and
win some games,” Fields
said. “We have a new
coach and several new
players on the team. You
could tell there was
a different attitude
during the sum-
mer. Everybody
was hitting the
weight room hard
to get better. We
were doing more
work than we had
ever done before.”
When Shannon Mc-
Gregory took the South
Lamar job last spring, he
promised nothing more
than hard work. Gregory
felt like the attitude and
work ethic were
good enough to get
the Stallions back
in the business of
winning games.
“I saw a group
of kids that were
hungry,” McGreg-
ory said. “They
were not despon-
dent even though they
had been losing. I have
coached a long time,
and I just wanted to help
teach them some ways
they could become better
football players. With the
help of some of the veter-
ans, such as Holden, the
kids bought in right away.
They were on board with
whatever we wanted to do
to try to make them win-
ners again.”
For Fields, the biggest
change during the offsea-
son was in the installation
of a new offense. South
Lamar now runs the
Wing-T.
“Switching to the
Wing-T has been the
greatest thing possible,”
Fields said. “It took us a
while to learn everything,
but once we did, it was a
good thing. We are excit-
ed about playing offense
again.”
Progress in the new of-
fense came slowly. Grant-
ed, the frst three games
were losses to Lamar
County, Pickens Coun-
ty, and Brilliant. That
group combined to win 23
games last season.
SECTION
B
SPORTS EDITOR
Adam Minichino: 327-1297
SPORTS LINE
662-241-5000
Sports
THE DISPATCH n CDISPATCH.COM n TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 2013
Vivians
NL PLAYOFF CHASE
W L Pct.
nAtlanta 92 64 .590
nSt. Louis 92 65 .586
nLos Angeles 90 66 .577
nCincinnati 90 67 .573
nPittsburgh 90 67 .573
nNOTE: Atlanta and Los Angeles
have clinched the NL East and NL
West. St. Louis, Cincinnati, and
Pittsburgh have clinched playoff
berths.
INSIDE
n The Pittsburgh Pirates clinched
their frst playoff berth in 21
years Monday. Page 3B
SATURDAY
n Ole Miss at Alabama,
5:30 p.m. (ESPN)
INSIDE
n LSU quarterback Zach
Mettenberger is eager to
get his return trip to Georgia
and a game against the
Bulldogs behind him. Also,
the Southeastern
Conference honored
Mississippi State’s Gabe
Jackson. Page 4B
Prep Softball: MAIS Class AAA, District 1 tournament College Football
See OLE MISS, 5B
See BRAVES, 3B
HIGH SCHOOL
Holden Fields
Player Week
Friendly City
Mini-Warehouses
2 Convenient Locations • 662.328.2424
Prep Player of the Week
Fields’ all-around effort helps South Lamar snap losing streak
See FIELDS, 2B
Fields
Women’s College
Basketball
By AdAm minichino
aminichino@cdispatch.com
Action hadn’t started Mon-
day, but Gary Harris wanted to
set the tone.
“It’s a new season,” the Her-
itage Academy fast-pitch soft-
ball coach said, exhorting his
players to try to create some
magic.
Unfortunately, Heritage
Academy had only one game’s
worth of magic left in its sea-
son.
Heritage Academy lost to
Madison-Ridgeland Academy
18-0, beat Starkville Academy
15-4 and lost to Washington
School 11-1 on Monday in the
Mississippi Association of In-
dependent Schools Class AAA,
District 1 tournament at Propst
Park in Columbus.
Magnolia Heights will play
Hillcrest Christian in a win-
ners’ bracket game at 10 a.m.
today at Heritage Academy.
Washington School and Pillow
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff
TOP: Heritage Academy starting pitcher Kaitlyn Oswalt and Starkville Academy starting pitcher
Meridee Higginbotham (BELOW) deliver pitches Monday in their game in the Mississippi Association
of Independent Schools Class AAA, District 1 tournament at Propst Park in Columbus.
HErITagE ExTENdS SEaSON ONE gamE
Lady Patriots eliminate Lady Vols before suffering same fate vs. Washington School
Major League Baseball
Braves’ lead for home-feld advantage shrinks after loss
Ole Miss
prepared
for trip to
Alabama
See SOFTBALL, 5B
Vivians
commits
to mSU
One of nation’s best
likes vision Schaefer
has for her, program
See VIVIANS, 5B
Prep Football
Friday’s games
Starkville at Columbus, 7 p.m.
New Hope at Clarksdale, 7 p.m.
Ethel at West Lowndes, 7 p.m.
West Point at Oxford, 7 p.m.
Caledonia at Choctaw County, 7 p.m.
Noxubee County at Leake Central, 7 p.m.
Corinth at Aberdeen, 7 p.m.
Bruce at Amory, 7 p.m.
East Webster at JZ George, 7 p.m.
Louisville at Kosciusko, 7 p.m.
East Oktibbeha at Noxapater, 7 p.m.
West Oktibbeha at French Camp, 7 p.m.
Oak Hill Academy at Heritage Academy, 7 p.m.
Winston Academy at Starkville Academy, 7 p.m.
Hebron Christian at Delta Academy, 7 p.m.
Immanuel Christian at Greenville Christian, 7 p.m.
Friendship Academy at Central Academy, 7 p.m.
Victory Christian at Tuscaloosa, 7 p.m.
Aliceville at Pickens County, 7 p.m.
Berry at Lamar County, 7 p.m.
South Lamar at Central of Coosa County, 7 p.m.
Sulligent at Fayette County, 7 p.m.
Pickens Academy at Eastwood Christian, 7 p.m.
Prep Soccer
Today’s Matches
Washington School at Heritage Academy, 3 p.m.
Indianola Academy at Immanuel Christian, 4 p.m.
Wednesday’s Match
Starkville Academy at Washington School, 3 p.m.
Thursday’s Matches
Heritage Academy at Starkville Academy, 3 p.m.
Bayou Academy at Immanuel Christian, 4 p.m.
Prep Softball
Today’s Games
Mississippi Association of Independent Schools
Class AAA North tournament
At Heritage, Columbus
Magnolia Heights vs. Hillcrest Christian, 10 a.m.
Washington School vs. Pillow Academy, 11:45 a.m.
MAIS Class A North tournament
At Carroll Academy, Carrollton
Central Academy vs. Benton Academy, 11:45 a.m.
Today’s Games
New Hope at Starkville, 6 p.m.
Smithville at Hamilton, 6:30 p.m.
Caledonia at Columbus, 6:30 p.m.
Prep Volleyball
Today’s Matches
New Hope at Ridgeland, 6 p.m.
DeSoto Central at Columbus, 6 p.m.
Belmont at Caledonia, 6 p.m.
Tupelo at Starkville, 6:30 p.m.
Thursday’s Matches
Caledonia at Amory, 6 p.m.
Starkville at Aberdeen, 6 p.m.
Columbus at New Hope, 6:30 p.m.
Today
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
6 p.m. — Milwaukee at Atlanta, SportSouth
SAILING
3 p.m. — America’s Cup, race 17 and race 18, at
San Francisco, NBC Sports Network
Wednesday
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1:10 p.m. — Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, WGN
6 p.m. — Tampa Bay at New York Yankees, ESPN
9 p.m. — Los Angeles Dodgers at San Francisco,
ESPN
CALENDAR
oN ThE AiR
bRiEFLy
Alabama
Volleyball team will play host to Alabama State
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. — The Alabama volleyball team will bring
a nine-match winning streak into its home match at 7 tonight against
Alabama State at Foster Auditorium.
Alabama (11-2) is coming off three victories last weekend at the
Clemson Classic in Clemson, S.C. The victories helped Alabama win its
third-straight tournament.
n In related news, redshirt freshman middle blocker Krystal
Rivers, of Birmingham, Ala., was named the Southeastern Conference
Freshman of the Week, as announced by the conference office
Monday. Last week, Rivers was named the Clemson Classic MVP after
averaging 3.92 kills, with a .398 hitting percentage, and 1.31 blocks per
set in the tournament.
Junior Colleges
ICC’s Grantham honored again
FULTON — For the second-straight week Itawamba Community
College sophomore Cullen Grantham, of Corinth, has been named the
MACJC Keeper of the Week when the conference released its weekly
awards on Monday.
Grantham earned this week’s honors after having five saves in a
1-0 victory against Northwest Mississippi C.C. in a North Division game.
It was his second-straight shutout.
Last year’s MACJC All-State selection went 230 consecutive
minutes without allowing a goal to help the Indians improve to 4-2-1 and
2-1-1 to take over first place in the division.
n In related news, the ICC soccer teams’ matches against Merid-
ian original scheduled for Saturday have been rescheduled to Friday.
The Lady Indians (2-4-1, 1-2-1 MACJC North) will start things off at 2
p.m., while the first-place Indians will follow at 4 p.m. in Meridian.
Etheridge, Newsom to be inducted into ICC Athletic Hall
of Fame
FULTON — Vick Etheridge, of Corinth, and former men’s
basketball coach Wayne Newsom, of Fulton, will be inducted into the
Itawamba Community College Athletic Hall of Fame on Saturday as
part of the Homecoming festivities.
Etheridge was a member of the 1965 and 1966 football teams
earning All-State honors during both seasons. As a sophomore, he was
named team captain, earned a spot on the North All-Star team, and
was a member of the baseball team.
Newsom, a native of Walnut, retired in 1998 after 23 seasons as
head coach of the Indians basketball team.
After earning his bachelor’s degree from Southeastern Louisiana
State, he began his coaching career at Alcorn Central High School
where he was head basketball and baseball coach until 1967. He moved
to Aberdeen where as head coach of the basketball and baseball
teams, he led the Bulldogs to two Little 10 championships.
Colleges
Women’s basketball summit generates ideas
to improve game
The NCAA brought in women’s basketball’s past and present to
help shape the sport’s future.
Some of the top contributors in women’s basketball got together
Monday as the NCAA hosted a women’s basketball summit with
coaches, administrators, and committee members.
Monday’s discussions were framed around a paper that new Big
East commissioner Val Ackerman put together and submitted to the
NCAA in June that took a look at ways to improve women’s basketball in
the short- and long-term.
While the group had no power to make changes, they came up with
a bunch of recommendations based on Ackerman’s paper, including
going back to the top 16 teams hosting the first two rounds of the NCAA
tournament. That used to be the way until the tournament went to
predetermined sites in 2003.
Moving the first two rounds of the tournament to the top seeds
could help attendance. Last season the NCAA averaged 5,466 for all
tournament rounds, which was 17th since the tournament began in
1982.
However, making that change would most likely lose a school like
Gonzaga, which has been one of the most successful sites over the
past few seasons.
Other suggestions from Monday which can’t be implemented this
season included:
nMoving the NCAA tournament back a week and changing back
to a Friday-Sunday format for the Final Four instead of the current
Sunday-Tuesday configuration.
nGoing with three super regionals for the rounds of 16 and eight
as well as the Final Four and rotating them every few years.
nHolding the Division I, II, and III championships on the same
weekend at the 2016 Final Four in Indianapolis.
Another area that was discussed Monday was officiating. Changes
will be implemented this season to help clean up and allow more
freedom of movement in the game by protecting the shooter and not
allowing there to be contact on cuts anymore.
Sports on TV
Film explores Archie Manning’s pro, personal life
The ESPN documentary “The Book of Manning”, which will air at
7 tonight, shows a new generation of football fans that Peyton and Eli
Manning got their athleticism and acumen from good bloodlines as well
as their strong work ethic.
The film, narrated by John Goodman, explores how tragedy
shaped one of the most influential families in pro sports history and
serves as a reminder of how good Archie Manning was at Ole Miss and
during his pro career with the otherwise hapless New Orleans Saints,
Houston Oilers and Minnesota Vikings in the 1970s and ‘80s.
“What intrigued me about telling the story was ... I felt like a lot of
people weren’t aware of the career that Archie had and how dynamic
of a player he was, especially in college,” director Rory Karpf said. “You
go back and you look at some of the old footage of Archie Manning in
college, and to me, it’s captivating. He was kind of like Barry Sanders
behind center, how athletic he was, and the footage is really breathtak-
ing to watch.”
The film explores the personal and professional life of Archie
Manning and how his father’s suicide impacted his life and the way he
and his wife, Olivia, raised their three sons, Cooper — whose football
career was cut short by a spinal condition — Peyton and Eli.
With Peyton and Eli Manning so successful in the NFL, Archie
Manning the QB has largely been forgotten, and the patriarch of the first
family of football said he’s always been fine with that.
“Oh, the years fly by, that’s just natural,” he said on a conference
call in advance of the film’s Tuesday night debut. “You know, if it wasn’t
for Peyton and Eli coming along, nobody would know who I was. Maybe
a few people in Mississippi, a few old people.
“I never worry much about that. I always had kind of a philosophy, I
really enjoyed playing. Gosh, I loved playing.”
NBA
League may have Heat, Nets wear nicknames on jerseys
MIAMI — So long, James, Allen, Pierce and Garnett.
King James, Jesus Shuttlesworth, The Truth and KG may be
headed to the backs of NBA jerseys.
Some members of the Miami Heat have been told the NBA is
considering having them and the Brooklyn Nets wear “nickname
jerseys” in at least one of their four matchups this season. The NBA has
not announced the plan, but teams apparently have been aware of the
likelihood of it happening for at least several weeks.
For now, only the Heat and the Nets would be taking part. It’s
unclear how many times those teams would wear the nickname jerseys,
or if they would ever wear them against other opponents.
Grizzlies announce hirings of three assistants
MEMPHIS, Tenn. — The Memphis Grizzlies have hired Elston
Turner, Duane Ticknor and Shawn Respert to join the returning Bob
Thornton as assistants on new head coach Dave Joerger’s staff.
Turner previously worked as an assistant for Portland (1996-2000),
Sacramento (2000-06), Houston (2007-11) and Phoenix (2011-13).
Ticknor spent last season as head coach of the NBA Development
League’s Fort Wayne Mad Ants. Joerger worked as an assistant for
Ticknor in 1999-2000 with the International Basketball Association’s
Dakota Wizards. Respert was director of player development for
Houston from 2008-11 and spent the last two years as an assistant with
Minnesota.
Shaquille O’Neal joining Kings ownership group
The larger-than-life figure that teased and tormented the Sacra-
mento Kings for so long is now the biggest name to join the franchise’s
new ownership group.
The Kings announced Monday that Shaquille O’Neal has acquired
a minority stake in the team under new owner Vivek Ranadive. The
Kings will introduce the four-time NBA champion at a news conference
Tuesday in Sacramento.
During the height of his career with the Los Angeles Lakers, O’Neal
fueled the rivalry with the Kings with his play on the court and his
personality off of it.
— From Special Reports
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 2B Tuesday, sepTember 24, 2013
Auto Racing
Sprint Cup Points Leaders
1. Matt Kenseth .........................................2,111
2. Kyle Busch ...........................................2,097
3. Jimmie Johnson ...................................2,093
4. Carl Edwards ....................................... 2,075
5. Greg Biffle ............................................ 2,073
6. Kevin Harvick .......................................2,072
7. Kurt Busch ............................................ 2,071
8. Jeff Gordon ..........................................2,069
9. Ryan Newman .....................................2,064
10. Clint Bowyer .......................................2,063
11. Dale Earnhardt Jr. ..............................2,049
12. Joey Logano ......................................2,042
13. Kasey Kahne ......................................2,040
14. Brad Keselowski ................................... 792
15. Jamie McMurray ................................... 786
16. Martin Truex Jr. ..................................... 752
17. Paul Menard .......................................... 742
18. Aric Almirola ......................................... 719
19. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. ............................. 700
20. Jeff Burton ............................................694
21. Juan Pablo Montoya .............................693
22. Marcos Ambrose ..................................693
23. Tony Stewart .........................................594
24. Casey Mears ......................................... 577
25. Denny Hamlin ....................................... 528
Sprint Cup Money Leaders
1. Jimmie Johnson ..........................$7,300,667
2. Kyle Busch ..................................$5,730,671
3. Matt Kenseth .............................. $5,598,408
4. Kevin Harvick ..............................$5,100,470
5. Brad Keselowski ........................ $5,070,877
6. Carl Edwards ............................. $4,820,469
7. Jeff Gordon .................................$4,621,051
8. Ryan Newman ............................$4,587,372
9. Dale Earnhardt Jr. ......................$4,521,373
10. Joey Logano ............................ $4,500,493
11. Martin Truex Jr. ........................ $4,444,379
12. Clint Bowyer ............................. $4,421,302
13. Ricky Stenhouse Jr. .................$4,302,181
14. Kasey Kahne ............................ $4,292,529
15. Kurt Busch ................................$4,146,393
16. Aric Almirola ............................ $4,048,588
17. Greg Biffle .................................$4,011,939
18. Jamie McMurray .......................$3,931,813
19. Juan Pablo Montoya ................ $3,923,756
20. Paul Menard ............................ $3,820,356
21. Marcos Ambrose ...................... $3,787,015
22. Tony Stewart .............................$3,710,624
23. David Ragan .............................$3,527,275
24. Casey Mears ............................ $3,322,900
25. Denny Hamlin .......................... $3,265,029
Sprint Cup Schedule
Sept. 29 — AAA 400, Dover, Del.
Oct. 6 — Hollywood Casino 400, Kansas City,
Kan.
Oct. 12 — Bank of America 500, Concord, N.C.
Oct. 20 — Camping World RV Sales 500,
Talladega, Ala.
Oct. 27 — Goody’s Headache Relief Shot 500,
Ridgeway, Va.
Nov. 3 — AAA Texas 500, Fort Worth, Texas
Nov. 10 — AdvoCare 500, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 17 — Ford EcoBoost 400, Homestead, Fla.
Nationwide Points Leaders
1. Sam Hornish Jr. ......................................962
2. Austin Dillon ............................................ 947
3. Regan Smith ........................................... 917
4. Elliott Sadler ...........................................908
5. Brian Vickers ..........................................902
6. Justin Allgaier ......................................... 887
7. Brian Scott ..............................................883
8. Trevor Bayne ...........................................868
9. Kyle Larson ............................................. 822
10. Parker Kligerman .................................. 783
11. Alex Bowman ........................................ 739
12. Nelson Piquet Jr. .................................. 709
13. Mike Bliss ..............................................664
14. Travis Pastrana ..................................... 617
15. Jeremy Clements .................................. 528
16. Reed Sorenson ..................................... 517
17. Michael Annett ...................................... 513
18. Mike Wallace ........................................496
19. Eric McClure ......................................... 419
20. Joe Nemechek ......................................409
21. Cole Whitt .............................................338
22. Johanna Long ....................................... 337
23. Jeffrey Earnhardt .................................. 301
24. Blake Koch ............................................ 275
25. Brad Sweet ........................................... 272
Nationwide Money
Leaders
1. Sam Hornish Jr. ............................ $985,357
2. Austin Dillon .................................. $929,284
3. Kyle Busch .................................... $909,040
4. Elliott Sadler .................................. $810,817
5. Brian Vickers ................................ $789,922
6. Trevor Bayne .................................. $766,142
7. Regan Smith ..................................$743,083
8. Kyle Larson ....................................$735,768
9. Brian Scott .....................................$731,598
10. Justin Allgaier ............................. $728,450
11. Parker Kligerman .........................$689,126
12. Alex Bowman ...............................$677,092
13. Nelson Piquet Jr. ..........................$628,792
14. Travis Pastrana ............................$616,087
15. Mike Bliss .....................................$608,182
16. Reed Sorenson ............................$592,242
17. Mike Wallace ............................... $578,096
18. Jeremy Clements ........................ $555,687
19. Brad Keselowski ......................... $542,305
20. Eric McClure ................................ $511,807
21. Joe Nemechek ............................ $492,497
22. Michael Annett ............................ $440,909
23. Blake Koch .................................. $406,587
24. Jeff Green .................................... $395,170
25. Joey Logano ............................... $393,670
Nationwide Schedule
Sept. 28 — 5-hour ENERGY 200 benefiting
Living Beyond Breast Cancer, Dover, Del.
Oct. 5 — Kansas Lottery 300, Kansas City,
Kan.
Oct. 11 — Dollar General 300, Concord, N.C.
Nov. 2 — O’Reilly Auto Parts Challenge, Fort
Worth, Texas
Nov. 9 — ServiceMaster 200, Avondale, Ariz.
Nov. 16 — Ford EcoBoost 300, Homestead,
Fla.
Basketball
WNBA Playoffs
CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS
(Best-of-three)
Eastern Conference
Atlanta vs. Washington
Thursday, Sept. 19
Washington 71, Atlanta 56
Saturday, Sept. 21
Atlanta 63, Washington 45
Monday’s Game
Atlanta 80, Washington 72, Atlanta wins series
2-1
Chicago vs. Indiana
Friday, Sept. 20
Indiana 85, Chicago 72
Sunday, Sept. 22
Indiana 79, Chicago 57, Indiana wins series 2-0
Western Conference
Minnesota vs. Seattle
Friday, Sept. 20
Minnesota 80, Seattle 64
Sunday, Sept. 22
Minnesota 58, Seattle 55, Minnesota wins
series 2-0
Los Angeles vs. Phoenix
Thursday, Sept. 19
Phoenix 86, Los Angeles 75
Saturday, Sept. 21
Los Angeles 82, Phoenix 73
Monday’s Game
Phoenix 78, Los Angeles 77, Phoenix wins
series 2-1
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-three)
Eastern Conference
Atlanta vs. Indiana
Thursday’s Game
Indiana at Atlanta, 6 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
Atlanta at Indiana, 2 p.m.
Western Conference
Minnesota vs. Phoenix
Thursday’s Game
Phoenix at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
Minnesota at Phoenix, 4 p.m.
Football
CFL
EAST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA
Toronto 8 4 0 16 354 315
Hamilton 6 6 0 12 316 329
Montreal 4 8 0 8 285 349
Winnipeg 2 10 0 4 251 368
WEST DIVISION
W L T Pts PF PA
Calgary 9 3 0 18 373 301
B.C. 8 4 0 16 325 302
Saskatchewan 8 4 0 16 376 282
Edmonton 3 9 0 6 294 328
Friday’s Game
B.C. at Winnipeg, 7 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Calgary vs. Hamilton at Guelph, Ontario, 5 p.m.
Toronto at Edmonton, 8 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
Saskatchewan at Montreal, Noon
The Sports Network
Football Championship
Subdivision Top 25
PHILADELPHIA — The weekly poll, with first-
place votes in parentheses, records through
Sept. 22, points and previous ranking:
Rec. Pts Pvs
1. North Dakota St. (157) 3-0 3949 1
2. E. Washington (1) 2-1 3669 2
3. Towson 4-0 3580 4
4. Sam Houston State 3-1 3415 5
5. Northern Iowa 3-0 3258 7
6. South Dakota State 3-1 2884 6
7. Montana 3-0 2802 9
8. Eastern Illinois 3-1 2622 8
9. McNeese State 4-0 2529 12
10. New Hampshire 1-1 2428 11
11. Montana State 2-2 2366 3
12. Coastal Carolina 4-0 1809 15
13. Central Arkansas 2-2 1681 13
14. James Madison 3-1 1578 17
15. Georgia Southern 2-1 1531 14
16. Fordham 4-0 1312 21
17. Wofford 2-2 1307 10
18. Cal Poly 1-2 1124 18
19. Villanova 1-2 966 20
20. Bethune-Cookman 3-1 876 19
21. Lehigh 3-0 821 22
22. Richmond 2-2 673 23
23. Tennessee-Martin 2-1 596 24
24. Northern Arizona 2-1 556 25
25. Gardner-Webb 3-1 483 —
Football Championship
Subdivision Coaches
Top 25
SPARTANBURG, S.C. — The weekly poll,
with first-place votes in parentheses, records
through Sept. 22 and previous ranking:
Rec. Pts Pv
1. N. Dakota St. (26) 3-0 650 1
2. Towson 4-0 616 3
3. Eastern Washington 2-1 598 4
4. Sam Houston St. 3-1 573 5
5. Northern Iowa 3-0 531 7
6. South Dakota St. 3-1 465 6
7. New Hampshire 2-1 460 9
7. Montana 3-0 460 11
9. McNeese St. 4-0 409 13
10. Montana St. 2-2 402 2
11. Coastal Carolina 4-0 372 15
12. Eastern Illinois 3-1 354 10
13. Central Arkansas 2-2 326 14
14. James Madison 3-1 283 16
15. Wofford 2-2 278 8
16. Fordham 4-0 217 21
17. Lehigh 3-0 214 18
18. B-Cookman 3-1 179 17
19. Cal Poly 1-2 169 19
20. Richmond 2-2 156 20
21. Villanova 1-2 155 23
22. No. Arizona 2-1 117 22
23. Stony Brook 1-2 107 12
24. Illinois St. 1-2 80 24
25. Youngstown St. 3-1 47 NR
AFCA Division II
Coaches Top 25
Rec. Pts Pvs
1. Valdosta St. (Ga.) (29) 2-0 793 1
2. Minn. St.-Mankato (2) 3-0 766 2
3. NW Missouri St. 3-0 723 3
4. West Texas A&M 3-0 692 4
5. Colo. St.-Pueblo (1) 3-0 676 5
6. Missouri Western St. 3-0 647 6
7. Indiana (Pa.) 3-0 581 8
8. Henderson St. (Ark.) 3-0 553 9
9. Gr. Valley St. (Mich.) 3-0 544 10
10. C-Newman (Tenn.) 3-0 493 11
11. Bloomsburg (Pa.) 3-0 450 13
12. Pittsburg St. (Kan.) 3-0 449 14
13. Minnesota-Duluth 2-1 400 7
14. Shepherd (W.Va.) 3-0 370 15
15. West Alabama 2-1 321 16
16. N.C.-Pembroke 3-0 315 18
17. W-Salem St. (N.C.) 2-1 256 19
18. Washburn (Kan.) 3-0 232 22
19. West Chester (Pa.) 3-0 227 20
20. St. Cloud St. (Minn.) 3-0 172 23
21. Chadron St. (Neb.) 2-1 149 21
22. Indianapolis (Ind.) 2-1 146 12
23. Mdwstrn St. (Texas) 1-1 88 25
24. Emporia St. (Kan.) 3-0 72 —
25. Tarleton St. (Texas) 2-0 58 —
AFCA Division III
Coaches Top 25
Rec. Pts Pv
1. Mt. Union (Ohio) (38) 2-0 1044 —
2. M.H.-Baylor (Texas) (4) 3-0 972 —
3. Linfield (Ore.) 2-0 921 —
4. North Central (Ill.) 2-0 904 —
5. Hobart (N.Y.) 2-0 737 —
6. Wis.-Platteville 3-0 712 —
7. Wis.-Whitewater 2-0 666 —
8. Bethel (Minn.) 2-0 652 —
9. Wis.-Oshkosh 2-0 628 —
10. Heidelberg (Ohio) 2-0 595 —
11. Wheaton (Ill.) 3-0 580 —
12. St. Thomas (Minn.) 2-1 525 —
13. Johns Hopkins (Md.) 3-0 506 —
14. Wesley (Del.) 2-1 499 —
15. Pac. Lutheran (Wash.) 2-0 488 —
16. Del.Valley (Pa.) 3-0 342 —
17. Coe (Iowa) 3-0 335 —
18. Wabash (Ind.) 2-0 334 —
19. St. John Fisher (N.Y.) 2-0 288 —
20. Franklin (Ind.) 1-2 244 —
21. St. John’s (Minn.) 3-0 240 —
22. Wittenberg (Ohio) 1-1 217 —
23. Huntingdon (Ala.) 2-0 215 —
24. Chr. Newport (Va.) 3-0 174 —
25. Thomas More (Ky.) 2-0 137 —
This Week’s Schedule
Thursday’s Games
SOUTH
Virginia Tech at Georgia Tech, 6:30 p.m.
Howard at NC A&T, 6:30 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Iowa St. at Tulsa, 6:30 p.m.
FAR WEST
Cal Poly at Portland St., 9:15 p.m.
Friday’s Games
FAR WEST
Middle Tennessee at BYU, 8 p.m.
Utah St. at San Jose St., 8 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
EAST
Fordham at St. Francis (Pa.), 11 a.m.
Oklahoma St. at West Virginia, 11 a.m.
Cornell at Yale, 11 a.m.
Monmouth (NJ) at Columbia, 11:30 a.m.
New Hampshire at Lehigh, 11:30 a.m.
Virginia at Pittsburgh, 11:30 a.m.
CCSU at Rhode Island, Noon
Bryant at Wagner, Noon
Princeton at Georgetown, 2 p.m.
Florida St. at Boston College, 2:30 p.m.
UConn at Buffalo, 2:30 p.m.
Penn at Villanova, 4 p.m.
Sacred Heart at Bucknell, 5 p.m.
Towson at Stony Brook, 5 p.m.
Holy Cross at Dartmouth, 6 p.m.
James Madison at Delaware, 6 p.m.
Brown at Harvard, 6:30 p.m.
SOUTH
Butler at Jacksonville, 11 a.m.
Miami at South Florida, 11 a.m.
South Carolina at UCF, 11 a.m.
South Alabama at Tennessee, 11:21 a.m.
East Carolina at North Carolina, 11:30 a.m.
Drake at Mercer, Noon
Davidson at Morehead St., Noon
Norfolk St. at Morgan St., Noon
San Diego at Stetson, Noon
Coastal Carolina at Elon, 12:30 p.m.
Robert Morris at VMI, 12:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Presbyterian, 1 p.m.
Hampton at SC State, 1 p.m.
Troy at Duke, 2 p.m.
W. Carolina at Samford, 2 p.m.
Charleston Southern at Appalachian St., 2:30
p.m.
Wake Forest at Clemson, 2:30 p.m.
LSU at Georgia, 2:30 p.m.
Cent. Michigan at NC State, 2:30 p.m.
Murray St. at Jacksonville St., 3 p.m.
Maine at Richmond, 3 p.m.
Alcorn St. at Alabama St., 5 p.m.
Chattanooga at Georgia Southern, 5 p.m.
Albany (NY) at Old Dominion, 5 p.m.
Delaware St. at Savannah St., 5 p.m.
Furman at The Citadel, 5 p.m.
Point (Ga.) at Gardner-Webb, 5 p.m.
Mississippi at Alabama, 5:30 p.m.
Texas Southern at Alabama A&M, 6 p.m.
Lamar at Grambling St., 6 p.m.
Florida at Kentucky, 6 p.m.
Kentucky Wesleyan at Liberty, 6 p.m.
Tulane at Louisiana-Monroe, 6 p.m.
Arkansas Tech at Nicholls St., 6 p.m.
Langston at Northwestern St., 6 p.m.
Jackson St. at Southern U., 6 p.m.
Navy at W. Kentucky, 6 p.m.
UAB at Vanderbilt, 6:30 p.m.
Indiana St. at Tennessee Tech, 7 p.m.
MIDWEST
Miami (Ohio) at Illinois, 11 a.m.
N. Illinois at Purdue, 11 a.m.
Marist at Dayton, Noon
Illinois St. at Missouri St., 1 p.m.
Campbell at Valparaiso, 2 p.m.
Akron at Bowling Green, 2:30 p.m.
E. Kentucky at E. Illinois, 2:30 p.m.
Toledo at Ball St., 2 p.m.
Tennessee St. vs. Central St. (Ohio) at St. Louis,
2 p.m.
N. Dakota St. at S. Dakota St., 2 p.m.
Iowa at Minnesota, 2:30 p.m.
Montana St. at North Dakota, 2:30 p.m.
Oklahoma at Notre Dame, 2:30 p.m.
South Dakota at W. Illinois, 3 p.m.
McNeese St. at N. Iowa, 4 p.m.
Youngstown St. at S. Illinois, 6 p.m.
UT-Martin at SE Missouri, 6 p.m.
Kent St. at W. Michigan, 6 p.m.
Arkansas St. at Missouri, 6:30 p.m.
Wisconsin at Ohio St., 7 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
SMU at TCU, 11 a.m.
E. Washington at Sam Houston St., 2 p.m.
Houston at UTSA, 3 p.m.
Army vs. Louisiana Tech at Dallas, 3 p.m.
Texas A&M at Arkansas, 6 p.m.
FAU at Rice, 6 p.m.
Prairie View at Stephen F. Austin, 6 p.m.
Wyoming at Texas St., 6 p.m.
FAR WEST
Stanford at Washington St., TBA
Colorado at Oregon St., 2 p.m.
UTEP at Colorado St., 2:30 p.m.
S. Utah at N. Colorado, 2:35 p.m.
Temple at Idaho, 4 p.m.
Arizona at Washington, 6 p.m.
UNLV at New Mexico, 7 p.m.
San Diego St. at New Mexico St., 7 p.m.
Sacramento St. at Weber St., 7 p.m.
Air Force at Nevada, 7:05 p.m.
Montana at N. Arizona, 8 p.m.
Idaho St. at UC Davis, 8 p.m.
Southern Cal at Arizona St., 9 p.m.
Southern Miss. at Boise St., 9:15 p.m.
California at Oregon, 9:30 p.m.
Fresno State at Hawaii, 10:59 p.m.
Hockey
NHL Preseason
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 5 4 0 1 9 17 13
Tampa Bay 4 4 0 0 8 18 11
Boston 5 4 1 0 8 16 15
Buffalo 5 3 1 1 7 18 15
Florida 5 2 1 2 6 16 17
Montreal 5 2 2 1 5 17 16
Ottawa 3 2 1 0 4 9 6
Detroit 5 2 3 0 4 15 11
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Columbus 6 4 1 1 9 20 17
Washington 5 2 0 3 7 16 17
Pittsburgh 5 2 2 1 5 15 19
New Jersey 4 2 2 0 4 10 9
Philadelphia 4 1 2 1 3 11 13
N.Y. Rangers 3 1 2 0 2 5 8
Carolina 4 1 3 0 2 9 17
N.Y. Islanders 5 1 4 0 2 10 17
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Chicago 5 3 0 2 8 16 14
Minnesota 4 3 1 0 6 11 8
Dallas 4 2 0 2 6 14 12
St. Louis 4 2 1 1 5 15 15
Colorado 3 2 1 0 4 7 6
Winnipeg 6 1 3 2 4 12 19
Nashville 4 1 2 1 3 8 14
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Edmonton 6 4 1 1 9 21 15
Calgary 6 4 2 0 8 23 18
Anaheim 5 3 2 0 6 12 13
San Jose 3 2 0 1 5 8 7
Phoenix 5 2 2 1 5 14 18
Los Angeles 4 1 2 1 3 12 13
Vancouver 4 1 3 0 2 11 13
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for over-
time loss.
Monday’s Games
Pittsburgh 3, Chicago 2, SO
Minnesota 2, Columbus 1, SO
Boston 3, Washington 2, OT
Montreal 3, New Jersey 2
Calgary 4, N.Y. Rangers 1
Edmonton 2, Winnipeg 1
Vancouver 6, Phoenix 1
Today’s Games
Ottawa at Toronto, 6 p.m.
New Jersey at Philadelphia, 6 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Nashville, 7 p.m.
Dallas at Colorado, 8 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Edmonton, 8:30 p.m.
Anaheim at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Columbus at Buffalo, 6 p.m.
Nashville at Washington, 6 p.m.
Montreal at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Detroit, 6:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Minnesota, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at Calgary, 8 p.m.
Soccer
Major League Soccer
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
New York 15 6 9 47 36 51
Sporting K.C. 14 6 9 43 28 48
Montreal 13 6 9 46 42 45
Houston 12 7 10 37 36 43
New England 11 7 11 41 33 40
Chicago 11 6 12 36 43 39
Philadelphia 10 9 10 37 39 39
Columbus 11 5 14 36 39 38
Toronto FC 4 11 15 25 44 23
D.C. 3 6 20 19 48 15
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W D L GF GA Pts
Seattle 15 5 8 38 28 50
Real Salt Lake 14 6 10 53 39 48
Portland 11 13 5 45 31 46
Los Angeles 13 6 10 46 36 45
Colorado 12 9 9 37 31 45
Vancouver 11 8 10 42 38 41
San Jose 11 8 11 31 41 41
FC Dallas 10 10 9 40 42 40
Chivas USA 6 8 16 29 54 26
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie
Friday’s Game
Philadelphia at Sporting Kansas City, 7 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
D.C. United at Toronto FC, Noon
Real Salt Lake at Vancouver, 6 p.m.
Houston at New England, 6:30 p.m.
Montreal at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Los Angeles at Portland, 2:30 p.m.
Columbus at FC Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Seattle FC, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Chivas USA, 10 p.m.
Tennis
WTA
Toray Pan Pacific Open
Monday
At Ariake Colosseum, Tokyo
Purse: $2.37 million (Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
First Round
Ana Ivanovic (11), Serbia, def. Annika Beck,
Germany, 6-1, 6-1.
Misaki Doi, Japan, def. Varvara Lepchenko,
United States, 6-7 (3), 6-0, 7-5.
Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, def. Monica Puig,
Puerto Rico, 6-0, 6-4.
Casey Dellacqua, Australia, def. Kristina
Mladenovic, France, 7-5, 6-1.
Ayumi Morita, Japan, def. Laura Robson,
Britain, 7-6 (4), 6-3.
Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, def. Francesca
Schiavone, Italy, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Daniela Hantuchova,
Slovakia, 6-3, 6-3.
Simona Halep (13), Romania, def. Anastasia
Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, 3-6, 7-6 (5), 3-0,
retired.
Madison Keys, United States, def. Carla Suarez
Navarro (10), Spain, 5-7, 7-5, 6-2.
Peng Shuai, China, def. Risa Ozaki, Japan,
6-2, 6-1.
Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def. Hsieh
Su-wei, Taiwan, 6-2, 5-7, 6-0.
Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def. Elena Vesnina,
Russia, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-4.
Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, def. Anastasia
Rodionova, Australia, 6-2, 4-1, retired.
Second Round
Petra Kvitova (7), Czech Republic, def. Belinda
Bencic, Switzerland, 7-5, 6-4.
Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Roberta
Vinci (8), Italy, 7-5, 6-4.
Angelique Kerber (5), Germany, def. Maria-
Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, 6-0, 6-1.
Doubles
First Round
Julia Goerges, Germany, and Barbora
Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, def.
Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, and Marina
Erakovic, New Zealand, 3-6, 6-3, 10-8.
Sunday
Singles
First Round
Sloane Stephens (9), United States, def.
Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 6-3, 6-2.
Samantha Stosur (12), Australia, def. Alize
Cornet, France, 2-6, 6-4, 6-1.
Kirsten Flipkens (14), Belgium, def. Barbora
Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, 7-6 (4),
7-5.
Sorana Cirstea (15), Romania, def. Julia
Goerges, Germany, 6-4, 6-4.
Dominika Cibulkova (16), Slovakia, def. Urszula
Radwanska, Poland, 6-3, 6-3.
Belinda Bencic, Switzerland, def. Daria
Gavrilova, Russia, 6-2, 5-7, 7-5.
Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Polona
Hercog, Slovenia, 6-4, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (2).
Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, def. Klara
Zakopalova, Czech Republic, 7-6 (6), 1-6, 6-3.
Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, def. Paula
Ormaechea, Argentina, 6-1, 6-2.
Elina Svitolina, Ukraine, def. Kurumi Nara,
Japan, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3.
Venus Williams, United States, def. Mona
Barthel, Germany, 6-3, 6-1.
Doubles
First Round
Cara Black, Zimbabwe, and Sania Mirza, India,
def. Kristina Mladenovic, France, and Flavia
Pennetta, Italy, 2-6, 6-0, 10-7.
Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, and Anastasia
Rodionova, Australia, def. Mandy Minella,
Luxembourg, and Elena Vesnina, Russia, 6-3,
6-1.
ATP World Tour
Thailand Open
Monday
At Impact Arena, Bangkok, Thailand
Purse: $631,530 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Singles
First Round
Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Daniel
Gimeno-Traver, Spain, 6-2, 6-4.
Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, def. Jarkko
Nieminen (7), Finland, 6-3, 7-6 (2).
Feliciano Lopez (6), Spain, def. Laslo Djere,
Serbia, 6-3, 6-3.
ATP World Tour
Malaysian Open
Monday
At Putra Stadium, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Purse: $984,300 (WT250)
Surface: Hard-Indoor
Singles
First Round
Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Daniel Brands,
Germany, 6-3, 6-4.
Federico Delbonis, Argentina, def. Chung
Hyeon, South Korea, 6-4, 6-2.
Doubles
First Round
Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, and Horacio Zeballos,
Argentina, def. Pablo Carreno Busta, Spain,
and Mohd Assri Merzuki, Malaysia, 6-4, 7-6 (6).
Transactions
Monday’s Moves
BASEBALL
American League
TAMPA BAY RAYS—Designated RHP J.D.
Martin for assignment. Reinstated RHP Jesse
Crain from the 60-day DL.
National League
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Placed RHP
Kyle Kendrick on the 15-day DL, retroactive
to Sept. 14.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Signed C
Dewayne Dedmon and G Cameron Jones.
MIAMI HEAT—Signed G Larry Drew II.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONA CARDINALS—Placed LBs Sam
Acho and Lorenzo Alexander on injured
reserve. Signed LB Dontay Moch from the
practice squad.
BUFFALO BILLS—Placed DE Alex Carrington
on injured reserve.
GREEN BAY PACKERS—Released WR Jer-
emy Ross.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS_Signed G
Jacques McClendon. Waived WR Jeremy
Ebert.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS_Placed FB Zach Line
on injured reserve.
Fields
Continued from Page 1B
“We had a very diffcult stretch to start
the season,” McGregory said. “The main
thing is we didn’t want the kids to get down.
We told them to keep working hard and to
get better each week and the wins would
come. I was really proud of the kids for f-
nally getting that win because it is a major
relief. They have kept working hard and be-
lieving. It was a great night for Holden, the
offensive line, and the entire offensive unit.”
Since he plays football, basketball, and
baseball at South Lamar High, Fields under-
stands the ups and downs of being an ath-
lete. He learned how to how become a better
players from his older brother, Hunter. The
two played together at South Lamar last sea-
son before Hunter graduated in May.
“I went out for football my seventh-grade
year because of how my brother liked it,”
Fields said. “He always played and he always
told me how much he liked it. He has always
been a big infuence for me and has pushed
me when I need it most. My brother and my
grandfather (Harry) have been the biggest
infuences on my football career.”
There is still plenty of football left for
Fields and the Stallions in the Alabama High
School Activities Association’s Class 1A, Re-
gion 5 race. The Stallions look to make the
frst victory a starting point, instead of an
ending one.
South Lamar will play Friday at Central of
Coosa County.
“We felt like we could win some games
this year,” Fields said. “Getting the frst one
won’t do anything but help our confdence.
We are always excited to play every Friday
night. Now that we have a win, we are even
more excited to keep it going.”
Follow Scott Walters on Twitter
@dispatchscott.
Prep Player of the Week
Every Tuesday, The Dispatch will recog-
nize a standout prep performer.
If you would like to nominate a prep player
of the week, call us at 662-327-1297 or e-mail
us at sports@cdispatch.com, aminichino@
cdispatch.com, or swalters@cdispatch.com
before 5 p.m. Saturday.
By JENNA FRyER
The Associated Press
CHARLOTTE, N.C. —
These are strange times
in NASCAR, where every-
thing has turned upside
down in the blink of an
eye.
Michael Waltrip Rac-
ing is fghting for its
survival in the wake of a
race-fxing scandal and a
driver who woke up two
Mondays ago in the Chase
for the Sprint Cup champi-
onship is now looking for
a job. Sponsors are taking
a stand, too — against a
team over ethics, maybe
even against NASCAR
for the perception that
all teams are not treated
equally.
A single-car team
based in Colorado sudden-
ly has the most desired
seat in the garage, and
when the music stops, a
pair of respected veterans
and the Nationwide Series
championship leader may
be left standing without
rides because the youth
movement has clearly tak-
en over.
Maybe everything
went haywire when Tony
Stewart broke his leg Aug.
5. That’s when co-owner
Gene Haas went rogue,
seizing the opportunity
while Stewart was inca-
pacitated to fnalize a deal
to hire the seemingly un-
touchable Kurt Busch.
Nothing else has made
much sense since then.
Busch, whose talent
had taken tiny Furniture
Row Motorsports to the
verge of a Chase berth,
was suddenly headed
back to a dream job. With
Stewart sidelined for the
rest of the season, defend-
ing Sprint Cup champion
Brad Keselowski stuck
in a slump and perpetual
contender Denny Ham-
lin out of Chase conten-
tion, the feld was open
to roughly 10 drivers sud-
denly vying for a golden
ticket into NASCAR’s ver-
sion of the playoffs.
As Furniture Row
walked the fne line of
courting a new driver —
the team few Juan Pablo
Montoya to Colorado for
a shop tour — while mak-
ing last-minute prepara-
tions for Busch’s Chase
push, Michael Waltrip
Racing was readying its
feet for the homestretch.
MWR had a legitimate
title contender in Clint
Bowyer, ranked second
or third in the standings
for 10 consecutive weeks,
and Martin Truex Jr. was
on the Chase bubble.
So everything seemed
somewhat normal head-
ed into Richmond, where
the Sept. 7 race would end
with the top 12 drivers
advancing into the Chase
and Montoya probably
taking the Furniture Row
job.
Then came the late-
race shenanigans by
MWR to get Truex the
fnal Chase berth. That’s
when things really spun
out of control.
NASCAR came down
hard with sanctions, in-
cluding Truex’s removal
from the Chase feld in
favor of Stewart teammate
Ryan Newman.
Longtime Waltrip spon-
sor NAPA Auto Parts, cit-
ing its belief in “fair play,”
then said it would pull its
multimillion-dollar spon-
sorship from MWR at
the end of the year. The
NAPA decision could
force MWR to lay off up to
100 employees and fold its
No. 56 car.
So Truex went from
driving his guts out in an
effort to make the Chase
to an unwitting partici-
pant in a team scandal to
being potentially out of
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com Tuesday, sepTember 24, 2013 3B
Auto Racing Baseball
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
x-Boston 95 62 .605 — — 6-4 W-1 53-28 42-34
Tampa Bay 87 69 .558 7½ — 7-3 W-4 51-30 36-39
New York 82 74 .526 12½ 4 4-6 L-1 46-32 36-42
Baltimore 81 75 .519 13½ 5 4-6 L-5 42-33 39-42
Toronto 71 85 .455 23½ 15 4-6 L-2 38-40 33-45
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Detroit 91 66 .580 — — 6-4 L-2 51-30 40-36
Cleveland 86 70 .551 4½ — 8-2 W-4 49-30 37-40
Kansas City 83 73 .532 7½ 3 6-4 W-2 44-37 39-36
Minnesota 66 90 .423 24½ 20 3-7 W-1 32-43 34-47
Chicago 62 94 .397 28½ 24 4-6 W-2 36-41 26-53
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
x-Oakland 94 63 .599 — — 8-2 W-5 52-29 42-34
Texas 85 71 .545 8½ 1 4-6 W-1 40-35 45-36
Los Angeles 76 80 .487 17½ 10 6-4 L-2 37-42 39-38
Seattle 68 89 .433 26 18½ 3-7 L-1 33-43 35-46
Houston 51 106 .325 43 35½ 0-10 L-10 24-54 27-52
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
x-Atlanta 92 64 .590 — — 4-6 L-1 52-23 40-41
Washington 84 73 .535 8½ 6 6-4 L-1 47-34 37-39
New York 71 85 .455 21 18½ 6-4 L-1 32-45 39-40
Philadelphia 71 85 .455 21 18½ 3-7 L-5 43-38 28-47
Miami 58 99 .369 34½ 32 3-7 W-1 32-44 26-55
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
z-St. Louis 92 65 .586 — — 6-4 W-1 49-27 43-38
z-Cincinnati 90 67 .573 2 — 7-3 W-2 49-26 41-41
z-Pittsburgh 90 67 .573 2 — 5-5 W-1 50-31 40-36
Milwaukee 70 86 .449 21½ 19½ 6-4 W-2 37-44 33-42
Chicago 65 92 .414 27 25 2-8 L-2 30-49 35-43
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
x-Los Angeles 90 66 .577 — — 4-6 W-2 46-32 44-34
Arizona 79 77 .506 11 10½ 6-4 L-1 44-34 35-43
San Diego 73 83 .468 17 16½ 6-4 W-1 43-35 30-48
San Francisco 72 84 .462 18 17½ 6-4 W-1 38-38 34-46
Colorado 71 86 .452 19½ 19 4-6 L-2 44-35 27-51
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Monday’s Games
Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 4
Texas 12, Houston 0
Minnesota 4, Detroit 3, 11 innings
Chicago White Sox 3, Toronto 2
Oakland 10, L.A. Angels 5
Kansas City 6, Seattle 5, 12 innings
Today’s Games
Chicago White Sox (H.Santiago 4-9) at
Cleveland (U.Jimenez 12-9), 6:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (M.Moore 15-4) at N.Y.
Yankees (Kuroda 11-12), 6:05 p.m.
Toronto (Redmond 4-2) at Baltimore
(Tillman 16-7), 6:05 p.m.
Houston (Peacock 5-5) at Texas (Darvish
13-9), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Fister 13-9) at Minnesota
(Diamond 6-11), 7:10 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 10-12) at Colorado
(Chatwood 7-5), 7:40 p.m.
Oakland (Griffin 14-9) at L.A. Angels
(Vargas 8-7), 9:05 p.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 8-3) at Seattle
(Paxton 2-0), 9:10 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Oakland (Straily 10-7) at L.A. Angels
(Weaver 10-8), 2:35 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 4-10) at
Cleveland (Salazar 1-3), 6:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Price 8-8) at N.Y. Yankees
(Undecided), 6:05 p.m.
Toronto (Rogers 5-8) at Baltimore
(B.Norris 10-12), 6:05 p.m.
Houston (Keuchel 6-9) at Texas
(M.Perez 9-5), 7:05 p.m.
Detroit (Scherzer 20-3) at Minnesota
(Correia 9-12), 7:10 p.m.
Boston (Peavy 11-5) at Colorado (Oswalt
0-6), 7:40 p.m.
Kansas City (E.Santana 9-9) at Seattle
(Iwakuma 13-6), 9:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Monday’s Games
Milwaukee 5, Atlanta 0
Cincinnati 3, N.Y. Mets 2, 10 innings
Miami 4, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 2, Chicago Cubs 1
St. Louis 4, Washington 3
San Diego 4, Arizona 1
Today’s Games
Milwaukee (Thornburg 3-1) at Atlanta
(F.Garcia 1-2), 6:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Niese 7-8) at Cincinnati
(Leake 14-6), 6:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Miner 0-1) at Miami
(H.Alvarez 4-5), 6:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Cole 9-7) at Chicago Cubs
(Rusin 2-5), 7:05 p.m.
Washington (G.Gonzalez 11-7) at St.
Louis (Wacha 3-1), 7:15 p.m.
Boston (Lackey 10-12) at Colorado
(Chatwood 7-5), 7:40 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 10-10) at San Diego
(T.Ross 3-8), 9:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 13-7) at San
Francisco (M.Cain 8-9), 9:15 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
N.Y. Mets (Matsuzaka 2-3) at Cincinnati
(G.Reynolds 1-2), 11:35 a.m.
Washington (Zimmermann 19-8) at St.
Louis (S.Miller 14-9), 12:45 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Liriano 16-7) at Chicago
Cubs (Arrieta 3-2), 1:20 p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 10-10) at Atlanta
(Maholm 10-10), 6:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 8-14) at Miami
(B.Hand 1-1), 6:10 p.m.
Boston (Peavy 11-5) at Colorado (Oswalt
0-6), 7:40 p.m.
Arizona (Delgado 5-6) at San Diego
(Kennedy 6-10), 9:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Nolasco 13-10) at San
Francisco (Bumgarner 13-9), 9:15 p.m.
By ANDREW SELIGMAN
The Associated Press
CHICAGO — The long
wait is over, Pittsburgh.
Your Pirates are fnally
headed back to the postsea-
son.
After a 21-year absence,
the Pirates clinched at least
a National League wild
card Monday night when
they beat the Chicago Cubs
2-1 and the Washington Na-
tionals lost to St. Louis.
Now, they can turn their
attention toward bigger
goals, the kind that seemed
like nothing more than a
pipe dream through all
those losing seasons.
“Even though I didn’t
lose for the last 20 years,
they make you feel like you
are. You feel like you lost
those 20 years,” Andrew
McCutchen said. “That’s
all you hear. You hear it ev-
ery single day — ‘When’s
it going to change? You
think this is the year?’ You
get sick and tired of hear-
ing that. It’s awesome that
there won’t be any ques-
tions anymore. The ques-
tion is, ‘Are we going to be
able to go farther?’”
It will be Pittsburgh’s
frst trip to the postseason
since Barry Bonds, Jim
Leyland and Co. won three
straight NL East titles from
1990-92. Bonds then left
for San Francisco as a free
agent, and the small-budget
Pirates piled up 20 consec-
utive losing records — the
longest streak in the four
major professional sports.
Starling Marte hit a
tiebreaking homer in the
ninth inning at Wrigley
Field, and the Pirates threw
out a runner at the plate for
the fnal out.
The Pirates sprayed
each other with bubbly
and beer and sparkling
cider in the visitors’ club-
house once St. Louis’ 4-3
win over the Nationals be-
came fnal.
The Cincinnati Reds
also clinched at least a wild-
card berth, when they beat
the New York Mets 3-2 in
10 innings. The Pirates and
Reds, both 90-67, trail St.
Louis by two games in the
NL Central with fve to go.
Pittsburgh players sang
Journey’s “Don’t Stop Be-
lieving.” They chanted
“MVP! MVP!” while dous-
ing McCutchen. They took
pictures and manager Clint
Hurdle had them gather for
a group photo in the mid-
dle of the cramped visitors’
clubhouse.
“The people of Pitts-
burgh have been waiting a
long time,” said Neil Walk-
er, who homered.
The Pirates snapped a
1-all tie when Marte sent a
drive off Kevin Gregg (2-6)
with two outs in the ninth
into the left feld bleachers.
In a ftting coincidence,
they then preserved the
victory on the fnal out in a
play at the plate.
McCutchen, the cen-
ter felder, picked up Ryan
Sweeney’s bloop single after
right felder Marlon Byrd
failed in trying to scoop up
the ball and threw to frst
baseman Justin Morneau,
positioned just in front of
the pitcher’s mound. Mor-
neau caught the throw on
one hop and made the relay
to catcher Russell Martin,
who applied the tag on Nate
Schierholtz trying to score
from frst base.
Still on his knees, Mar-
tin held the ball over his
head in jubilation. Then,
he was embraced by closer
Jason Grilli before heaving
the ball toward deep left
feld as the Pirates celebrat-
ed near the mound. Grilli
escaped with his 32nd save
in 34 chances.
“Twenty-one years since
we popped Champagne in
a Pirates clubhouse — and
we’re acting like it’s been
a long time,” Hurdle said.
“The hard work, the fun.
I’m just proud of each and
every man in here, the fans
they represent, ownership,
general manager, president
... the scouts, players. This
has been a group effort for
a long time.”
Pirates clinch frst
playoff spot in 21 years
NASCAR has been
turned upside down
in past two months
InsIde
n MORE AUTO RACING:
Sprint Cup, Nationwide
Points, Money Leaders.
Page 2B
See NASCAR, 6B
WoRld leAdeRs, PGA Money leAdeRs
Golf
WORLD GOLF RANKING
Through Sept. 22
1. Tiger Woods USA 13.22
2. Adam Scott Aus 9.25
3. Phil Mickelson USA 8.52
4. Henrik Stenson Swe 8.23
5. Justin Rose Eng 7.78
6. Rory McIlroy NIr 7.50
7. Steve Stricker USA 6.88
8. Matt Kuchar USA 6.64
9. Brandt Snedeker USA 6.27
10. Jason Dufner USA 6.08
11. Gr. McDowell NIr 5.52
12. Zach Johnson USA 5.52
13. Jim Furyk USA 5.21
14. Keegan Bradley USA 5.11
15. Luke Donald Eng 5.10
16. Jason Day Aus 4.91
17. Sergio Garcia Esp 4.65
18. Lee Westwood Eng 4.62
19. C. Schwartzel RSA 4.51
20. Ian Poulter Eng 4.47
21. Jordan Spieth USA 4.37
22. Ernie Els RSA 4.31
23. Dustin Johnson USA 4.26
24. Webb Simpson USA 4.18
25. Hunter Mahan USA 4.09
PGA TOUR MONEY LEADERS
Through Sept. 22
Player Trn Money
1. Tiger Woods 16 $8,553,439
2. Henrik Stenson 18 $6,388,230
3. Matt Kuchar 23 $5,616,808
4. Phil Mickelson 21 $5,495,793
5. Brandt Snedeker 23 $5,318,087
6. Adam Scott 16 $4,892,611
7. Steve Stricker 13 $4,440,532
8. Justin Rose 17 $4,146,148
9. Zach Johnson 24 $4,044,509
10. Jordan Spieth 23 $3,879,820
11. Keegan Bradley 25 $3,636,813
12. Jason Day 21 $3,625,030
13. Billy Horschel 26 $3,501,703
14. Bill Haas 25 $3,475,563
15. Jim Furyk 22 $3,204,779
16. Jason Dufner 22 $3,132,268
17. Kevin Streelman 25 $3,088,284
18. Hunter Mahan 25 $3,036,164
19. Dustin Johnson 22 $2,963,214
20. Webb Simpson 25 $2,957,582
21. Graham DeLaet 26 $2,834,900
22. Boo Weekley 27 $2,786,662
23. D.A. Points 28 $2,658,887
24. Nick Watney 26 $2,477,639
25. Charl Schwartzel 19 $2,256,723
By DOUG FERGUSON
The Associated Press
ATLANTA — Tiger Woods al-
ways has been measured against
Jack Nicklaus and his 18 majors,
and most recently Sam Snead and
his 82 PGA Tour victories.
Now he’s being measured
against himself.
And it’s not a fair fght.
The PGA Tour sent out its
awards ballot Monday to those
players eligible to vote. The win-
ners are to be announced Friday.
Woods should be a lock for play-
er of the year, provided he is mea-
sured against the other four names
on the ballot instead of the previous
seasons when he won the award.
He won fve times this year, and
the only tournament that could be
classifed as a medium-strength
feld was at Torrey Pines. Woods
won two World Golf Champion-
ships, at Doral and Firestone. He
won The Players Championship on
perhaps his least favorite course
on tour. And he won Bay Hill. The
world ranking points he earned
from those fve wins alone were
more than any player has earned
all year except for Henrik Stenson.
But he didn’t win a major, the
very standard by which Woods
measures a great season. And
there was nothing particularly
memorable about his wins, except
that two of them were on a Monday
and all of them were on courses
where he had won before. In fact,
Woods couldn’t even remember
where he won. It was a harmless
oversight, but no less amusing,
when Woods last week at East
Lake put himself down for winning
Memorial instead of Torrey Pines.
Nice problem to have.
Woods already has won the
award 10 times. His record this
year is worse than every season he
won the award except 2003. So this
has been a great season by any oth-
er comparison except with himself.
Three of the last four winners
did not win a major.
Luke Donald won in 2011 with
only two victories, one of them at
Woods competing against past as players deliver votes
Disney. He also won the money ti-
tle and the Vardon Trophy, and his
win at Disney was one of clutch per-
formances. Needing nothing short
of a win to be the frst player with
money titles on both sides of the At-
lantic in the same year, he birdied
the frst six holes on the back nine
and shot 64 to do just that.
Jim Furyk won in 2010 with
only three victories and one other
signifcant trophy — the FedEx
Cup. Phil Mickelson won the Mas-
ters that year, but the other majors
went to players who weren’t even
PGA Tour members at the time
(Graeme McDowell, Louis Oost-
huizen, Martin Kaymer).
Woods won in 2009 with seven
wins and a sweep of all the other
awards (Vardon, money title).
To be sure, Mickelson and
Adam Scott could have made a con-
vincing case by winning the Tour
Championship. That would have
given either of them three wins,
including a major and the FedEx
Cup (Mickelson would have need-
ed some help for the latter).
But they didn’t.
One of the more famous sayings
in golf is that the scorecard has
only a number, not pictures.
These are the numbers:
n Woods led the league with
fve wins. He won the money ti-
tle by over $2 million. He won the
Vardon Trophy for lowest adjusted
scoring average.
n Scott won the Masters and
The Barclays, which arguably has
the strongest feld in golf. He fn-
ished in the top 5 at two other ma-
jors.
n Mickelson won the British
Open and the Phoenix Open. He
was runner-up in the U.S. Open.
Stenson also is on the ballot
with two FedEx Cup playoff wins
and the trophy itself (along with
the $10 million bonus). He fnished
in the top 3 at two other majors.
Two great wins and zero majors
don’t cut it. Matt Kuchar is also
on the ballot, but only for balance.
He had his best year ever with two
wins. That will have to do.
Adding pictures to the score-
card is the only thing that could
change the vote.
Mickelson came within in a
dimple of 59 in the Phoenix Open.
He had the lead on the back nine
at Merion and was runner-up at the
U.S. Open for the sixth time. He
bounced back to win the British
Open — the major not even Mick-
elson thought he could win — with
what his peers consider one of the
greatest closing rounds in a ma-
jor. It left him one leg short of the
Grand Slam, though winning on a
links course already defnes him
as a complete player even without
a U.S. Open.
Scott became the frst Aussie in
a green jacket and he was leading
the British Open on the back nine
until making four straight bogeys.
He was poised for a run at the Tour
Championship until getting sick at
the wrong time.
Both are great stories. But did
they have better years?
Here are a few things to keep in
mind. This is a vote of the players,
and there’s no telling how they de-
fne the award. Best player or best
year? Do they have an agenda? Is it
a popularity contest? Still baffing
is Rickie Fowler winning rookie of
the year in 2010 over Rory McIlroy,
even though McIlroy won at Quail
Hollow, Fowler didn’t win at all and
neither reached the Tour Champi-
onship.
Is it a sentimental pick for Mick-
elson, the greatest to have never
won player of the year? Is there re-
sentment toward Woods for how he
handled the penalty given to him at
Conway Farms for his ball moving?
The tour won’t release results,
only a winner. And it won’t reveal
voter turnout. Most of these guys
only pay attention to their tee
times.
One fnal thought as it relates to
Woods: If his record this year be-
longed to any other player, would
this even be a debate?
Braves
Continued from Page 1B
Aramis Ramirez homered
off reliever Anthony Var-
varo.
Marco Estrada (7-4)
gave up two hits, walked
three and struck out six.
He threw a career-high
115 pitches, 76 for strikes.
The hits Estrada al-
lowed were a triple by An-
drelton Simmons in the
second and single by Jus-
tin Upton in the sixth.
In his last eight starts
since coming off the dis-
abled list with a strained
left hamstring, Estrada
is 3-0 with a 2.26 ERA, a
span of 51 2/3 innings.
Carlos Gomez gave Mil-
waukee a 1-0 lead in the
frst, hitting the frst pitch
he saw from Minor for his
22nd homer.
The Brewers went
up 3-0 in the ffth when
Norichika Aoki doubled
and scored on Jonathan
Lucroy’s 18th homer.
After Ramirez’s 12th
homer in the eighth, Mil-
waukee took a 5-0 lead
when Sean Halton dou-
bled off Varvaro, moved to
third on Yuniesky Betan-
court’s infeld single and
scored on shortstop Sim-
mons’ throwing error.
Minor has allowed at
least two homers in sev-
en starts this season and
is 0-3 with a 5.12 ERA in
those outings. He gave up
just three homers over an
11-start stretch from June
26-Aug. 25, but has been
taken deep seven times in
his last fve games.
Home plate umpire
Angel Hernandez ejected
Gonzalez with two outs in
the seventh. With a run-
ner at frst, Estrada hit
Paul Janish in the left leg
with a pitch, but Hernan-
dez ruled that Janish, who
leaned into the 89 mph
fastball, did not attempt to
get out of the way.
By BRETT MARTEL
The Associated Press
BATON ROUGE, La. — After
spending most of his young life cher-
ishing every moment in Georgia’s
Sanford Stadium, LSU quarterback
Zach Mettenberger can’t wait until
his next visit is done and over with.
“I’m looking forward to Sunday
morning tremendously,” said Met-
tenberger, who left the
Bulldogs in disgrace
in 2010. “There’s just
so much put into this
game that has noth-
ing with the game
that actually goes on
between the snap and
the whistle. The worst
part is my mom has to
deal with a lot of this stuff, too, and
that’s just unfair.”
The senior quarterback addressed
the sixth-ranked Tigers about his
Georgia homecoming before Mon-
day’s practice.
“I don’t want any outside media or
spotlight on myself or my relationship
with Georgia to take away from this
game and the experience for all the
other guys,” he said.
Although Mettenberger prefers
not to dwell on how intensely personal
this week’s matchup with No. 9 Geor-
gia is for him, it’s also hard to deny it.
It’s not every week a quarterback
faces the very program he revered as
a kid, and for which his mother would
be working this week if Georgia
coach Mark Richt hadn’t given her
some time off to escape the limelight.
“It’d be awkward for her to be
hanging around,” Richt said of Tam-
my Mettenberger, adding that he told
her to just try and enjoy a week off at
a time when she doesn’t normally get
one.
Even for Richt, it’s personal. He
watched Zach grow up in the football
operations building, where Tammy
Mettenberger has worked since her
son was 8 years old. He remembers a
young Zach visiting his mom at work,
often wearing Georgia red, being on
the feld on game days and meeting
his players. Richt later gave him a
scholarship, but then had to dismiss
him when the redshirt freshman
quarterback was embroiled in legal
trouble over his treatment of a wom-
an at a bar not long after 2010 spring
practice.
“We all really like Zach and want
the best for him, but just don’t want
him to win the game this weekend,”
Richt said.
Richt also said he did not intend to
bring up the Mettenberger storyline
with his players, but rather would talk
about him like any other opposing
quarterback.
“We’re not going to be worrying
about, ‘He’s Zach Mettenberger,’ so
much as he’s 6-foot-5, 230-whatev-
er-he-is, and can sling it,” Richt said.
In this young season, Mettenberg-
er is on pace to have one of the best
seasons ever by an LSU quarterback.
His 10 scoring passes and 1,026
yards passing are the most an LSU
QB has posted through four games.
Earlier this season, his fve scoring
passes against UAB set an LSU sin-
gle-game record. He ranks second in
the SEC in passing effciency, behind
only Georgia’s Aaron Murray, his for-
mer teammate.
When LSU last played Georgia in
the 2011 SEC title game, Mettenberg-
er was a third-string quarterback in
his frst year with the Tigers after
transferring from junior college. He
didn’t play a snap, but remembers a
number of Bulldogs fans expressing
their opinions about him in the Geor-
gia Dome that night.
“It was pretty bad two years ago
getting heckled and I didn’t even play
so I can imagine it’s just going to be
that much better this time around,”
Mettenberger said. “I’m expecting
the worst, but I’ve just got to go in
there with a level head and play foot-
ball.”
Mettenberger’s teammates say
their quarterback’s demeanor hasn’t
changed much this week, and they’re
not surprised.
“Zach is a guy that, when he’s fo-
cused, nothing can get him off track,”
said left guard Vadal Alexander, a
Georgia native himself. “He’s been
focused this whole season and I feel
like this week’s not going to be any
different.”
Les Miles has treated the story
line with humor, saying Richt must
have known LSU was counting Tam-
my Mettenberger for intelligence
about the Bulldogs.
Miles said playing “between the
hedges” at Georgia’s Sanford Sta-
dium is a special experience for any
SEC player, so he wasn’t about to
downplay how much it would mean to
a player who grew up so close to the
Bulldogs’ program, envisioning him-
self coming out of that tunnel wearing
red for most of his young life.
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 4B Tuesday, sepTember 24, 2013
Football: NFL
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
New England 3 0 0 1.000 59 34 2-0-0 1-0-0 2-0-0 1-0-0 2-0-0
Miami 3 0 0 1.000 74 53 1-0-0 2-0-0 2-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0
N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 55 50 2-0-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 1-0-0 1-1-0
Buffalo 1 2 0 .333 65 73 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-2-0 1-0-0 0-2-0
South
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
Houston 2 1 0 .667 70 82 1-0-0 1-1-0 2-1-0 0-0-0 1-0-0
Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 68 48 1-1-0 1-0-0 1-1-0 1-0-0 0-0-0
Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 60 56 1-0-0 1-1-0 2-1-0 0-0-0 0-1-0
Jacksonville 0 3 0 .000 28 92 0-1-0 0-2-0 0-2-0 0-1-0 0-0-0
North
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 75 64 2-0-0 0-1-0 1-0-0 1-1-0 1-0-0
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 71 64 2-0-0 0-1-0 2-1-0 0-0-0 1-0-0
Cleveland 1 2 0 .333 47 64 0-1-0 1-1-0 0-2-0 1-0-0 0-1-0
Pittsburgh 0 3 0 .000 42 76 0-2-0 0-1-0 0-2-0 0-1-0 0-1-0
West
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away AFC NFC Div
Denver 3 0 0 1.000 127 71 2-0-0 1-0-0 2-0-0 1-0-0 1-0-0
Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 71 34 1-0-0 2-0-0 1-0-0 2-0-0 0-0-0
Oakland 1 2 0 .333 57 67 1-0-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 0-0-0 0-1-0
San Diego 1 2 0 .333 78 81 0-1-0 1-1-0 0-2-0 1-0-0 0-0-0
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
Dallas 2 1 0 .667 83 55 2-0-0 0-1-0 2-0-0 0-1-0 1-0-0
Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 79 86 0-2-0 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-2-0 1-0-0
N.Y. Giants 0 3 0 .000 54 115 0-1-0 0-2-0 0-2-0 0-1-0 0-1-0
Washington 0 3 0 .000 67 98 0-2-0 0-1-0 0-3-0 0-0-0 0-1-0
South
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
New Orleans 3 0 0 1.000 70 38 2-0-0 1-0-0 3-0-0 0-0-0 2-0-0
Carolina 1 2 0 .333 68 36 1-1-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-0
Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 71 74 1-0-0 0-2-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-1-0
Tampa Bay 0 3 0 .000 34 57 0-1-0 0-2-0 0-1-0 0-2-0 0-1-0
North
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
Chicago 3 0 0 1.000 95 74 2-0-0 1-0-0 1-0-0 2-0-0 1-0-0
Detroit 2 1 0 .667 82 69 1-0-0 1-1-0 2-1-0 0-0-0 1-0-0
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 96 88 1-0-0 0-2-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-0-0
Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 81 96 0-1-0 0-2-0 0-2-0 0-1-0 0-2-0
West
W L T Pct PF PA Home Away NFC AFC Div
Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 86 27 2-0-0 1-0-0 2-0-0 1-0-0 1-0-0
St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 58 86 1-0-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 0-0-0 1-0-0
San Francisco 1 2 0 .333 44 84 1-1-0 0-1-0 1-1-0 0-1-0 0-1-0
Arizona 1 2 0 .333 56 79 1-0-0 0-2-0 1-2-0 0-0-0 0-1-0
Thursday, Sept. 19
Kansas City 26, Philadelphia 16
Sunday, Sept. 22
Tennessee 20, San Diego 17
New Orleans 31, Arizona 7
Dallas 31, St. Louis 7
Cleveland 31, Minnesota 27
Baltimore 30, Houston 9
Carolina 38, N.Y. Giants 0
Detroit 27, Washington 20
New England 23, Tampa Bay 3
Cincinnati 34, Green Bay 30
Miami 27, Atlanta 23
Indianapolis 27, San Francisco 7
Seattle 45, Jacksonville 17
N.Y. Jets 27, Buffalo 20
Chicago 40, Pittsburgh 23
Monday’s Game
Denver 37, Oakland 21
Thursday’s Game
San Francisco at St. Louis, 7:25 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
N.Y. Giants at Kansas City, Noon
Seattle at Houston, Noon
Baltimore at Buffalo, Noon
Arizona at Tampa Bay, Noon
Indianapolis at Jacksonville, Noon
Cincinnati at Cleveland, Noon
Chicago at Detroit, Noon
Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, Noon
N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 3:05 p.m.
Washington at Oakland, 3:25 p.m.
Dallas at San Diego, 3:25 p.m.
Philadelphia at Denver, 3:25 p.m.
New England at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Open: Carolina, Green Bay
Monday, Sept. 30
Miami at New Orleans, 7:40 p.m.
Broncos 37, Raiders 21
Oakland 0 7 7 7 — 21
Denver 10 17 3 7 — 37
First Quarter
Den—Decker 2 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
10:28.
Den—FG Prater 53, :47.
Second Quarter
Den—Welker 12 pass from Manning (Prater kick), 7:27.
Oak—D.Moore 73 pass from Pryor (Janikowski kick),
5:57.
Den—J.Thomas 13 pass from Manning (Prater kick),
3:40.
Den—FG Prater 41, :19.
Third Quarter
Den—FG Prater 40, 8:41.
Oak—Reece 16 pass from McFadden (Janikowski
kick), :17.
Fourth Quarter
Den—Hillman 1 run (Prater kick), 11:27.
Oak—McFadden 1 run (Janikowski kick), 1:15.
A—76,978.
Oak Den
First downs 13 31
Total Net Yards 342 536
Rushes-yards 17-49 35-164
Passing 293 372
Punt Returns 0-0 3-34
Kickoff Returns 2-45 1-8
Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0
Comp-Att-Int 21-31-0 32-37-0
Sacked-Yards Lost 3-23 1-2
Punts 6-52.5 1-37.0
Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-2
Penalties-Yards 8-77 5-40
Time of Possession 24:36 35:24
INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS
RUSHING—Oakland, Pryor 4-36, McFadden 12-9,
Ford 1-4. Denver, Hillman 9-66, Ball 11-61, Moreno
12-39, Manning 3-(minus 2).
PASSING—Oakland, Pryor 19-28-0-281, Flynn 1-2-
0-19, McFadden 1-1-0-16. Denver, Manning 32-37-
0-374.
RECEIVING—Oakland, D.Moore 6-124, Reece 4-45,
Butler 3-54, Streater 3-42, Rivera 2-21, Jennings 2-15,
Ford 1-15. Denver, D.Thomas 10-94, Decker 8-133,
Welker 7-84, J.Thomas 3-37, Hillman 1-12, Moreno
1-6, Tamme 1-5, Green 1-3.
Manning, Denver beat
Oakland to go to 3-0
By EDDIE PELLS
The Associated Press
DENVER — Peyton
Manning slapped his hands
together fve, six, seven
times and barked out the
signals. A few seconds later,
Wes Welker was all alone,
cradling the quarterback’s
latest touchdown pass.
All part of another im-
peccably crafted victory for
Manning and the Denver
Broncos, who rolled over
the Oakland Raiders 37-21
Monday night. Denver’s
127 points lead the league
and are 31 more than sec-
ond-place Green Bay.
It was Denver’s 14th
straight regular-season
win, tying the franchise re-
cord set in 1998 when the
Broncos won their second
Super Bowl.
Manning went 32 for 37
for 374 yards and put his
name in the record books
a few more times while out-
witting the Raiders (1-2).
“You see fashes of good
things,” Manning said.
“When we’re executing and
not making mistakes, we
can go the distance. We can
go 80 yards, take advantage
of a short feld.”
Manning’s 12 touch-
down passes are one more
than Tom Brady’s old record
for the frst three games, set
in 2011. Manning still has
yet to throw an interception,
which matches a record
held by Michael Vick, who
also threw 12 touchdowns
before his frst pick in 2010.
“We get to play with one
of the greatest quarterbacks
and football players to ever
play the game,” said tight
end Julius Thomas, who
caught one of the touch-
downs. “He’s great. There’s
no other way to cut it up or
slice it.”
As much as the numbers,
it was Manning’s decipher-
ing of the Oakland defense
that made jaws drop.
His frst touchdown, a
2-yard pass to Eric Decker
(eight catches, 133 yards),
came after a subtle play-ac-
tion fake that froze the de-
fense and left Decker un-
covered in the back of the
end zone.
By ROB HARRIS
The Associated Press
LONDON — The fa-
mous arch rising above
Wembley Stadium is be-
coming an increasingly fa-
miliar sight for NFL fans.
The London venue has
become the trusted vehicle
for the league’s annual ef-
forts to drum up more over-
seas interest. Heading into
the frst of two regular-sea-
son games at Wembley this
year, it’s clear that stadium
offcials want to see a lot
more of the NFL as well.
With the league expand-
ing its annual international
series from one game to
two this year, the usual
questions arise whether
one day the league will ex-
pand to London. And while
the league says any such
decision is several years
away, Wembley offcials say
they’ll be ready if the day
comes.
Squeezing in a full slate
of home games on Sundays
shouldn’t interfere with the
stadium’s commitments
to host England’s national
team soccer fxtures and
other events, Wembley’s
managing director Roger
Maslin said Monday.
“Absolutely we can,”
Maslin said in an execu-
tive box overlooking the
Wembley pitch. “I am ab-
solutely confdent if (NFL
Commissioner) Roger
Goodell wanted to have a
franchise here we could
absolutely deliver on it.”
Known for being En-
gland’s national football
stadium — the other foot-
ball, played with a round
ball — Wembley started
staging regular-season
NFL games in 2007. On
Sunday, the Minnesota Vi-
kings play the Pittsburgh
Steelers, before the Jack-
sonville Jaguars face the
San Francisco 49ers on
Oct. 27.
It is the frst of four
games over four seasons
in London for the Jaguars,
raising the prospect of the
Florida team one day up-
rooting to London, where
owner Shad Khan bought
Premier League club Ful-
ham in July.
The two 2013 games
sold out within hours,
which Maslin said is a sign
of the rising popularity of
the NFL in Britain. Sun-
day’s game matches a pair
of 0-3 clubs.
The “core fan base” in
the U.K. is now more than
2 million, according to
Chris Parsons, the NFL’s
senior vice president of in-
ternational.
That’s more than dou-
ble the fgure when the
league frst brought reg-
ular-season games to
Wembley in 2007, but still
not high enough for a fran-
chise here to be sustain-
able.
“We’ve doubled our fan
base in the last 3 1-2 to four
years,” Parsons said. “I’d
like to see that at least dou-
ble again in the next three
or four years. That would
put us among the top fve
sports in the U.K. in terms
of core fan base.”
Wembley keen on team,
Super Bowl in London
Offenses contributing to high sacks totals in frst three weeks
By BARRy WILNER
The Associated Press
Eli Manning went down seven
times, EJ Manuel one more than
that Sunday. NFL teams are on a
near-record sacks pace, and it’s
not solely because of what defens-
es are doing. These spread-out of-
fenses are making quarterbacks
more vulnerable than ever.
After Oakland and Denver
combined for four sacks Monday
night, Week 3 wound up with 101,
one off the record set in 1986’s
11th week. The New York Jets
led the way with eight on Buffalo
rookie Manuel.
“You get what’s coming to you
when you play the Jets. If you dig
a hole, that’s their game,” Bills
center Eric Wood said.
The Carolina Panthers got
those seven on the Giants’ Man-
ning, including fve in the frst
quarter. FIVE!
“I think the big thing is you
have to see how many passes
are being thrown, more than
anything else,” Panthers coach
Ron Rivera said. “It’s funny, but
when people are throwing the
ball more you are creating more
opportunities (for sacks).”
Greg Hardy beat left tackle
Will Beatty for three sacks.
“I’ve got one simple job — pro-
tect the guy with the ball. That’s
my job,” Beatty said. “Do your
job, good things are going to hap-
pen. I let it get way out of hand by
having him go down.”
The sack parade began last
Thursday night when Kansas
City and Philadelphia combined
for 11, including 3½ by Chiefs
linebacker Justin Houston, who
leads the league with 6½. Hous-
ton is on pace for more than 30,
which would obliterate Michael
Strahan’s record of 22½.
So what gives, other than of-
fensive lines that can’t protect
passers?
In part, blame the current
trend of more wide-open attacks,
particularly when offenses spread
out personnel and place the onus
on fve linemen to handle whatev-
er number of rushers. By getting
more skill players out in space on
pass plays, there’s also more bur-
den on quarterbacks to get rid of
the ball quickly.
They can’t always do that with
blitzing linebackers or safeties
joining the rush coming from
the guys up front. So you get 259
sacks through three weeks, the
most for that period in league his-
tory, beating a mark set in 1985.
“You want to do everything
you can, obviously, to eliminate
that and minimize those sacks,”
said Browns frst-year coach Rob
Chudzinski, who made his mark
as an offensive coordinator. “But
everybody’s trying to get the
chunk plays which you need to
score. It’s hard methodically to
drive the ball down the feld; you
have to get that big play.
“So with it comes some of
the things you don’t necessarily
want.”
Cleveland had plenty of things
it wanted against Minnesota, in-
cluding six sacks. Considering
that the Browns were able to min-
imize Adrian Peterson’s impact
in the running game, the sacks
almost were a bonus.
Browns rookie linebacker
Barkevious Mingo, who got to
Christian Ponder once, was draft-
ed No. 6 overall to chase down
quarterbacks. Super Bowl MVP
Joe Flacco was introduced to
Mingo quickly — on his frst NFL
play, he sacked the Baltimore
quarterback.
Is the way NFL offenses strat-
egize suited for a guy like him?
“Defnitely,” Mingo said, fash-
ing a wide smile. “I think this
team is suited for pass defense.
Our defensive coordinator (Ray
Horton) likes to get after it and
cause pressure. We’ve got some
guys that can get after the quar-
terback, and when they try to run
we’ve got inside guys that are just
gobbling it up, and I think we’ve
got the pieces.”
The most sacks in one season
are 1,313 in 1984; sacks became
an offcial stat in 1982. The cur-
rent pace would bring more than
1,400 sacks.
Still, guys like Houston and
Hardy, Mingo and Mario Wil-
liams and J.J. Watt can dream
about smashing Strahan’s sin-
gle-season mark. And smashing
quarterbacks.
AP Sports Writers Tom
Withers and Steve Reed contributed
to this story.
College Football
SEC IN BrIEF
SEC honors MSU’s
Jackson; Time set for
game vs. LSU
nBIRMINGHAM, Ala.
—Shortly after Mississippi
State senior guard Gabe
Jackson was named the SEC
offensive lineman of the
week, the Bulldogs learned
their Oct. 5 home game with
LSU will kick off at 6 p.m. on
ESPN, ESPN2, or ESPNU. The
network carrying the contest
will be announced no later
than Sunday.
Jackson, a senior from
Liberty, was instrumental
in MSU manufacturing 551
yards of total offense and
fve rushing touchdowns. The
honor is the frst of Jackson’s
career, and he is the frst
Bulldog to earn the weekly
offensive line award from the
league since Tobias Smith on
Oct. 13, 2012.
The league also honored
LSU running back Jeremy Hill,
Florida defensive lineman
Dante Fowler, and Arkansas
longsnapper Alan D’Appollo-
nio are Southeastern Confer-
ence players of the week.
The SEC announced the
winners Monday.
Missouri defensive end
Kony Ealy was named defen-
sive lineman of the week.
Georgia wide receiver
Reggie Davis was named the
top freshman.
Other times for games
Oct. 5 are: 11:21 —
Georgia State at Alabama
(SEC TV), 2:30 p.m. —
Arkansas at Florida/Ole
Miss at Auburn/Georgia at
Tennessee (WCBI), 6 p.m.
— Arkansas at Florida/Ole
Miss at Auburn/Georgia at
Tennessee/LSU at Miss. St.
(ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU), 6:30
p.m. — Kentucky at South
Carolina (Fox Sports Net),
6:30 p.m. — Missouri at
Vanderbilt
Alabama’s Saban expects
Cooper, Belue to play
nTUSCALOOSA, Ala. —
Alabama expects to get most
of its injured players back for
the game against Ole Miss.
The top-ranked Crimson
Tide held several starters out
of a victory against Colorado
State while they were nursing
injuries.
Coach Nick Saban said
Monday all but backup safety
Nick Perry appear ready to
participate in preparations
for the 21st-ranked Rebels.
Perry has a shoulder injury.
Wide receiver Amari Coo-
per and Deion Belue sat out
the 31-6 win over Colorado
State with toe injuries. Guard
Anthony Steen missed the
game with a headache. Wide
receiver Kevin Norwood also
sat out with an unspecifed
injury.
Safety Jarrick Williams
had been having problems
after getting poked in the eye
against Texas A&M.
All that left freshman
Eddie Jackson and sopho-
more Bradley Sylve starting
at cornerback.
n In other news, the
Alabama coaches recog-
nized Christion Jones and
DeAndrew White as players
of the week on offense. Trey
DePriest and C.J. Mosley
represented the defense,
and Landon Collins, Kenyan
Drake, and Altee Tenpenny
were recognized on the spe-
cial teams list.
Mettenberger eager to get to Georgia game
Mettenberger
Harris, whose team
qualifed for the Class
AAA State tournament
last year in his frst
season as coach at the
school, was disappointed
the Lady Patriots couldn’t
extend their season. He
said the team struggled
through an assortment
of ups and downs all sea-
son. Those challenges
continued Monday in the
team’s second elimination
game against Washington
School. Trailing 3-1, pitch-
er Kaitlyn Oswalt tried
to stretch a double into a
triple and was thrown out
at third base. Harris said
Oswalt slid hard into the
base and re-aggravated
a back injury and had to
leave the game. He said
Shiloh Ellis came in to re-
place Oswalt in the circle
and did an admirable job,
but Washington School
slowly pulled away en
route to the run-rule vic-
tory.
“We were in the game
until KO goes out,” Harris
said. “After that psycho-
logically that is a tough
blow for you. Our kids
got down after that and it
was tough to get back up.
It just kind of snowballed
on us.”
Heritage Academy re-
bounded from its open-
ing run-rule loss against
Starkville Academy.
Trailing 4-0, the Lady
Patriots (10-16) erupted
for nine runs on four hits
in the second inning.
Even though Heritage
Academy had only eight
hits, getting runners on
base appeared to give the
squad life. Macy Walters
had two hits and three
RBIs, and Macy Nord-
quist had two hits and
four RBIs to give the team
hope it could string victo-
ries together to extend its
season.
“If some people start
hitting the ball it is like
our whole team jumps on
it and everyone catches it.
It is contagious,” Walters
said. “It also helps when
we play teams that are
our rivals like Starkville
Academy because we re-
ally want to beat them and
stay alive (in the tourna-
ment).”
Walters said Harris
told the players to forget
about the frst game. She
said not focusing on the
bad became a lot easier
when she and her team-
mates started to hit the
ball. Unfortunately, the
high-fves the Lady Patri-
ots generated from scor-
ing so many runs didn’t
materialize, even though
it showed the resilien-
cy Harris saw a lot more
from the team in 2012.
“It is such a mental
game,” Harris said. “You
would think he most tal-
ented team always wins, so
you have to stress to them
that they have to be focused
and ready. To be honest, it
has been a challenge to
keep them focused. It is not
something we have done a
great job of doing, as our
record shows.”
Harris acknowledged
that his team’s surprise
run to the state tourna-
ment last season con-
tributed to his disap-
pointment that the Lady
Patriots couldn’t earn
a return trip. Unable to
work the “magic” like it
did last season, Harris
said neither he nor the
players should be satis-
fed with double-digit vic-
tories in a season. He said
the program is not where
he thought it would be
after the second season
and that he has to fgure
out what he needs to do
to better prepare the play-
ers.
“We’re going to have
to make some changes
and make some sacri-
fces we haven’t made,”
Harris said. “I have to do
a better job selling this
program. We have got to
make it fun for the girls
to play. We have to start at
the younger levels like we
have been trying to do.”
Harris also said it is
imperative that more than
two players (Oswalt and
Brooklyn Waldrep) play
travel ball so they are
better players by the time
the 2014 fast-pitch season
begins.
“We have to get fast-
er,” Harris said. “We were
not able to put pressure
on teams like they did to
us. We have to fnd some
softball players. Softball
players are committed
to it and work hard year-
round. It is not just some-
thing you pick up for two
months out of the year.”
Class a North State tournament
n central Academy
qualifes for overall
state tournament: At
Carrollton, The Lady Vi-
kings went 2-1 Monday
to secure one of the four
spots from the North in
the Class A overall state
tournament Sept. 28 and
30 at Center City Park in
Pearl.
Central Academy, the
No. 1 seed from District 1,
edged host Carroll Acade-
my 8-6 in the frst game.
It lost to Tunica Academy
5-0 in its second game
and then defeated Deer
Creek Academy 8-2 in an
elimination game.
“Everybody chipped in
on the whole day,” Cen-
tral Academy coach Sam-
my Lindsey said. “They
played hard. It defnitely
was a team effort.”
Courtney Gaylord
pitched all three games
for the Lady Vikings.
Lindsey said Kayla
Brown hit well in the
frst game in which the
Lady Vikings rallied for
three runs in their fnal
at-bat. He said Savanah
Stapleton, Sadie Lindsey,
Sarah Norris, and Allie
Beth Rigdon were part of
the scattered hitting the
team had throughout the
day.
Central Academy will
play Benton Academy at
11:45 a.m. The four teams
will play for seeding next
week in the tournament
that also will include the
top four teams from the
South.
Follow Dispatch sports
editor Adam Minichino on
Twitter @ctsportseditor.
Ole Miss junior quarter-
back Bo Wallace said. “It is
good to have two full weeks
to prepare for Alabama
because they do so many
things well. This will be a
big challenge, but I like our
chances.”
Last season, Ole Miss
stayed with Alabama well
into the third quarter of
play. In the end, a kick re-
turn for touchdown and
three turnovers doomed
the Rebels in a 33-14
loss. Still, the confdence
gleaned from that loss and
a 30-27 loss at Texas A&M
the following week helped
Ole Miss reach the post-
season for the frst time in
three years.
“Physically they’re (Al-
abama) very, very good,”
Freeze said. “They’re not
going to make the mistake
that allows you to have
many explosive plays.
That’s been their staple of
their defense. They’re go-
ing to stay in the right po-
sition. Very rarely do you
see explosive plays. We’ve
got to fnd a way to create
those, or fnd a way to stay
in and convert on third and
shorts to stay on the feld.
“Do I think we’re better
prepared for this year? I
do. We have a better under-
standing of who we are and
what we want to do.”
Ole Miss (3-0, 1-0 South-
eastern Conference) al-
ready has won twice on the
road. It opened the season
with a SEC victory at Van-
derbilt and then delivered a
dominating performance in
a road win at Texas.
“We knew we had some
big challenges right off the
bat,” Wallace said. “I like
the confdence level of this
team. You can tell we are
no longer intimidated when
we go on the road and into
hostile situations.”
Freeze feels improved
play at quarterback will
give the Rebels a better
chance against the Crim-
son Tide. Against Texas,
Wallace was 17 of 25 for 177
yards and two touchdowns.
The Rebels committed only
one turnover and scored
the fnal 30 points of a 44-23
victory.
“Bo (Wallace) has tak-
en care of the ball better
(this season),” Freeze
said. “ If you look at that
last year, those three turn-
overs resulted in a touch-
down and two feld goals,
13 points or so. If you don’t
have those, maybe we’re in
it in the fourth quarter last
year. He’s proven this year
to this point that he’s been
more conscious about it,
and hopefully he will be
again.”
Ole Miss junior wide
receiver and former Noxu-
bee County standout Vince
Sanders is expected to be
back in the lineup after
suffering an injury against
Vanderbilt.
“Vince will play,” Freeze
said. “He went through
a full practice yesterday.
We’ll incorporate him in
just like we would anybody.
He’ll be ready to go. You’ll
see him, Laquon (Tread-
well), Ja-mes (Logan), and
Donte (Moncrief) out there
at the same time. We’ll just
rotate them and keep him
fresh. We love having him
back. It gives us another
threat for sure.”
The status of linebacker
Denzel Nkemdiche is ex-
pected to be determined
later in the week. Freeze
said the Rebels have played
with a lack of depth at line-
backer all season and he
expects that trend to con-
tinue.
Alabama (3-0, 1-0) is
coming off a 31-6 home
victory against Colorado
State on Saturday. Freeze
expects a much more fo-
cused Alabama team this
weekend, so Ole Miss will
need to limit mistakes if
it has a chance to earn its
fourth win, its third road
win, and its second win in
Tuscaloosa.
“It would mean we’re
defnitely ahead of sched-
ule in our program, to go
there and win or beat them
here,” Freeze said. “We
won’t talk about Ole Miss
winning just once there.
That really doesn’t mat-
ter to these kids. ... Our
coaches probably don’t
even know that. I know it
because I’ve followed this
program. I don’t think that
would motivate us one way
or another. What should
motivate us, and I think
will, is an opportunity to go
stand in front of the mea-
suring stick and prove that
you deserve to be there.
That’s what we’ll focus
on. If it does go our way, it
would be a huge boost to
our program and move us
a few steps forward quicker
than anybody thought, in-
cluding myself.”
Follow Scott Walters on
Twitter @dispatchscott.
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com Tuesday, sepTember 24, 2013 5B
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PASS
MPS
2x2
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2x2
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Ole Miss
Continued from Page 1B
Softball
Continued from Page 1B
Vivians
Continued from Page 1B
Vivians, a 6-foot guard/
forward, was named a frst-
team All-American by Max-
Preps after averaging 39.7
points and leading Scott
Central to its second Class
2A state title in three sea-
sons. Vivians also averaged
15.1 rebounds, four steals,
and one block last season,
and has been named frst-
team All-State in each of her
frst three seasons. She was
the nation’s second leading
scorer this season. Her scor-
ing average eclipsed the
37.6 points per game Mary
Kathryn Govero averaged
in 2006-07. Govero, who
played at Mt. Salus Christian
School in Clinton, went on to
play for four years at MSU.
She fnished her MSU ca-
reer with 1,173 points, which
is 12th in program history.
Vivian’s scoring prowess
is just one reason nearly all
of the top programs in the
nation sought her. After Viv-
ians narrowed her choices
to MSU, Florida, Louisville,
and Kentucky, Harrison
saw his standout player was
ready to end the recruiting
process. He said Vivians
expressed a desire to go to
MSU last fall but that he en-
couraged her and her family
to take their time with the
decision and to make sure
she was certain where she
wanted to go. He said he
called Victoria’s father, John,
as soon as she told him the
news and began calling
coaches and media outlets.
“I am proud because I
wanted this to be her deci-
sion,” said Harrison, a MSU
graduate. “I didn’t want her
to go to Mississippi State be-
cause of me and not have it
be the right ft for her.”
Harrison said Vivians’
ties with her family likely
played a key role in her de-
cision to stay in the state.
He said Vivians typically
has 50-60 family members
at all of her games, and she
usually has a huge following
everywhere she goes. He
credited her family for help-
ing her remain grounded
throughout the process and
Vivians for being a wonder-
ful young lady to coach.
“I think she truly believes
in the vision coach Schaefer
has for the program,” Har-
rison said. “Last summer
when she was at camp, he
brought her in and he and
Scott Stricklin said they
want her to be the face of
Mississippi State basketball
and lead the program into
the future. They said the
program did special things
with Tan White (Tupelo)
and LaToya Thomas (Green-
ville) and that the program
could do even more with
her. They told her that if she
made a commitment other
players in the region would
come. I think she is satis-
fed with the pieces in her
recruiting class and where
everything is heading and
that she believes she can
win there. I think she is sold
that (Schaefer) has a really
good vision and a good fol-
low through and that she
will be successful.”
Dan Olson, director
of Dan Olson’s Collegiate
Girls Basketball Report and
espnW HoopGurlz, has Viv-
ians rated the No. 24 player
in the Class of 2014. Bret Mc-
Cormick, of All-Star Girls
Report, another national re-
cruiting service, has Vivians
ranked No. 40 in the nation.
Both men believe Schaefer
and his staff secured a play-
er with a wealth of talent and
potential who could help
push MSU into the upper
echelon of the Southeastern
Conference.
“It is another big get for
Vic Schaefer because he
has another good athlete,”
Olson said. “I don’t want
to sit here and say she is a
program-changer, but she
can be. He is moving right
along into the mix of the
SEC and getting athletes
who can help Mississippi
State compete against the
other schools that are ath-
letic.”
Said McCormick, “Vic
and (assistant coach) Aqua
(Franklin) and the rest of
the coaching staff stuck a
feather in their caps because
they did good. She should
pay major dividends right
away.”
Vivians is part of a re-
cruiting class that includes
Starkville High School
guard Blair Schaefer, who
is Vic Schaefer’s daughter,
and Morgan William, a
point guard from Shades
Valley High in Birmingham,
Ala. William gave a verbal
commitment to MSU in July.
Olson had William ranked
278th in the Class of 2014
at the time of her commit-
ment. She has since moved
up to No. 139 in the country.
McCormick had William
ranked 254th in country at
the time of her verbal com-
mitment.
The three commitments
come on the heels of a 2013
signing class that includes
Dominique Dillingham, an
All-State player from Texas,
Chinwe Okorie, a center
from Stoneleigh-Burnham
(Mass.) School, Breanna
Richardson, an All-State
player from Georgia, Kiki
Patterson, an All-State play-
er from Columbus High
School, Ketara Chapel, an
All-State player from Tex-
as, and Savannah Carter,
a transfer from Trinity Val-
ley Community College.
New Albany High standout
Jazmine Spears also signed
with MSU but didn’t qualify
academically and is at Trini-
ty Valley C.C.
Olson ranked the class of
seven players No. 35 in his
national rankings. Richard-
son, who is No. 77 in Olson’s
individual rankings, is the
highest-rated player in the
class. Carter is the 27th-best
junior college player, accord-
ing to Olson.
College coaches can’t
comment on signings until
they receive a signed Na-
tional Letter of Intent. A ver-
bal commitment is non-bind-
ing. The frst day of the early
signing period is Nov. 13. It
runs to Nov. 20. Harrison
said he anticipates Vivians
signing a NLI in the early
signing period. He said the
family likely would hold a
signing ceremony at the
school.
DILBERT
ZITS
GARFIELD
CANDORVILLE
BABY BLUES
BEETLE BAILEY
DOONESBURY
MALLARD FILMORE
FOR SOLUTION SEE THE
CROSSWORD PUZZLE
IN CLASSIFIEDS
FAMILY CIRCUS
D
EAR ABBY:
I’m a
23-year-
old woman who
still lives at
home. I have
been working
for the last fve
years and have
saved enough
to live comfort-
ably on my own.
Unfortunately, my
parents have for-
bidden me to do
it because they
think I’m being
manipulated into
it by my boyfriend,
that I just want to “do whatever
I want” and be out until late
(although I’m rarely up past
9 p.m. and they know it), and
because I “can’t stand them”
anymore.
I have no privacy! My mail
is opened “mistakenly” and my
calls are listened in on even
when I politely — and some-
times angrily — ask them not
to. They have even imposed a
rule that I must show them my
bank balance weekly.
They have told me I will not
leave the house without being
married frst. I would like to
live on my own before I actually
marry so I can experience what
it’s like. This is something I
have always wanted to do.
If I do move out, they say I’ll
“bring shame and embarrass-
ment” to the family.
There seems to be a double
standard going on here be-
cause my older brother has his
girlfriend sleep over. How can I
accommodate my parents with-
out being disowned? — FEEL-
ING HELPLESS IN
ILLINOIS
DEAR FEEL-
ING HELPLESS:
Your parents
have chosen to
ignore that you
are an adult,
self-supporting
and entitled
to make your
own choices.
They may be
well-meaning, but
they are extreme-
ly heavy-handed.
Their hyper-vigi-
lance — opening
your mail, eaves-
dropping on your phone calls
and insisting on checking your
bank balance weekly — is over
the top. They would like you to
be “safely” married before you
leave their protection.
Is their problem that they
disapprove of your boyfriend?
If you get a place of your own,
do you plan on moving him in?
If that’s not the case, there
is no reason why your living
independently might shame or
embarrass them.
Not knowing your parents, I
can’t judge whether their threat
to disown you is serious or not.
However, if it is, realize it’s a
form of blackmail, and you will
have to decide which is more
important — your freedom or
their support.
DEAR ABBY: “Lights Out
in Federal Way, Wash.” (Aug.
13) asked if it was a “sign”
that her deceased parents
were watching over her when
streetlights would go out as
she drove under them on her
way home.
I understand your desire to
give encouragement to some-
one who has lost her loved
ones, but don’t you know that
many streetlights are light-acti-
vated so that after headlights
hit them in just the right way
they will turn off? After you
pass under them, it becomes
dark enough again and they
will turn back on within a few
minutes.
While I’m sure that given
the opportunity this girl’s
parents would watch over her,
the streetlights she described
have nothing to do with the
paranormal but have a scien-
tifc and logical explanation.
— SOMEONE’S WATCHING IN
GUILFORD, MO.
DEAR WATCHING: While
many readers shared similar
experiences, the majority had
a logical explanation as you
did. However, I still feel that if
what she’s experiencing brings
her comfort, the important
thing is what she chooses to
believe.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips, and was
founded by her mother, Pauline
Phillips. Write Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
For everything you need to
know about wedding planning,
order “How to Have a Lovely
Wedding.” Send your name and
mailing address, plus check
or money order for $7 (U.S.
funds) to: Dear Abby, Wedding
Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount
Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Ship-
ping and handling are included
in the price.)
The DispaTch • www.cdispatch.com 6B Tuesday, sepTember 24, 2013
Comics & Puzzles
Dear Abby
Dear Abby
TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Sept.
24). Your talents shine this
year, but do not rely on them.
It’s hard work and dedication
that will see you through the
fnish line of a big project.
Someone with opposing views
will make your work and life
richer in October. You’ll get to
experience something special
and exclusive in December.
Aries and Sagittarius people
adore you. Your lucky numbers
are: 5, 2, 33, 19 and 4.
ARIES (March 21-April
19). Beware of those who
associate with you primarily
because they think it makes
them look better. While this
is fattering, it’s so superfcial
that you can’t trust the con-
nection. It could change at any
moment.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20). You believe in every
person’s right to live well.
That’s why it makes you angry
when people waste the things
that would mean so much to
another person. You’ll proudly
take part of an effective redis-
tribution.
GEMINI (May 21-June
21). You believe that life is
full of beauty. But for some
reason, people talking about
that in overly simplistic and
sentimental ways makes you
feel inwardly rebellious. You
prefer to fnd beauty on your
own terms.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
Should you stick to your ritual
or veer from it? Every time you
repeat an action, it strength-
ens the neural pathways in
your brain that make the next
repetition easier. Will that be
better for you or worse?
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Just
because you can sense the lay-
ers inside yourself and spend
time in those depths doesn’t
mean others are able to do
this. Your gift for introspection
is a rare talent to celebrate.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
A person who enjoys you will
tend to overlook any less than
perfect things you do and even
make up reasons why your
faws and mistakes are actually
glorious.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
There are those who will try to
get away with anything and ev-
erything they can. It’s up to you
to uphold the ideal of justice
for all. Where justice is denied,
everyone suffers, not only the
oppressed.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
21). It’s as though the wind
wants to mess up your hair —
and not in a mean way, but in
an older sibling way that lets
you know that wherever you
are, someone is keeping you
in check.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-
Dec. 21). Anger is an emotion
that makes you seek your own
interest instead of seeking the
truth. That’s why it’s better not
to make any decisions or try to
express yourself in the heat of
an angry moment.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). So often the roles we cut
out for ourselves become like
traps. Real power is feeling
that you are free to be the role
or not and come or go as you
please.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). Your sign mate Abraham
Lincoln, the great humanitar-
ian and 16th president of the
United States, said, “When I
do good, I feel good; when I do
bad, I feel bad. And that is my
religion.”
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20). When receiving a compli-
ment on work that was done by
someone else, for instance for
a haircut or an item of clothing,
some take the credit. You’ll as-
sign it appropriately, and your
honesty attracts an admirer.
Horoscopes
NASCAR
Continued from Page 3B
work eight weeks from now.
Bowyer, one of the most pop-
ular drivers in the garage, is now
feeling the ire of fans for his role
in the Richmond scandal and his
promising season has fallen apart
after two mediocre races to start
the Chase, maybe because of all
the pressure. He’s 10th in the
standings, essentially out of title
contention, and sponsor 5-Hour
Energy said it will decide after
the season if it will continue its
relationship with MWR.
Then 5-Hour President Scott
Henderson took a peculiar
stance Sunday at New Hamp-
shire, where he seemed to ques-
tion NASCAR chairman Brian
France’s decision not to punish
Penske Racing the same way it
did MWR for trying to manip-
ulate the Richmond race to get
Joey Logano into the Chase,
and perhaps for expanding the
Chase feld to 13 drivers to ac-
commodate Jeff Gordon. Bow-
yer and Gordon had an issue late
last season that took Bowyer out
of title contention.
“There’s a lot of talk about in-
tegrity,” Henderson said. “When
the guy who’s in charge can say,
‘I can do whatever I want and
I’m going to do it and I just did,’
I wonder about integrity. I want
to make sure we can win in this
sport, OK?”
Should 5-Hour bail at the end
of the year, Bowyer will be in far
worse shape than Truex. At least
Truex has some time to look for
a job. In December, there won’t
be any jobs to be had.
And speaking of jobs, there’s
really only one seat open right
now — the Furniture Row vacan-
cy that Montoya turned down.
Sometime after Richmond,
Penske Racing picked up the
phone and lured Montoya back
to IndyCar. Maybe they wanted
the former Indianapolis 500 win-
ner to complement their open-
wheel organization, or maybe
the Penske folks wanted to clear
the path to Colorado for long-
time company man Sam Hor-
nish Jr.
Currently leading the Na-
tionwide championship race,
Hornish is at another cross-
roads in his career. Penske is
full at the Cup level with Kes-
elowski and Logano, and it ap-
pears the team wants Hornish’s
Nationwide seat for 19-year-old
Ryan Blaney, who grabbed his
frst career victory Saturday
night at Kentucky.

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