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Archives of Sexual Behavior, Vol. 29, No. 3, 2000
BOOK REVIEWS
Against My Better Judgment: An Intimate Memoir of an Eminent Gay Psy-
chologist. By Roger Brown. Haworth Press, Binghamton, New York, 1996,
253 pp., $36.00 (hardback), $22.00 (paperback).
Reviewed by Edward Stein, Ph.D.
1
Brown was an eminent psychologist known for his work on how children develop
language (e.g., Brown, 1958) and for his widely read textbook on social psychol-
ogy, with its noteworthy chapters discussing issues in sexual liberation (Brown,
1986). Browns teaching and work were foundational to the development of cog-
nitive science. Against My Better Judgment, written after Browns retirement from
Harvard University and published just a year before his death in 1997, is a very
different book from anything he had written before. There are no general theories
of human thought or nature offered here. Rather, the book contains a thoughtful and
moving autobiography focusing on Browns sex life and psychosexual wandering
after the death of his lover of some 40 years. After several months of mourning,
Brown, aged 65, began paying young men to have sex with him.
Against My Better Judgment is primarily the story of how Brown fell in
love with three such young men and how he developed romantic relationships
with them. Many gay men and some lesbians have written autobiographies. Some
of them are surely of interest to many lesbians, gay men, bisexual, and transgen-
dered people who are looking to read the stories of other sexual minorities, stories
that mainstream culture, in various ways, hides. A much smaller number of these
queer autobiographies are of interest to sex researchers. Surveys can tell us some-
thing about a persons sexual desires, but even lengthy questionnaires are going to
simplify and cubbyhole the complexities of individuals, their experiences, and
their characters. An autobiography allows a person to tell her own story. Although
a person is likely to be able to provide an accurate report of her life (she was
there for all of it, after all), she may not be the most reliable reporter of her sexual
motivations and the source of her sexual desires.
1
Departments of Philosophy and Law, Yale University, P.O. Box 208306, New Haven, Connecticut
06520-8306.
291
0004-0002/00/0600-0291$18.00/0
C
2000 Plenum Publishing Corporation
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Brown describes his feelings and desires for these young men and his anx-
ieties about paying for their attention. I was not always convinced that Brown
understood himself or the young men with whom he had sex. But I learned a lot
from reading his accounts of his experiences and emotions. There is much in these
pages that spoke to me as a gay man, even though I am about 40 years younger
than Brown would have been were he still alive and my sexual interests are signif-
icantly different from what his were. More importantly, there was much in these
pages that spoke to me as a theorist of human sexual desire. The sexual desires
and activities of people over 50 and of lesbians and gay men who survive their
long-term companions have not been the subject of much scientic or psycholog-
ical research. Although Brown was not attempting to conduct such research on
himself, as Against My Better Judgment suggests, though not directly, he provided
some indications about the ways that we might begin to think about these interest-
ing aspects of human sexuality. Along the way, it makes for fun, interesting, and
engaging reading.
REFERENCES
Brown, R. (1958). Words and Things, Free Press, New York.
Brown, R. (1986). Social Psychology: The Second Edition, Free Press, New York.
Fetish: Fashion, Sex & Power. By Valerie Steele. Oxford University Press, New
York, 1995, 243 pp., $35.00.
Reviewed by Albert Wong, M.D.
2
Steele is a cultural historian and this book is an analysis of the relation between
fetish clothing items and their sexual meanings both to the wearer and in the context
of the fetish subculture. Steeles focus is on the history of fetish fashions rather than
the nature of fetishes themselves, or on fetishism as a broader cultural discourse.
Well researched and documented, this book contains hundreds of references to the
psychological andhistorical literature as well as informationfrompornographyand
interviews with people involved in sadomasochism, cross-dressing, and fetishism.
In a clear and intelligent style, Steele presents ideas of interest to scholars of
history, anthropology, fashion, and psychology.
The book begins with a brief discussion of fetishism and reviews the salient
psychiatric, psychoanalytic, sociological, and anthropological perspectives. Steele
2
Centre for Addiction and Mental HealthClarke Division, 250 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5T
1R8, Canada.
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addresses some controversial topics such as why most paraphiliacs are men, the
essentialism/constructivism debate on the nature of sexuality, evolutionary the-
ories of sexuality, and the psychiatric debate on sexually normative behavior,
fetishism, and psychopathology. Steele draws from a wide range of theorists
including Freud, Foucault, Stoller, Kunzle, and Krafft-Ebbing. The analysis is
cursory at times but summarizing this area in one chapter necessitates a brief
overview.
Chapter 2, entitled Fashion and Fetishism, considers the emergence of
fetish clothing, mainstream fashion, and popular culture. Steele explains this as a
combination of several factors: the sexual liberation of the 1960s and 1970s, the
anarchistic punk movement, the undercurrent of sex and violence in subculture
styles, the inuence of fashion photographers and stylists such as Helmut Newton,
and the sex appeal of the commodity. She refutes the notion that our era is dif-
ferent in its overt sexuality, and convincingly argues that the asexual stereotype
of the Victorian age is inaccurate. The conicting feminist viewpoints on fashion
imagery as degrading and objectifying women versus a liberating reclamation of
sexually powerful roles are presented. The chapter ends with an insightful discus-
sion of Marxist and neo-Marxist theories on fetish objects as commodities and
fashion in general as capitalisms favorite child.
The rest of the book is divided into chapters that concentrate on specic types
of fetish clothing: The Corset, Shoes, Underwear and Second Skin, as well
as related topics such as body piercing and tattooing. These chapters are mostly
a descriptive chronology of fetish clothing in relation to mainstream fashions,
with some discussion of the symbolism of dominance, control, and submission in-
herent in the clothes. She uses examples of fetish tastes from pornography, cata-
logs of fetish clothing suppliers, literature, photography, and fashion and couture
shows. Twenty-four pages of well-chosen color photographs supplement these
chapters.
In the concluding chapter, Fashion, Fetish, Fantasy, Steele analyzes the
various archetypes that have been used in both fashion and fetish clothing: the
dominatrix, the uniform, the biker, leathermen, and the French maid. This book
is an excellent overview of the history of fetish clothing from the perspective of
fashion culture. Steele is often witty and entertaining, and she manages to integrate
a diverse set of discourses: the postmodern, the politicized, the psychiatric, the
popular, and the pornographic, into a thoughtful and balanced book. She remains
objective and nonjudgmental without being distant. Although parts of the book
are not directly relevant to sexologists, it provides a fascinating background to the
often mysterious world of fetish subculture and clothing.
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294 Book Reviews
Women and New Reproductive Technologies: Medical, Psychosocial, Legal,
and Ethical Dilemmas. Edited by Judith Rodin and Aila Collins. Lawrence
Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ, 1991, 171 pp., $36.00.
Reviewed by Norma L. McCoy, Ph.D.
3
This book is based on a conference sponsored by the John D. and Catherine T.
MacArthur FoundationNetworkonthe Determinants andConsequences of Health-
Promoting and Health-Damaging Behaviors. It consists of 10 chapters, 8 chapters
by different contributors and an introduction and concluding chapter by the editors.
In the Preface, the editors state that this volume focuses on reproductive technolo-
gies because it is an area in which the profound ethical, legal, social, and psycho-
logical issues surrounding the use of medical technology are easily discerned.
Chapter 2 (The History of the Relationship Between Womens Health and
Technology) by SchromDye focuses almost exclusively on the history of medical
practice in childbirth and the role that technology played during the 19th and early
20th century. Although caesareansectionandthe use of forceps were possible inthe
19th century, doctors had respect for the simple ways of nature and technological
interventions were relatively rare. After 1880, Schrom Dye argues that this view
broke down and was supplanted by one that supported considerable technological
intervention even though infection associated with its use remained the major cause
of maternal death until the 1930s.
Chapter 3 (Pregnancy-Inducing Technologies: Biological and Medical Im-
plications) by Thatcher and DeCherney consists mainly of a detailed description
of the technologies involved in in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF/ET).
Major topics in laymens terms are inducing ovulation, retrieval of eggs, fertiliza-
tion and growth of the fertilized egg in the laboratory, and transfer of the fertilized
egg to the uterus. The authors report statistics fromthe 1988 United States Registry
of IVF/ET, indicating that 16% of such attempts to impregnate were successful
and 12% of them resulted in live births.
Chapter 4 (Autonomy, Choice, and the NewReproductive Technologies: The
Role of Informed Consent in Prenatal Genetic Diagnosis), by Faden, begins with
a brief history of informed consent in American medicine and a discussion of its
meaning. This serves as the backdrop for the issue of consent in genetic diagnosis.
Currently, this technology is most commonly employed to diagnose disease in
fetuses and identify carrier status in adults. Genetic technology increasingly will
confront parents with tough decisions about the use of abortion in their pursuit
of perfect offspring. Other issues include whether mothers should be compelled
to undergo testing and whether maternal consent will be required when the fetal
condition tested for is treatable.
3
Department of Psychology, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco,
California 94132.
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In Chapter 5 (Ethical Issues Raised by the New Medical Technologies),
Whitbeck argues that applied ethics has been shaped by economic ideology that
sanctions treating everything as a resource and utilizes costbenet analysis,
restricting consideration to those consequences that can be quantied. Loss of
integrity is difcult to quantify and thus is not considered as a cost. Whitbeck dis-
cusses the effects of medical technologies on human relationships, on character
and moral integrity, and on families and communities in the context of HIV/AIDS,
IVF/ET, and contraception.
Chapter 6 (Womens Reproductive Rights: The Impact of Technology),
by Ruzek, is a well-referenced and excellent discussion of the social and ethical
issues surrounding current birth technologies, such as electronic fetal monitor-
ing, Caesarian section, episiotomy, out-of-hospital birth, and prenatal care. Ruzek
points out the lack of critical evaluation of adopted surgical technologies and
makes the case that even when sufcient evaluation exists, it does not necessarily
affect practice. The United States is dominated by fee-for-service medicine where
services are rationed on the basis of ability to pay. Ruzek concludes that [t]he
social and economic consequences of supporting unjustiable medical tinkering
and failing to provide a oor of equity for birth are . . . enormous and . . . must be
changed.
Chapter 7 (Women and Advances in Medical Technologies: The Legal Is-
sues), byClayton, deals withreproductive technologies. Twonewforces withlegal
ramications have emerged: procreation is increasingly viewed as a medical/health
issue in which physicians can intervene and there is the increasing tendency to view
the fetus as having interests separate from the pregnant woman. Clayton argues
that both have contributed to decreasing womens freedom of choice.
Chapter 8 (Psychological Issues in New Reproductive Technologies: Preg-
nancy-Inducing Technology and Diagnostic Screening), by Adler, Keyes, and
Robertson, focuses on the psychological effects of pregnancy-inducing technolo-
gies and prenatal diagnostic screening, particularly amniocentesis and chorionic
villus sampling. Relevant studies on psychological effects are reviewed but the au-
thors stress their limitations given that women with the most negative experiences
rarely cooperate in research.
Chapter 9 (Communicating About the New Reproductive Technologies:
Cultural, Interpersonal, and Linguistic Determinants of Understanding), by Rapp,
explores social and cultural aspects of prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.
This interesting contribution is based on two years of eldwork in New York City
observing and interviewing genetic counselors, observing a cytogenetics labora-
tory, and interviewing pregnant women and their families.
This volume contains a discussion of many thought-provoking issues sur-
rounding the use of reproductive technologies, but like most collections of con-
ference papers, the contributions are not integrated with each other in terms of
content to form a coherent whole, and the introduction and concluding chapter do
little if anything to remedy the problem. The format of chapters varies and two
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296 Book Reviews
of six contributions have no headings or subheadings. These failings are minor
and not unusual. What is not excusable is the failure even to name, much less
discuss, the major reason for the rise to power of these reproductive technologies!
The fruits of the feminist movementthe escape from early marriage and child-
bearing in the pursuit of a careerhave had their costs. As women age, fertility
declines. With increasing age, women have a greater chance of having experienced
a sexually transmitted disease or contracted another disease that impairs fertility.
Moreover, increased age of the mother is associated with an increase in genetic
aberrations in the fetus (e.g., Downs syndrome) as well as with increased difcul-
ties in childbirth. Clearly, late childbearing has contributed to the development of
reproductive technologies and the many medical, psychosocial, legal, and ethical
dilemmas they create. The failure to consider this issue is a major weakness of this
volume.
Counselling for Fertility Problems. By Jane Read. Sage, London, 1995, 204 pp.,
$39.95 (hardback), $17.95 (paperback).
Reviewed by Jules Black, M.D.
4
This is the ninth volume in the Sage Counselling in Practice Series. Read is an
accredited counselor based in London. Her book is aimed at those who counsel
the 1:6 couples who present to an infertility clinic with a perceived difculty in
achieving a successful pregnancy or those who have difculty deciding whether
or not to continue with a pregnancy, normal or otherwise.
Since the mid-1980s, the British health authorities have recognized the need
for providing this counseling facility for those undergoing fertility treatments. Suf-
cient time has passed for considerable experience to have been amassed in this
area. Four distinct types of counseling are dened: (1) information counseling,
(2) implications counseling, (3) support counseling, and (4) therapeutic counsel-
ing. No one is obliged to accept counseling, but it is generally recognized to be
benecial. Interestingly, contrary to popular beliefs, there is still no proven asso-
ciation between a couples psychodynamics and infertility. Much is anecdotal and
not supported by researchfor example, that adoption will lead to a subsequent
spontaneous conception. It is stressed that the counselor must know about the
various procedures involved in infertility treatment. It should not be overlooked
that abortion counseling also falls within the ambit of fertility problems and is
discussed at length.
There are some 14 text boxes throughout the book containing useful questions
from which the counselor can select to consider asking the client. The book is
4
2 Rae Street, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia.
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Book Reviews 297
clearly written in an easily absorbed style. Case examples are given throughout
covering a comprehensive range of situations. These include special cases such
as the appropriateness of treatment of women with HIV positive men or who
are HIV positive themselves, infertility and adoption, and genetic counseling.
Regarding genetic counseling, this includes management of selective abortion or
refers to micromanipulation through in vitro fertilization to guarantee genetically
intact offspring where defects occurred previously in the couple itself or in previous
offspring.
Four counseling modalities are explored, the fourth being developed by the
author. The rst uses the KublerRoss death and dying model. The second is
the Worden tasks of mourning model, also for grief counseling and grief therapy.
The thirdis Egans helpingmodel, followedbyReads InfertilityCounselingModel
(ICM). The ICM Model has ve phases: (1) diagnosis, (2) managing feelings,
(3) planning action, (4) having treatment, and (5) awaiting outcomes. At the end
of the chapter is a good comparative table of the four models. The ICM Model
is then applied to abortion counseling. Ample strategies are discussed to help the
therapist with the clients decision-making process.
The raison d etre for this review to appear in these pages is a good chapter
addressing the issues of fertility and sexual problems. A 1988 study is quoted
which found that sexual dysfunction was the primary cause of infertility in 5%
of the cases seen. The author also writes about her experiences with cases where
the converse pertained, i.e., where infertility problems led to sexual dysfunction.
After all, the infertility therapist often creates demands, more correctly, dictates
that the couple do it at a certain time, on certain dates, and a certain number
of times. This creates sometimes enormous performance problems for both, and
certainly is likely to remove any modicum of pleasure left in the sexual act for the
couple. At the end of the road, there can be a complex mix of issues which will
possibly need further attention and resolution postpartum. Finally, the author has
sections on couples counseling, gender issues, donation issues, and counseling for
the donors themselves.
There are useful appendices. Pertinent British acts are included so that the
counselor can familiarize himself or herself with what the letter of the law is on is-
sues such as the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act of 1990 or the Abortion
Act of 1967 and its latest amendment revision of 1991. A chapter on resources
and organizations in the United Kingdom follows. This is one of the few criti-
cisms I need to make about the book. It is clearly for British conditions, and for
this book to travel overseas, local publishers would need to insert their equiva-
lent list of local resources and organizations. Separately, conception technologies
and assisted conception methods are galloping along so quickly that the glossary
given at the start of the book is bound to be out-of-date some ve minutes after
publication.
In summary, this is a useful, blessedly concise book, and if one is starting out
in the eld of counseling infertility clients, this is an ideal starting point.
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298 Book Reviews
The Janus Report onSexual Behavior. By Samuel S. Janus andCynthiaL. Janus.
John Wiley, New York, 1993, 430 pp., $29.95.
Reviewed by Eugene E. Levitt, Ph.D.
5,6
This book describes the results of a national survey of sexual behaviors, attitudes,
and beliefs of a sample of 1347 men and 1418 women collected during the pe-
riod 1988 to 1992. This number represents 60.8% of the questionnaires that were
distributed. Apparently, the questionnaires were self-administered rather than pro-
viding structure for an interview, though this is not clearly stated. In addition,
there were 125 in-depth interviews; again, it is not clear whether the data from the
subsample are included with the main sample. In general, the methodology of the
survey is inadequately described.
As is always the case, a survey, especially a survey dealing with a sensitive
topic, is evaluated primarily by its methodology rather than its ndings. This
applies even more clearly to the Janus report because so many of the survey items
were designed to tap attitudes and beliefs rather than behaviors. A number of item
wordings indicate that insufcient attention was given to this precaution.
The questionnaire was composed of 105 items, 1 of which is actually 14 sep-
arate questions plus another that is open-ended and might yield another 14 indi-
vidual items, making a total of 132 items which are presented in 280 tables. To
avoid biasing responses, this kind of item must be even more carefully phrased
than items dealing directly with sexual behaviors. Some of the stimulus items in
the questionnaire contain salient words that require specialized knowledge, such as
sexual surrogate, necrophilia, and brown showers, as well as terms that require
interpretation, such as sexual molestation, traditional sex roles, and bisexual.
A number of the target questions in the survey not only are suggestive, but
are vulnerable to subjective interpretation, for example, traditional sex roles have
no place in modern society, it is better to love and be hurt than not to know
love, abortion is murder. A respondent might reasonably be puzzled as to how
to respond on a four-step percentage scale ranging from 10 to 100 to the item,
How much below maximum sexual potential are you? This fanciful, not easily
comprehended, possible biasing language pervades the items in the Janus survey.
Of course, a major avenue for assessing the value of a survey is its sampling.
Like a number of its predecessors, the Janus sample is overweighted with better-
educated and more afuent respondents who are too often single. Compared to U.S.
population norms, the Janus sample contained only a fth of the required respon-
dents with less than a high-school education, 12% more respondents with some
college contact, 17%fewer low-income individuals, and a 20%shortage of Protes-
tant respondents. In addition to these very possibly biasing sample characteristics,
5
Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5200.
6
Deceased.
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the ethnic composition of the sample is unspecied. The authors state that the
sample includes respondents from most sizeable minority groups but they in-
tentionally ignored this aspect of the sample in presenting results. The reason
was to include them unidentied in our general sample and thereby reect as
much as possible heterogeneity of the American public (p. 402), a most dubious
motivation.
Despite its methodological deciencies, this report will probably be quoted
from time to time like other methodologically weak surveys, including the various
magazine polls such as Redbook, McCalls, Psychology Today, etc. Janus is even
more likely to be quoted because of the wide range of subject matter, which
includes 10 forms of deviant practices, religion, politics, money, power and sex,
and singles.
Some of the ndings are startling. More than 25%of the women in the sample
report that they have had an abortion. Almost half of the married sample had lived
together before marriage. Six percent of the men and 4% of the women reported
personal experience with golden showers, an enormous number to be engaged in
this esoteric practice assuming that the survey respondents understood that the item
was not a reference to meteorological conditions. In the absence of contradictory
data, it is not possible to infer with certainty but it appears at least likely that such
remarkable results are a function of sampling or item wording shortcomings.
The surveyors nd that 23% of the women subjects and 11% of the males
believe that they were sexually molested in childhood. The key term is not de-
ned in any way. In a sizable minority of the cases, the molestation is allegedly
ongoing, a peculiar nding in a group with a minimum age of 18 years. Another
sizable minority reports that they were molested only once. If this subgroup is
removed from the molested group on the grounds that it is a great deal easier to
be mistaken about one incident than about many, the proportions will be 18% for
women and 9%for men, a bit closer to expectation. Similarly, the authors analyzed
their data to come to the conclusion that 9% of the men and 5% of the women
are homosexuals. However, only 4% of the men and 2% of the women identify
themselves as homosexuals. If the estimate is based on those who say that they are
having homosexual experiences frequently or ongoing, the estimates are even
lower, less than 3% for the men and less than 2% for the women.
In summary, this survey shares the serious methodological shortcomings of
most national surveys of human sexuality. Its ndings may be considered to be
grossly accurate within a considerable probable error. When frequencies are low,
the error should preclude a denitive conclusion by the cautious reader. On the
one hand, one might predict that the results of this survey will be quoted in future
human sexuality texts because of the range of activities it examined. A sizable
segment of its items will not be found in any other national survey. On the other
hand, it is more likely that the Janus and Janus sex survey will take a back seat to
the recent urry of epidemiologically more rigorous sex surveys that appeared on
the sexological scene shortly after the publication of this volume (see, e.g., Bozon
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300 Book Reviews
and Leridon, 1996; Laumann et al., 1994; Wellings et al., 1994; cf. Schmidt, 1997;
Wiederman, 1997).
REFERENCES
Bozon, M., and Leridon, H. (eds.) (1996). Sexuality and the Social Sciences: AFrench Survey on Sexual
Behaviour (trans., G. Rogers), Dartmouth, Aldershot, England.
Laumann, E. O., Gagnon, J. H., Michael, R. T., and Michaels, S. (1994). The Social Organization of
Sexuality: Sexual Practices in the United States, University of Chicago Press, Chicago.
Schmidt, G. (1997). Review of The Social Organization of Sexuality: Sexual Practices in the United
States. Arch. Sex. Behav. 26: 327332.
Wellings, K., Field, J., Johnson, A. M., and Wadsworth, J. (1994). Sexual Behavior in Britain: The
National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles, Penguin Books, London.
Wiederman, M. W. (1997). Review of Sexual Behavior in Britain: The National Survey of Sexual
Attitudes and Lifestyles. Arch. Sex. Behav. 26: 332337.
A Guide to Americas Sex Laws. By Richard A. Posner and Katharine B.
Silbaugh. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1996, 243 pp., $26.95.
Reviewed by Kenneth J. Zucker, Ph.D.
7,8
The senior author is chief judge on the United States Court of Appeals, Seventh
Circuit, and a Senior Lecturer at the University of Chicago Law School. For those
who work at the interface of sexology and the law, Posner is best known for his
volume Sex and Reason (Posner, 1992), which received widespread attention and
analysis (see, e.g., Reilly, 1996).
In this volume, Posner and Silbaugh summarize the sex laws that exist in
each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia for each of 17 sex crimes:
rape and sexual assault, marital exemptions from rape and sexual assault, age of
consent, sodomy, transmission of disease, public nudity and indecency, fornica-
tion, adultery, abuse of position of trust or authority, incest, bigamy, prostitution,
possession of obscene materials, bestiality, necrophilia, obscene communications,
and voyeurism.
Each of the 17 chapters begins with a concise description of the offense,
including whether it is a misdemeanor or a felony. For some of the putative sex
crimes, some states do not have specic statutes, although it is likely that one might
be charged under a nonsexual statute (e.g., with regard to necrophilia). The penalty
for sex crimes varies markedly across states. For example, with regard to bestiality
(the abominable and detestable crime against nature with a beast), Rhode Island
7
Book Review Editor, Archives of Sexual Behavior.
8
Child and Adolescent Gender Identity Clinic, Child Psychiatry Program, Centre for Addiction and
Mental HealthClarke Division, 250 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1R8, Canada.
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Book Reviews 301
imposes a penalty of not less than 7 years in prison, whereas in Minnesota the
penalty is not more than 1 year. Either the remaining states do not have a specic
statute for bestiality or, for those that do, the penalty is presumably left to the
discretion of the judge.
For those whoare interestedinsexologyandthe law, this is anextremelyuseful
volume. One hopes that the authors will prepare a second volume comparing sex
laws in the United States with those in other countries throughout the globe, as
was recently done by West and Green (1997) with regard to homosexuality (cf.
Grey, 1999).
REFERENCES
Grey, A. (1999). Review of Sociolegal Control of Homosexuality: A Multi-Nation Comparison. Arch.
Sex. Behav. 28: 271276.
Posner, R. A. (1992). Sex and Reason, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA.
Reilly, M. T. (1996). Review of Sex and Reason. Arch. Sex. Behav. 25: 650655.
West, D. J., and Green, R. (eds.). (1997). Sociolegal Control of Homosexuality: A Multi-Nation
Comparison, Plenum Press, New York.
Handbook of Sexuality-Related Measures (Second Edition). Edited by Clive M.
Davis, William L. Yarber, Robert Bauserman, George Schreer, and Sandra L.
Davis. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, 1998, 589 pp., $99.95.
Reviewed by Kenneth J. Zucker, Ph.D.
7,8
Fromabortiontovasectomy, this editedvolume is anextremelyuseful compendium
of extant measures relevant to the mission of sexual science. Each of the 200+en-
tries contains a description of the measure (including instructions for scoring and
its psychometrics in the majority of cases), relevant references, and the measure it-
self. For those who engage in quantitative sexological research, this volume should
be kept on ones bottom shelf, close to the computer.