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THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE


COURSE GUIDE
2014/2015

DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY

AT3027 Anthropological Theory



Welcome to the School of Social Science.
This course guide gives information about the social science course you have chosen to study.

It must be read in conjunction with the School of Social Science Handbook, which is available on
MyAberdeen. You should also look at the School of Social Science General Information page on
MyAberdeen.

MyAberdeen is the University of Aberdeens Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). This is where
you will find learning materials and resources associated with the courses you are studying.

MyAberdeen also provides direct access to TurnitinUK, the online originality checking service,
through which you may be asked to submit completed assignments.

You can log in to MyAberdeen by going to: www.abdn.ac.uk/myaberdeen and entering your
University username and password (which you use to access the University network).

Further information on MyAberdeen including Quick Guides and video tutorials, along with
information about TurnitinUK, can be found at: www.abdn.ac.uk/students/myaberdeen.php


It is important that you make yourself familiar with the Universitys policies and procedures which
have been made available within MyAberdeen
(https://abdn.blackboard.com/bbcswebdav/institution/Policies).


Course Co-ordinator
The Course Co-ordinator for AT3027 is Dr Arnar rnason (Room: G22, Edward Wright Building; e-
mail: arnar.arnason@abdn.ac.uk; tel.: 27- 3127). Office hours:

The Departmental Secretary is Jill Davis j.davis@abdn.ac.uk

The External Examiner is Dr Richard Baxtrom, University of Edinburgh.

This data has been provided for information purposes only.
Students should not, under any circumstances, contact the External Examiner.

Credit Rating
This course is offered in the first semester. It has a rating of 30 credit points; that is, it is expected
to take up 50% of the time of a full-time student.

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Course Requirements and Assessment
Requirements
Satisfactory attendance at, and participation in, tutorials
Submission of an annotated bibliography, a research journal and a research essay by
the relevant deadlines.

Course Aims and Learning Outcomes
The course
Building on the work done in your second year anthropology courses, this course explores
theoretical issues and key debates in contemporary anthropology. We begin by establishing a
broad overview of theoretical developments in anthropology. We will then review how the central
concepts of culture and society were rethought in anthropology during the 1980s. Following on
from this, we ask the questions that underlie the discussions during this course: how can
anthropology proceed if the targets of its investigation can no longer be understood as objective
entities? How can anthropology proceed if the anthropologist themselves is inevitably implicated in
and part of those very targets? To look for possible answers, the course examines current
anthropological interest in power and history, political economy and phenomenology, experience,
embodiment and practice. While the intent is theoretical these issues and debates will be explored
largely through ethnographic writing on such subjects as the body, genetics and reproduction,
technology, things that perhaps talk, ontologies, politics, death, memory and forgetting. Emphasis
will be placed on encouraging students to apply theoretical insights from anthropology to their
everyday lives and the world around them.

Course Aims and Learning Outcomes
A. Knowledge and Understanding

The course will give students an understanding of theoretical developments within anthropology.

The course will help students to identify the main issues and key theoretical debates in
contemporary anthropology.

The course will discuss the ways in which current concerns in anthropology relate to intellectual
and theoretical debates in related disciplines.

Students will be encouraged to develop their abilities to describe and critically interpret theoretical
ideas and evaluate their effectiveness in interpreting social and cultural processes.

Students will be encouraged to develop a critical understanding of basic and contemporary
anthropological concepts, principles, and terminology.

Students will be encouraged to critically analyse their day-to-day lives and relate them to current
anthropological theorising.

B. Intellectual Skills

The course will promote student study skills in writing analytical, critical essays that draw on
diverse and advanced ethnographic and theoretical sources.


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Students will learn to formulate and express coherent and reasoned arguments in class
discussions about theoretical issues in anthropology.

The course will promote creative research and critical analysis, encouraging students to draw upon
a wide range of theoretical ideas and traditions.

The course will engage students in the preparation of material for directing and participating in
seminar discussions.

This course will promote self-directed learning by encouraging students to identify theoretical ideas
and apply them to ethnographic material and the world around them.

C. Practical Skills

Students will learn to effectively use library, electronic, ethnographic, and other information sources
to research relevant material related to theoretical debates in anthropology.

The course will advance student skills in oral presentation and engagement in thoughtful,
intellectual discussion on abstract and substantive anthropological issues.

Students will learn to synthesise written material from across the discipline, and from other
disciplines, and to evaluate it in relation to ongoing debates in theoretical anthropology.

The course will enable students to present work within small group settings, to contribute regularly
to small-group discussions, and to sharpen their skills in team work and group facilitation.

D. Transferable Skills

The course will encourage the development of a broad set of study skills, including effective time
management, and research skills working with diverse sources.

Students will learn to work collaboratively with other students in seminar preparations and
discussions.

Students will learn to present reasoned and coherent oral and written work.

E. Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, students should be able to:
demonstrate understanding of the major developments in anthropological theory
demonstrate understanding of major theoretical approaches in contemporary anthropology
describe and critically employ theoretical ideas
produce coherent and reasoned arguments in written work and class discussions about
topics related to anthropological theories
demonstrate a critical understanding of empirical research informed by particular theoretical
approaches

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show an understanding of the importance of a comparative and critical approach in
anthropology
use the library and other information sources effectively to research relevant theoretical and
empirical material
prepare material for leading and participating in seminar discussions
work with fellow students in organising seminars and in commenting on each others work
engage in self-directed learning.
take a reflexive approach to their own work, involving balanced self-criticism and intellectual
progression.

Attendance/progress monitoring
Set criteria are used to determine when a student should be reported in the monitoring system.
You will be warned that your class certificate is at risk if
(i) you are absent from two tutorial meetings;
and/or
(ii) you fail to submit a piece of in-course assessment by the stated deadline without a medical
certificate or an agreed extension.

Tutorial attendance is compulsory. If you do not attend 70% or more of the tutorials for this course,
even if the absence is for medical or other good cause, then you cannot be deemed to have
fulfilled the requirements of the course and your class certificate will be withdrawn. This means
that you cannot sit the exam or the resit.
Full details about certification of absence are available on the web at:

www.abdn.ac.uk/staffnet/teaching/aqh/appendix7x5.pdf

If you are having trouble meeting our requirements, you must talk to your tutor or Course Co-
ordinator.

If you lose your class certificate and wish to appeal, you should contact
sssmonitoring@abdn.ac.uk in the first instance.

Students are reminded that signing attendance for students other than yourself at lectures/tutorials
is deemed, by the University, as a form of misconduct as outlined in the Code of Practice on
Student Discipline (Non-Academic), Appendix A- Forms of Misconduct. A person who, without
good cause, seriously disrupts, abuses or interferes with the functions, duties or activities of any
member of the University Community, or any University activity, is guilty of misconduct under this
Code.

Assessment
This course is assessed by:
one annotated bibliography (10%) due at 5pm on 17
th
of October 2014,
one journal (10%) due at 5pm on 7
th
November 2014,
one research essay (20%) due at 5pm on 28
th
November 2014,
examination (60%).

Description of course work:

Annotated Bibliography
The first part of your assessment is an annotated bibliography on your topic of choice. You should
write on the topic you focus on in your journal (see below). The annotated bibliography should start

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with a brief (300-500 word) proposal outlining your thesis and possible avenues of exploration. This
should be followed by a list of 8-10 academic articles, chapters or books supporting your argument.
For each item you should give a two-three sentence thematic summary of the content of the article
or chapter and its possible relevance to your question. The bibliography will be marked for the
accuracy and completeness of the citations and the quality of the annotations.

Anthropological journal
The second part of your assessment will consist of an anthropological journal that I am asking you
to keep during the course. This journal is in fact the core of your continuous assessment during this
course. Your annotated bibliography should be on the same topic as your journal and your essay
should be written on the basis of the journal. Put simply the idea is this: while the intent of the
course is theoretical I am keen that you use the theoretical ideas we talk about analytically to
understand and make sense of what we might call ethnographic material. In this case, I am asking
you to note down things that you notice around you in relation to a particular topic (discussions in
the media or in public about DNA data bases; about assisted suicide; about genetic research;
about childhood obesity; about the language of advertising and so on) that you can choose. I am
not expecting and asking people to write down an awful lot, but I am looking for evidence of people
using the ideas that we talk about to conduct initial analysis, of linking what they note with the
literature that we read. The important task here is using theoretical concepts to analyse the
material you collect (rather than simply the collection of the material). Remember this is a theory
course. You are being asked to show that you understand the concepts, the ideas we talk about,
by using them. Students are then to use the journal and what they have focused on there as the
topic around which they construct their other continuous assessments, the annotated bibliography
and the essay.

Research paper/essay
Your main assignment will be a 3000-3500 word paper building on the initial research conducted in
your annotated bibliography, and on the topic you focus on in your journal. The paper should use
relevant concepts and ideas to analyse and make sense of the material students have collected for
their journal. Treat this as an essay. It has to be a coherent and independent piece of work. But
remember too that this is a research paper, it should explore the topic that you have chosen and
not a question set by the course co-ordinator.

Anonymous marking
There is an expectation within the University and the School that any assignment that contributes
towards your overall course mark or programme award (e.g., in-course assignments, projects,
dissertations, or presentations) will be marked anonymously. This means that the person marking
your assignment will not know your identity when they do so. There are cases when this is not
possible, practical, or beneficial. If you have questions about whether and why your assignments in
a particular course are being marked anonymously, contact your course co-ordinator.

Feedback Deadlines
Feedback will be given on bibliographies and journals within two weeks of their submission.

LECTURES
The examination assesses your understanding of the whole course. Failure to attend lectures
will adversely affect your performance.

You will be able to make your own course selection online using MyCurriculum and make your
selection of tutorials, practicals and labs using MyTimetable. Together these tools will allow you to
choose your courses, sign-up for associated teaching events, and then be provided with a
personalised timetable.

You will meet your Course Co-ordinator at the first lecture.


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Lectures for this course take place on Tuesdays at 12-13 in KCG11 Kings College and at
Thursdays at 10-11 in KCG5 Kings College.

LECTURES




University
teaching
timetabling
week number

Week
commencing


Topic
1 10 15 Sept 2014 Introduction.
The concept of
culture
2 11 22 Sept 2014 The concept of
culture
3 12 29 Sept 2014 The concept of
society
4 13 6 Oct 2014 Habitus and
embodiment
5 14 13 Oct 2014 Emotion
6 15 20 Oct 2014 Reproduction
and biopower
7 16 27 Oct 2014 Technology and
society
8 17 3 Nov 2014 Can the thing
talk?
9 18 10 Nov 2014 Is ontology just
another word for
culture?
10 19 17 Nov 2014 Power,
governmentality
and agency
11 20 24 Nov 2014 Subjectivity: or
how it is we
dont exist

Lecture Outlines
Week 1 Introduction and the concept of culture
During the first lecture we will discuss the aims and the organisation of the course. The different
assignments will be explained. We will then discuss the place and role of theory in anthropology.
During the second lecture we will start to discuss the concept of culture.

Required readings:
Ellen, Roy 2010. Theories in anthropology and anthropological theory, Journal of the Royal
Anthropological Institute (N.S.) 16:387-404.
Moore, Henrietta L. 1999. Anthropological theory at the turn of the century, in Anthropological
theory today (ed.) Henrietta L. Moore. Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 1-23.

Week 2 The concept of culture

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Once a, if not the, key concept of anthropology, culture has in recent years been subjected to
sustained rethinking, even attack, within the discipline. What are anthropologists talking about
when they discuss and describe culture? What are the meanings of the concept of culture? What
have been and are its uses in anthropology? Why have many anthropologists recently argued
against its usage and promoted such concepts as hegemony, ideology, discourse and ontology
instead?

Required readings:

Abu-Lughod, Lila 1991. Writing against culture, in Recapturing anthropology. Working in the
present (ed.) Richard G. Fox. Santa Fe: School of American Research.
Clifford, James 1986. Introduction: partial truths,in Writing culture. The poetics and politics of
ethnography (eds.) James Clifford and George E. Marcus. Berkeley: University of California Press,
pp.1-26.
Dirks, Nicholas B., Geoff Eley & Sherry B. Ortner 1994. Introduction, in Culture/power/history. A
reader in contemporary social theory (eds.) Nicholas B. Dirks, Geoff Eley & Sherry B. Ortner.
Princeton: Princeton University Press, pp. 3-45.
Viveiros de Castro, Eduardo 1998. Cosmological deixis and Amerindian perspectivism. Journal of
the Royal Anthropological Institute, 4(3): 469-488

Recommended Readings:
American Anthropologist September 2004 issue.
Carrithers, Michael 1993. Why humans have cultures. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Clifford, James. 1988. The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth Century Ethnography, Literature,
and Art, Cambridge, Mass. and London: Harvard University Press.
Dirks, Nicholas B. 1998 In near ruins: cultural theory at the end of the century, in In near ruins.
Cultural theory at the end of the century (ed.) Nicholas B. Dirks. London: University of Minnesota
Press, pp. 1-18.
Geertz, Clifford 1973. Interpretation of cultures. New York: Basic Books.
Gupta, Akhil & James Ferguson 1997a. Culture, power, place: ethnography at the end of an era,
in Culture, power, place. Explorations in critical anthropology (eds.) Akhil Gupta & James
Ferguson. London: Duke University Press, pp. 1-29.
Gupta, Akhil & James Ferguson 1997b. Beyond culture: space, identity, and the politics of
difference, in Culture, power, place. Explorations in critical anthropology (eds.) Akhil Gupta &
James Ferguson. London: Duke University Press, pp. 33-51.
Ingold, Tim 1994 Introduction to culture, in Companion encyclopedia to anthropology (ed.) Tim
Ingold. London: Routledge.
Jameson, Frederic 1998. The cultural turn. London: Verso.
Rosaldo, Renato 1989. Culture and truth: the remaking of social analysis. Boston: Beacon Press.

Week 3 The concept of society
Another key concept of anthropology, society, has similarly been subjected to sustained re-thinking
in the last two decades. During the first lecture we will revisit the classic anthropological
understanding of society. With Marilyn Strathern we will then identify some of the problems with
this conception. With Tim Ingold we will distinguish between three different senses of the social
and focus on anthropological conceptions of social relationships. In the second lecture we will
discuss Latours challenge to the concept of the social and explore links between the concept of
society and government. A mention may be made of the spatialisation of social theory, and maybe
we will wonder what happens if anthropology moves beyond the relation.

Required Readings:

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Ingold, Tim 1986. Evolution and social life. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Chapter 6.
Ingold, T., M. Strathern, J. D. Y. Peel, C. Toren and J. Spencer 1996. The concept of society is
theoretically obsolete, in Key Debates in Anthropology, (ed). Tim Ingold. London: Routledge, pp.
55-98.
Latour, Bruno 2005. Introduction: how to resume the task of tracing associations in Reassembling
the social: an introduction to actor-network-theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-17.
Rose, Nikolas 1996. The death of the social. Economy and society, 25 (3):327-56.

Recommended Readings:
Appadurai, Arjun. 1996. Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis and
London: University of Minnesota Press.
Biernacki, Richard & Jennifer Jordan 2002. The place of space in the study of the social in The
social in question: new bearings in history and the social sciences (ed.) Patrick Joyce. London:
Routledge, pp. 133-150.
Bourdieu, Pierre 1977. Outline of a theory of practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Carrithers, Michael 1993. Why humans have cultures. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Gupta Akhil & James Ferguson (eds.) 1997. Culture, power, place. Explorations in critical
anthropology. London: Duke University Press.
Inda, Jonathan Xavier (ed.) 2005. Anthropologies of Modernity. Foucault, governmentality and life
politics. Oxford: Blackwell.
Ingold, Tim 2000. Perception of the environment. London: Routledge. Chapter One: Culture,
nature, environment: steps to an ecology of life. Available as e-book through the library.
Ingold, Tim 1994. Introduction to social life in Companion encyclopedia to anthropology (ed.) Tim
Ingold. London: Routledge.
Joyce, Patrick (ed.) 2002. The social in question: new bearings in history and the social sciences
(ed.) Patrick Joyce. London: Routledge
Kuper, Adam (ed.) 1992. Conceptualizing societies. London: Routledge.
Strathern, Marilyn 1988. Gender of the gift: problems with women and problems with society in
Melanesia. Los Angeles: University of California Press.
Strathern, Marilyn 2005. Kinship, law and the unexpected. Relatives are always a surprise.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Chapter 1 (Relatives are always a surprise) and
Chapters 2 and 3 (Embedded Science and Emergent Properties).
Urry, John 2000. Sociology beyond societies: mobilities for the Twenty-First Century. London:
Routledge. Chapter 1.
Viveiros de Castro, E. 1996. Societyin Encyclopedia of social and cultural anthropology, (eds.)
Alan Barnard and Jonathan Spencer. London: Routledge, pp. 514-522.

Week 4 Habitus and embodiment
The body and embodiment have been put forward by a number of theorists as concepts able to do
the analytical and comparative work that culture and society have, according to some critics, failed
to do. Furthermore the concept embodiment, it is suggested, allows us to move beyond the
problematic and ethnocentric dichotomy between mind and body. It allows us to focus on the
experience of social life as a process, rather than static cultural categories through which
experience is classified. The body and embodiment are the topics for this week.

Required Readings:
Bourdieu, Pierre 1977. Outline of a theory of practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Chapter 2 Structures and the habitus.

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Csordas, Thomas J. 1994. Introduction: the body as representation and being-in-the-world, in
Embodiment and experience. The existential ground of culture and self (ed.) Thomas J.
Csordas. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-24.
Foucault, Michel 1984. The body of the condemned & Docile bodies. Both in The Foucault
reader: an introduction to Foucaults thought (ed.) Paul Rabinow. London: Penguin.
Halliburton, Murphy 2002. Rethinking anthropologys study of the body. American Anthropologist,
1123-34.
Jackson, Michael 1983. Knowledge of the body. Man (N.S.) 18:327-45.
Mauss, Marcel 1992 [1934]. Techniques of the body, in Incorporations (eds.) Jonathan Crary &
Sanford Kwinter. New York: Zone, pp. 455-77.

Recommended Readings:
Bourdieu, Pierre 1984. Distinction. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
Butler, Judith 1993. Bodies that matter. New York: Routledge.
Classen, Constance (ed.) 2005. The book of touch. London: Berg.
Conklin, Beth A. 2001. Consuming grief: compassionate cannibalism in an Amazonian society.
Austin: University of Texas Press.
Crary, Jonathan & Sanford Kwinter (eds.) 1992. Incorporations. New York: Zone
Csordas, Thomas J. 1999. The bodys career in anthropology, in Anthropological theory today
(ed.) Henrietta L. Moore. Cambridge: Polity Press, pp. 172-205.
Falk, P. 1994. The Consuming Body. London: Sage.
Featherstone, M., M. Hepworth & B. Turner. The Body: Social Processes & Cultural Theory.
London: Sage.
Foucault, Michel 1991. Discipline and punish. London: Penguin.
Hallam, E., J.L. Hockey & G. Howarth 1999. Beyond the Body. Death and Social Identity. London:
Routledge.
Martin, Emily 1992. The end of the body. American Ethnologist 19(1):121-140.
Scheper-Huges, Nancy 2005. The last commodity: post-human ethics and the global traffic in
fresh organs, in Global assemblages: technology, politics, and ethics as anthropological
problems (eds.) Aihwa Ong and Stehpen J. Collier. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 145-67.
Shilling, C. 1993. The Body and Social Theory. London: Sage.
Strathern, Andrew. & Michael Lambek (eds.)1998. Bodies and Persons. Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press.
Turner, B.S. 1984. The Body and Society. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.
Turner, Terence 1994. Bodies and anti-bodies: flesh and fetish in contemporary social theory, in
Embodiment and experience. The existential ground of culture and self (ed.) Thomas J. Csordas.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp.27-47.
Verdery, Katherine 1999. The political lives of dead bodies: reburial and postsocialist change. New
York: Columbia University Press.

Week 5 Emotion
Seen to bring together the embodied and the cultural, emotion has been forwarded as another
domain that might replace culture and society at the centre of anthropology. This week we discuss
some of the major theoretical approaches that have informed the study of emotion in anthropology.
We discuss approaches that emphasise the discursive construction of emotion and approaches
that see emotion as a social phenomenon.

Required Readings:

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Abu-Lughod, Lila & Catherine A. Lutz 1990. Introduction: emotion, discourse, and the politics of
everyday life, in Language and the politics of emotion (eds.) Lila Abu-Lughod & Catherine A. Lutz.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Lutz, Catherine A. 1990. Engendered emotion: gender, power, and the rhetoric of emotional
control in American discourse, in Language and the politics of emotion (eds.) Lila Abu-Lughod &
Catherine A. Lutz. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Lyon, Margot, L. 1995. Missing emotion: the limitations of cultural constructionism in the study of
emotion. Cultural Anthropology 10 (2):244-63.
Milton, Kay 2005. Meanings, feelings and human ecology, in Mixed emotions: anthropological
studies of feeling (eds.) Kay Milton & Maruka Svaek. Oxford: Berg, pp. 25-41.
Reddy, William 1997. Against constructionism: the historical ethnography of emotions. Current
Anthropology 38 (3):327-351.

Recommended Readings:
Abu-Lughod, Lila 1986. Behind the veil: honor and poetry in a Bedouin society. Cairo: The
American University in Cairo Press.
Briggs, Jean L. 1970. Never in anger: portrait of an Eskimo family. London: Harvard University
Press.
Lutz, Catherine A. 1988. Unnatural emotions: everyday sentiments on a Micronesian atoll and the
challenge to western theory. London: The University of Chicago Press.
Lutz, Catherine A. & Geoffrey A. White 1986. The anthropology of emotion. Annual Review of
Anthropology 15:405-36.
Lyon, M.L. & J.M. Barbalet 1994. Societys body: emotion and the somatization of social theory
in Embodiment and experience: the existential ground of culture and self (ed.) Thomas J. Csordas.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Rosaldo, Michelle Z. 1980. Knowledge and passion. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Shweder, Richard A. & Robert A. Levine (eds.) 1984. Culture theory: essays on mind, self and
emotion. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Svaek, Maruka 2005. Introduction: emotions in anthropology, in Mixed emotions:
anthropological studies of feeling (eds.) Kay Milton & Maruka Svaek. Oxford: Berg, pp. 1-24.
White, Geoffrey M. & John Kirkpatrick (eds.) 1985. Person, self, and experience: exploring Pacific
ethnopsychologies. London: University of California Press.

Week 6 Reproduction and biopower
Reproduction is a classic theme in anthropology. It has resurfaced in recent years as an important
issue as the implications of new reproductive technologies have exercised anthropologists minds.
These technologies are themselves frequently linked to developments in and applications of the
new genetics, which in turn have raised questions about the meaning and future of humanity,
culture and society. In dealing with emerging technologies many anthropologists rely on Foucaults
notion of biopower or biopolitics. These ideas will be discussed this week.

Required Readings:
Franklin, Sarah 2005. Stem cells r us: emergent life forms and the global biological, in Global
assemblages: technology, politics, and ethics as anthropological problems (eds.) Aihwa Ong and
Stehpen J. Collier. Oxford: Blackwell, pp.59-78.
Franklin, Sarah & Helen Ragon 1998. Introduction, in Reproducing reproduction: kinship, power
and technological innovation (eds.) Sarah Franklin & Helen Ragon. Philadelphia: University of
Pennsylvania Press, pp. 1-14.
Rabinow, Paul 1992. Artificiality and enlightenment: from sociobiology to biosociality, in
Incorporations (eds.) Jonathan Crary & Sanford Kwinter. New York: Zone, pp.234-252.

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Rose, Nikolas 2007. The politics of life itself. Biomedicine, power, and subjectivity in the Twenty-
First Century. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Chapter 1 Biopolitics in the Twenty-First
Century.
Taussig, Karen-Sue, Rayna Rapp, & Deborah Heath 2005. Flexible Eugenics: technologies of the
self in the age of genetics, in Anthropologies of modernity: Foucault, governmentality, and life
politics (ed.) Jonathan Xavier Inda. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 194-212.

Recommended Readings:
Finkler, Kaya 2000. Experiencing the new genetics: family and kinship on the medical frontier.
Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.
Franklin, Sarah 2003. Re-thinking nature-culture: anthropology and the new genetics.
Anthropological Theory 3:65-85.
Franklin, Sarah, Ceila Lury & Jackie Stacey, 2000. Global nature, global culture. London: SAGE.
Helmreich, Stefan 1998. Replicating reproduction in artificial life: or, the essence of life in the age
of virtual electronic reproduction, in Reproducing reproduction: kinship, power and technological
innovation (eds.) Sarah Franklin & Helen Ragon. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press,
pp.207-234.
Inda, Jonathan Xavier 2005. Analytics of the modern: an introduction, in Anthropologies of
modernity: Foucault, governmentality, and life politics (ed.) Jonathan Xavier Inda. Oxford:
Blackwell, pp.1-20.
Inhorn, Marica C. (ed.) 2007. Reproductive disruptions: gender, technology, and biopolitics in the
new millennium. Oxford: Berghahn.
Konrad, Monica 2005. Nameless relations: anonymity, Melanesia and reproductive gift exchange
between British ova donors and recipients. Oxford: Berghahn.
Konrad, Monica 2005. Narrating the new predictive medicine. Cambridge: Cambridge University
Press.
Nguyen, Vinh-Kim 2005. Antiretroviral globalism, biopolitics, and therapeutic citizenship, in Global
assemblages: technology, politics, and ethics as anthropological problems (eds.) Aihwa Ong and
Stehpen J. Collier. Oxford: Blackwell, pp.124-44.
Plsson, Gsli 2007. Anthropology and the new genetics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Rabinow, Paul 2005. Midst anthropologys problems, in Global assemblages: technology, politics,
and ethics as anthropological problems (eds.) Aihwa Ong and Stehpen J. Collier. Oxford:
Blackwell, pp.40-53.
Rose, Nikolas 2007. The politics of life itself. Biomedicine, power, and subjectivity in the Twenty-
First Century. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
Strathern, Marilyn 1992. Reproducing the future: anthropology, kinship and the new reproductive
technologies. Manchester: Manchester University Press.
Strathern, Marilyn 1992. After nature: English kinship in the late twentieth century. Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press.

Week 7 Technology and society
Following on from the previous week this weeks lectures take up the question regarding the
relationship between technology and society/culture. During the second lecture we will focus on the
shifting and porous boundary between human, animal and machine. The question that emerges
regards the humanity that anthropology claims to study.

Required Readings:

Haraway, Donna J. 1991 [1985]. A cyborg manifesto: science, technology and socialist-feminism
in the late twentieth century in Donna J. Haraway Simians, cyborgs, and women: the reinvention of
nature. New York: Routledge, pp.149-181. [Not in Reader, will be made available].

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Haraway, Donna J. 2007. When species meet. London: University of Minnesota Press. Available
as e-book through the library, pp 3-44 (read lightly).
Heath, Deborah 1997. Bodies, antibodies, and modest interventions in Cyborgs & Citadels:
anthropological interventions in emerging sciences and technologies (eds.) Gary Lee Downey &
Joseph Dumit. Santa Fe: School of American Research Press, pp.67-82.
Ingold, Tim 2000. The Perception of the environment: essays in livelihood, dwelling and skill.
London & New York: Routledge. Chapter 16.
Latour, Bruno 1991. Technology is society made durable in A sociology of monsters: essays on
power, technology and domination (ed.) John Law. London & New York: Routledge, pp. 103-131.

Recommended Readings:

Downey, Gary Lee & Joseph Dumit (eds.) 1997. Cyborgs & Citadels: anthropological interventions
in emerging sciences and technologies (eds.) Gary Lee Downey & Joseph Dumit. Santa Fe:
School of American Research Press.
Haraway, Donna J. 1991. Simians, cyborgs, and women: the reinvention of nature. New York:
Routledge.
Inda, Jonathan Xavier (ed.) 2005. Anthropologies of Modernity. Foucault, governmentality and life
politics. Oxford: Blackwell.
Latour, Bruno 1996. Aramis, or, The love of technology. Translated by Catherine Porter.
Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
Latour, Bruno 2005. Reassembling the social: an introduction to actor-network-theory. Oxford:
Oxford University Press.
Latour, Bruno 1993. We have never been modern. Translated by Catherine Porter. Cambridge,
Massachusetts: Harvard University Press.
Latour, Bruno 2000. The Berlin key or how to do words with things in Matter, materiality and
modern culture (ed.) Paul M. Graves-Brown. London & New York: Routledge, pp. 10-21.
Law, John (ed.) 1991. A sociology of monsters: essays on power, technology and domination (ed.)
John Law. London & New York: Routledge.
Ong, Aihwa & Stephen J. Collier (eds.) 2005. Global assemblages: technology, politics, and ethics
as anthropological problems. Oxford: Blackwell.
Rapp, Rayna 1997. Real- time fetus: the role of the sonogram in the age of monitored
reproduction in Cyborgs & Citadels: anthropological interventions in emerging sciences and
technologies (eds.) Gary Lee Downey & Joseph Dumit. Santa Fe: School of American Research
Press, pp31-48.

Week 8 Can the thing talk?
In the wake of the questioning of culture as an object of anthropological study, scholars have
suggested that things need to set free, that we need to recognise the ability of things to speak for
themselves. This week we discuss how objects, materials, things, have become central to
anthropological thinking and we discuss the question: Can the thing really speak?

Required Readings:
Henare, Amiria, Martin Holbraad & Sari Wastell 2007. Introduction: thinking through things in
Thinking through things: theorising artefacts ethnographically. London: Routledge, pp. 1-31.
Holbraad, Martin 2007. The power of powder: multiplicity and motion in the divinatory cosmology
of Cuba If (or mana again, in Thinking through things: theorising artefacts ethnographically.
London: Routledge, pp. 189-225.
Holbraad, Martin 2011. Can the thing speak. OAC Press Working Papers Series 7. [Will be made
available]

13
Ingold, Tim, 2007. Materials against materiality. Archaeological Dialogues 14(1): 1-16.

Recommended Readings:
Gell, Alfred, 1998. Art and Agency: An Anthropological Theory. Oxford: Clarendon Press
Miller, Daniel, 1987. Material Culture and Mass Consumption. Oxford: Basil Blackwell
-----------, 2005. Materiality: an introduction. In Materiality, D. Miller (ed.). Durham & London:
Duke University Press, 1-50
-----------, 2007. Stone age or plastic age? Archaeological Dialogues 14(1): 23-7

Week 9 Is ontology just another word for culture?

The emancipation of the thing is in anthropology linked to an increased interest in ontology. For
some cutting edge anthropologists, ontology should replace the notion of culture as the disciplines
central concept. Here we tap into a debate from the Group for Debates in Anthropological Theory:
Ontology just another word for culture.

Required Readings:
Ontology Is Just Another Word for Culture. In Critique of Anthropology 2010, 30(2): 152-200.
Available online through the library.

Viveiros de Castro, Eduardo 1998. Cosmological deixis and Amerindian perspectivism. Journal of
the Royal Anthropological Institute, 4(3): 469-488

Week 10 Power, governmentality and agency
Anthropology has recently witnessed a renewed interest in power and politics. Foucaults
conception of power as positive and creative has been particularly significant here. More recently
his concept of governmentality, the rationalities of government, has been adopted and employed
by anthropologists. Sometimes this is linked or even contrasted to an interest in agency.


Required readings:
Gordon, Colin 1991. Governmental rationality: an introduction in The Foucault Reader 1991.
London: Penguin.
Inda, Jonathan Xavier 2005. Analytics of the modern: an introduction, in Anthropologies of
modernity: Foucault, governmentality, and life politics (ed.) Jonathan Xavier Inda. Oxford:
Blackwell, pp.1-20.
Ortner, Sherry B. 2006. Power and projects: reflections on agency in Anthropology and social
theory: culture, power and the acting subject. London: Duke University Press, pp. 129-153.

Recommended Readings:
Collier, Stephen J. 2005. Budgets and biopolitics in Global assemblages: technology, politics, and
ethics as anthropological problems (eds.) Aihwa Ong and Stehpen J. Collier. Oxford: Blackwell,
pp.373-390.
The Foucault effect: studies in governmentality (eds.) G. Burchell, C. Gordon & P. Miller. London:
Harvester Wheatsheaf.
The Foucault Reader 1991. London: Penguin.
Harvey, David 2005. A brief history of neo-liberalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

14
Inda, Jonathan Xavier (ed.) 2005. Anthropologies of modernity: Foucault, governmentality, and life
politics. Oxford: Blackwell.
Navaro-Yashin, Yael 2003. Life is dead here. Sensing the political in no mans land.
Anthropological Theory3 (1):107-125.
Ong, Aihwa 2005. Ecologies of expertise: assembling flows, managing citizenship, in Global
assemblages: technology, politics, and ethics as anthropological problems (eds.) Aihwa Ong and
Stehpen J. Collier. Oxford: Blackwell, pp.337-353.
Ong, Aihwa & Stephen J. Collier (eds.) 2005. Global assemblages: technology, politics, and ethics
as anthropological problems. Oxford: Blackwell.
Scott, David 2005. Colonial governmentality, in Anthropologies of modernity: Foucault,
governmentality, and life politics (ed.) Jonathan Xavier Inda. Oxford: Blackwell, pp.23-49.

Week 11 Subjectivity
A number of different approaches are of course possible when researching personhood, self and
subjectivity anthropologically. This week to concentrate on foucaultian approaches and discuss in
particular Foucaults work on technologies of the self and Nikolas Roses work on genealogy of
subjectification.

Required Readings:
Cruikshank, B. 1993. Revolutions within: self-government and self-esteem. Economy and Society
22:327-44.
Fuss, Diana 1995. Introduction and Chapter 1 of Identification papers. London: Routledge.
Foucault, Michel 1988. Technologies of the self, in Technologies of the self. A seminar with Michel
Foucault (eds.) L.H. Martin, H. Gutman & P.H. Hutton. Amherst: The University of Massachusetts
Press.
Good, Byron 2012. Theorizing the subject of medical and psychiatric anthropology. JRAI
18(3):515-535.
Rose, Nikolas 1996. Inventing our selves: psychology, power and personhood, Cambridge:
University Press. (Chapter How to write history of the self).

Recommended Readings:
Cruikshank, B. 1994. The will to empower: technologies of citizenship and the war on poverty.
Socialist Review 23:29-55.
Foucault, Michel 1983. The subject and power, in Michel Foucault: beyond structuralism and
hermeneutics (eds.) H.L. Dreyfus & P. Rabinow, 2
nd
edition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Rose, Nikolas 1989. Governing the soul. The shaping of the private self, London: Routledge.
Rose, Nikolas 1992. Governing the enterprising self, in P. Heelas and P. Morris (eds) The values
of the enterprise culture: the moral debate, London: Routledge.
Rose, Nikolas 1996. Inventing our selves: psychology, power and personhood, Cambridge:
University Press.


TUTORIALS


15

MyTimetable
You will be able to choose your tutorials and finalise your personal timetable via
MyTimetable. Step-by-step online help will guide you through this process. You can access
MyTimetable on your phone, tablet or PC as well as subscribe to it on Android, iPhone or
Outlook.

Once signed up for a tutorial group, you MUST stay in that group. Changes of group will only be
allowed in exceptional circumstances, and must be approved in advance by the course co-
ordinator. Your tutor and the School Office have copies of the form which must be used to request
permission to attend an alternative tutorial, even if it is only for one week.

Tutorial
meeting
number
Week commencing Topic
1 (10) 15 Sept 2014 No tutorial
2 (11) 22 Sept 2014 Introduction
3 (12) 29 Sept 2014 Culture
4 (13) 6 Oct 2014 Society
5 (14) 13 Oct 2014 Habitus and
embodiment
6 (15) 20 Oct 2014 Emotion
7 (16) 27 Oct 2014 Reproduction and
biopower
8 (17) 3 Nov 2014 Technology and
society
9 (18) 10 Nov 2014 Can the thing talk?
10 (19) 17 Nov 2014 Ontology
11 (20) 24 Nov 2014 Power

Tutorial Outlines
Meeting 1 N/A
There is no tutorial in the first week.

Meeting 2 Introduction
Tutorial party games: Introduction.

Meeting 3 Culture
Tutorial statement: The concept of culture is only useful in anthropology if culture is understood to
be a relatively bounded and coherent entity.

Meeting 4 Society
Tutorial declaration: Anthropology has to move beyond the notion of society and its derivatives.

Meeting 5 Habitus and embodiment
Tutorial questions: What exactly is habitus? Does the concept move us beyond the classic
anthropological concept of culture? What is embodiment? Can focus on the body move
anthropological theorising beyond the impasse that the concept of society has reached? Part of the
tutorial will be devoted to a close reading of a paragraph of Bourdieu.

16
Meeting 6 Emotion
Tutorial answer: Emotion is best understood as produced through discourse.

Meeting 7 Reproduction and biopower
Tutorial demand: Students will be given a short text to read. They will be divided into small groups
and asked to analyse this text, thinking in particular whether the concept of biopolitics is useful in
that process.

Meeting 8 Technology and society
Tutorial adventure: Bruno Latour claims in one place that technology is society made durable.
Students will be invited to think about this statement, a process that will involve thinking about the
meaning of technology and of society and the possible links between the two, if indeed they are
two. The tutorial may involve an outing

Meeting 9 Can the thing talk
Tutorial misadventure: This tutorial will involve a close reading of Holbraads paper Can the thing
speak and a debate on its substance.

Meeting 10 Ontologists have all the fun
Tutorial drama: In the final staging of the debate that had its dress rehearsal in Manchester, we
will debate the question: Is ontology just another word for culture.

Meeting 11 Power, governmentality and agency
Tutorial musical: What are the main characteristics and uses of the Foucauldian concept of
power? Can it take us beyond the dead end that the concept of society is to many theorists? If so,
how? What is agency? What is the link between power and agency if any? What is
governmentality? Are there any traces of the anthropological concept of culture in the idea of
governmentality?

READING

All required readings will be available in the course reader, through journals available in the library,
or through electronic books available through the library.

Recommended background reading for the course
Appadurai, Arjun. 1996. Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis and
London: University of Minnesota Press.
Bourdieu, Pierre 1977. Outline of a theory of practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Carrithers, Michael 1993. Why humans have cultures. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Clifford, James & George E. Marcus (eds.) 1986. Writing culture. The poetics and politics of
anthropology. Berkeley: University of California Press.
Comaroff, John & Jean Comaroff 1992. Ethnography and the historical imagination. Boulder:
Westview Press.
Csordas, Thomas J. (ed.) 1994. Embodiment and experience: the existential ground of culture and
self. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Foucault Michel 1980. Power/knowledge, (ed.) Colin Gordon. Brighton: Harvester Press.
Geertz, Clifford 1973. Interpretation of cultures. New York: Basic Books.
Gupta Akhil & James Ferguson (eds.) 1997. Culture, power, place. Explorations in critical
anthropology. London: Duke University Press.
Inda, Jonathan Xavier (ed.) 2005. Anthropologies of Modernity. Foucault, governmentality and life
politics. Oxford: Blackwell.
Ingold, Tim 1986. Evolution and social life. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Ingold, Tim 2000. Perception of the environment. London: Routledge.

17
Moore, Henrietta L (ed.) 1999. Anthropological theory today. Cambridge: Polity Press.
Moore, Henrietta L. & Todd Sanders (eds.) 2006. Anthropology in theory: issues in epistemology.
Oxford: Blackwell.
Ong, Aihwa & Stephen J. Collier (eds.) 2005. Global assemblages: technology, politics, and ethics
as anthropological problems. Oxford: Blackwell.
Wolf, Eric 1982. Europe and the people without history. Berkeley: University of California Press.


18


What you need to do now:

Book a place in a tutorial group via MyTimetable. Step-by-step online help will guide you
through this process. You can access MyTimetable on your phone, tablet or PC as well as
subscribe to it on Android, iPhone or Outlook.
Note the day/week numbers/time and room.
Note your lecture times day/week numbers/time and room.
Note your essay deadlines.
Read the Student Handbook.
Start the prescribed reading.

All students are asked to make themselves familiar with the information on key institutional
policies which have been made available within MyAberdeen.
(https://abdn.blackboard.com/bbcswebdav/institution/Policies).
These policies are relevant to all students and will be useful to you throughout your studies. They
contain important information and address issues such as what to do if you are absent, how to
raise an appeal or a complaint and how seriously the University takes your feedback.
These institutional policies should be read in conjunction with the School Handbook, in which
School and College specific policies are detailed. Further information can be found on the
Universitys Infohub webpage or by visiting the Infohub.
The information included in the institutional area for 2014-2015 includes the following:

Absence
Academic Appeals & Complaints
Common Grading Scale
Codes of Practice on Student Discipline (Academic and Non-Academic)
Class Certificates
Transcripts
MyAberdeen
TurnitinUK
Feedback Framework
Communication
Aberdeen Graduate Attributes
The Co-Curriculum


What else do you need to know about?
Submission of assignments

Please submit your assignment electronically through TurnitinUK (go to MyAberdeen at:
http://www.abdn.ac.uk/students/myaberdeen.php ). Print off page one of the TurnitinUK
Originality Report and affix it and the cover sheet, when completed, to your assignment. The
submission date is that logged on TurnitinUK.

Hard copies of assignments, with a completed cover sheet, are to be placed in the relevant essay
box opposite room F14 in Edward Wright Building. Only ONE hard copy of assignment is
required.

Your course work must be properly referenced. Please note all books, articles, websites etc that
are referenced in essays need to have been directly consulted before they are referenced.


19

Instructions are noted in the Student Handbook, and on the web at: www.abdn.ac.uk/sls/online-
resources/avoiding-plagiarism and details will also be provided in the tutorials.

Any student who thinks that they will be unable to submit an essay by the deadline due to illness or
personal difficulties may request an extension from their tutor or course co-ordinator before the
due date. They must give supporting evidence of the medical condition or personal
circumstance. The extension must be signed by the tutor or course co-ordinator on the
assignment cover sheet.

Any student who misses the deadline due to illness or adverse personal circumstances has one
week after the deadline in which to contact the tutor or course co-ordinator, in writing, to explain
the reason for the delay. Supporting evidence of the medical condition or personal circumstance
must be included.

If an essay is handed in after the submission date without an acceptable reason (see above), then
the highest mark it can be awarded is 9.

No extensions will be granted for submission after the Monday at the start of the relevant exam
diet (December or May annually).

Plagiarism and referencing

We expect what you submit as course work to be your own work. One way we try to ensure this is
by requiring that essays be submitted to TurnitinUK via MyAberdeen:
http://www.abdn.ac.uk/students/myaberdeen.php
TurnitinUK is an online service which compares student assignments with online sources including
web pages, databases of reference material, and content previously submitted by other users across
the UK. The software makes no decision as to whether plagiarism has occurred; it is simply a tool
which highlights sections of text that have been found in other sources thereby helping academic staff
decide whether plagiarism has occurred.

TurnitinUK will be accessed directly through MyAberdeen. Advice about avoiding plagiarism, the
Universitys Definition of Plagiarism, a Checklist for Students, Referencing and Citing guidance, and
instructions for TurnitinUK can be found in the following area of the Student Learning service
website: www.abdn.ac.uk/sls/online-resources/avoiding-plagiarism

We distinguish between bad practice and cheating. We do not tolerate students deliberately
passing off the work of others as their own, and will investigate any suspected cases. You must
make sure you understand the rules and follow the instructions given to you.

Self-Plagiarism

While it is entirely legitimate for you to pursue a particular interest through the levels and courses
of your degree, you should not recycle assessed course work from one course to another or from a
taught course to a dissertation. Such recycling is likely to attract a poor grade because:
o Unless the questions are identical, work that answers one essay question well is likely to be
poorly fitted or even irrelevant to another;
o Work that fits well within the requirements of one exercise (a short Level 1 essay for
example) will fail to meet the standard or level of detail required for a different exercise (a
Level 4 essay or a dissertation, for example);
o We expect students to progress through their years of study. A level of understanding that
attracts a good grade at Level 1 will be much less impressive at Level 3.

Guidance on approved referencing techniques can be found in the Good Writing Guides on
MyAberdeen.

The University regards plagiarism as a serious offence. In extreme cases it can result in the
student being removed from the course.

20




Feedback

We provide feedback that aims to be timely, constructive, clear, detailed and helpful.
Staff offer feedback through a combination of the following:
Oral and written comments on assessed work, class presentations, multiple choice tests,
dissertation presentations and guidance on exam techniques.
Comments are given within 2-3 weeks of submission of work.

Staff-Student Liaison Committee Meetings (feedback)
Please note Dates and times of the Student /Staff Liaison Committee (SSLC) meetings, attended
by Class representatives and School representatives are as follows:

HS1 course discussions - Wednesday 3 December 2014 from 2 pm
HS2 course discussions - Wednesday 29 April 2015 from 2 pm

If you would like help with your study, such as essay writing techniques, contact the Student
Learning Service: http://www.abdn.ac.uk/sls/
If you need additional help during your course or at exam time, contact:
http://www.abdn.ac.uk/student-support/

Please do remember to check your university e-mail account regularly. If you decide to contact
staff by e-mail, please write the message carefully so that it is immediately clear who the message
is from and what the issue is.

If I have any other questions then who can I ask?

Your tutor (contact details will be given to you at your first tutorial meeting)
The course co-ordinator (see front of guide)
At the School Office, room F50 Edward Wright Building socsci@abdn.ac.uk
Your departmental secretary (see front of guide)



21




SPACE MANAGEMENT (TEACHING TIMETABLING) NEW WEEK NUMBERS 2014-2015

Week 1 14 July 2014 -18 July 2014 Resit exams start Saturday 19th July
Week 2 21 July 2014 -25 July 2014 Resit exams
Week 3 28 July 2014 -01 August 2014 Resit exams
Week 4 04 August 2014 -08 August 2014
Week 5 11 August 2014 -15 August 2014 Result deadline Wednesday 13th August
Week 6 18 August 2014 -22 August 2014
Week 7 25 August 2014 -29 August 2014
Week 8 01 September 2014 -05 September 2014
Week 9 08 September 2014 -12 September 2014 - Freshers week
Week 10 15 September 2014 -19 September 2014 First half session teaching starts
Week 11 22 September 2014 -26 September 2014
Week 12 29 September 2014 -03 October 2014
Week 13 06 October 2014 -10 October 2014
Week 14 13 October 2014 -17 October 2014
Week 15 20 October 2014 -24 October 2014
Week 16 27 October 2014 -31 October 2014
Week
17
03 November 2014 -07 November 2014
Week 18 10 November 2014 -14 November 2014
Week 19 17 November 2014 -21 November 2014
Week 20 24 November 2014 -28 November 2014
Week 21 01 December 2014 -05 December 2014 Structured Revision week
Week 22 08 December 2014 -12 December 2014 Exams
Week 23 15 December 2014 -19 December 2014 Exams
Week 24 22 December 2014 -26 December 2014 Holidays
Week 25 29 December 2014 -02 January 2015 - Holidays
Week 26 05 January 2015 -09 January 2015 Holidays
Week 27 12 January 2015 -16 January 2015
Week 28 19 January 2015 -23 January 2015 Second half session teaching starts
Week 29 26 January 2015 -30 January 2015
Week 30 02 February 2015 -06 February 2015
Week 31 09 February 2015 -13 February 2015
Week 32 16 February 2015 -20 February 2015
Week 33 23 February 2015 -27 February 2015
Week 34 02 March 2015 -06 March 2015
Week 35 09 March 2015 - 13/03/2015
Week 36 16 March 2015 -20 March 2015
Week 37 23 March 2015 -27 March 2015
Week 38 30 March 2015 -03 April 2015
Week 39 06 April 2015 -10 April 2015 Holidays
Week 40 13 April 2015 -17 April 2015 Holidays
Week 41 20 April 2015 -24 April 2015 Holidays
Week 42 27 April 2015 -01 May 2015 Revision week
Week 43 04 May 2015 -08 May 2015 Exams
Week 44 11 May 2015 -15 May 2015 Exams
Week 45 18 May 2015 -22 May 2015 Exams
Week 46 25 May 2015 -29 May 2015

22
Week 47 01 June 2015 -05 June 2015
Week 48 08 June 2015 -12 June 2015
Week 49 15 June 2015 -19 June 2015 Graduation/Revision week
Week 50 22 June 2015 -26 June 2015 Resit exams
Week 51 29 June 2015 -03 July 2015 Resit exams
Week 52 06 July 2015 -10 July 2015