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GE

Security

EST3
Self-Study Course
P/N 270412 Rev 4.0 30JUN06

Copyright

Copyright 2009 GE Security, Inc. All rights reserved.


This document may not be copied in whole or in part or otherwise reproduced
without prior written consent from GE Security, Inc., except where specifically
permitted under U.S. and international copyright law.

Disclaimer

The information in this document is subject to change without notice.


GE Security, Inc. (GE Security) assumes no responsibility for inaccuracies or
omissions and specifically disclaims any liabilities, losses, or risks, personal or
otherwise, incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, of the use or
application of any of the contents of this document. For the latest documentation,
contact your local supplier or visit us online at www.gesecurity.com.
This publication may contain examples of screen captures and reports used in daily
operations. Examples may include fictitious names of individuals and companies.
Any similarity to names and addresses of actual businesses or persons is entirely
coincidental.

Trademarks and patents

GE and the GE monogram are registered trademarks of General Electric Company.


Other trade names used in this document may be trademarks or registered
trademarks of the manufacturers or vendors of the respective products.

Intended use

CREDITS

Use this product only for the purpose it was designed for; refer to the data sheet
and user documentation for details. For the latest product information, contact
your local supplier or visit us online at www.gesecurity.com.

This manual was designed and written by the GE Security


Technical Training Department.

DOCUMENT HISTORY
Date

Revision

Reason for change

22SEPT96

1.0

Initial release

25JULY96

1.5

Revision

18JAN99

2.0

Revision
Added: Module 7 and upgraded 3-CPU1

30JAN01

3.0

Revision
Upgraded to Installation and Service Manual Rev. 3.0 and System
Operations Manual Rev. 3.0.

30JUN06

4.0

Revision
Upgrade to Installation and Service manual, Rev. 6.0; System
Operations Manual, Rev. 6.0; Installation Sheets, Rev. 3.0; and
introduction to basic programming, 3-SDU, release 3.6 or greater.

Content

Module 1

EST3 Enclosures and major components 1.1


Introduction to module 1 1.2
Key items 1.5
Objectives 1.6
EST3 Cabinet installation 1.7
3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 panel controller module 1.18
Network theory 1.25
3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 option cards 1.26
EST3 power supplies 1.38
EST3 component installation 1.49
Module 1 evaluation 1.55

Module 2

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 displays 2.1


Introduction to module 2 2.2
Key items 2.3
Objectives 2.4
3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 display modules 2.5
3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 display front panel controls 2.11
LCD displays 2.23
EST3 message processing 2.30
EST3 command menu 2.31
Optional control/display modules 2.52
EST3 addressing 2.59
Module 2 evaluation 2.65

Module 3

Traditional zone I/O module 3.1


Introduction to module 3 3.2
Key items 3.3
Objectives 3.4
3-IDC8/4 traditional zone I/O module 3.5
Module 3 evaluation 3.10

Module 4

Analog addressable driver controller 4.1


Introduction to module 4 4.2
Key items 4.3
Objectives 4.4
3-AADC analog addressable controller module 4.5
Module evaluation 4.9

EST3 Self Study Course

Content

Module 5

Signature driver controllers 5.1


Introduction to module 5 5.3
Key items 5.4
Objectives 5.5
3-SSDC(1) and 3-SDDC(1) Signature driver controllers 5.6
Signature Series detectors 5.10
Signature Series bases 5.15
Signature Series modules 5.23
SIGA module personality codes 5.20
Signature Series manual pull stations 5.29
Remaining SIGA modules 5.34
Example 3-SSDC(1) / 3-SDDC(1) application 5.61
Module evaluation 5.63

Module 6

Emergency voice paging and audio systems 6.1


Introduction to module 6 6.2
Key items 6.3
Objectives 6.4
3-ASU audio source unit 6.5
EST3 amplifiers 6.18
3-ASU/FT audio source unit with firefighter telephone 6.24
Module evaluation 6.32

Module 7

EST3 supplementary components 7.1


Introduction to module 7 7.2
Key items 7.3
Objectives 7.4
EST3 ancillary modules 7.5
3-OPS off-premises notification signaling module 7.8
3-MODCOM, 3-MODCOMP modem communicator module 7.13
3-SAC security access control module 7.21
CRC and CRCXM card reader controller module 7.25
KPDISP keypad display module module 7.34
Remote annunciator cabinets 7.38
Envoy series graphic annunciator 7.43
CDR-3 zone coder 7.46
EST3 compatible printers 7.48
Module evaluation 7.50

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EST3 Self Study Course

Content

Important information
Limitation of liability
This product has been designed to meet the requirements of
NFPA Standard 72, 1993 Edition; Underwriters Laboratories,
Inc., Standard 864, 7th Edition; and Underwriters Laboratories
of Canada, Inc., Standard ULC S527. Installation in accordance
with this manual, applicable codes, and the instructions of the
Authority Having Jurisdiction is mandatory. GE Security shall
not under any circumstances be liable for any incidental or
consequential damages arising from loss of property or other
damages or losses owing to the failure of GE Security
products beyond the cost of repair or replacement of any
defective products. GE Security reserves the right to make
product improvements and change product specifications at
any time.
While every precaution was taken during the preparation of
this manual to ensure the accuracy of its contents, EST
assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions. Features
described in this manual are subject to change without notice.

FCC warning
This equipment can generate and radiate radio frequency
energy. If this equipment is not installed in accordance with
this manual, related product manuals and installation sheets,
it may cause interference to radio communications. This
equipment has been tested and found to comply within the
limits for Class A computing devices pursuant to Subpart B of
Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These rules are designed to provide
reasonable protection against such interference when this
equipment is operated in a commercial environment.
Operation of this equipment is likely to cause interference, in
which case the user at his or her own expense, will be
required to take whatever measures may be required to
correct the interference.

EST3 Self Study Course

iii

Content

EST3 Self-Study Course getting started


Welcome to GE Securities EST3 Self-Study Course. This
course is designed to train you, the technician, in:
Component identification.
The application of component features and functions
to meet your unique project requirements.
The installation of components within an EST3
systems environment.
The use of the EST3 front panel controls and
indicators to monitor system operation, administrate
system operator privileges and diagnose system
activation or trouble events.
Configure EST3 system components and database to
support desired project requirements.
The materials for this course include:

EST3 Installation and Service Manual (P/N 270380)


EST3 System Operations Manual (P/N 270382)
EST3 Self-Study Course Manual (P/N 270412)
EST3 Online Support System CD (P/N 270395), which
also contains media copies of the Technical Manuals and
other related publications.

This self-study course is also designed to facilitate your use of


the EST3 technical reference manuals and related
publications. While taking this course, keep the manuals close
by, as you will be referred to them on frequent occasions.

iv

EST3 Self Study Course

Content

This self-study course also facilitates the use of the EST3


Online Support System CD. It is also a good idea to have this
CD installed on your pc while taking this course. You can
minimize this CDs window while performing other tasks and
then maximize it when you wish to reference it.
As you can see, publications and the 3-SDU HELP utility are
easily selected from the contents list on the left side of the
screen to be viewed during the course. This online support CD
also gives you the ability to print copies of any publications
listed.

EST Partner Login

Two types of students participate in this EST3 self-study


course:
The Strategic Partner Technician.
The Strategic Partner sponsored End User.

EST3 Self Study Course

Content

The SP technician has access to the GE Security Partners area


and the sponsored End Users do not. The most current
publications files are available under GE Security partners. To
gain access to the publications on the web, go to
www.gesecurity.com.
Select Training and subsequently select GE Security Partner
Login to gain access to the EST3 related publications. On the
Login window enter your PIN number that you received when
you received conformation to the self-study course. Enter
your password and click on SIGN IN.

vi

EST3 Self Study Course

Content

EST3 Self Study Course

vii

Content

The course consists of seven modules covering the EST3


components and their installation. The modules were
designed for use in a logical progression. Accordingly, study
them in the order in which they are presented.
To answer any questions or concerns encountered while
studying these modules, you can contact a course instructor
at the GE Security Training Department.
Upon completion of each module take the appropriate online
module examination at our WEB Site.
Simply go to www.gesecurity.com, select Training, sign-in,
select online training, select Self-Study Testing and then
select EST3 Self-Study Test.
An average grade test score of 85% for all modules combined
is required for successful completion. Upon satisfactory
completion, you are qualified to take the factory based EST3
Programming and Network Class. This class is necessary to
complete the course and receive your certification and the
3-SDU software.

viii

EST3 Self Study Course

Content

Bring the manuals and CD you received with your Self-Study


Course to the EST3 Programming and Network Class. These
will be used for reference during this class.
Mail any correspondence to:
GE Security
Training Department
8985 Town Center Parkway
Bradenton, FL 34202
Our FAX number is: 1 866 534 5117
To talk to an instructor, please call 1 941 739-4304.
Caution: Use caution when using this course material as a

reference manual after completing the course. Changes and


additions to EST3 will continue for the life of the product.
These will be added to the EST3 technical reference manuals
in periodic revisions. Your course material may NOT receive
these revisions. The Installation Sheets received with
hardware will contain the most current information.

EST3 Self Study Course

ix

Content

EST3 Programming and Network Course


Prerequisites:
You must successful complete of the EST3 Hardware and
Installation Self-Study Course or the three-day EST3
Hardware and Installation Classroom Course.
You should have at least two years of field experience or
training with other Fire Alarm systems. Make sure that you
and your management have selected a course that is
compatible with your skill level. If you have an opportunity
to work with an EST3 prior to class, please do so
Caution: This course is not intended for those new to the

industry. Students that come to class with the appropriate


background have an easier time during this class. For those
new to the industry it is recommended that they attend Basic
Fire, Fire Alarm Tech and possibly other GE Security fire alarm
product courses prior to attending the EST3 Programming
and Network Course.
You should have some field experience with programming,
be comfortable with computers and have some working
experience in a Windows environment.
You will also configure and program Signature Devices during
this course. You will be Signature certified when you graduate
from this course.
During class you will work on classroom computers. However,
you should bring a laptop to the course, it will be a helpful tool
during some class activities and an aid in completing
homework assignments.
This is an intense, hand-on course. If you do not meet the
above prerequisites, achieving a passing score may be
difficult.

EST3 Self Study Course

Module 1

EST3 Enclosures and major components

Summary
This module describes the cabinets and the required primary
components of the EST3 System. This module also gives
detailed instructions for the installation and wiring of the basic
EST3 System.

Content
Introduction to module 1 1.2
Key items 1.5
Objectives 1.6
EST3 Cabinet installation 1.7
3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 panel controller modules 1.18
Network theory 1.25
3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 option cards 1.26
3-RS485 network communications card 1.26
3-FIB fiber optic communications cards 1.34
3-RS232 ancillary communications card 1.36
EST3 power supplies 1.38
Primary power supply, 3-PPS/M or 3-PPS/M-230 1.39
Booster power supply, 3-BPS/M or 3-BPS/M-230 1.44
EST3 component installation 1.49
Module 1 evaluation 1.55

EST3 Self Study Course

1.1

Enclosures and major components

Introduction to module 1
GE Securitys EST3 is a multiplexed fire alarm network that can
link up to 64 panel controllers (nodes) together to form a peerto-peer token ring network. EST3 is designed with modular
hardware and software components to ensure rapid
configuration, installation, and testing. Most of the network
components are quick connect, plug-in assemblies that
provide data processing, inter-panel communications,
response data, audio signal processing, and power
distribution. In addition, each module provides standoffs to
support a variety of operator layer control/display
(Switch/LED) modules. The control/display modules operate
independently from the modules to which they are attached.
As you begin this study of GE Securitys EST3, it is important to
understand that your education has four parts.
Part 1 is this EST3 Self-Study Course. This course introduces
the components of the system, their function and features,
and their installation procedures. This self-study also
introduces you to some basis prerequisite programming
knowledge you will need to learn prior to attending factory
training. Upon completing this course, you will be able to
identify each EST3 component, discuss its function and
features, demonstrate the ability to install it properly and
discuss the basis configuration and programming aspects of
the EST3 systems 3-SDU configuration applications software.
Part 2 is the EST3 Programming and Network Course, which is
instructor led, factory-based training that takes place at the
GE Security Training Center in Bradenton, Florida. Here you will
receive instruction on state-of-the-art programming
techniques for the EST3 data entry program, called the System
Definition Utility, (3-SDU). This course is application-driven and
is designed to provide you with the most effective means of
programming the integrated EST3 system for fire applications.
For this reason, advanced programming of an EST3 network is
not discussed in this self-study course.
Part 3 is the EST3 Synergy Enabled 3-MODCOM self-study
Course. This course describes the features and capabilities of
the 3-MODCOM and 3-MODCOMP, which are modem and
dialer local rail modules used in integrated EST3 system
environments. This course describes MODCOM operations,
installation considerations and introduces you to the basic
MODCOM configuration and programming process required
to incorporate the MODCOM into an integrated EST3
environment for fire applications.

1.2

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

This self-study course is designed for those who are EST3


certified for fire alarm systems and is the prerequisite training
for the EST3 Synergy Enabled integrated system certification
course. The MODCOM does not require factory training and
successful completion of this self-study enables your
organization to purchase the MODCOM products and
incorporate them into your EST3 application for fire using the
3-SDU, release 3.0 or greater. The more sophisticated
integrated fire, security and access control MODCOM
applications are discussed in detail in the EST3 Synergy
Enabled integrated system certification course
Part 4 is the EST3 Synergy Enabled Course, which is instructor
led, factory-based training that takes place at the GE Security
Training Center in Bradenton, Florida. Here you will receive
instruction on state-of-the-art programming techniques for
the EST3 Synergy Enabled integrated dialer/modem, fire,
security and access control applications.. This course is
application-driven and is designed to provide you with the
most effective means of programming the fully integrated
EST3 system. This course introduces the components of the
Synergy Enabled integrated system, their function, and their
installation procedures. Upon completing this course, you will
be able to identify each EST3 Synergy component, discuss
their function and features, demonstrate the ability to install
them properly, discuss the configuration and programming
aspects of the EST3 systems advanced integrated dialer, fire,
security and access control applications and perform the
configuration and programming tasks of the EST3 systems
advanced integrated dialer, fire, security and access control
applications
This enclosures and major components module discusses the
cabinets available for EST3 components. In addition, we
discuss the fundamental components that every EST3 system
cabinet must have. These are each EST3 panels 3-CPU central
processing unit, the 3-PPS primary power supply heat sync
assembly, and the 3-PSMON primary power supply monitor
module.
When discussing cabinets, it is important to remember that
the integrated EST3 fire alarm system is modular by design. As
a result, the cabinets you encounter here will be somewhat
different than those you may have encountered in the past.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.3

Enclosures and major components

Associated study

Use the following technical reference manuals and installation


sheets as associated study material for this module:

EST3 Installation and Service Manual, (P/N 270380, Rev 8.0, or


later)
EST3 System Operations Manual, (P/N 270382, Rev 8.0, or later)

EST3 Fire Alarm Support Tools, Online Support System CD


(P/N 270395, Rev 6.0 or later)
The EST3 component installation sheets, Signature Series
component, installation sheets, and other related manuals are
available for your reference on this CD.

All of the required EST3 manuals, installation sheets and


related literature are contained on this CD. However, the
documents published on this CD may not be current to the
release level of the components. The most current EST3
system and Signature literature is available to you via our web
site at www.GE.com. All thats required in your student PIN
number given you when you received your EST3 self-study kits
and a password you establish when you first login. Refer to
the EST3 Self-Study Course getting started description in the
front matter of this manual for instructions on using the CD or
connecting to our web site.
This Online Support System CD and our web site are a useful
tools. The minimum system requirements for your PC or
laptop are:

IBM compatible Pentium computer


SVGA monitor (800 x 600 pixel at 256 color)
Windows 2000 or greater
2X CD-ROM Drive
Acrobat Reader software version 7.0 or later

The installation of this CD is easy, simply put CD in your drive


and follow screen prompts to install Acrobat and then start
using the support tools. If Acrobat is already installed simply
put CD in the drive and start using the support tools. It may
be a good idea to install the CD, keep its window open and
minimize/maximize this window to reference literature during
this course.
As stated above, it would be impossible for GE Training to
maintain these installation sheets to their current revisions
levels on the CD, which is updated when major changes to the
EST3 system are made. The actual installation sheets, shipped
with the product components and those posted on our web
site, reflect the current revision levels. It would be good
practice to maintain a current set of these installation sheets
on site and/or at your office.

1.4

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Key items
Key points to look for:

Lobby and remote cabinets


Chassis types
Layered design
Local rail module (hardware layer)
Control/LED display modules (operator layer)
System Installation sequence
Rail assembly
3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 panel controllers
3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 option cards
Inter cabinet/chassis cable connections
Class A vs Class B network data and audio risers
AC power and battery wiring
Peer to peer, token passing network
3PPS/M primary power supply
3-PSMON primary power supply monitor LRM
3BPS/M booster power supply
3-BPMON booster power supply monitor LRM
Rail chassis interface card

Key terms and components to learn:

EST3 Self Study Course

Rail
Communications cards (3-RS232, 3-RS485 and 3-FIB)
Class A and Class B Network Data Riser
Class A and Class B Audio Riser
Inner, middle and outer layers
Inter-rail-to-rail data and power wiring
Heat-sink assembly
Monitor module
Slot location

1.5

Enclosures and major components

Objectives
Upon completion of this module you will be able to:
1. Identify specific cabinet and chassis types.
2. Install EST3 cabinet enclosures and chassis
3. Describe the three layers of a chassis assembly.
4. Describe the basic system installation sequence.
5. Describe how the data and power cables are connected
between chassis within a cabinet.
6. Identify the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 and describe their
functions.
7. Install the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 local rail modules.
8. Identify the types and describe the functions of the plug-in
option cards for the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3.
9. Install the CPU option cards.
10. Identify the 3-PPS/M and 3-BPS/M power supplies and
give their specifications.
11. Install a 3-PPS/M and 3-BPS/M power supply and its
related monitor LRM.
12. Differentiate between the 3-PPS/M and 3-BPS/M power
supplies.

1.6

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

EST3 Cabinet installation


Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 1:
System Overview.
Read: related EST3 Installation Sheets (P/N 3100051, Rev. 3.0).
Chapter 1 and the related installation sheets provide an
overview of the EST3 system, its structure and relevant design
and application requirements. This chapter is an excellent
way to get started on this self-study course. In this lesson,
pay particular attention to the physical structure of an EST3
cabinet and the Class A and B wiring considerations for the
Data Network and Audio Risers considerations.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 5:
Installation.
In this lesson, pay particular attention to the topic System
installation sequence. In Chapter 5, (Figure 1-1) which
describes the recommended installation sequence. The steps
shown are an excellent example of the sequence of events
that should take place for the successful installation of an
EST3 fire alarm network.
When practical, it is most efficient to develop a startup version
of your projects application, where you have configured only
the cabinets and modules, minus the field devices (i.e.
Signature devices). This startup version is then downloaded
into each cabinet before the field wiring is connected (i.e.
signature devices). This startup version is used to establish the
cabinet address identity of each node and to limit
troubleshooting to the module level of each node (Local
Troubles). After this phase you will then connect field wiring
and download the full application version and resolve any
field troubles (System Troubles) that may occur.
When a large multi-node system is involved, another labor
saver would be to select a staging area. Each cabinet node
would then be built in the staging area and the startup version
of the applications would be downloaded, into it establishing
its identity. All local troubles would then be resolved. After all
local troubles have been eliminated the cabinet would then be
installed at its final location within the facility and the field
devices connected. After the system has been preconfigured
in this manner, the full application is downloaded via the
network and any system troubles are resolved.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.7

Enclosures and major components

Start

Verify the field wiring per Chapter 5, Preliminary field wiring testing,
Table 5-3
Install chassis assemblies into appropriate panel enclosures.
Refer to the appropriate installation sheets
Install the chassis footprint mounted modules - primary and backup
power supply heat sync assemblies, ASU and FTCU
per the appropriate installation sheets.
Install chassis-to-chassis inter-enclosure cables
per the 3-CHAS7 installation sheet P/N 270484
NOTE: Remember your rail-to-rail chassis interface card cables
when using an ASU and FTCU
Install all rail modules and control/display modules in
their required slot locations.
Refer to Chapter 5, Local rail module installation and the
appropriate installation sheets

Download the initial startup version of your applications CPU


database to each node, and clear any panel local troubles.
Establish each nodes system identity.
Refer to Chapter 5, Creating an initial startup version of the project
database
Install chassis-to-chassis inter-enclosure cables.
Refer the 3-CHAS7 installation sheet P/N 270484.
NOTE: Remember your rail-to-rail chassis interface card cables
when using an ASU and FTCU .
Connect field wiring, download the full application
and clear any system troubles.
Refer to Chapter 6, Power up and Testing and 8, Service and
troubleshooting.
Verify proper system operation.
Refer to Chapter 6 detector, input module, and output module a testing.
Finish

Fill out systems record completion.


Refer Chapter 6, Record of completion

Figure 1-1: System installation sequence.

1.8

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

When you begin this chapter, note the power-limited and nonpower-limited wiring requirements in a typical cabinet,
described in the 3-CAB Series Enclosure Equipment Backboxes
installation sheets (P/N 387557) and 3-CAB-E Series
Equipment Enclosure Doors (P/N 270488 and P/N 387549). In
addition, closely read the cabinet installation instructions in
the 3-CAB and 3-CHAS7 (P/N 270484) installation sheets. Here
you will find step-by-step instructions on assembling the EST3
cabinets.
Pay particular attention to the description of the layers
involved in a full cabinet assembly in Chapter 1, under the
heading System construction. Observe the relationship
between the chassis/rail assembly, local rail modules (LRMs),
and the control/display modules.
As shown in its installation sheet (P/N 270487), the 3-CAB5
cabinet enclosures are different from the 3-CAB7, 3-CAB14
and 3-CAB21 cabinets used for EST3 panels because it is
made for small installations. The 3-CAB5 consists of a
backbox, inner door, and an outer door with a viewing
window. It holds up to 5 modules and two 10 Ah, 12 Vdc
batteries. The modules are plugged into a built-in assembly of
two rails, upper and lower, which are attached to the
sidewalls of the back box. The rails are removable to permit
ready mounting the power supply assembly on the backbox
footprint.
Note: If the battery requirements exceed the battery size
permitted in any cabinet, a remote closet cabinet (install sheet
P/N 270488) may be used. In standard form, these can store
up to two 50 Ah batteries. Optionally, with the 3-BATS battery
shelves installed (install sheet 387338), they can store up to
two 65 Ah batteries. Any battery size larger than this would
require an external battery cabinet.
The remaining EST3 cabinets are the 3-CAB7, 3-CAB14, and
3-CAB21. Each of these cabinets consists of a backbox, an
inner door, and an outer door with a viewing window. The last
digits in the cabinet model number indicate the number of
rail-slots where mounted modules may be installed in each
cabinet type. In these cabinets the rail assemblies are
preinstalled in one of three assembly types called a 3-CHAS7,
3-ASU/CHAS4, or 3-ASU/FT chassis.
Chassis: The chassis assembly is a large, horizontally
mounted U-shaped plate that is mounted to the cabinets
backbox. Each of the 3-CHAS7 chassis assemblies contains
one pair of rails. The chassis is best understood as a three
layer-mounting frame.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.9

Enclosures and major components

The 3-CHAS7 chassis, described in 3-CHAS7 Seven Local Rail


Module Chassis installation sheets (P/N 270848), consists of
three layers. Where:

The first is the inner layer, which is the rear of the chassis
assembly and is attached to the back box. It contains
mounting spaces (footprints) for the non-rail mounted
components which include primary and booster power
supply heat sink assemblies, audio source unit cards, and
firefighters telephone control unit cards. There is a 1/2
footprint used for special application cards such as the rail
chassis expansion card and the CDR-3 Zone Coder card.

The second is the middle layer of the 3-CHAS7, which is


the upper and lower rail assemblies which allows for the
mounting of up to seven local rail modules (LRMs). The
hardware layers LRMs are considered part of this layer.

The last is the outer layer, which is composed of the


operator layer control/LED panels for each custom
installation.
3-CHASE7
chassis assembly
with rail assemblies

LRM Mounted
operator layer
Control/LED panels
and LCD.

Rail mounted
hardware layer
Local Rail Modules

Outer door

Inner door

Backbox

Figure 1-2: Layered Assemblies.

The 3-ASU/3-CHAS4 chassis is described in the 3-ASU Audio


Source Unit installation sheets (P/N 270482) This description
covers the 3-ASU audio source unit, which consists of the
footprint-mounted 3-ASU controller board, associated cover
assembly (paging microphone and controls), 3-RCIC Rail
Chassis Interface Card, and a 3-CHAS4 rail assembly that
supports four additional optional LRMs.

1.10

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Figure 1-3: 3-ASU/CHAS4 Assembly.


The 3-ASU/FT chassis is described in the 3-ASU/FT Audio
source unit with Firefighters telephone installation sheets (P/N
270481). This description covers the 3-ASU/FT, which consists
of the 3-ASU controller board, associated cover assembly
(paging microphone and controls), the 3-FTCU controller
board and associated firefighters telephone cover assembly,
and the 3-RCIC Rail Chassis Interface Card.

Figure 1-4: 3-ASU/FT Assembly.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.11

Enclosures and major components

Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 5: Local


rail module installation.
Local rail module (LRM): Those EST3 components or modules
designed to plug into the rail assemblies are grouped together
as local rail modules (LRMs). They may be dual or single LRMs.
For example, the 3-CPU1, 3-CPU3 and 3-ZA95 LRMs use two
plug-in slot positions, while the other LRMs use a single slot.
As shown in Figure 1-5, each single LRM has a set of hinged
standoffs, permitting control/display modules to be attached.
The 3-ZA90 LRM has two sets of hinged standoffs to supports
two control/display modules. These components are on the
outer layer of the chassis and may be viewed through a lobby
enclosure cabinet with a window on the outer door. Each of
the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 have two sets of hinged standoffs to
attach the 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL front control panels. The 3-LCD
front panel can only be installed on the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3.
The 3-LCDXL front panels are installed on the 3-CPU1 or 3CPU3 and the next two subsequent slot positions to the right.

Figure 1-5: Hinged Standoff.

1.12

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

The most current information on the EST3 products is


provided in the installation sheets shipped with these
products or on our web site. Always use the sheets shipped
with the product or obtained from our web site for the most
current information.
Note: The control/display modules are not related to the LRM
modules to which they are attached. For example, an LED
annunciator panel attached to the front of a power supply
monitor LRM would operate completely independent of the
power supply monitor. The control/display module is installed
electrically onto the rails through its ribbon cable.
Control/display module operation is determined during the
configuration and programming process.

Figure 1-6 shows the layout of the chassis and its associated
layers.
Rails
Rails

Local
Rail
Module

Standoffs

Control/LED
Display
Chassis Frame

Chassis
Frame
Back Box
Back Box

SIDE VIEW

FRONT VIEW
Without Modules Installed

Figure 1-6: 3-CHAS7 chassis views.


The side view in Figure 1-6 shows the ends of the rails
attached to the sides of the chassis. A local rail module card is
plugged into the rails. A control/display module card is
attached to (snap onto) the standoffs on the local rail module.
The front view shows the upper and lower rails without any
modules installed on them. Notice that both the upper and
lower rails contain seven plug-in positions called slots. When a
local rail module is plugged into the rails, it will occupy at least
one upper and one lower slot position, depending on the size
of the LRM module.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.13

Enclosures and major components

Figure 1-7 depicts a detailed look at the rails.

Figure 1-7: Seven-module rail assembly.

As you can see, the upper and lower rails are almost identical.
Each set of rails provides an upper and lower assembly to
mount up to seven modules.
There is a set of four plugs at the right end of each rail. The
two larger outer plugs are for Data In and Data Out. The
smaller inner plugs are for Power In and Power Out. These
plugs are where the connections are made from one chassis
assembly to another within a cabinet.
Details on LRM installation to rails are provided in the EST3
Installation Sheets Manual and the respective LRMs install
sheets.
In Figure 1-8, a 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 panel controller LRM is
installed on the rail assembly. This card is a dual local rail
module; therefore it requires two module spaces or slots on
the rail assembly.

Figure 1-8: Rail assembly with 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 local rail module
installed

1.14

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets:


These install sheets may be viewed on the Support CD you
received with your self-study kit or via our web site.
3-CAB and 3-CAB-E Series Equipment
Enclosure Backboxes
P/N 387557,
P/N 270488,
P/N 387549
3-CAB5 / 3-CAB5R
P/N 270487
3-CHAS7 Seven Local Rail Module
Chassis
P/N 270484
3-RCC Series Remote Closet
Cabinet
P/N 270486
3-RCC-E Series Remote Closet
Cabinet
P/N 387551
Figure 1-9 shows the typical data and power line connections
between chassis installed within the same cabinet. Since three
sets of rails are shown, it follows that the cabinet of this
example has three chassis installed and must be a 3-CAB21.

Figure 1-9: Inter-rail data and power connections.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.15

Enclosures and major components

This section traces out the wiring paths in Figure 1-9 to


familiarize you with the wiring routes. As you study Figure 1-9,
there are several important points to understand and
remember:

Each cabinet (panel or node) within a EST3 fire alarm


system network requires one 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 panel
controller.

In standard applications, the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 panel


controller must always be installed in the top chassis
assembly and in the left most, first two module spaces on
the rails.

Optionally, the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 panel controller can be


physically installed in the middle or bottom chassis
assembly (still in the left most, first two module spaces on
the rails). In this case, you must use the optional 3-CBLKIT1 data and power cables. In this cabinet configuration,
even through the chassis 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 is physically
not in the top chassis it electrically and logically is still in
the first two slots on the rails.

The chassis rails on which 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 is installed


must have Data Out and Power Out connections made
only to the rail connectors.

Chassis rails on which the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 is installed


cannot have connections to any of the chassis rail Data In
or Power In connectors.

Based on the proceeding wiring requirements, the top set


of rails in Figure 1-9 is wired for the 3-CPU1 or3-CPU3.

Based upon the associated cable part numbers, the rail


power and data cables are manufactured with the
required connectors and cable lengths. The data cable is a
ribbon cable, while the power cables are large, three- or
four-bundled wire cables.

Now review the 3-CAB7, 3-CAB14 and 3-CAB21 specifications


in the installation sheets. Notice the following information
about each cabinet:

1.16

Each holds up to two 17 Ah 12 Vdc batteries.


Each comes in enamel gray or red.

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets:


These install sheets may be viewed on the Support CD you
received with your self-study kit or via our web site.
3-RCC Series Remote Closet
Cabinet
P/N 270486
3-RCC-E Series Remote Closet
Cabinet
P/N 387551
The RCC series cabinets are designed for distant locations
where visual displays, such as the 3-LCD displays or
control/display modules, are not desired or needed. The back
box is the same as the CAB series models, but the outer door
is solid metal without a viewing glass. This series does not
include an inner door.
There are three models:

EST3 Self Study Course

3-RCC7: One chassis, 7 module spaces


3-RCC14: Two chassis, 14 module spaces
3-RCC21: Three chassis, 21 module spaces

1.17

Enclosures and major components

3-CPU3 panel controller modules


Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets:
These install sheets may be viewed on the Support CD you
received with your self-study kit or via our web site.
3-COU1 and 3-CPU3 Central Processor Module
P/N 3100648
3-RS485 (A/B/R) and 3-RS232 Ancillary
Option Cards
P/N 270489
3-LCD Main LCD Display
P/N 3100586
3-LCDXL1 Main LCD Display
P/N 3101006
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6: Power
up and testing:
CPU with 3-LCD (XL) Display.
3-RS232 Card installed in CPU.
3-RS485 Card installed in CPU, Class B configuration.
3-RS485 Card installed in CPU, Class A configuration.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 8:
Service and troubleshooting:

CPU Central Processor Module.

3-CPU3 panel controllers: These 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 central


processor units, or panel controllers, are the control element
for all other modules and operator interface panels installed
within a cabinet enclosure.

Figure 1-10: 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3.

1.18

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

These CPUs process all information from the modules installed


on the chassis rails within a cabinet as well as processing
data received form the network via the network data circuit
Older panels may be equipped with the 3-CPU or 3-CPU1
central processing units. The 3-CPU3 is a replacement for the
3-CPU and 3-CPU1. The 3-CPU has configuration limitations
of Class B audio only, which are discussed in this module.
There are four types of CPUs you may come across in the field:

3-CPU Older applications, Class B audio only.


3-ANNCPU - remote annunciator applications, with out
audio.
3-CPU1 - Class A or B Audio.
3-CPU3 - Class A or B Audio.

Lets review what you have already learned about the


installation of the EST3 CPUs:

One CPU must be installed in every cabinet (node) within a


system.

The CPU occupies the first two left-most, electrical module


positions on the top rail assembly.

Only Power Out and Data Out connections are made on


the rail assembly in which the CPU resides.

As you read through this section, note the following CPU


parameters:

EST3 Self Study Course

Available EEPROM and RAM capacity.

3-RS485 communication for data network and audio


risers, Class A or Class B.

Available ports, circuit length.

Each CPU automatically identifies (addresses) and


supervises all modules within its cabinet (network node).

Provides Form C alarm, supervisory, and trouble contacts


that react to conditions within the network specified by
network routing configuration process as described in the
Help utility of the 3-SDU System Definition Utility.

Contacts may react to all cabinets or a subset of cabinets


specified during the configuration process for network
routing for each CPU within the system.

Provides 3-RS485 communications (Class A or B) with


other CPUs on a data network riser.

Provides command and control for the 8-channel audio


network riser.

1.19

Enclosures and major components

Supports a Class A or B audio riser for 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3


applications and a Class B only audio riser for older 3-CPU
applications.

Supports two optional RS232 ports, which can be


configured for auxiliary, printer, zone-coder or graphic
front-end operation.

Supports both 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL main control panel


installation. Where these LCDs can only be installed on
the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 and these CPUs will not support
the other control/display modules.

Caution: The 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 are shipped from the


factory with the most current microcode versions installed.
During the periods when new software is being released it is
critical that you verify that the microcode onboard your CPUs
matches the microcode you are using in your System
Development Utility (3-SDU) programming environment.
This is easily accomplished by performing a version request
prior to downloading your applications software into the your
systems CPUs.
Now lets take a closer look at the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 LRM
modules illustrated in Figure 1-11.
On the front of the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 LRM modules you will
find:

(J5) RJ-11 jack. The (J5) RJ-11 jack on the front top left
corner is used for downloading from the data entry
program (SDU).

TB-1 terminal block. TB-1 is the connection point for the


alarm, supervisory, and trouble contacts. These are used
primarily for off-premises notification.

J1 ribbon connector. J1 accepts the ribbon cable from


either a 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL Display panel when used.
Note: From a field techs point of view the difference
between the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 is the placement of the
J1 ribbon connector. The new placement for this
connector on the 3-CPU3 provides greater integrity and
stability for the ribbon cable from the 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL
main control panels.
Note: Also note that the 3-CPU3 is the replacement part
for 3-CPU1 LRM modules. The 3-CPU3 is the replacement
for older 3-CPU and 3-CPU1 LRM modules.

1.20

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

3-CPU1
FRONT

BACK

3-CPU3
FRONT
Figure 1-11: 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 panel controller modules.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.21

Enclosures and major components

Communication LEDs.

TB2 terminal block.

TB1 and TB2 are detailed in the 3-CPU3 installation sheet and
Chapter 1 the EST3 Installation and Service Manual. TB2
provides connections for the:

Network data risers (CPU to CPU communications).


Network audio riser.
Two auxiliary 3-RS232 ports.

Caution: Downloading 3-CPU microcode versions earlier than


1.33 into a 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 will disable connector J5 (RJ-11).
The 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 are shipped with the most recent
microcode installed.
For networks where older 3-CPUs are present with earlier
than 1.33 microcode versions; EST strongly recommends
updating the program and microcode. Where existing CPUs
have been downloaded with an earlier version which disables
connector J5, downloads may still be accomplished through
the TB2 RS-232 port when the 3-RS232 option card is installed.
Programmers can verify the version of existing CPUs by
performing a version request using the 3-SDU.
On the back of the CPU LRM modules you will find:

P1A, P1B, P2A, and P2B rail connectors. P1A, P1B, P2A, and
P2B plug into the corresponding upper and lower rail
assembly connectors.

J2 daughter board connector. J2 is used for 3-RS485 or


3-FIB fiber optic network communication cards.

J3 daughter board connector. J3 is for an ancillary 3RS232 communication card, which supports the two RS232 ports.

J4A/J4B daughter board connectors. J4A/J4B are for the


memory expansion card (not used for 3-CPU3
applications).

The 3-RS485 Card is required for 3-ANNCPU remote


annunciator applications. It is part of a daughter card factory
mounted on standoffs on the 3-ANNCPU modules. The other
options cards are not available for 3-ANNCPU applications.
The 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 operating power is from the rail
assembly. Power for the rails comes from the 3-PPS/M primary
power supply and optionally from the 3-BPS/M booster power
supplies, discussed later.

1.22

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

The 3-ANNCPU LRM modules power must be supplied from an


external +24 Vdc source (e.g., +24 Vdc AUX power from TB1 on
the 3-PSMON or 3-BSMON modules).
The EST3 system network supports up to 64 3-CPU1, 3-CPU3
and/or 3-ANNCPU panel controllers (nodes).
TB1 and TB2: The components that are attached to each of
the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 circuit boards, labeled as TB1 or TB2,
are part of a two-piece termination block assembly, which
supports the EST3 snap fit construction. In Figure 1-12 the
board section is called the header termination block and is the
male plug part of the assembly.

Figure 1-12: Header termination block.

The other part of the block assembly, called the connector


termination block shown in Figure 1-13, is where all field
wiring is connected. The connector termination block provides
the female plug part of the assembly.
Field Wiring

TOP

FRONT, Female Plug

LABEL

BACK, Field Wiring Insert

Figure 1-13: Connector termination block.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.23

Enclosures and major components

As you can see in Figure 1-13, field wiring is attached to the


connector termination block. One advantage of this is that
field wiring can be connected without requiring the prior
installation of the local rail module (LRM). When ready, the
connector termination block is plugged into the header
termination block on the appropriate module. A second
advantage to using the connector terminal block is during
local rail module replacement. In this case, you simply unplug
the connector termination blocks from the old module,
remove the old module from the rail assembly, install the new
module on the rail assembly, and plug the connector
termination blocks into the new one.
As stated at the beginning of this module, an EST3 integrated
fire alarm panel may operate in standalone mode or as part of
a network. In standalone mode, the system consists of one
cabinet with one 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 controlling all the
modules and communication within the single cabinet.
In network applications there are multiple cabinets, each with
its own 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 and each communicating with the
others. EST3 uses a unique, state-of-the-art communications
protocol to provide rapid, accurate communication between
these CPU panels.

1.24

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Network theory
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual, Chapter 1: System
Overview:
Digital Network Subsystem
Network Applications
Multi-priority, peer-to-peer, token passing network is a
microprocessor communication network where electronically
there is no master panel. Each panel in the network must
contain a 3-CPU1or 3-CPU3 with RS-485 or 3-FIB network
card and is equally capable and provides what is termed
peer-to-peer communication. A token passing network
operates differently from a traditional multi-drop network.
Where, in a token passing network, the panel having the
token is temporarily in charge of the network and there is no
master panel.

GE Securitys EST3 token network is logically sequenced.


Message traffic depends upon the priority of the message, the
alarms having the highest priority, supervisory next, and then
troubles. Monitor messages have the lowest priority.
Each panel is given permission to send its messages by the
token being passed to it. If a panel receives the token and it is
not in alarm, its first action is to send out a high priority
invitation to speak. If any panel in the network has an alarm
message, which is a high priority, the token is immediately
passed to that panel. The panel in alarm then transmits its
alarm message, followed immediately by a high priority
invitation for any other panel in alarm.
This process continues until all alarm messages have been
transmitted. The last panel with an alarm message will
transmit any other low priority messages and then pass the
token to the next panel in the network.
If the panel having the token receives no response to its high
priority invitation, it transmits any low priority messages it has
and passes the token to the next panel on the network. If the
panel receives no response to the high priority invitation and
has no messages, it passes the token immediately to the next
panel on the network.
This may seem to be very time consuming, but the token is
electronically passed through the network approximately 20
times a second in a fully configured 64 node EST3 network
with no alarms. Alarm conditions in this network report to the
panel within 3 seconds.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.25

Enclosures and major components

3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 option cards


Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheet::
These install sheets may be viewed on the Support CD you
received with your self-study kit or via our web site.
3-RS485 (A/B/R) and 3-RS232 Ancillary
Option Cards
P/N 270489

Figure 1-14: CPU Option Cards..

3-RS485 network communications card

Figure 1-15: 3-RS485 network (A/B/R) communications card.

1.26

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

The 3-RS485 network communications card shown in Figure


1-15 is inserted into J2 on the back of the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3
modules. It provides two independent, RS-485 communication
circuits (Class A or Class B). One is used for the CPU-to-CPU
data network communications. The other is used for the
network audio riser (Class A or Class B).
Note: The older 3-CPU provides Class B audio only. The newer
3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 audio riser can be Class A or B.
This card is required on every 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 in an EST3
network using RS-485 communication protocol. This card
supports the two Data Network RS-485 circuit connections on
TB2 of these CPUs (Network OUT A and Network IN B).
The 3-RS485 Card is required in 3-ANNCPU applications and is
part of a daughter card mounted on the 3-ANNCPU module
as shown in 3-ANNCPU Annunciator Controller Module
installation sheet (P/N 3100650).
There are four versions of the 3-RS485 option card that you
may encounter in the field:

EST3 Self Study Course

For older 3-CPU based systems there is a 3-RS485 card,


which provides for Class A and B data network risers and
Class B only audio network riser. This card has been
discontinued.

For older 3-CPU based systems there is a 3-RS485R card,


which provides Class A and Class B data network risers
and Class B only audio network riser. This card is currently
available for use on 3-CPU systems. This card is used to
replace the original RS-485 cards that may have failed.
This card is also used to replace the older 3-CPUs which
have failed with 3-CPU1s or 3-COU3s. Using the 3RS485R cards enables you to use the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3
as a replacement card in 3-CPU systems. This card
enables 3-CPUs, 3-CPU1s and 3-CPU3s to exist and
communicate over the same data network riser.

For 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 systems there is a 3-RS485B card,


which provides Class A and Class B data network and
Class B only audio network risers only. This card is used for
3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 systems applications only.

For 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 systems there is a 3-RS485A card,


which provides Class A and Class B data network and
Class A and Class B audio network risers. This card is also
used for 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 systems applications only.

1.27

Enclosures and major components

Caution: Option cards may be damaged or their operation


compromised when installed on the incorrect processing unit.
Amplifier firmware (PAL Chips) must be compatible with the
processing unit as listed in Table 1-1. Existing 3-CPUs cannot
accept the 3-RS485A or 3-RS485B cards. The newer 3-CPU1
and 3-CPU3 cannot use the older 3-CPU 3-RS485 option card.
When using 3-RS485A or 3-RS485B option cards you must
upgrade the 3-ZA15 and 3-ZA30 amplifier firmware, if these
amps exist in your system, using the improved algorithm. The
firmware for the newer 3-ZA20 (A or B) and 3-ZA40 (A or B) is
already current. In all cases, refer to the related TECH FAXes
and 3-SDU release notes for firmware requirements.

Table 1-1: EST3 component replacement matrix

1.28

To replace:

Use:

Notes

3-CPU

3-CPU3

Can reside on the same network

3-CPU1

3-CPU3

Can reside on the same network

3-RS485 (240626)
original algorithm

3-RS485R (241044-03)

Can reside on the same network

3-RS485 (240971)
original algorithm

3-RS485R (241044-03)

Can reside on the same network

3-RS485R (241044-03)
original algorithm

3-RS485R (241044-03)

Can reside on the same network

3-RS485 (240829)
improved algorithm

3-RS485B (241044-01)

Can reside on the same network

3-RS485B (241044-01)
improved algorithm

3-RS485B (241044-01)

Can reside on the same network

3-RS485A (241044-02)
improved algorithm

3-RS485A (241044-02)

3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 only

3-ZA15

3-ZA20A, 3-ZA20B

3-ZA15 w/PAL V1.2 or lower


must use 240626, 240971, or
241044-03 3-RS485R cards.

3-ZA20A, 3-ZA20B

3-ZA20A, 3-ZA20B

3-ZA30

3-ZA40A, 3-ZA40B

3-ZA40A, 3-ZA40B

3-ZA40A, 3-ZA40B

3-ZA30 w/PAL V1.2 or lower


must use 240626, 240971, or
241044-03 3-RS485R cards.

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Before we look at the other options cards, lets take a few


minutes to review network wiring. To start, notice TB2 located
on the bottom of the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3, which is shown in
Figure 1-16. On the top of this figure, the portion of TB2 that is
mounted on the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 modules is shown. Notice
the label that indicates terminal block connections.
Where:

Network data connections are made to plugs 17 through


20.
Network audio connections are made to plugs 9 through
16.
2 optional RS-232 port connections are plugs 1 through 8.

A front view of the TB2 snap-fit plug, where field-wiring


connections are made, is shown in the middle of this figure.
Existing 3-CPU modules have TB2 audio-in polarity reversed
from current 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 modules
A bottom view of this snap-fit plug is illustrated at the bottom
of this figure.
TB2
NETWORK
IN
OUT
A A B B
+
+
-

AUDIO AUDIO AUDIO AUDIO


B IN
A IN A OUT
B OUT
+

R
X
1

T
X
1

R
T
S
1

C
O
M
1

R
X
2

T
X
2

R
T
S
2

C
O
M
2

Plug front

20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10

Plug bottom

Figure 1-16: TB2 on the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 modules

The network connections for the 3-ANNCPU of the remote


annunciators are made at TB1 at the top of this module. These
connections will be covered later in this course.
In a standalone configuration there is no need for 3-RS485
cards, since no network data connections are made.
In standalone application where the 3-RS485 card is not
present, the Primary Audio Out from the 3-ASU card is
connected to the Audio A Out (plugs 13 and 14) on the 3CPU1s or 3-CPU3s TB2.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.29

Enclosures and major components

In Figure 1-17, you can see network data connections are


easy to make. Network data input from the previous panel
(node) within a system are made to TB2 terminals 20 and 19
(A+ and A-). The Figures given in Chapter 1 of the EST3
Installation and Service Manual and the 3-CPU3 installation
sheet (P/N 3100648 provide additional information. Network
data output to the next panel within a system are to TB2
terminals 17 and 18 (B+ and B-).
20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10
NETWORK
OUT
IN
A A B B
+
+

AUDIO AUDIO AUDIO AUDIO


A IN
A OUT
B IN
B OUT
+

8
R
X
1

T
X
1

R
T
S
1

C
O
M
1

4
R
X
2

T
X
2

R
T
S
2

C
O
M
2

3-CPU1-TB2
To next 3-CPU1,
3-ANNCPU, or
first 3-CPU1's
Class A return
From previous
3-CPU1, 3-ANNCPU,
or Class A return
Network data riser

Figure 1-17: 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 network data


connections.

Figure 1-18 illustrates Class A and Class B network


interconnections. A 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 panel controller has
two bi-directional terminal connections for wiring the panel to
the network data riser (A and B terminals). The correct method
for wiring a Class B network data riser is to connect the
isolated network B terminal connections on one panel
controller to the non-isolated network A terminal connections
on the next, as shown in Figure 1-17. Up to 64 3-CPU1s, 3CPU3s or 3-ANNCPUs may be connected in this way.
Class A is wired in the same way, however the B terminals of
the last 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 on the network are wired to the A
terminals on the first 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 as the Class A return.
Caution: When downloading to a 3-CPU1s J5 RJ11 connector,

the set of A network terminals are disables on that CPU. As


shown in Figure 1-18, when performing a network download
in a Class B configuration, always connect to the node without
network connections to the A terminals.
Also, when performing a network download to a Class A
configured system the panel will indicate a Class A Network
Failure during the download process. This is normal.

1.30

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Use this panels CPU (no connection to it's A port) for downloading to
all panels over the Class B network data riser. Using any other panels
CPU in a Class B network will prevent the downloading of all data to
those CPUs connected to a CPUs A port.

Panel
Controller
CPU

Panel
Controller
CPU

Panel
Controller
CPU

Panel
Controller
CPU

Class B Network Data Riser


Panel
Controller
CPU

Panel
Controller
CPU

Panel
Controller
CPU

Panel
Controller
CPU

Class A Network Data Riser


Figure 1-18: Class A and B network node interconnections.

Now lets look at network audio wiring. There are two methods
for wiring network audio, based on the type of CPU used in
your system. In the older 3-CPU systems network, audio is
limited to Class B only. In the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 systems,
network audio can be configured Class A or B.
Figure 1-19 shows the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 TB2 audio
connections for standalone operation, where the 3-ASU TB1
terminals 1 and 2 for primary audio data, are connected to
the 3-CPU1 TB2 terminals 14 and 13, which are for Audio Out.
Because there is no 3-RS485 option card for standalone
applications the audio connections are made to the Audio Out
for these systems.
Connecting the ASU primary audio to the Audio In terminals in
a standalone configuration will cause a configuration fault
within the system. If it is desired to connect to the Audio In
terminals, a 3-RS485 option card must be added to the
standalone application.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.31

Enclosures and major components

NETWORK
IN
OUT
A A B B
+
+
-

R
X
1

T
X
1

R
T
S
1

C
O
M
1

R
X
2

T
X
2

R
T
S
2

C
O
M
2

AUDIO AUDIO AUDIO AUDIO


B IN
A IN
B OUT
A OUT
+

20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10

3-CPU1
TB2
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

3-ASU
TB1

Figure 1-19: Audio data connection in non-network application,


without a RS485 option card

Audio data connections in a network application are shown in


Figure 1-20. In this case, with the appropriate optional 3RS485 card installed, the Primary Audio Out from the 3-ASU is
connected to the Audio In (A terminals) on the CPU. The Audio
Out from the CPU is then connected to the Audio In on the
next CPU in the network, and so on.
NETWORK
IN
OUT
A A B B
+
+
-

3-CPU1
or
3-CPU3
TB2

AUDIO AUDIO AUDIO AUDIO


B IN
A IN
B OUT
A OUT
+

R
X
1

T
X
1

R
T
S
1

C
O
M
1

R
X
2

T
X
2

R
T
S
2

C
O
M
2

To next 3-CPU1
or 3-CPU3
AUDIO IN in
network
Network audio riser
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

3-ASU
TB1

Figure 1-20: Network audio connection

1.32

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Figure 1-21 shows an example of audio network node


interconnections for Class B 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 panel
controller applications.
Network audio riser wiring - Class B
Panel
controller
CPU

Panel
controller
CPU

Audio A Audio A
IN
OUT

Panel
controller
CPU

Audio A Audio A
IN
OUT

Audio A Audio A
IN
OUT

Primary audio data from 3-ASU

Figure 1-21: Class B panel controller network node interconnections


for audio 3-RS-485, 3-RS485R & 3-RS485B.

Only one 3-ASU can control a network audio riser in the three
types of CPU applications. The 3-CPU network node
interconnection uses the RS-485R, while the 3-CPU1 or 3CPU3 network node utilizes the RS-485B. When more than one
firefighter telephone panel and riser are required in a 3-CPU1
or 3-CPU3 system application, an additional 3-ASU must be
installed with the additional 3-FTCU. However, this ASU cannot
be connected to the existing network audio riser.
Figure 1-22 shows an example of audio data network node
interconnections for 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 applications, which
support Class A and B network audio riser using the 3-RS485A
option card. Effectively this is a redundant Class B configure
which emulates Class A.
Network audio riser wiring - Class A
Panel
controller
CPU
Audio A
IN OUT

Audio B
IN OUT

Panel
controller
CPU
Audio A
IN OUT

Audio B
IN OUT

Panel
controller
CPU
Audio A
IN OUT

Audio B
IN OUT

Primary audio data from 3-ASU

Figure 1-22: 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 network node interconnections for


audio with 3-RS485A.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.33

Enclosures and major components

3-FIB fiber optic communications cards


Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets:
These install sheets may be viewed on the Support CD you
received with your self-study kit or via our web site.
3-FIB/3-FIBA Fiber Optic Communications
Interface Module
P/N 378333

Figure 1-23: 3-FIB/A Fiber optic communications cards

The fiber optic communications card (3-FIB/A) provides a Class


A and Class B data network riser and a Class A and Class B
audio network riser, used for 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 applications
The 3-FIB/A fiber optic interface consists of two cards
connected by a ribbon cable:

The fiber optics communication electronics card which


mounts into J2 on the back of the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3
module

The fiber optics communication interface card which


mounts onto a 3-MPFIB mounting plate that is installed
onto the bottom of the chassis assembly

The 3-FIB/A interface provides two independent fiber optic


circuits (Class A or Class B). One is used to connect network
data riser of two CPU panel controllers together. The other
provides the network fiber optic audio riser for older 3-CPU
Class B only and for 3-CPU1and 3-CPU3 Class A and B
applications. The 2-card interface is required on each 3CPU1or 3-CPU3 that is using the fiber optic communications
protocol. The 3-FIB/A electronics card supports using fiber
optics within a copper wire network. In that, fiber optic links
can be used in portions of the network where fiber is desired

1.34

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

and standard copper wire links can be used in the remainder


of the network.

Figure 1-24: 3-FIB/A Fiber optic 3-CHAS7 installation.

Figure 1-25: 3-FIB/A Fiber optic 3-CAB5 installation.


The 3-FIB/A interface card provides ST fiber optic connectors
and a secondary power option. This permits communications
to flow through this module even with panel power
disconnected.
Using the 3-FIB/A fiber optic interface and fiber optic cables to
transmit network data and audio offers the following
advantages:

EST3 Self Study Course

Electrical isolation.
Lightening surge current and transient immunity.
EMI/RFI noise immunity.
No spark or fire hazard.
No radiation or noise emissions.
Short circuit protection (i.e. no current flow).
Low maintenance.
Lightweight, small diameter fiber optic cables.
Cost effective.

1.35

Enclosures and major components

3-RS232 ancillary communications card


Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets:
These install sheets may be viewed on the Support CD you
received with your self-study kit or via our web site.
3-RS485 (A/B/R) and 3-RS232 Ancillary
Option Cards
P/N 270489
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6: Power
up and testing:
3-RS232 Card installed in CPU.

Figure 1-26: 3-RS232 ancillary communications card.

This option card is used to add two RS-232 ports to the 3CPU1 or 3-CPU3. The 3-RS232 communications card plugs
into J3 on the back of the 3-CPU1or 3-CPU3 module. This card
adds two program configurable serial ports at TB2 for the
connection of printers, PCs, CDR-3 coder and/or a gateway
graphics front-end.
Refer to Figure 1-27 for the TB2 terminals used for 3-RS232
connections. The 3-RS232 Port 1 is an isolated port on TB2
terminals 5 through 8 and the 3-RS232 Port 2 is on TB2
terminals 1 through 4.
These ports are configurable for supervised or unsupervised
operation. When a port is configured using the EST3
applications software and the port is configured for
unsupervised operation, when nothing is connected to it, it
does not report to the control panel.

1.36

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Figure 1-27: 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 3-RS232 port connections.

Review the specifications in the 3-RS232 installation sheets for


the 3-RS232 communications card, paying particular
attention to the maximum length of circuit wiring.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.37

Enclosures and major components

EST3 power supplies


Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 5:
Installation:
AC power and DC battery wiring.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6:
Power-up and testing:
Cabinet power-up procedures.
Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets:
Power Supply

P/N 270495

Figure 1-28: EST3 Power Supply and Monitor Module.

Two types of power supply are available for EST3 system


applications. The first, called a primary power supply (PPS), is
used in every cabinet. The second, called a booster power
supply (BPS), is used when additional power is required on a
cabinet-by-cabinet basis. Depending upon the cabinet size
and power requirements, a primary power supply and up to
three booster power supplies may be used in one cabinet.
Each type power supply consists of two parts:

1.38

A power supply heat sink assembly mounted on the


chassis footprint.

A monitor module mounted on the chassis rail assembly.

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Primary power supply, 3-PPS/M or 3-PPS/M-230


3-PPS/M primary power supply: The 3-PPS/M provides the

required power and related supervision functions for the


panel (cabinet) in which it is installed. The power supply
consists of two major components. The first is the heat sink
assembly (3-PPS), which mounts on the rear of the top chassis
assembly behind the rails on the left-most footprint.

The second component is the power supply monitor module


(3-PSMON). The 3-PSMON is a single local rail module installed
into the third rail slot next to the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 module.
This module is often called the driver module because it
monitors the primary power supply.
The 3-PPS/M requires 120 Vac at 50-60 Hz, while the 3-PPS/M230 requires 230 Vac at 50-60 Hz.
In your review of the installation manual, look for the following
power supply specifications:

Provides filtered regulated power to the rail assemblies.

Rated at 24 Vdc at 7.0 A for all outputs.

Provides two independent, power limited, supervised


auxiliary 24 Vdc outputs. Current output may be up to 3.5
Amps each, depending on the amount of current being
supplied to the rail and control/display modules.

Terminal connections for these outputs are located on TB1


of the 3-PSMON monitor module.

Supervises and charges 10 to 65 Ah batteries.

Features a dual rate, constant current battery charger


with automatic temperature compensation.

Incoming ac power and battery charger connections are


made on the 3-PPS heat sink assembly, which separates
these connections from the panels power limited wiring.

Battery monitor circuit disconnects the batteries when


battery voltage drops to 20 Vdc or below

Automatically transfers to batteries when input ac power


drops to 102 Vac or below

Note: The maximum output current of the primary power


supply is 7.0 Amps. This limitation also applies to the booster
power supply. The total current supplied to the rail assembly
and the two output terminals on the monitor modules cannot
exceed 7.0 Amps.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.39

Enclosures and major components

When the primary power supply is operating with a group of


booster power supplies (up to three in the 3-CAB14 or
3-CAB21), and one of the boosters fails, the primary power
supply determines the ability of the remaining booster power
supplies and itself to maintain the load demand. Should it
determine that the load has exceeded the ability of the
remaining power supplies, the standby batteries are
automatically switched in.
3-PPS heat sink assembly: The 3-PPS heat-sink assembly is
too large and heavy to mount on the rails. As previously
stated, the chassis assembly is connected directly to the back
box. The 3-PPS heat-sink assembly is mounted on threaded
studs (left-most footprint) located on the rear of the chassis.
Lets take a closer look at the 3-PPS in Figure 1-29.
Primary
ac
Voltage
Terminals

120VAC

TB1

16-pin
Data
Ribbon
Cable
Connection
for
3-PSMON
Module
Power
Cable
Connection
for
3-PSMON
Module

P3

TB2

P2
+BATTERY-

Battery
Charger
and
Temperature
Riser
Terminals

Figure 1-29: 3-PPS heat sink assembly.

1.40

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Take note of the following 3-PPS connections:

TB1: terminal connections for primary ac voltage, 120 Vac


or 230 Vac.

TB2: provides the terminal points for the battery charger


and temperature risers.

P2: connection point for the power cable that runs to P6


on the back of the 3-PSMON monitor module.

P3: connection for the 16-pin data ribbon cable that runs
to P4 on the back of the 3-PSMON.

The 3-PPS/M specifications of the installation sheets provide


details about 3-PPS/M mounting and termination.
3-PSMON monitor module: The 3-PSMON monitor module
provides the interface between the 3-PPS heat sink and the
chassis rail assembly. The 3-PSMON provides the required
data and power connections to the chassis rails. As previously
stated, the monitor module is a single local rail module. This
module has hinged standoffs, which support mounting an
independent control/LED panel or protective blank faceplate.
3-PSMON
Primary Power
Monitor LRM

3-PPS
Primary Power
Heat Sink
Assembly

3-BPS
Booster Power
Heat Sink
Assembly

3-BPMON
Booster Power
Monitor LRM

3-CHAS7
Assembly

Figure 1-30: 3-CHAS7 with Primary and Booster Power Supplies.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.41

Enclosures and major components

Using Figure 1-31 look for the following details on the front of
the monitor module:

J1 is the terminal connection for the ribbon cable from


any control/LED module occupying the hinged standoffs.

TB1 is the terminal point for the two independent auxiliary


24 Vdc outputs. The current output may be up to 3.5 A for
each, depending on the amount of current being supplied
to the rail and control/display modules.

J1
Terminal
Connector
for
Control/LED
Panel
Ribbon Cable

TB1
Terminal
Block for
24 Vdc
independent
AUX Power
FRONT
VIEW

Figure 1-31: 3-PSMON monitor module, front view.

1.42

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

In Figure 1-32 the back view of the 3-PSMON monitor module


is shown. It contains:

Two daughter boards.


P1 and P2 for plugging the module onto the rail assembly.
P6, which accepts the power cable from the 3-PPS.
P4, which accepts the data cable from the 3-PPS.

Daughter
Boards
Rail
Mounting
Connectors

P6
6 Conductor
Connector
for Power Cable
from 3-PPS

P4 16 Pin
Connector
for Data
Ribbon Cable
from 3-PPS
REAR
VIEW

Figure 1-32: 3-PSMON monitor module, rear view

Note: The 3-PSMON monitor module must be mounted in the


rail space (slot 3) immediately adjacent to the 3-CPU1 or 3CPU3 panel controller module.
When additional power beyond the capacity of the 3-PPS/M is
required, the 3-BPS/M booster power supply is used.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.43

Enclosures and major components

Booster power supply, 3-BPS/M or 3-BPS/M-230


3-BPS/M booster power supply: The 3-BPS/M is used to
provide power over and above that of the 3-PPS/M primary
power supply. Up to three 3-BPS/M power supplies may be
added to a cabinet, depending on cabinet size. Each chassis
can hold up to two supplies. Up to 28 Amps is available per
cabinet for internal and external applications with a full
compliment of one 3-PPS and three 3-BPS.
Like the 3-PPS/M, the 3-BPS/M booster power supply consists
of two major components:

The 3-BPS heat sink assembly, which mounts on the


footprints on the rear of the chassis.

The 3-BPMON booster monitor module, which is a local rail


module.

Due to cable lengths, the 3-BPMON booster monitor module


can only be installed into slots 3 and/or 5 on the rail assembly.
In Figure 1-33, look for the following 3-BPS heat sink assembly
connections:

TB1 terminal connections for primary ac voltage, 120 Vac


or 230 Vac.

TB2 terminal points for the supervised battery riser.

P2 connection point for the power cable that runs to P6 on


the back of the 3-BPMON monitor module.

P3 connection for the 14-pin data ribbon cable that runs


to P4 on the back of the 3-BPMON.

In Figure 1-33, it would appear that the 3-BPS looks exactly


like the 3-PPS. Actually, there are three distinctive exceptions.
The transformer in the top center of the board below TB1, the
battery terminal block has only two terminals and the P3 data
connector has only 14 pins.. These make it easy to distinguish
between the primary and booster power supplies.
In this section, you will see some similarities between the
primary and booster power supplies:

1.44

Each provides filtered, regulated power to the rail


assemblies.

Each 3-BPS is rated at 24 Vdc at 7.0 A for all outputs.

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Primary
ac
Voltage
Terminals

120VAC

TB1

Transformer

14-pin
Data
Ribbon
Cable
Connection
for
3-PSMON
Module

P3

Power
Cable
Connection
for
3-BPMON
Module

TB2

P2
+BATTERY-

Two Terminals
Supervised
Batery
Riser
Terminals

Figure 1-33: 3-BPS heat sink assembly.

EST3 Self Study Course

Two independent, power limited, supervised 24 Vdc


outputs. (Current output may be up to 3.5 A each,
depending on the amount of current being supplied to the
rail and control/display modules).

Terminal connections for these outputs are located on the


3-BPMON Monitor Module, TB1.

Incoming ac power and battery connections are made on


the 3-BPS heat sink assembly, which separates these
connections from the panels power limited wiring.

Automatically transfers to batteries when input ac power


drops to 102 Vac or below.

1.45

Enclosures and major components

The differences between booster and primary power supplies


are that boosters:

Do not have a constant current battery charger.


Do not monitor battery circuit.
Do not have battery-charging capability, but supervises its
own connection to the standby batteries.

Note: The primary power supply and booster power supplies


in a cabinet share a common set of standby batteries.
However, only the primary power supply charges and
monitors the batteries. The 3-BPS only supervises its leads
going to the battery.
In the event of a 3-BPS failure, a trouble is annunciated at the
front panel and the panel load is redistributed among the
remaining power supplies. Should the required power exceed
the capabilities of the remaining power supplies, the system
automatically transfers to the batteries.
The 3-BPMON monitor module is the interface between 3-BPS
heat sink assembly and the rail assembly. It is a local rail
module, which uses one module position on the rails and has
standoffs to mount a control/display module or blank cover
on its front.
The 3-BPMON looks almost exactly like the 3-PSMON, except
for the number of IC chips on the front of the module board.
Also, the P4 connector on the 3-PSMON has 16 pins, while the
P4 connector on the 3-BPMON has 14 pins. The only way to
insure you are installing the correct monitor module is to
double-check the part numbers of the components.
3-BPMON monitor module: The 3-BPMON monitor module
provides the interface between the 3-BPS heat sink and the
chassis rail assembly. The 3-BPMON provides the required
data and power connections to the chassis rails. As previously
stated, the monitor module is a single local rail module. This
module has hinged standoffs, which support mounting an
independent control/LED panel or protective blank faceplate.
Using Figure 1-34 look for the following details on the front of
the monitor module:

1.46

J1 is the terminal connection for the ribbon cable from


any control/LED module occupying the hinged standoffs.

TB1 is the terminal point for the two independent auxiliary


24 Vdc outputs. The current output may be up to 3.5 A for
each, depending on the amount of current being supplied
to the rail and control/display modules.

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

J1
Terminal
Connector
for
Control/LED
Panel
Ribbon Cable

TB1
Terminal
Block for
24 Vdc
independent
AUX Power

FRONT
VIEW
Figure 1-34: 3-BPMON monitor module, front view.

In Figure 1-35 the back view of the 3-BPMON monitor module


is shown. It contains:

EST3 Self Study Course

Two daughter boards.


P1 and P2 for plugging the module onto the rail assembly.
P6, which accepts the power cable from the 3-BPS.
P4, which accepts the data cable from the 3-BPS.

1.47

Enclosures and major components

Daughter
Boards
Rail
Mounting
Connectors

P6
6 Conductor
Connector
for Power Cable
from 3-BPS

P4 14 Pin
Connector
for Data
Ribbon Cable
from 3-BPS

REAR
VIEW
Figure 1-35: 3-BPMON monitor module, rear view.

Note: The 3-BPMON monitor module must be mounted in slots


3 or 5 because of cable length between it and its associated
3-BPS heat sink assembly.

1.48

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

EST3 component installation


As you have learned, GE Securitys EST3 system components
are modular in construction and specifically designed for
installation into its unique chassis rail assembly. The figures
on the following pages should help in understanding how all
of this comes together. We will start with an empty chassis rail
assembly, shown below:

J9
J8

J11
J10

J9
J8

J11
J10

[3PPSIN2.CDR]

Figure 1-36: Empty 3-CHAS7 chassis assembly.

The first step in the installation of components into the chassis


is to install the ones that are mounted at the rear of the
chassis, beneath the rail assembly. Lets begin by installing a
3-PPS power supply heat sink assembly on the threaded studs
of the rear chassis, left-most footprint, as shown below:
120VAC

TB1

J9
J8

J 11
J10

J9
J8

J 11
J 10

P3

TB2

P2
+BATTERY-

[3PPSIN2.CDR]

Figure 1-37: 3-CHAS7 chassis with 3-PPS installed.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.49

Enclosures and major components

Due to the size of the 3-PPS and 3-BPS assemblies, there is a


limit of two per chassis. In cases where you require the full
cabinet load of one 3-PPS and three 3-BPS power supplies,
you must mount them on at least two chassis assemblies.
Remember, that the 3-PSMON will always be mounted
immediately adjacent to the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 in slot 3 and
the 3-BPMONs will be mounted in slots 3 and 5. The 3-BPS/M
power supplies should be located in the vicinity of the heaviest
loads. Review the instructions on the location of booster
supplies and the maximum allowable chassis assembly
current.
The next step in panel configuration would be to connect the
power supply-to-monitor cables to the 3-PPS and 3-BPS
assemblies. These are connected to the corresponding
monitor modules later.
Now you are ready to install the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 panel
controller module on the rail assembly. Prior to doing this,
ensure that the desired network communication cards (3RS485 or 3-FIB) and 3-RS232 communications cards are
installed on the back.
If the fiber optic option is used, youll need to install the 3-FIB
fiber optics communications card into J2 on the back of the
respective CPU module. For 3-CAB5 applications the fiber
optics communications interface card and mounting plate are
installed on the half-footprint on the back of the chassis.
For 3-CAB7, 3-CAB14 and 3-CAB21 applications the fiber
optics communications interface card and mounting plate are
installed on the bottom rail assembly of the chassis containing
the CPU module.

1.50

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

The 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 take the first two module (left-most)


slots on the first (top) chassis in the cabinet.
120VAC

TB1

J9
J8

J 11
J10

J9
J8

J 11
J 10

P3

TB2

P2
+BATTERY-

[3PPSIN2.CDR]

Figure 1-38: 3-CPU1 (shown) or 3-CPU3 module installed in the first


two module spaces or slots

With the CPU Controller module now installed on the rail


assembly, you are ready to install the 3-PSMON in slot 3,
immediately adjacent to the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3. Connect the
power and data cables you installed with the 3-PPS assembly,
to the appropriate plugs on the 3-PSMON and then plug it
onto rail assembly.
120VAC

TB1

J9
J8

J11
J 10

J9
J8

J11
J10

P3

TB2

P2
+BATTERY-

[3PPSIN2.CDR]

Figure 1-39: 3-PSMON Monitor module installed on rail assembly

The 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 modules have hinged standoffs that


are designed to take the 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL display panels.
These LCD displays will be discussed later. Lets install one
here to demonstrate the use of the hinged standoffs.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.51

Enclosures and major components

As you will learn later, these LCD displays provide the operator
interface with the EST3 network. It is important to remember
that this component is optional. While you are required to
install a LCD in the cabinet where operator interface is desired
(at least one in the system), it is not required with any other
CPU in the networked system. If the LCD display is not needed
for this cabinet, two blank plates may be installed on the
CPUs standoffs.
To install the LCD Display panel (3-LCD shown), simply connect
the ribbon cable between the respective LCD and J1 on the
respective CPU module and snap the LCD into the left-most
standoffs. Remember, to route the ribbon cable so it goes into
the module to the right.
120VAC

TB1

J9
J8

J11
J 10

J9
J8

J11
J10

P3

TB2

P2
+BATTERY-

[3PPSIN2.CDR]

Figure 1-40: Chassis with 3-LCD display panel installed


Note: When installing the 3-LCDXL (not shown) this display
take up four module slots (1 through 4). This 3-LCDXL should
not be installed until the optional LRM for your applications is
installed into slot 4.

1.52

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

You have learned that all of the single slot local rail modules
(i.e. 3-PSMON) have hinged standoffs for installing
control/display modules. For the example of this lesson lets
install a 12 switch, 24 LED annunciator panel (3-12/Sx) on the
hinged standoffs of the 3-PSMON.
120VAC

TB1

J9
J8

J11
J 10

J9
J8

J11
J10

P3

TB2

P2
+BATTERY-

[3PPSIN2.CDR]

Figure 1-41: 3-12/Sxx Control/display module installed

We have installed a 3-PPS heat sink assembly on the rear of


the chassis, the 3-CPU1 panel controller and 3-PSMON
monitor modules on the rail assembly, and a 3-LCD display
and a 12-switch, 24-LED control/display module on top of
these. There are four local rail module spaces left for use.
These can be used for optional LRMs that will be covered later
in this course.
The inner door of the cabinet is cut out so only those
components on the hinged standoffs may be seen. In this
way, the same components may be viewed through the
window of the outer door.
This lesson demonstrates the typical method of installation, in
three layers, that should be repeated for all the systems
cabinets.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.53

Enclosures and major components

Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6:


System power-up and testing > Cabinet power-up procedure
Read this topic carefully, it makes some substantially
important points including:

Connect ac power prior to connecting the batteries.

The CPU fail light is not an uncommon occurrence when


the 3-CPU1 is initializing on power up.

The CPU fail light will clear when the power up sequence
has completed.

Chapter 5 lists the program initial turn on downloading


procedure. On the initial download of a network (either
Class A or Class B), you must download to each 3-CPU1 or
3-CPU3 individually to establish its identity.

Note: This enables you to establish the identity of each node


within the system network. Chapter 5 in the installation
manual recommends that a start-up version of your projects
application be downloaded for this purpose.

On subsequent downloads:

1.54

In Class A or B the entire network may be downloaded


from any cabinet at either the 3-RS485 RJ45 plug or the 3RS232 TB2 serial port.

If an audio source unit (ASU) is part of the network, its


database may be downloaded directly into the ASU or via
the network CPU.

If a 3-SSDC or 3-SDDC signature driver controller is


installed, specific Signature device data may be
downloaded directly into each 3-SSDC or 3-SDDC or via
the network CPU.

EST3 Self Study Course

Enclosures and major components

Module 1 evaluation
This concludes Module 1 of the EST3 Self-Study Course. Return
to the objectives stated at the beginning of this module. Study
them carefully to ensure that you are comfortable with each
objective. If not, return to that section and review it. When you
are satisfied, take the EST3 Module 1 Exam.

EST3 Self Study Course

1.55

Enclosures and major components

1.56

EST3 Self Study Course

Module 2

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 displays

Summary

This module describes the functions, controls, and indicators


of the 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 Display. These LCD display
modules are the operator interface for an EST3 network, and
mount on the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 Central Processor module.
You will learn how messages are prioritized, about other
control/display modules, and about EST3 logical addressing
conventions.
Content
Introduction to module 2 2.2
Key points and terms 2.3
Objectives 2.4
3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 display modules 2.5
3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 display front panel controls 2.11
System status LEDs 2.11
System control switches and LEDs 2.12
LCD display screen 2.15
Change of state and message processing (acknowledge) LEDs
and switches 2.17
LCD displays 2.23
Modes and display priority 2.23
3-LCD Normal state display 2.24
3-LCDXL Normal state display 2.25
3-LCD Off-normal state display 2.26
3-LCDXL Off-normal state display 2.28
EST3 message processing 2.30
EST3 command menu 2.31
Status command 2.33
Disable command 2.35
Enable command 2.38
Activate command 2.38
Restore command 2.40
Reports command 2.40
Program command 2.42
Test Command 2.48
Optional control/display modules 2.52
3-24x control/display module 2.54
3-12Sx control/display module 2.55
3-12/Sxx control/display module 2.56
3-6/3S1Gxx control/display module 2.57
EST3 addressing 2.59
Module 2 evaluation 2.65

EST3 Self Study Course

2.1

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Introduction to module 2
The 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL are special EST3 control/display
modules. These display modules mount on the hinged
standoffs of the 3-CPU1or 3-CPU3 Central Processor modules
and provides the operator interface for standalone or network
system configurations.
Only one 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL1 display is required for an entire
network, located at the point (node) of control. However,
additional LCD displays can be added to any CPU in the
network to provide remote control and annunciation. These
LCD displays are also provided with the 3-ANNCPU for EST-3
remote annunciator applications.
This module of the self-study course describes the 3-LCD and
3-LCDXL1 features, their basic operation, and the special
functions they can perform. We also discuss the other
control/LED display panels available for EST3 fire alarm
networks. These control/LED display panels are installed on
the hinged standoffs of typical local rail modules.
Finally, we will look at the addressing scheme used in EST3
systems. This will help you to understand how a system is laid
out and permit you to read address information on these LCD
displays effectively.

Associated study
Use the following technical reference manuals as associated
study material for this module:
EST3 Installation and Service Manual, (P/N 270380)
EST3 System Operations Manual, (P/N 270382)
EST3 Fire Alarm Support Tools, Online Support System CD
(P/N 270395, Rev 6.0 or later)
The EST3 component installation sheets, Signature Series
component, installation sheets, and other related manuals are
available for your reference on this CD.

2.2

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Key items
Key points to look for:

Feature/function domain.
Local market place fire alarm system local mode.
Proprietary market place fire alarm system - proprietary
mode.
Alarm, supervisory, trouble, and monitor display priority.
Command menu functions.
Automatic cancel of test sequence.

Key terms and operations to learn:

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1.


3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3.
System status LEDs.
System control switches and LEDs.
Acknowledge switches and LEDs.
Previous and next message switches.
Details switch.
Command menu switch.
3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 Normal state display.
3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 Off-normal state display.
Acknowledging and resetting off-normal conditions.
EST3 Message processing and routing.
Alarm silence, panel silence, and drill panel functions.
Establishing password access levels.
Status command.
Disable and enable commands.
Activate and restore commands.
LED and relay control commands.
Displayed or printed report access.
Setting time, date, and holidays.
Editing passwords.
Editing holidays.
Restarting panels.
Clearing panel history.
Selecting service group zones for testing.
Performing a lamp test.
Control/LED display panels.
EST3 addressing conventions.

2.3

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Objectives
Upon completion of this module you will be able to:
1. Describe and perform the 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 Display
panel installation.
2. Describe the purpose of each 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL feature.
3. Describe the difference between a local system and a
proprietary system.
4. Describe alarm, supervisory, trouble and monitor
message processing based on priority established for
these LCDs.
5. State configurable control/display functions within a
multi-node system based on network routing.
6. When shown the 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL in an off-normal
condition, interpret the information presented on the
display.
7. Identify and describe each function on the command
menu.
8. When given a specific 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL function, identify
the password level required.
9. When given one of the four EST3 control/display modules,
identify the type, describe its installation, and provide an
example of an application in which it would be used.
10. Determine the logical address of any cabinet, LRM,
control/display module or device within an EST3 fire alarm
system.

2.4

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 display modules

Supv

Details

Figure 2-1: 3-LCD display module

EST3 Self Study Course

2.5

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Details

Figure 2-2: 3-LCDXL1 display module.

Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6: CPU


with LCD module.
Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets:
These install sheets may be viewed on the Support CD you
received with your self-study kit or via our web site.
3-LCD Main LCD Display
P/N 3100586
3-LCDXL1 LCD Main LCD Display
P/N 3101006
These installation sheets provide a brief description of the
installation procedure for the LCD modules. Use Figure 2-3
and note the following details:

2.6

The module mounts only on the left-most hinged


standoffs of the 3-CPU1or 3-CPU3 panel controller.

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

The ribbon cable is connected between J1 on the back of


the 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL1 and J1 on the front of the 3-CPU1
or 3-CPU3.

The LCD portion of the 3-LCD display panel features a 64 x


128 pixel, super twist, backlit liquid crystal display capable
of showing 168 characters

The LCD portion of the 3-LCDXL1 display panel features a


240 x 320 pixel, super twist, backlit liquid crystal display
capable of showing 960 characters

3-CPU1

3-CPU3

3-LCD or 3-LCDXL1
Figure 2-3: 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL1 installation on 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3.

Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 1:


Introduction.
The 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 control/display modules contain a
group of features and functions in the form of an LCD, LEDs
and switches. The LEDs and switches are programmed to
respond to or to activate functions for a specific group of EST3
cabinets within the EST3 system network.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.7

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Feature/function domain: A domain is the specific cabinet or


group of EST3 cabinets affected when a feature or function is
activated at the 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL1 display module.
Three domains are available:

Local: Only the cabinet in which the 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL1


display is installed responds to the function that is
activated.

Group: A predefined group of cabinets respond to the


function activated.

Global: All the cabinets in the network respond to the


activated function.

Creating a domain is accomplished in the system definition


utility (SDU) by configuring network and message routing.
Through the configure network or message routing process
you can select the panel or group of panels that respond to
the following specific features:

State: Specifies panel or group of panels that alarm,


supervisory, trouble, and monitor off-normal event status
messages are accepted from.

Reset switch: Specifies panel or group of panels to which


reset commands are sent.

Alarm silence switch: Specifies panel or group of panels to


which alarm silence commands are sent.

Trouble silence switch: Specifies panel or group of panels


to which trouble silence commands are sent.

Drill switch: Specifies panel or group of panels to which


drill commands are sent.

Acknowledge switches: Specifies panel or group of panels


to which acknowledge commands are sent.

Network routing (3-LCD or 3-LCDXL1) domain) is established


during the system configuration process using the 3-SDU. The
EST3 system default is global. This means that the configured
network routing defaults to ALL CABINETS.
In this case if you press the Reset switch on any 3-LCD or 3LCDXL1 within a network, every cabinet in that network will
reset. Additionally, all changes of state within the entire
network are reported to and displayed by all LCD display
panels.

2.8

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Actually, these conditions are what you might normally expect


and want. Nevertheless, lets look at an example, where this
might not be the case.

Figure 2-4: Network example.

Figure 2-4 shows two large buildings separated by a large


parking lot. One EST3 fire alarm network protects both
buildings. The network consists of five EST3 cabinets (nodes) in
Building A (1 through 5) and five EST3 cabinets (nodes) in
Building B (6 through 10). Cabinets 1 and 6 are located on the
ground floor of their respective buildings and each has a LCD
Display module.
If we left the system in its default configuration of global, a fire
alarm in building A would cause both displays to show the
alarm. Consequently, someone in Building B could silence all
the alarms in Building A. This may not be a desirable situation.
However, we may want the drill switch on either panel to set
off the required annunciation devices in both buildings.
During the configuration and programming process we could
configure network routing for Cabinet 1s LCD (located in
Building A) to receive changes of state only from cabinets 1, 2,
3, 4, and 5. Additionally, we would configure network routing
so that the Reset, Alarm Silence, Trouble Silence, and
Acknowledge switches on Cabinet 1s LCD would affect only
cabinets 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. The Drill function for the entire
system would be configured to activate from either Cabinet 1
or Cabinet 6 (all cabinets).

EST3 Self Study Course

2.9

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

For Building B, Cabinet 6s LCD display module would be


configured to receive changes of state from cabinets 6, 7, 8, 9,
and 10 only. We would specify that the Reset, Alarm Silence,
Trouble Silence and Message Acknowledge switches affect
only Cabinets 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10. Again, the drill function would
be activated from Cabinet 1 or Cabinet 6 (all cabinets).
In this way, an alarm or any other change of state would
affect and be displayed only in the building in which it
occurred. Furthermore, the Reset, Alarm Silence, Trouble
Silence, and Acknowledge Switches would be configured to
affect only their respective buildings cabinets. On the other
hand, if a fire drill were desired, pressing the switches on
either building LCD would result in a drill for both buildings.
Note: The EST3 also supports the configuration of alternate
network message routing for any object within its database.

2.10

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 display front panel controls


Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 2: 3-LCD and

3-LCDXL1 operating instructions > Controls and indicators.


It may be helpful to make a copy of Figure 2-1 and Figure 2-2
(the 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1) to refer to as you progress through
the assigned reading and this module.
The functional operation of both the 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 are
the same. The controls and indicators for each panel are laid
out differently but provide the same functional operation. As
you can see the main operational difference is in the size and
operation of the LCD display screen.
For this lesson lets divide the 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 front
panels into five specific areas. Starting at the top:

System status LEDs.


System control switches and LEDs.
LCD display screen.
Change of state and message processing LEDs and
switches.
Numeric keypad, expanded message and command
menu switch.

System status LEDs


The 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL1 have five system status LEDs. They
are:

Power: a green LED that is on when ac power is present to


the panel.

Test:: a yellow LED that is on when a predetermined


portion (service group) of the system is placed in test
mode via the command menus.

Note: The test function contains a programmable timer


(default 30 minutes) that exits the test mode after the
specified period of inactivity.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.11

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

CPU Fail: a yellow LED that turns on when the onboard


watchdog circuit detects a failure.

Note: Where processor failures must be reset manually.

GND Fault: a yellow LED that turns on when a ground


fault has been detected by the cabinets power supply.

Disable: a yellow LED that turns on whenever any point or


zone has been manually disabled via the command
menus.

System control switches and LEDs


Reset

The Reset switch activates the system reset sequence to


restore the system to normal after an off-normal condition
has been acknowledged. It also has a yellow LED that:

Flashes rapidly during smoke power down phase.


Flashes slowly during the power up phase.
Goes steady during the reset sequence restorial phase.
Turns off when reset is completed.

The Reset switch does not have any effect on disabled points
or manually overridden functions.
This Switch/LED combination is programmable and may be
password protected during the 3-SDU configuration process.
Note: The Reset switch is disabled during any Alarm Silence
Inhibit timer period, which can be up to 3 minutes and is
configured in the 3-SDU.

2.12

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Note: The Reset switch may not affect security or access


control events. Which may need to be reset as a function of
the security partition in which they reside.
Alarm silence

The Alarm Silence switch turns off all audible (default


configuration) or audible and visual (optional configuration)
notification appliances. While an alarm silence is active, the
yellow LED is on, indication that the panel is silence during an
active alarm event. Pushing this switch a second time
resounds the Audibles and turns on the Visibles, if configured
to be silenced.
This Switch/LED combination is programmable and may be
password protected during the SDU configuration process.
Note: The Alarm Silence switch is disabled during any Alarm
Silence Inhibit timer period, which can be up to 3 minutes and
is configured in the SDU.
Note: The Alarm Silence function is SDU configurable to be
disabled on waterflow switch activation or configured to
silence NAC circuits activated by a waterflow.
Panel silence

In US and Canada local market applications, the Panel Silence


switch turns off the panels internal buzzer when pressed. The
panel also silences after all messages have been
acknowledged in both the local and proprietary modes. The
panels internal buzzer will sound on detection of any of the
following conditions:

EST3 Self Study Course

Active alarms.
Active supervisory conditions.
Active trouble conditions.
Active monitor conditions.
During internal software self-check.

2.13

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

A yellow LED turns on when the internal buzzer has been


turned off and the panel is in an off-normal condition.
This Switch/LED combination is programmable and may be
password protected during the SDU configuration process.
Note: The operation of this LED switch varies depending on
the EST3 system operation configuration: Local or Proprietary
operations. Where in the proprietary mode, this button is
disabled, and the panel is silenced only after all events have
been acknowledged.
Note: The CPUs onboard buzzer can be 3-SDU configured to
resound the panel buzzer at regular intervals to remind the
operator that the panel has been silenced and the panel still is
in an off-normal state.
Local mode fire alarm system: A fire system that activates
the notification appliance circuits only on the premises being
protected when an alarm condition is initiated.
In local mode system operations the alarm, supervisory,
trouble and monitor acknowledge switches due not have to
be pressed to acknowledge each event message. The Reset
switch can be used in the local mode to globally acknowledge
the off normal event messages and restore the system after
the off normal conditions have been cleared.
In a local mode system configuration the panel silence switch
silences the buzzer, even with multiple events existing, as
soon as the switch is pressed.
Proprietary mode fire alarm system: A fire alarm system,
which is controlled and monitored 24-hours a day by trained
onsite personnel at a control station located on the protected
property.
In a proprietary mode fire alarm system each event must be
individually acknowledged by pressing the corresponding
message queues acknowledge switch.
Configuring the EST3 for local or proprietary mode operation
is accomplished within the 3-SDU.

2.14

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Drill

Pressing the Drill switch activates the drill command,


sounding all of the audible devices and optionally the visible
devices during a fire alarm. The corresponding yellow LED
lights steady, indicating that the panel is performing a fire drill
test sequence. This Drill switch:

Activates the fire drill function.


Yellow LED is on while drill function is active.
May be configured and programmed to be disabled or to
perform functions in other than drill.

This Switch/LED combination is programmable and may be


password protected during the SDU configuration process.
Note: The Reset, Alarm Silence, Panel Silence and Drill
functions may be 3-SDU configured to perform customized
System Functions 1 through 4.

LCD display screens


The 3-LCD display screen is a super twist, backlit,
alphanumeric, 64 x 128 pixels, 168-character display of 8 lines
of 21 characters.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.15

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

The 3-LCDXL1 display screen is a super twist, backlit,


alphanumeric, 240 x 320 pixels, 960-character display of 24
lines of 40 characters.

An EST3 system uses the LCD screen to display:

Time.
Active point count.
Disabled point count.
Up to two 21 character x 2 line (42 character) location text
message fields for 3-LCD applications.
Note: In 3-LCD applications, only two event location
message fields may be displayed at a time. Initially, the
highest priority first event and the most recent, highest
priority last event in the Alarm, Supervisory, Trouble or
Monitor queues are displayed. As you scroll each
message in the queues each subsequent event is
displayed in the top location message field. After all
events have been scrolled, the last event in the respective
queue is displayed in both message fields.
Up to eight 40 character x 1 line (40 character) location
text message fields for 3-LCDXL1 applications.
Note: In 3-LCDXL1 applications, up to eight event location
message fields may be displayed at a time. Initially, the
highest priority first event and the first seven events are
displayed in the seven location message fields. These
events are displayed in the order of their occurrence and
based on the priority of the event queue. The selected
event (initially the oldest or first) is displayed in the first
selected event message field. The most recent, highest
priority last event in the Alarm, Supervisory, Trouble or
Monitor queues is displayed in the last most recent event
location message field. As you scroll each message in the
queues each subsequent event is displayed in the top
location message field. After all events have been

2.16

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

scrolled, the last event in the respective queue is


displayed in both the last message in the queue field and
the most recent event message fields.
Alarm, supervisory, trouble, and monitor location message
event queue count.

Both LCD display screens are used to display Command Menu


functions during manual panel operating procedures.

Change of state and event message processing


(Acknowledge) LEDs and switches
These LDC display panels contain four acknowledge
switch/LED combinations. These are for acknowledging the
Alarm, Supervisory, Trouble and Monitor event messages.
A panel can store up to 2000 event messages of the four
types. The messages stored are organized into message
queues, where Alarm is the highest priority, then Supervisory,
then Trouble and finally Monitor. Messages are posted in the
queue based on their priority.
The EST3 panel places all events into five categories:

Fire alarm events life safety events, such as, smoke


detector, waterflow, pull station and etc

Security alarm events burglar and holdup alarms


generated by security devices

Supervisory events off-normal non-alarm events of a


related fire protection system, such as sprinkler system
valve

Trouble events faults within the EST3 system detected


by built in diagnostics

Monitor events changes in the normal status for low


priority, ancillary system components
Note: For display and priority purposes, Security Alarm
and Supervisory events are posted in the Supervisory
message queue.

Each of the Alarm, Supervisory, Trouble and Monitor message


queues can contain up to 2000 messages, as long as the total
for all messages does not exceed 2000 messages. These
messages queues are also prioritized, where alarm is the
highest priority event and monitor is the lowest priority event.
Each message queue has a displayed counter, which stops at
999. When the respective Alarm, Supervisory, Trouble or
Monitor event queue holds more than 999 event messages,
*** is displayed in the corresponding counter field.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.17

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Initially, when events occur, the event message from the


queue with the highest priority is displayed. When the Alarm,
Supervisory, Trouble or Monitor Acknowledge switch is
pressed its corresponding queue of messages is selected for
display.
Alarm acknowledge switch

Alarm events are displayed in the order they are received.


Subsequently pressing this switch scrolls the alarm event
messages in the order received. The red LED on the Alarm
switch lights during an active alarm event. There are two
modes of LED operation:

When flashing this LED indicates that one or more alarm


event messages have not been viewed (local mode) or
acknowledged (proprietary mode).

When steady this LED indicates that all the alarm


messages have been viewed and acknowledged.

Pressing the Alarm switch selects the alarm message queue


for display, and displays the first 42-character alarm message
on the LCD screen. Pressing the switch again acknowledges
the displayed message and displays the next message. Each
subsequent depression of this switch displays the next
message in the alarm queue until the last message has been
displayed and acknowledged (LED goes steady).
Supervisory acknowledge switch

Supv

Supervisory and security alarm events are displayed in the


order they are received. Subsequently pressing this switch
scrolls the supervisory event messages in the order received.
The yellow LED on the Supervisory (Supy) switch lights when a
supervisory condition exists on the system. There are two
modes of LED operation:

2.18

When flashing this LED indicates that one or more


supervisory event messages have not been viewed (local
mode) or acknowledged (proprietary mode).

When steady this LED indicates that all the supervisory


messages have been viewed and acknowledged.

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Pressing the Supv switch selects the supervisory message


queue for display, and displays the first 42-character
supervisory message on the LCD screen. Pressing the switch
again acknowledges the displayed message and displays the
next message. Each subsequent depression of this switch
displays the next supervisory message in the queue until the
last message has been displayed and acknowledged (LED
goes steady).
Note: Security events allow multiple activations and the
corresponding event message from the same point.
Trouble acknowledge switch

Trouble events are displayed in the order they are received.


Subsequently pressing this switch scrolls the trouble event
messages in the order received. The yellow LED on the
Trouble switch lights when a trouble condition exists on the
system. There are two modes of LED operation:

When flashing this LED indicates that one or more trouble


event messages have not been viewed (local mode) or
acknowledged (proprietary mode).

When steady this LED indicates that all the trouble


messages have been viewed and acknowledged

This switch provides the same function for the trouble


messages as the Alarm or Supv switches provide for their
corresponding message queues.
Monitor acknowledge switch

Monitor events are displayed in the order they are received.


Subsequently pressing this switch scrolls the monitor event
messages in the order received. The yellow LED on the
Monitor switch lights when a monitor condition exists on the
system. There are two modes of LED operation:

EST3 Self Study Course

When flashing this LED indicates that one or more monitor


event messages have not been viewed (local mode) or
acknowledged (proprietary mode).

2.19

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

When steady this LED indicates that all the monitor


messages have been viewed and acknowledged

This switch provides the same function for the monitor


messages as the Alarm, Supy and Trouble switches provide
for their corresponding message queues.
Previous and next message switches

Pressing the Previous switch (up arrow) scrolls the LCD display
to the preceding message in the currently selected Alarm,
Supervisory, Trouble or Monitor queue when in the local
mode.
Pressing the Next switch (down arrow) scrolls the LCD display
to the following or next message in the selected queue in the
local mode.
The event queue sequencing function of this switch is
disabled in the proprietary mode, where each event must be
individually acknowledged by pressing its corresponding
acknowledge switch.
The switch is also used to scroll through displayed command
menu items in both the local and proprietary modes.
Note: Press and hold either of these switches to auto-scroll
event messages in the previous or next direction.
Details switch
Details

This switch provides several functions in EST3 applications:

2.20

For active Zone Groups pressing this switch displays a list


of active devices, on a displayed expanded message
screen, within the displayed Zone group.

For active monitor event Instruction Text Groups pressing


this switch displays the expanded message screen use to
display a custom, scrollable 1k character message for a
Instruction TEXT Group configured during the
programming process.

For maintenance alert events pressing this switch displays


a list of the dirty devices.

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

For active Common Trouble events pressing this switch


displays a list of specific troubles for the selected device.

For active Guard Patrol events pressing this switch


displays the guard station at which the event occurred
and indicates whether the activation was caused by an
early, late or out-of-sequence condition.

In older versions of the 3-LCD panel this switch was called the
Expanded Message switch. In either case its operation is the
same.
When the event for an individual device is displayed its
message field displays the 3-SDU configured location
message. In this case, for an event for a single object (nonzone group), pressing the Details switch displays some
additional information, such as the cabinet/local rail
module/device address.
Command Menu switch

Pressing the Command Menu switch displays the system


command menu that permits access to the advanced system
status and control functions.
The command menu uses password levels that permit
specific operators at the specified password level to:

EST3 Self Study Course

Review the status of the systems active and disabled


points.

Disable and enable system points.

Activate alternate sensitivity and restore to primary


sensitivity.

Activate alternate message routing and restore to primary


message routing.

Activate and restore programmed guard patrol or checkin group functions.

Activate and restore Control LEDs and Relays.

View and print reports.

Initiate custom configured service group test sequences.

Program system attributes: such as, set time, set date,


enter holidays, set passwords, initiate a reboot of the
panel(s) and clear the alarm history.

Bypass and un-bypass security points.

Arm and disarm security partitions.

2.21

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Numeric keypad

The panels numeric keypad lets the operator select menu


items by number or enter required passwords or addresses.
You simply enter the desired number then press the Enter
button. The Backspace button lets you correct entries or back
out of menu displays and return to the normal or active event
display.
Now that you are familiar with the LEDs and switches on the
front of the 3-LCD Display module, lets take a look at the
displays you may encounter on the LCD screen.

2.22

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

LCD displays
Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 1:
Introduction > the following topics:
Display operation.
Normal state.
Off-normal state.
Message details.
Display priorities.
Message processing.

Modes and display priority


Display priority: Each type of event message, alarm,
supervisory, trouble, or monitor, has an assigned priority. A
message with a higher priority automatically removes a lower
priority message from the LCD screen and appears on the
display.

Message priorities (from highest to lowest) are:

Alarm (left-most number of alarm events count on bottom


of display.)
Supervisory and security alarm event count on bottom of
display.
Trouble event count on bottom of display.
Monitor (right-most number of monitor events count on
bottom of display).

The LCD has two display modes:


Unattended mode: In this mode, without an off-normal
condition the normal state screen is displayed. During an offnormal condition, the first and last event of the highest
priority event type, alarm, supervisory, trouble or monitor, are
automatically displayed for LCD applications. During an offnormal condition on the LCDXL display, the first event in the
selected queue, up to the first six events in the selected queue
and the last event are automatically displayed.
Attended mode: In this mode, the display is under the control
of an operator, who can, through the panel controls, manually
display any desired event or menu, regardless of its priority.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.23

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

3-LCD normal state display


Figure 2-5 shows the display you will see on the 3-LCD when
the system is up and operating with no active points.
Current Time

Custom
Project
Label
or
Banner

Current Date

09:35:23

05-01-2006

EST Training
Department
Alarm History:

0000

Alarm History Count


Figure 2-5: Normal state display for the 3-LCD display screen.

As shown, the 3-LCD normal display indicates:

Current time (in 24 hour format) in the upper-left corner

Current date in upper-right corner: 3-SDU configuration


permits three date configurations:
MMDDYYYY (the default).
DDMMYYYY.
YYYYMMDD.

Project label (custom banner): the desired project label is


programmed via the 3-SDU during project configuration.

Alarm history: shows the number of times the system has


gone into the alarm condition.

Note: This counter can be cleared, along with the event


history buffer, by operators with the required access level
password, described later in this lesson.

2.24

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

3-LCDXL1 normal state display


Figure 2-6 shows the display you will see on the 3-LCDXL1
when the system is up and operating with no active points.
Current Time

09:35:23

Current Date

05-01-2006

Custom
Project
Label
or
Banner

EST Training
Department

Alarm History Count: 0000

Alarm History Count

Figure 2-6: Normal state display for the 3-LCDXL1 display screen.

Like the 3-LCD, the 3-LCDXL1 normal display indicates:

Current time (in 24 hour format) in the upper-left corner.

Current date to the-right of the current time: 3-SDU


configuration permits three date configurations:
MMDDYYYY (the default).
DDMMYYYY.
YYYYMMDD.

Project label (custom banner): the desired project label is


programmed via the 3-SDU during project configuration.

Alarm history: shows the number of times the system has


gone into the alarm condition.

Note: This counter can be cleared, along with the event


history buffer, by operators with the required access level
password, described later in this lesson

EST3 Self Study Course

2.25

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

3-LCD Off-normal state display


In the event of an off-normal condition, the 3-LCD Display
changes as per the alarm event example shown in Figure 2-7.
Note: Event messages are displayed by order of priority as
previously stated. Supervisory, trouble, or monitor off-normal
conditions would operate in the same manner as the alarm
condition used for this example.
Note: The EN54 marketplace displays operate differently than
described in this section. Refer to the EST3 International
Installation Supplement Manual for details on EN54
applications.
Current Time

First, oldest or last


reviewed, highest
priority event in
selected event queue.
Highlighted on bottom
line of display.

# of Active Points

09:35:23
A0007 D0000
0001 PULL STATION ACTIVE
Paint Shop Pull Stn
North Entrance
0005 WATERFLOW ACTIVE
Paint Shop Waterflow
A005

# of
Active
Alarms
Events
in Queue

# of Disabled Points

S001

# of
Active
Supervisory
Events
in Queue

T001

Most recent, highest


priority event in
selected event queue.
Highlighted on bottom
line of display.

M000

# of
Active
Trouble
Events
in Queue

# of
Active
Monitor
Events
in Queue

Event field definition


Event Number
(1st event shown)

09:35:23
A0007 D0000
0001 PULL STATION ACTIVE
Paint Shop Pull Stn
North Entrance
0005 WATERFLOW ACTIVE
Paint Shop Waterflow
A005

S001

T001

Event Type

Active devices
location message,
2-lines of 21-characters

M000

Figure 2-7: 3-LCD Off-normal display, unattended mode, alarm


event.

Lets examine the display in some detail.


Top line
The top line displays the system time, in 24-hour format, the
total number of active points, and the total number of
disabled points.

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EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Event lines
The reversed text area displays the first, oldest or most
recently reviewed event message (alarm in this example) of
the selected queue type. The first line is generated by the EST3
system, and shows the event sequence number and the event
type. The second and third lines are a custom location
message for the device. The custom location message is
limited to two lines of 21 characters each.
In the attended mode, where the operator has intervened, this
area contains the last active event that has not been
acknowledged or reviewed. After the operator has reviewed
and acknowledged all of the events, this area contains the
last event in the selected queue that was acknowledged.
The three lines below the reversed text area display the last
received, highest priority, active event in the selected queue.
In this case, we have chosen the simple example of a fifth
alarm event. The custom message for this device is only one
line, so a total of two lines are displayed for the event.
This area always contains the last event received in the
selected queue.
Bottom line
The bottom line shows you the total number of active events
for each event queue type, displayed in order of priority, from
left to right. You can tell here, how many messages you have
waiting in each event type queue.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.27

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

3-LCDXL1 Off-normal state display


In the event of an off-normal condition, the 3-LCDXL1 Display
changes as per the alarm event example shown in Figure 2-8.
Note: Event messages are displayed by order of priority as
previously stated. Supervisory, trouble, or monitor off-normal
conditions would operate in the same manner as the alarm
condition used for this example.
Note: The EN54 marketplace displays operate differently than
described in this section. Refer to the EST3 International
Installation Supplement Manual for details on EN54
applications.
Current Time
Event number and
event type
Active devices location
message, 1-line of
40-characters

Current Date

# of Active Points

# of Disabled Points

09:35:23

05-01-2006
ACT:0005 DIS:0000
- - SELECTED ALARM - 0001 PULL STN ACTIVE
Paint Shop Pull Stn North Entramce
- - ALARM QUEUE - 0001 PULL STN ACTIVE
Paint Shop Pull Stn North Entrance
0002 SMOKE ACTIVE
Paint Shop Smoke
0003 HEAT ACTIVE
Paint Finishing Bake Room
0004 PULL STN ACTIVE
Paint Shop Pull Stn South Entrance
0005 WATERFLOW ACTIVE
Paint Shop Waterflow

- - MOST RECENT ALARM - 0005 WATERFLOW ACTIVE


Paint Shop Waterflow
ALARM SUPERVISORY TROUBLE MONITOR
0005
0000
0000
0000

# of
Active
Alarms
Events
in Queue

# of
Active
Supervisory
Events
in Queue

# of
Active
Trouble
Events
in Queue

First, oldest or last


reviewed, highest
priority event in
selected event queue.
Highlighted on bottom
line of display.

Up to seven
active events
displayed

Most recent, highest


priority event in
selected event queue.
Highlighted on bottom
line of display.

# of
Active
Monitor
Events
in Queue

Figure 2-8: 3-LCDXL1 Off-normal display, unattended mode,


alarm event.
Lets examine the display in some detail.
Top line
The top line displays the system time in 24-hour format, the
date in 3-SDU configured format, the total number of active
points, and the total number of disabled points.

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EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Event lines
The reversed text area displays the first, oldest or most
recently reviewed event message (alarm in this example) of
the selected queue type. The first line identifies this as the
currently selected alarm and the second line is generated by
the EST3 system, and shows the event sequence number and
the event type. The third line is a custom location message for
the device. The custom location message is limited to one line
of 40 characters.
Up to 7 active events may be displayed in the alarm queue. In
the attended mode, where the operator has intervened, this
area contains up to seven active events that have not been
acknowledged or reviewed. After the operator has reviewed
and acknowledged all of the events, this area contains the
last event in the selected queue that was acknowledged.
The three lines below this alarm queue area display the last
received, highest priority, active event in the selected queue.
In this case, we have chosen the simple example of a fifth
alarm event.
This area always contains the last event received in the
selected queue.
Bottom line
The bottom two lines shows you the total number of active
events for each event queue type, displayed in order of
priority, from left to right. You can tell here, how many
messages you have waiting in each event type queue.
Note: In either case (3-LCD or 3-LCDXL1), pressing any of the
queue acknowledge select buttons places the display in the
attended mode to review and acknowledge events in the
corresponding queue. This prevents the displayed reverse
text area from being updated by an event of a higher priority.
These displays automatically return to the unattended mode
after the user timeout period (5 seconds default) has expired.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.29

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

EST3 message processing


As you learned earlier in this module, there are four types of
event message: alarm, supervisory, trouble, and monitor. As
each event occurs, a related message is stored in that specific
event queue. Only the messages of the queue with the highest
priority are displayed. Therefore, alarm messages take priority
over the other types, supervisory messages take priority over
trouble and monitor messages, and so on.
When an event message is stored in a queue, the LED on the
queue switch flashes. This indicates that an unacknowledged
message exists in the queue. To see that message, if it is not
on the LCD screen, simply press the switch.
In the local fire alarm system mode, each events message
may be individually acknowledged by subsequent depression
of the associated queue switch or by pressing the Next
Message switch. This mode does not require that messages
be individually acknowledged. As long as the off-normal
conditions have been cleared, the reset switch will globally
restore the system.
In the US proprietary fire alarm system mode, each message
must be individually acknowledged and the event restoration
must also be acknowledged. The Next Message and Previous
Message switches are disabled from acknowledging events or
sequencing the event queues.
When all the messages have been acknowledged in an event
queue, the associated LED goes steady and the panel is
silenced. The last events message will be displayed in both
message areas of the 3-LCD display, and in the selected
alarm and most recent alarm fields of the 3-LCDXL1 display.

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EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

EST3 command menu


Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 1:
Introduction.
Optional Features.
Entering logical addresses..
You have learned about the application of both types of LCD
modules, their controls, and their messages. You have also
learned how incoming event messages are processed. Now
lets learn about the 3-LCD and 3-LCDX1L command menu.
Command menu: The command menu provides access to the
maintenance and advanced functions of the EST3 system.
Access to each function requires one of five password levels.
The EST3 system employs five levels of user or service
password protected access the command menu functions.
The specific function being used determines the password
level required. The password to function relationship is:
Users

Default

Access to functions

Level 1

1111

User 1
Public Mode Access

Level 2

2222

User 1 and 2
Emergency Mode Access

Level 3

3333

User 1, 2, and 3
Maintenance and Administrator
Mode Access

Service

Default

Access

Level 4

4444

User 1, 2, 3, and Service 1


Service Mode Access

Level 5

XXXX*

User 1, 2, 3, Service 1 and 2


Restricted Manufactures Access

*Authorized EST access only

Password protection in Chapter 1, Introduction in the operations


manual, shows the privileges of each password level. The default
passwords can be used prior to entering custom facility specific
passwords through the command menu.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.31

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Part of your responsibilities may be to train your customers


personnel on the operations of the LCD control panels. An
interactive distance-learning course has been developed to
help you do this. This course contains a CD that enables your
user to perform LCD operations through emulated
applications, a self-study manual that guides the user through
this process and a quick reference guide to aid the user
during their day-to-day operator tasks. This course also
contains online tests and the ability to submit results to GE
Security to gain a certificate. This is the EST3 Operators
Course, P/N 9700197.
When the Command Menu switch is pressed, the main menu
appears on the 3-LCD display as illustrated in Figure 2-9.
Main Menu with Status Selected
MAIN MENU
1) Status
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
A000 S000

T000

M000

Main Menu with Activate Selected


MAIN MENU
1) Status
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
A000 S000

T000

M000

Scroll
Arrow(s)

Main Menu with Security Selected


MAIN MENU
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
8) Test
9) Security
A000 S000

T000

M000

Figure 2-9: Commands main menu.

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3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

The command main menu list (9 items) is long enough that it


does not fit on a single screen of the 3-LCD display. Item 9
Security is not discussed in this course. You must use the up
and down arrows (Previous and Next Message switches) to
scroll between menu items. The displayed scroll arrow points
down when you are at the top of this menu, points both up
and down when you are within the menu, and points up when
you are at the bottom of the list,
Once the desired command it highlighted, press the Enter
switch to navigate to its sub-menus.
Status command
Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 2: 3-LCD and
3-LCDXL1 operating instructions.
Creating a status report.
The Status command lets you determine the condition of
individual system components. When you select Status from
the Main Menu, the system displays the Status Menu as
shown in Figure 2-10.
From the Status Menu you can select All Active Points,
individual active point types (Alarm, Test, etc.) or Disabled
Points. In Figure2-10 All Active Points is shown as an example.
If we had selected any other Status menu item, its display
operation is the same as the all active point function shown in
our example.
Main Menu with Status Selected
MAIN MENU
1) Status
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
A000 S000

T000

M000

Status Menu with All Active Points Selected


STATUS MENU
1) All Active Points
2) Alarm
3) Supervisory
4) Trouble
5) Monitor
6) Test
A000 S000 T000

M000

Status Menu with Security Selected


STATUS MENU
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
8) Test
9) Security
A000 S000 T000

ENTER PANEL
PP

M000

Figure 2-10: Status Menu and with Active Points Selected.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.33

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

The Status Menu gives you nine choices:

2.34

All Active Points: lets you display or print on a panel-bypanel basis; every input point within the selected panel on
the network that is in an alarm or active condition and
every output point within the selected panel on the
network that is in a set condition.

Alarm: lets you display or print on a panel-by-panel basis


every Alarm type input point within the selected panel on
the network that is in an alarm condition.

Supervisory: lets you display or print on a panel-by-panel


basis every Supervisory type input point within the
selected panel on the network that is in an active
condition.

Trouble: lets you display or print on a panel-by-panel


basis every Trouble type input point within the selected
panel on the network that is in an active condition.

Monitor: lets you display or print on a panel-by-panel


basis every Monitor type input point within the selected
panel on the network that is in an active condition.

Test: lets you display or print on a panel-by-panel basis


every input point within the selected panel on the network
that has been activated during a service group test
sequence.

Disabled Points: lets you display or print on a panel-bypanel basis; every point within the selected panel on the
network that has been disabled.

Outputs: lets you display or print on a panel-by-panel


basis every output point within the selected panel on the
network that is in a set condition.

Security: lets you display or print partition or security


holdup status. Security is not discussed during this
course.

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

In each case above, the points address and related message


are displayed. As shown in Figure 2-11, the point or device
logical address consists of the cabinet (P = panel) address, the
LRM address (C = card), and related point or device address.
The EST3 logical addressing scheme is discussed later in this
lesson.
For our example lets select all active points and observe that
the display requires that you enter the panel address you wish
status for.

Report Output Menu with Display Selected


ENTER PANEL
02

REPORT OUTPUT MENU


1) Display
2) Print Locally

A000

S000

T000

M000

ALL ACTIVE POINTS


LOCAL MNTR ACT
P:02 C:00 D:0001
Startup Response

A000

S000

T000

M000

Figure 2-11: Selecting all active points for display.


For our example we will enter panel address 02 and observe
that the Report Output Menu is displayed. This menu lets you
display the status on the LCD or print the status on a printer.
The example in Figure 2-11 shows the first active point for
panel 02 when Display was selected from the Report Output
Menu. You would simply scroll through the active points to
view each in turn until prompted at the end of the report.
Disable command
Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 2: 3-LCD and
3-LCDX1L operating instructions.
Disabling groups.
Disabling hardware components.
The Disable command lets you disable a point, time control or
logical group in the system. Select Disable from the Main
Menu and observe that the Disable Menu is displayed as
shown in Figure 2-12.
The disable menu lists six (password-restricted) commands for
disabling various types of system components.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.35

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Device: Access levels 3 through 5. Disables the selected Input


or Output device. The disabled input will not respond to an
active or faulty condition, or a disabled output cannot be
activated manually or via the programmed application.
Card: Access levels 4 and 5. Prevents the input or output
functions from operating for the selected card (LRM)
Group: Access levels 2 through 5. Disables the selected group.
The disabled group will not respond when conditions for the
selected group are satisfied.
Check-in groups (access level 3 through 5) are specialized
program functions that are used in nursing homes for patient
control and monitoring.
Matrix groups (access level 3 through 5) are specialized
programming functions that are typically used in
extinguishing agent release. A matrix group is similar to an
AND group (access level 3 through 5), but uses x and y
coordinates to determine statement satisfaction.
Disabling a service group (access level 4 through 5) causes
the test mode to revert to circuit-by-circuit testing.
When a Guard Patrol group (access level 3 through 5) is
disabled the system will not be able to initiate the disabled
groups guard patrol routes.
Disabling a Zone group (access level 2 through 5) prevents the
selected zone group from responding when the groups
specified input conditions are satisfied.
Disabling an Instruction Text group (access level 3 through 5)
prevents the selected group from responding when the
groups specified input conditions are satisfied.
Time Control: Access levels 4 and 5. Prevents the selected
time control from functioning at the programmed time.
Switch: Access level 4 and 5. Disables selected switch from
operating as configured in the system.
LED: Access level 4 and 5. Disables selected LED from
operating as configured in the system.

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EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays


Main Menu with Disable Selected
MAIN MENU
1) Status
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
A000 S000

Disable Menu with Device Selected

T000

M000

DISABLE MENU
1) Device
2) Card
3) Group
4) Time Control
5) Switch
6) LED
A000 S000 T000

M000
ENTER DEVICE
PPCCDDDD

Figure 2-12: Disabling a device.


The display sequence to disable an input device is illustrated
in Figure 2-12 and Figure 2-13.

ENTER DEVICE
02020120

Figure 2-13: Disabled device panel indicators.


As you can see from the example in these figures, to disable
an input device you must:
1. Select Device from the Disable Menu.
2. Enter the logical address for the device.
When you have disabled a point, notice that the Trouble
Acknowledge LED flashes and the Disable LED comes on
steady.
You would use this same procedure to disable any other item
from the Disable Menu as shown in Figures 2-12 and 2-13.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.37

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Enable command
Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 2: 3-LCD and
3-LCDXL operating instructions.
Enabling groups.
Enabling hardware components.
The Enable command lets you enable any previously disabled
point, time control or logical group. This command applies to
the same system components listed in our discussion of the
Disable command. The steps for using Enable are basically
the same as those for the Disable command.
Activate command
Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 2: 3-LCD
operating instructions.
Guard Patrol groups.
Check-in groups.
Changing the smoke detector sensitivity level.
Changing event message routing.
Changing the output state of a relay or LED.
Activate lets you turn on one of four system functions or to
activate a relay, LED, audio amp or audio message. Simply
select Activate from the Main Menu to display the Activate
Menu as shown in Figure 2-14. The eight items, which can be
activated, are:
Alternate sensitivity: Access level 2 through 5. Causes the
smoke detectors to use the secondary sensitivity (when
configured) to determine the alarm point.
Alternate message route: Access level 2 through 5. Routes
the specified event messages to secondary destinations
(when configured).
Guard patrol: Access level 3 through 5. Starts the selected
patrols early, late, and out of sequence functions, initiating
the programmed system response created by you.
Check-in group: Access level 3 through 5. Turns on the
selected check-in groups preconfigured check-in window to
receive normal check-ins. Activates an emergency output,
programmed by you, when check-in does not occur within the
window.
Relay: Access level 3 through 5. Manually control of selected
relay.

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EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

LED: Access level 3 through 5. Manually control of selected


LED.
Audio Amp: Access level 3 through 5. Manually control of
selected Amp.
Audio Message: Access level 3 through 5. Manually control of
selected audio message and related audio channel.
Main Menu with Activate Selected
MAIN MENU
1) Status
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
A000 S000

Activate Menu with Alt. Sensitivity Selected

T000

M000

ACTIVATE MENU
1) Alt. Sensitivity
2) Alt Message Route
3) Guard Patrol Route
4) Check In Group
5) Relay
6) LED
A000 S000 T000 M000

Activate Menu with Audio


Message Selected

ACCESS LEVEL 2
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX

ACTIVATE MENU
3) Guard Patrol Route
4) Check In Group
5) Relay
6) LED
7) Audio Amp
8) Audio Message
A000 S000 T000 M000

Figure 2-14: Selecting activate menu.


The display sequence to activate alternate sensitivity is
illustrated in Figure 2-14. The display sequence to activate
alternate message routes or to activate the guard patrol and
check-in groups operate in the same manner.
The Activate and Restore Menus enable you to manually
control (turn on or off) relays or LEDs. Figure 2-15 and Figure
2-16 show the display sequence when using the Activate
function to turn on a LED. The operation to turn on a relay,
audio amp or audio message is basically the same, except
you cannot fast or slow blink a relay, amp or message.
To turn on a LED, relay, audio amp or audio message, you
select the device type from the Activate menu. The 5) LED, 6)
RELAY, 7) Audio Amp and 8) Audio Message functions enable
you to turn a relay, amp or message on, or to turn an LED on
steady, fast blink or slow blink. The Output Priority Menu
allows you to assign a priority to the desired device. Then
simply enter the desired device address to turn it on.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.39

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays


Activate Menu with LED Selected
Main Menu with Activate Selected
MAIN MENU
1) Status
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
A000 S000

T000

ACTIVATE MENU
1) Alt. Sensitivity
2) Alt Message Route
3) Guard Patrol Route
4) Check In Group
5) Relay
6) LED
A000 S000 T000 M000

M000

Figure 2-15: Selecting control output function.

LED Menu with Steady Selected


Output Priority Menu with Set Selected

LED MENU
1) Steady
2) Slow Blink
3) Fast Blink

A000

S000

T000

OUTPUT PRIORITY MENU


1) Set
2) Latch
3) Low Priority
4) Medium Priority
5) High Priority

M000

A000

When relay, audio amp or audio


message are selected sequence
goes directly to OUTPUT PRIORITY
MENU because these devices are
simply turned on.

S000

T000

M000

Whenever you turn an output


on with a priority you must turn
it off with the same priority.

ENTER DEVICE
PPCCDDDD

Figure 2-16: Control output commands.


Restore command
The Restore command lets you manually turn off a previously
activated function, LED, relay, audio amp or audio message.
This command operates in the same manner as the Activate
command described above.
Note: Items 1 and 2 on the Restore Menu will be Primary
Sensitivity and Primary Message Route, respectively. You
must turn a LED, Relay, amp or message off with the same
priority that you used when turning it on.
Reports command
Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 2: 3-LCD and
3-LCDXL1 operating instructions.
Creating reports.
The Reports command lets you access various reports
available within the EST3 system. Device Maintenance,
Sensitivity, History, Revision level and Modcom compliance
reports can be viewed on the 3-LCD, 3-LCDXL1 or sent to a
printer. Figure 2-17 and Figure 2-18 show the display
sequence when using the Reports command to select Device
Maintenance.

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EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays


Main Menu with Reports Selected
MAIN MENU
1) Status
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
A000 S000

Reports Menu with Device Maintenance Selected

T000

M000

REPORTS MENU
1) Device Maintenance
2) History
3) Revisions
4) Modcom Compliance
A000

S000

T000

M000

Device Maintenance Menu with


Dirty Device >80% Selected
DEVICE MAINTENANCE
1) Dirty Device >80%
2) Dirty Device >20%
3) Single Device
4) Devices on a card
A000

S000

T000

M000

Figure 2-17: Selecting reports.


When Dirty Device >80% or >20% are selected you are
prompted to enter the Panel Address.
When a Single Device is selected you are prompted to enter
the device address.
When Devices on a card is selected you are prompted to
enter the desired SIGA loops address.

When Dirty Devices


>80% or >20%
enter
panel address

ENTER PANEL
PP

When Single Device


Sensitivity
enter
device address

ENTER DEVICE
PPCCDDDD

When Devices on a card


Sensitivity
enter
loop address

ENTER LOOP
PPCCL

Figure 2-18: Entering desired address.


No password is required to use the Report command. The
reports available include Device Maintenance (Sensitivity),
History, Revision Levels, and Modcom Compliance reports.
Modcom compliance is not discussed in this course and is
available as a separate self-study course.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.41

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Device Maintenance: provides the following selections:

Two Dirty head lists: One identifies all detectors that have
reached the maintenance-alert level of >80%. The second
identifies all detectors at > 20%, when periodic preventive
maintenance is performed.

Single device: Which lists the sensitivity of the selected


detector.

Devices on a card: Which provides sensitivity listing of all


the detectors on a specific signature loop circuit.

History: provides a chronological listing of all events within


the system. This report can be viewed with text (logical
address and location message) or without text (logical
address only).
Revision Levels: provides a listing of all the existing hardware
and software (firmware) revisions currently installed on all
associated LRMs on a panel by panel basis.
After report selection, the screen indicates that the desired
report is building. This report is then displayed or printed.
Program command
Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 2: 3-LCD and
3-LCDXL operating instructions.
Setting the system time and date.
Changing user access level passwords.
Restarting the panel.
Scheduling holidays.
Clearing the panel history file.
The Program command allows password-limited access to
the following system configuration functions:

2.42

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Change Time: lets you set system time in 24-hour format.


Main Menu with Program Selected
MAIN MENU
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
A000 S000

Program Menu with Change Time Selected

T000

M000

PROGRAM MENU
1) Change Time
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
A000 S000 T000

M000

Program Menu with


Toggle Language Selected

ACCESS LEVEL 3
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX

PROGRAM MENU
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
7) Toggle Language
A000 S000 T000 M000
ENTER TIME
HHMMSS

Figure 2-19: Program Menu, setting the time

Change Date: lets you set the system date in MMDDYYYY


(default), DDMMYYYY and YYYYMMDD formats.
Main Menu with Program Selected
MAIN MENU
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
A000 S000

Program Menu with Change Date Selected

T000

M000

PROGRAM MENU
1) Change Time
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
A000 S000 T000

M000

Program Menu with


Toggle Language Selected

ACCESS LEVEL 3
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX

PROGRAM MENU
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
7) Toggle Language
A000 S000 T000 M000
ENTER DATE
MMDDYYYY

Default date of MMDDYYYY shown. May be configured as DDMMYYYY or YYYYMMDD.

Figure 2-20: Program menu, setting date


Note: The format of the date display may be changed during
the 3-SDU configuration process.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.43

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Edit Passwords: lets you set custom passwords for user


access levels 1 through 4.
Note: Only level 1 through 4 passwords may be changed.
Level 5 is factory-fixed.
Main Menu with Program Selected
MAIN MENU
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
A000 S000

Program Menu with Edit Passwords Selected

T000

M000

PROGRAM MENU
1) Change Time
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
A000 S000 T000

Password Menu with Level 1 Selected


PASSWORD MENU
1) Level 1
2) Level 2
3) Level 3
4) Level 4
M000
A000

S000

T000

M000

Program Menu with


Toggle Language Selected
PROGRAM MENU
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
7) Toggle Language
A000 S000 T000 M000

ACCESS LEVEL N
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX

1. Where an access level (N) to change the password


must be higher or equal to the password being changed.
2. Access Level 5 is a factory fixed proprietary password.
3. Access Level 1 is a public mode access and no password
is required except in the case of security applications.

ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX

Figure 2-21: Program Menu, setting passwords

2.44

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Restart: lets you perform a warm boot of all 3-CPU1s and 3CPU3s (all panels) on the network or a specific 3-CPU1 or 3CPU3 (panel controller).
Note: When restarting all panels no panel address entry is
required and the entire system restarts or reboots.
Main Menu with Program Selected
MAIN MENU
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
A000 S000

Program Menu with Restart Selected

T000

M000

PROGRAM MENU
1) Change Time
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
A000 S000 T000

Restart Menu with By Panel Selected


RESTART MENU
1) By Panel
2) All Panels
M000

Program Menu with


Toggle Language Selected
PROGRAM MENU
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
7) Toggle Language
A000 S000 T000 M000

A000

S000

T000

M000

ENTER PANEL
PP

ACCESS LEVEL 4
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX

Figure 2-22: Program Menu, restarting panel or system.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.45

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Edit Holiday List: lets you set specific dates to be treated as


holidays. Holidays may be programmable via time controls in
the system application software.
Main Menu with Program Selected
MAIN MENU
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
A000 S000

T000

M000

Program Menu with Edit Holiday List Selected


PROGRAM MENU
1) Change Time
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
A000 S000 T000

Holiday Menu with Add Holiday Selected

M000

Program Menu with


Toggle Language Selected

HOLIDAY MENU
1) Add Holiday
2) Add Holiday
3) Add Holiday

A000

S000

T000

M000

PROGRAM MENU
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
7) Toggle Language
A000 S000 T000 M000

ENTER HOLIDAY
MMDD

ACCESS LEVEL 3
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX

Figure 2-23: Program Menu, entering holidays


Note: This program menu function lets you insert new
holidays, edit existing holidays or delete existing holidays.

2.46

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Clear History: allows you to erase (clear) the displayed alarm


history count and the system history file on a panel-by-panel
basis. This command is available for level 4 access only.
Main Menu with Program Selected
MAIN MENU
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
A000 S000

T000

Program Menu with Clear History Selected


PROGRAM MENU
1) Change Time
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
A000 S000 T000

M000

M000

Program Menu with


Toggle Language Selected
PROGRAM MENU
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
7) Toggle Language
A000 S000 T000 M000

ENTER PANEL
PP

ACCESS LEVEL 4
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX

Figure 2-24: Program Menu, clearing history


When the Clear History command is used, both the history
buffer and the alarm history counter display are cleared.
Toggle Language: The Program Menu also provides item 7)
Toggle Language. This allows you to manually switch
between the primary language and the secondary language,
when your system is configured for two languages.
Main Menu with Program Selected
MAIN MENU
2) Enable
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
A000 S000

T000

M000

Program Menu with


Toggle Language Selected
PROGRAM MENU
2) Change Date
3) Edit Passwords
4) Restart
5) Edit Holiday List
6) Clear History
7) Toggle Language
A000 S000 T000 M000

Figure 2-25: Program Menu, toggle language

EST3 Self Study Course

2.47

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Test command
Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 2: 3-LCD and
3-LCDXL operating instructions.
Testing alarm input devices.
Testing security input devices.
Testing the panel lamps and panel sounder.
Testing Signature devices.
The Test command is available to access levels 1 through 5
personnel and lets you select a preconfigured and
programmable service group for testing, the panel lamps and
sounder for testing and the Signature devices for testing.
Figure 2-26 illustrates the display sequence for selecting the
test function.
Commands on the Test Menu are:
Start Test: Places the specified service group into a programdependent test sequence.
Cancel Test: Enables the service group in test to exit from the
test mode.
Lamp Test: Performs same panel test (LED and display) as
occurs by pressing the Alarm and Panel Silence buttons
simultaneously.
Signature Device Test: Performs a Signature detector or
module devices test for alarm, prealarm or trouble conditions.
To restore the latching Signature devices you must reset the
panel. Non-latching Signature devices restore automatically
without performing a reset.

2.48

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

When a desired service group is in test, the test LED on the


top of the 3-LCD panel lights steady and goes out when the
test is canceled. The Trouble LED also lights during the test
mode.
Main Menu with Test Selected
MAIN MENU
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
8) Test
A000 S000

Test Menu with Start Test Selected

T000

M000

TEST LIST
Floor 1 Service
Floor 2 Service
Floor 3 Service

TEST MENU
1) Start Test
2) Cancel Test
3) Lamp Test
4) Sig. Device Test
A000

S000

T000

M000

A000

S000

T000

M000

ACCESS LEVEL 4
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX

Figure 2-26: Main Menu, service group or service device test


sequence
Note: The Cancel Test function operates in the same manner
as Start Test.
If you forget to cancel a test sequence, the panel
automatically clears the test mode after a period of 30
minutes (default). This automatic clear timer period may be
custom configured by using the 3-SDU. All tested devices
must be restored prior to canceling a test sequence. If you
cancel the test prior to restoring a tested device, the panel will
not go into alarm but initiates a Service Device Trouble
instead. A Service Device Trouble is also initiated if the test
mode times out prior to restoring a tested device. In either
case, you simple restore the tested device and reset the panel
to restore the panels normal operation.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.49

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Main Menu with Test Selected


MAIN MENU
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
8) Test
A000 S000

Test Pattern

Test Menu with Lamp Test Selected

T000

M000

TEST MENU
1) Start Test
2) Cancel Test
3) Lamp Test
4) Sig. Device Test
A000

S000

T000

M000

All
Panel
LED
illuminate

Figure 2-27: Main Menu, lamp test


Main Menu with Test Selected
MAIN MENU
3) Disable
4) Activate
5) Restore
6) Reports
7) Program
8) Test
A000 S000

Test Menu with Sig. Device Test Selected


Sig Device Test Menu with
Alarm, etc. Selected

TEST MENU
1) Start Test
2) Cancel Test
3) Lamp Test
4) Sig. Device Test
T000

M000
A000

S000

T000

M000

SIG DEVICE TEST MENU


1) Alarm, etc.
2) Prealarm, etc.
3) Trouble

A000

S000

T000

M000

ENTER DEVICE
PPCCDDDD

ACCESS LEVEL 4
ENTER PASSWORD
XXXX

Customized
Programmed
Response

Figure 2-28: Main Menu, Signature device test

2.50

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

As you have seen from the previous description, the 3-LCD


and 3-LCDXL1 displays permit extensive operator interface
with an EST3 network.
The cabinet or group of cabinets the switches on a specific
LCD affects is determined during the network routing
configuration process of 3-SDU programming.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.51

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Optional control/LED display modules


Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets:
Control/LED displays
LED Display Support LRM

P/N 270493
P/N 270485

Four types of control/LED display modules are used in EST3


applications. These are modules with:

24-LEDs.
12 LEDs and 12 switches.
24 LEDs and 12 switches (2 LEDs per switch).
6 groups of 3 LEDs and 3 switches.

These control/display modules are installed on the hinged


standoffs of single-slot local rail modules. The control/LED
display modules connect to the chassis rails through the
ribbon cable via their host LRM as describe in Module 1 of this
course.
The operation of the LEDs and switches on these panels is
independent of the LRMs on which they are mounted. Also
note that adding 32 to its host LRM address determine each
control/LED display modules logical address.
Note: The 3-ZA95 amplifier modules take up two slots and will
support two control/display modules.

Figure 2-29: Control/LED display module assembly.

2.52

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

The EST3 control/LED display modules are shipped as


membranes without the frame for mounting onto the host
LRMs. Its important that you save the blank plate LRM covers
received with the LRMs. To install a control/LED display
module you must remove the center blank plate held on by
the rivets and install the control/LED display membrane in its
place with the new rivets supplied with it.
As shown in Figure 2-29, each control/LED display module
comes with an identification label that lets you label each LED
switch position. Simply type in the required identification on
the label (per the requirements of your project) and insert it
into the module.
To insert the label and install the module:
1. Remove the two right plastic snap-rivets holding the front
membrane to the panel assembly frame.
2. Place the label between the front membrane and the
panel assembly, making sure that the desired label
identification text is aligned with the corresponding LED or
switch.
3. Re-install the snap-rivets.
4. Snap the control/LED display module onto the hinged
standoffs of the desired host LRM.
5. Plug the interconnecting ribbon cable into the control/LED
display module and the host LRM. Verify that all pins mate
with the connectors and that the connectors are
completely seated.
6. Close the control/LED display module over the host LRM
module and lock it into place with the slide locks.
Its important to note here that each LED and switch on these
panels is an independent device and is configured and
programmed separately using the 3-SDU application. This
means that if you want an LED to light (steady, fast blink or
slow blink) when its corresponding switch segment is
depressed, you must program it to do so.
All switch segments on these panels may be configured for
momentary, toggle, or interlock operation when developing
your application software. Operation of each type is built into
the 3-SDU. When configured for interlock operation, sets of
three switches are interlocked (ON, AUTO and OFF) and the
auto segment does not need to be programmed.
Note: The default setting for the 12 and 24 LED/12 switch
panel switches is toggle, and the default setting for the 3
LED/3 switch X 6 panel is interlock.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.53

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Note: The device addresses for the switches on each


control/display module start at 0001. The device addresses
for the LEDs start at 0129.
Each of the four control/LED display modules is described on
the following -pages.

3-24x control/LED display module

Figure 2-30: 3-24x control/LED display module.


The 3-24x display module has 24 LEDs with accompanying
labels. This panel is available in four models:

2.54

Model 3-24R with 24 red LEDs.


Model 3-24Y with 24 yellow LEDs.
Model 3-24G with 24 green LEDs.
Model 3-12RY with 12 red over yellow pairs LEDs.

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

3-12Sx control/LED display module

Figure 2-31: 3-12S control/LED display module.


The 3-12Sx module has 12 LEDs and 12 corresponding
switches. These LEDs and switches can operate
independently through programming. This panel is available
in three models:

EST3 Self Study Course

Model 3-12SG with 12 green LEDs


Model 3-12SR with 12 red LEDs
Model 3-12SY with 12 yellow LEDs

2.55

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

3-12/Sxx control/LED display module

Figure 2-32: 3-12/Sxx control/LED display module.


The 3-12/Sxx module has 24 LEDs and 12 corresponding
switches, arranged two LEDs per switch. These LEDs and
switches can operate independently through programming.
This panel is available in three models:

2.56

Model 3-12/S1GY with 12 green over yellow pairs of LEDs.


Model 3-12/S1RY with 12 red over yellow pairs of LEDs.
Model 3-12/S2Y with 24 yellow LEDs.

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

3-6/3S1Gxx control/LED display module

Figure 2-33: 3-6/3S1Gxx control/LED display module.

The 3-6/3S1Gxx control/LED display module has six sets of


three LEDs with three corresponding switches. These LEDs
and switches can operate independently through
programming. This module is available in two models:

EST3 Self Study Course

Model 3-6/3S1G2Y with 6 green over yellow over yellow


LED triads

Model 3-6/3S1GYR with 6 green over yellow over red LED


triads

2.57

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

There are times when the number of control/LED display


modules desired exceeds the number of LRMs available. If
empty slots are available within an enclosure, additional
control/display modules may be installed by using a 3-LDSM
in the empty slots.

Figure 2-34: 3-LDSM LED display support local rail module.

This module provides the circuitry required for the operation


of the control/LED display modules when mounted into empty
slots. It is used when you want a control/LED display module
and do not have local rail module to mount it on.
The remote annunciator panels use a form of this LRM called
the 3-ANNSM. This module provides the hardware layer for
the remote annunciators enclosures and is electrically
identical to the 3-LDSM. It is physically different due to the
unique assembly requirements of the remote annunciators.
Note: This module will not accept 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL1 displays.

2.58

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

EST3 addressing
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Appendix A:
System addresses or- EST3 System Operations Manual >
Appendix A: System addresses.
Within the EST3 database each object has a:
Logical Address, which is machine language between
components within the EST3 system.
Label for programming.
Location Message for display.
Logical Address
PP-CC-DDDD

Label
Object Label

Location Message
Object Location Message

EST3 system logical addressing is unique because addresses


are established and assigned through the System Definition
Utility (3-SDU) program. Unlike past systems, where addresses
were a part of your system configuration and programming
tasks, you now use a naming convention called labeling to
identify system components when developing EST3
applications. Addresses are used for troubleshooting and
front panel manual control in EST3 applications.

Panel, Cabinet or Node

Local Rail Module or


Control/LED Display Module

PP CC DDDD
Device Address:
Detector
Module
Strobe
Audible
Audio Message
Logical Group
Pseudo Point

Refer to the Installation and Service Manual,


Chapter 8: Service and troubleshooting,
Pseudo point descriptions for a list of
available EST3 Pseudo points.

Figure 2-35: An EST3 address has eight digits.


As shown in Figure 2-35 an EST3 address contains eight digits.
The first two digits are the cabinet or node address. The
cabinet address is a two-digit number from 01 to 64, assigned
in the order in which the cabinets are entered into the 3-SDU
programs database.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.59

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Each individual cabinets 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 assigns a two


digit logical address to each module within the cabinet, in the
order in which they are installed on the cabinet rails. These
are the next two digits of the address starting with 00. These
CPUs are always at logical address 00 of their respective
cabinet or node. The 3-SDU assigns the same cabinet address
to each module as it is configured in the program database.
Note: If the order in which modules are entered into the 3SDU is different than that actually installed, the CPU posts a
configuration fault for that module after the 3-SDU database
is downloaded.
Within the 3-SDU the LRMs installed into each chassis within a
cabinet are called the hardware layer. The 3-LCD, 3-LCDXL1
and control/LED display modules mounted on each LRM are
called the operator layer. The operator layer modules derive
their logical address by adding 32 to the host LRM address.
Thus, these addresses will start at 32, which is always the LCD
address when present.
To help understand this better, lets look at the example of
logical addressing for the 3-CHAS7 shown in Figure 2-36.
00
3-CPU1
or
3-CPU3

01 02 03 04 05
E
M
P
T
Y

Hardware Layer Addressing

E
M
P
T
Y

3-LCD

32

33 34 35 36 37

Operator Layer Addressing

00

01 02 03 04 05

Hardware Layer Addressing

3-CPU1
or
3-CPU3

E
M
P
T
Y

E
M
P
T
Y

3-LCDXL

32

35 36 37

Operator Layer Addressing

Figure 2-36: 3-CHAS7 addressing scheme.

2.60

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

In this example, the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 is logical address 00


and its corresponding 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL is logical address 32.
The next LRM space (slot 3, card 2) has logical address is 01 in
both examples. In 3-LCD applications the next operator layer
panel address would be 33. In 3-LCDXL1 applications, which
take up 4 slot locations, the next operator layer panel address
would be 35.
Note: Addressing continues by each space from left to right
whether an LRM is installed in a slot or not. This is also true for
each LRMs operator layer module. Thus, each slot has a
reserved address. When a new LRM or control/display module
(LRM address + 32) is installed into a chassis it assumes the
address of the slot it is installed into.
Now lets look at the 3-CAB14 with two 3-CHAS7s example in
Figure 2-37. Observe that logical addressing continues from
left to right in the second chassis for both the hardware layer
LRMs and the operator layer control/display modules.
00

01 02 03 04 05

Hardware Layer Addressing

33 34 35 36 37

Operator Layer Addressing

3-CPU1
or
3-CPU3

3-LCD

32

06 07 08 09 10 11 12

E
M
P
T
Y

Hardware Layer Addressing

E
M
P
T
Y

38 39 40 41 42 43 44

Operator Layer Addressing

Figure 2-37: 3-CAB14 with two 3-CHAS7s and a 3-LCD installed


addressing.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.61

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

For this example, lets assume that this 3-CAB14 is the twelfth
cabinet on the network and assigned a logical panel address
of 12. Therefore, the logical address of the first point (device or
object) on the fourth module (logical LRM address 09) in the
second chassis would be 12090001. The actual type of device
would depend on the type of LRM installed at address 09. Lets
look at some different types of devices for this LRM and its
control/LED display module.
If it were a 3-SSDC, device addressing would be:

Detectors = 12090001 through 1209125


Modules = 12090126 through 12090250

If it were a 3-ZA20 amp, the audio output address would be


the LRM itself (12090000) and the visible NAC circuit output
device address would be 12090001.
If a 12 LED/12 Switch module were installed onto this LRM the
LED and switch device addressing would be:

Switches = 12410001 through 12410012


LEDs = 12410129 through 12410140

Caution: The 3-SDU Cabinet configuration must match the


actual cabinet configuration. If they do not match you will get
a configuration fault trouble pseudo point when you
download the SDU application into the cabinet.

2.62

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays


00

01 02 03 04 05

Hardware Layer Addressing

3-CPU1
or
3-CPU3

Top Chassis
3-LCD

32

33 34 35 36 37
07

06

3-ASU

3-FTCU

Operator Layer Addressing


Hardware Layer Addressing

Middle Chassis

Operator Layer Addressing


08 09 10 11 12 13 14

E
M
P
T
Y

E
M
P
T
Y

40 41 42 43 44 45 46

Hardware Layer Addressing

Bottom Chassis

Operator Layer Addressing

Figure 2-38: 3-CAB21 with 3-ASUFT and a 3-LCD installed


addressing.
Figure 2-38 illustrates a 3-CAB21 that is almost filled to
capacity and contains a 3-ASUFT chassis in the middle
position. The logical addressing begins at the top leftmost
local rail module (the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 with 00) and
progresses from left to right for the top chassis.
Observe that the 3-ASU (07) and 3-FTCU (06) use one logical
address each. Both of these units together occupy one
complete chassis assembly. They are addressed from right to
left due to the way they are electrically connected to the rail
via the Rail Chassis Interface card.
The bottom chassis modules are then addressed from left to
right (08 through 14). Later on, if you added another local rail
module next to address 12, it would become address 13.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.63

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Finally, lets consider the installation and addressing of the


operator layer 3-LCD display and auxiliary control/LED display
modules of the example in Figure 2-38. The 3-LCD display
must be mounted on the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3. The control/LED
display modules are mounted on any single local rail module.
If a specification calls out for you to mount a control/LED
display module panel in one of the empty slots, a 3-LDSM
module must be installed.
The addressing conventions for these control/display modules
are:

The 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL display and each control/LED


display module address will equal the address of the LRM
it is mounted on plus 32.

The 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL display will always be 32 because it


is mounted only on a 3-CPU1or 3-CPU3 at address 00 (32
+ 00 = 32).

As you look at Figure 2-38 observe that:

A 3-LCD mounted on the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 has address


32.

A control/LED display module mounted on local rail


module 02 is addressed 34 (02+32=34).

A control/LED display module mounted on local rail


module 04 is addressed 36 (04+32=36).

A control/LED display module mounted on local rail


module 08 is addressed 40 (08+32=40).

A control/LED display module mounted on local rail


module 09 is addressed 41 (09+32=41).

Again, if this cabinet had an address of 12, the first LED on the
control/LED display module mounted on local rail module 04
would be 12360129. Where:

12 = cabinet.
36 = control/LED display module address (04+32=36).
0129 = first LED on this panel.

Note: On any LED/switch or LED-only display panel, the device


address of the top or first LED is 0129. The device address of
the top or first switch is 0001.
When a point, zone, or device is identified on the 3-LCD or 3LCDXL1 Display, it is identified with an address. The ability to
interpret this address saves you considerable time in
identifying where the off-normal alarm, supervisory, trouble or
monitor condition is. Also you are able to identify system
objects by address, which enables you to manually control
system functions from the 3-LCD or 3-LCDXL displays.

2.64

EST3 Self Study Course

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

Module 2 evaluation
This concludes Module 2 of the EST3 Self-Study Course. Return
to the objectives stated at the beginning of this module. Study
them carefully to ensure that you are comfortable with each
objective. If not, return to that section and review it. When you
are satisfied, please continue on to Module 3 and 4. The test
for Module 2, Module 3, and Module 4 will be given at the end
of Module 4.

EST3 Self Study Course

2.65

3-LCD and 3-LCDXL displays

2.66

EST3 Self Study Course

Module 3

Traditional zone I/O module

Summary
This module describes the 3-IDC8/4 Traditional Zone I/O
module and its installation.
Content
Introduction to module 3 3.2
Key items and terms 3.3
Objectives 3.4
3-IDC8/4 traditional zone module 3.5
Module 3 evaluation 3.10

EST3 Self Study Course

3.1

Traditional zone module

Introduction to module 3
At this point, you have become familiar with the basic
components of the standalone and network EST3 fire alarm
systems.
In the first self-study module we discussed the EST3
enclosures available and their required operating
components. This included the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 Central
Processor (panel controller) modules, primary and booster
power supplies and their associated monitors, and the 3-CPU1
and 3-CPU3 plug-in cards.
In module 2 we discussed the 3-LCD and 3-LCDXL Displays,
the auxiliary control/LED display (LED and switch) modules,
and EST3 addressing conventions.
The EST3 system has several optional input/output (I/O)
interface modules. These modules provide the CPUs with
input points (devices or objects) such as alarm, supervisory,
trouble, and monitor. Moreover, they provide output points
(devices or objects) for operating audible or visible notification
appliances and various other controlled outputs. All of the
EST3 I/O modules are LRMs and are installed on the chassis
rail assemblies. Each I/O module operates in a different way,
depending on the types of devices it supports.
In this self-study module we will discuss the first of these I/O
interface modules, the 3-IDC8/4 Traditional Zone I/O module.
This module provides the interface between traditional IDC
and NAC conventional devices and the EST3 environment. This
module lets you configure these devices with the labeling
conventions required for SDU programming applications.
Associated study

Use the following technical reference manuals as associated


study material for this module:
EST3 Installation and Service Manual, (P/N 270380).
3-IDC8/4 Traditional Zone I/O Module Installation Sheet,
(P/N 270492).

3.2

EST3 Self Study Course

Traditional zone module

Key items
Key points to look for:

Traditional zone module purpose.


IDC and NAC device types and capabilities.
Device compatibility.
Internal source for NAC zones.
External source for NAC zones.

Key terms to learn:

EST3 Self Study Course

Initiating device circuit (IDC) wiring.


Notification appliance circuit (NAC) wiring.
External NAC source.
Internal NAC source.
Configuration jumpers.

3.3

Traditional zone module

Objectives
Upon completion of this module you will be able to:

1. Install a 3-IDC8/4 in an EST3 cabinet.


2. Install and configure a group of traditional IDC and/or NAC
circuits within the EST3 system environment using the
3-IDC8/4.

3.4

EST3 Self Study Course

Traditional zone module

3-IDC8/4 traditional zone I/O module


Traditional zone module: This EST3 local rail module is used to

interface non-addressable, supervised, Class B, IDC and NAC


circuits to the EST3 microprocessor-based fire alarm system.
This LRM provides the means for the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 to
identify, communicate with, and control traditional hard-wired
circuits.

Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6: System


power up and testing:
3-IDC8/4 Initiating device circuit module.
Traditional 2-wire smoke detectors connected to 3-IDC8/4
modules.
Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets:

3-IDC8/4 Traditional Zone I/O Module

P/N 270492

The front and back views of this module are shown in Figure
3-1.

Front

Back

Figure 3-1: 3-IDC8/4 traditional zone local rail module.

EST3 Self Study Course

3.5

Traditional zone module

A drawing of the front and back views of this module is shown


in Figure 3-2.

P1
RX TX

JP 1 JP 2
1
1
2
2
3
3

JP1 JP2
1
1
2
2
3
3

External NAC Source


Internal NAC Source

J1

1
1
2
2
3
3
JP 3 JP4

1
1
2
2
3
3
JP3 JP4

Internal NAC Source


External NAC Source

P2

BACK

FRONT

Figure 3-2: 3-IDC8/4 drawing.

The 3-IDC8/4 Traditional Zone LRM can provide up to eight


Class B (Style B) traditional inputs for initiating devices. Four of
these inputs (IDC3, IDC4, IDC7, and IDC8) are dedicated to
initiating device circuits (IDCs). The other four inputs
(IDC/NAC1, IDC/NAC2, IDC/NAC5, and IDC/NAC6) may also be
configured as Class B (Style Y), notification appliance circuits
(NAC) or output circuits. This modules eight IDC inputs can
supervise normally open, dry contact input devices, or
compatible 2-wire smokes. When configured, the four NAC
output circuits are capable of supporting:

24 Vdc.
Audio signals.

The 3-IDC8/4 IDCs may be set for latching/non-latching and


verified/non-verified operation. Each IDC circuit can support
up to 30 Model 6270B photoelectric smoke detectors or up to
50 Model 6250B ionization smoke detectors.

3.6

EST3 Self Study Course

Traditional zone module

Note: Refer to the EST3 ULI/ULC Compatibility List (P/N

3100427) for a list of compatible devices for 3-IDC8/4


applications.

As you read about the 3-IDC8/4 module, note that the NAC
circuits are configured in pairs. NAC circuits 1/2 and 5/6 are
paired together. Therefore, if an audio signal is coming in on
NAC IN 1/2, the outputs of both IDC/NAC 1 and 2 are audio.
However, a different external signal source (such as 24 Vdc)
may be used for IDC/NAC 5 and 6 via NAC IN 5/6.
When IDC/NAC 1 and 2 or IDC/NAC 5 and 6 are configured as
NACs, each pair shares a common source. The JP1 through
JP4 jumpers select the signal source for each pair. That is, the
jumper settings select whether the input power for the NAC
pairs comes from an external or an internal source. For audio
applications, the jumpers must be set for external (70 Vrms @
100 W).
When using a 24 Vdc source for the NAC circuits, the power
may be drawn internally (from the rails) or externally through
the terminal connection block. Refer to the jumper setting
table in the installation sheets or the jumper settings shown
below to configure the internal/external operation of the 3IDC8/4.
External
from
NAC IN
Terminals

Internal
from
Rail

IDC/NAC 1 and 2

JP1 TO 1 AND 2
JP2 TO 1 AND 2

JP1 TO 2 AND 3
JP2 TO 2 AND 3

IDC/NAC 5 and 6

JP3 TO 2 AND 3
JP4 TO 2 AND 3

JP3 TO 1 AND 2
JP4 TO 1 AND 2

Circuits

Note: When using a 24 Vdc source for the NAC circuits,


whether external or internal, the total current for each pair of
the NAC circuits must not exceed 3.5A. When using an
external source for input, that source must be power limited.

The 3-IDC8/4 LRM is equipped with hinged standoffs for


mounting a control/LED display. For such display modules, the
ribbon cable plugs it into J1 on the 3-IDC8/4 LRM.

EST3 Self Study Course

3.7

Traditional zone module

Note: Before connecting the 3-IDC8/4 field wiring, test the field

wiring as described in EST Installation and Service Manual >


Chapter 6: Power up and testing.
Remember the following details about the 3-IDC8/4:

Four output relays are located on the back of the module.

All eight available zones may be used as inputs if no


outputs are required.

Module accepts compatible 2-wire smokes.


Strobe
Circuit

15 Kohm

+ 1 2

+
3

+
5

+
7

2-Wire
Smoke
Circuit

IDC #3

IDC #4

IDC/NAC #1

NAC IN 1 and 2

Horn
Circuit

IDC 4

IDC 3

IDC/NAC 2

IDC/NAC 1

15 Kohm

IDC/NAC #2

+
9

JP1 JP2
1
1
2
2
3
3

RX TX

1
1
2
2
3
3
JP3 JP4

5
-

4
+

3
-

2
+

1
-

NAC IN 5 and 6

6
+

IDC 8

7
-

IDC 7

8
+

IDC/NAC 6

9
-

IDC/NAC 5

10
+

4.7 Kohm

JP3 and JP4


Jumpers on
2 and 3 for
External Audio
Source

J1

TB2

Manual
Pull Station
Circuit

4.7 Kohm

JP1 and JP2


Jumpers on
2 and 3 for
Internal Source
from Rail

10

TB1

NAC IN 5 and 6
Audio Source

15 Kohm

Speaker
Circuit

15 Kohm

Speaker
Circuit

IDC #8

IDC/NAC #5

IDC/NAC #6

IDC #7

Tamper
Switch
Circuit
2-Wire
Smoke
Circuit

4.7 Kohm

Figure 3-3: Typical 3-IDC8/4 application.

3.8

EST3 Self Study Course

4.7 Kohm

Traditional zone module

Figure 3-3 illustrates a typical 3-IDC8/4 application. Check this


figure to find that:

IDC 3 and 4 (at the top) monitor a 2-wire smoke and


manual pull station, respectively.

All zones configured as inputs (whether alarm,


supervisory, monitor, or security) require a 4.7 k EOL
resistor. Zones configured as outputs require a 15 k EOL
resister.

Zones 1 and 2 are configured as output zones for NACs. In


this case, the 24 Vdc source is drawn internally from the
rails. NAC IN 1/2 is not used. Note the 15 k EOL.

JP1 and JP2 jumpers should be plugged into 2 and 3

Zones 7 and 8 are configured as input zones. Zone 8 is a


supervisory zone that monitors a sprinkler gate valve
switch. Zone 7 monitors 2-wire smokes. Note the 4.7 k
EOL resisters.

Zones 5 and 6 are configured as NACs. Each supports a


speaker circuit. Note that NAC IN 5/6 has an external
source audio signal for zones 5 and 6. Note the 15 k EOL.

JP3 and JP4 jumpers should be plugged into 2 and 3

Note: When an amplifier with output supervision is used as the

external audio source an EOL resister may be required across


the NAC IN terminals. For example, if a 3-ZA20 amplifier is
used in the example of Figure 3-3, a 15 k EOL resister must
be placed across NAC IN 5/6.

EST3 Self Study Course

3.9

Traditional zone module

Module 3 evaluation
This concludes Module 3 of the EST3 Self-Study Course. Return
to the objectives stated at the beginning of this module. Study
them carefully to ensure you are comfortable with each
objective. If not, return to that section and review it. When you
are satisfied, please continue on to Module 4. The test for
Module 2, Module 3, and Module 4 will be given at the end of
Module 4.

3.10

EST3 Self Study Course

Module 4

Analog addressable driver controller

Summary

This module describes the 3-AADC Analog Addressable Driver


Controller module.
Content
Introduction to module 4 4.2
Key items 4.3
Objectives 4.4
3-AADC analog addressable controller module 4.5
Module evaluation 4.9

EST3 Self Study Course

4.1

Analog addressable driver controller

Introduction to module 4
In this module we will discuss the second of the optional EST3
I/O interface modules, the 3-AADC Analog Addressable Driver
Controller module. This module provides the interface
between System Sensor type addressable sensor and module
devices and the EST3 environment. This module lets you
configure these devices with the labeling conventions
required for developing 3-SDU programming applications.
The 3-AADC module provides an EST3 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 with
analog addressable input points (devices or objects) such as
alarm, supervisory, trouble, and monitor. Additionally, this
module provides addressable output points (devices or
objects) for operating audible or visible notification appliances
and various other controlled outputs. The 3-AADC is an LRM
and is installed on the chassis rail assembly.
Associated study

Use the following technical reference manuals as associated


study material for this module:
EST3 Installation and Service Manual, (P/N 270380)
3-AADC Analog Addressable Device Controller Module
Installation Sheet, (P/N 387332).

4.2

EST3 Self Study Course

Analog addressable driver controller

Key items
Key points to look for:

Analog addressable controller module purpose.


Retrofit applications.
New applications.
Device compatibility.
Setting device addressing.
Class A and Class B wiring requirements.

Key terms to learn:

EST3 Self Study Course

Class A and Class B wiring.


3-AADC Line Interface card.
System Sensor Analog Addressable devices.

4.3

Analog addressable driver controller

Objectives
Upon completion of this module you will be able to:

1. Install a 3-AADC in an EST3 cabinet.


2. Identify a line interface card and discuss its function and
installation procedure.
3. Develop Class A and Class B 3-AADC field wiring schemes.
4. Identify compatible analog addressable devices.
5. Retrofit an existing System Sensor facility into an EST3
system

4.4

EST3 Self Study Course

Analog addressable driver controller

3-AADC analog addressable controller module


Analog addressable driver controller: The 3-AADC LRM is used
as an input/output interface between the EST3 3-CPU1 and
analog addressable System Sensor devices. This controller
was developed to handle retrofit systems, where an EST3
system is used to support existing System Sensor field devices.
This controller is also useful in applications where an EST3
system is being installed and the existing field devices are to
be changed out on a phased basis or in markets where
Signature devices are not used.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6: System
power up and testing:
Addressable analog detectors on a 3-AADC module circuit.
Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets::

3-AADC Analog Addressable Driver Controller module P/N


387332

The front and back views of this module are shown in Figure
4-1.

Front

Back

Figure 4-1: 3-AADC analog addressable device controller local


rail module.

EST3 Self Study Course

4.5

Analog addressable driver controller

A drawing of the front and back views of this module is shown


in Figure 4-2.
Filter Board

P1

No
Connection

P4

P3

J2

Line
Interface
Card

J1

J3

P2

Front

Back

Figure 4-2: 3-AADC Analog addressable driver controller module

The 3-AADC module consists of a 3-AADC LRM and a Line


Interface daughter card. The Line Interface card mounts into
the P3 connector on the back of the 3-AADC module. The 3AADC communicates with and controls System Sensor devices
that reside on its data line. Refer to the EST3 ULI/ULC
Compatibility List (P/N 3100427) for a list of compatible devices
for 3-AADC applications.
Caution: RZB12-6 and UIO modules are not compatible with

3-AADC module applications.

4.6

EST3 Self Study Course

Analog addressable driver controller

Note: For new projects, it is suggested that the microprocessor

based Signature Series products, discussed in Module 5, be


used for improved performance and reduced development
expense.

The 3-AADC module supports 99 addressable analog sensors


and 99 addressable modules. Each EST3 cabinet, depending
on the availability of slots, can support up to a total of 10
addressable 3-AADC and/or 3-SSDC (3-SDDC) circuits (loops).
This means that if your cabinet already has 5 signature
circuits, you can only add 5 3-AADC circuits, to reach the
maximum of ten.
When configuring the 3-SDU database for an AADC
application, you can either enter the devices into the
database in the order established by each devices preset
address (on its address wheels) for retrofit applications. For
new applications simply enter the devices into the 3-SDU
database and then set each devices address wheels to match
a predetermined addressing scheme. In either case, the actual
address and the 3-SDU address must match for each device.
Details for configuring the 3-AADC for EST3 applications are
given in the 3-SDU help utility.
Figure 4-3 shows an example of a Class A 3-AADC field circuit,
while Figure 4-4 shows a Class B 3-AADC field circuit. In either
case, it is important to follow the wiring rules given in the
installation manual and installation sheets when designing
and wiring these analog addressable device circuits. Observe
that T-Taps can be used in Class B configurations.

Ionization
Smoke

Monitor Module

Isolation Module

Photo
Electric
Smoke

Thermal

3-ZASE Circuit
Class A Return

3-ZASE
Circuit
Source

Monitor
Module

Control
Module

Photo
Electric
Smoke

Figure 4-3: 3-AADC Class A field wiring

EST3 Self Study Course

4.7

Analog addressable driver controller

Control
Module

Ionization
Smoke

Monitor Module

Ionization
Smoke

3-ZASE
Circuit
Source

Photo
Electric
Smoke

Thermal

Control
Module

Ionization
Smoke

Monitor
Module

Photo
Electric
Smoke

Monitor
Module

Monitor
Module

Terminals 1 & 7 and terminals 2 & 8


are electrically the same. However,
when both sets are used for Class B
installation, they must be shielded.

Figure 4-4: 3-AADC Class B field wiring

4.8

EST3 Self Study Course

Analog addressable driver controller

Module evaluation
This concludes Module 4 of the EST3 Self-Study Course. Return
to the objectives stated at the beginning of this module. Study
them carefully to ensure you are comfortable with each
objective. If not, return to that section and review it. When you
are satisfied, take the EST3 Module 2, 3, and 4 Exam.

EST3 Self Study Course

4.9

Analog addressable driver controller

4.10

EST3 Self Study Course

Module 5

Signature driver controllers

Summary

This module introduces you to the 3-SSDC(1) Single Signature


Driver Controller and the 3-SDDC(1) Dual Signature Driver
Controller. This module also discusses the Signature detectors,
bases, and modules available for EST3 applications.
Content
Introduction to module 5 5.3
Key items 5.4
Objectives 5.5
3-SSDC and 3-DSDC Signature driver controller modules 5.6
Signature Series detectors 5.10
Signature Series smoke detectors 5.12
Signature Series heat detectors 5.13
Signature Series bases 5.15
SIGA-SB and SB4 standard bases 5.15
SIGA-RB and RB4 relay bases 5.16
SIGA-IB and IB4 isolator bases 5.17
SIGA-IM isolator module 5.18
SIGA-AB4 audible (sounder) base 5.189
SIGA-SD super duct detector 5.1821
Signature Series modules 5.23
SIGA module personality codes 5.26
Rules for assigning personality codes 5.26
Descriptions of the personality codes 5.26
Signature Series manual pull stations 5.29
SIGA-278 manual pull station 5.29
SIGA-270, 270F, and 270B manual pull stations 5.31
SIGA-270P and 270PB manual pull stations 5.32
Remaining SIGA modules 5.34
SIGA-CT1 single Input module 5.34
SIGA-CT2 and MCT2 dual input modules 5.35
SIGA-MM1 monitor module 5.37
SIGA-WTM waterflow / tamper dual input module 5.38
SIGA-CR and MCR control relay modules 5.39
SIGA-CR2 control relay module 5.3941
SIGA-CC1 and MCC1 single input signal modules 5.412
SIGA-CC1S and SIGA-MCC1S single input auto-sync signal
module 5.414
SIGA-CC2 and MCC2 dual input signal modules 5.445
SIGA-IO and SIGA-MIO input / output module 5.416
SIGA-UM and MAB universal Class A/B I/O module 5.468
SIGA-CCR and SIGA-MCRR control reversing relay module 5.51
SIGA-RM1 and SIGA-MRM1 riser monitor modules 5.4153
SIGA-APS auxiliary power supply 5.524

EST3 Self Study Course

5.1

Signature driver controllers


SIGA-AAxx auxiliary amplifiers 5.54
SIGA-SEC2 Security Loop Module 5.57
SIGA-MD Motion Detector Module 5.58
SIGA-REL Releasing Module 5.59
Example 3-SSDC(1) / 3-SDDC(1) application 5.61
Module evaluation 5.63

5.2

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Introduction to module 5
In Module 3 you were introduced to the 3-IDC8/4 Traditional
Zone I/O module, designed for non-addressable, traditional
inputs and outputs. In Module 4 you were introduced to the 3AADC Analog Addressable module, designed for analog
addressable inputs and outputs. The primary function of these
modules is to provide a method for the 3-CPU1and 3-CPU3 to
identify and communicate with hard-wired, non-intelligent fire
alarm circuits connected to the 3-IDC8/4, or with analog
addressable fire alarm circuits connected to the 3-AADC.
In this module we will discuss a third type of input/output
interface module, the 3-SSDC(1) and 3-SDDC(1) Signature
Driver Controller modules. These modules support individually
addressed intelligent Signature Series detectors and modules.
It is important to understand that each detector and module
has its own on-board microprocessor that allows it to make its
own decisions and retain specific information about itself.
The 3-SSDC(1) Single Signature Driver Controller with its
attached 3-SDC Signature Data Card is specifically designed
to communicate with and control Signature Series devices on
a single data line. The 3-SDDC(1) Dual Signature driver
controller has two attached 3-SDC Signature Data cards and
is specifically designed to communicate with and control
Signature Series devices on two Signature data lines. Both
controllers act as a data interface between Signature Series
devices and the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 main panel controller.
In this module, we will look at the single and dual Signature
driver controllers and discuss their installation procedures.
Additionally, we will discuss the Signature Series devices and
some typical applications.
Associated study

Use the following technical reference manuals as associated


study material for this module:

Signature Series Component Installation Manual (P/N


270497).
EST3 Installation and Service Manual, (P/N 270380).
Related product Installation Sheets.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.3

Signature driver controllers

Key items
Key points to look for:

Signature driver controller 3-SSDC(1) and 3-SDDC(1).


Signature Data Card 3-SDC.
Signature Series heat and smoke detectors.
Signature Series detector bases.
Signature Series modules.
Personality codes.
Self-diagnostics.

Key terms to learn:

5.4

3D and 4D detectors.
Signature Series base types.
3-SDC Signature data card.
SIGA module types.
Ring tone generator.
Class A and Class B wiring.

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Objectives
Upon completion of this module you will be able to:

1. Identify a 3-SSDC(1) Single Signature Driver Controller,


identify a 3-SDDC(1) Dual Signature Driver Controller, and
discuss the function and installation procedures for each.
2. Install a 3-SSDC(1) and 3-SDDC(1).
3. Identify a 3-SDC Signature Data Card and discuss its
function and installation procedure.
4. Install a 3-SDC.
5. Develop Class A and Class B 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1) field
wiring schemes.
6. Identify each Signature detector type and describe the
function of each.
7. Install Signature detectors and bases.
8. Identify each Signature module type, describe the function
of each, and describe the applicable personality code for
each type.
9. Install Signature modules.
10. Install the 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1) controller to incorporate
Signature components into the EST3 system environment.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.5

Signature driver controllers

3-SSDC(1) and 3-SDDC(1) Signature driver controller modules


3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1) Signature driver controller module: The

Signature addressable controller modules communicate with


and control the Signature devices that reside on their
respective data lines (loops). In addition, the controller acts as
an input/output interface between the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 and
the Signature devices.

Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 1: System


Overview:
Signature series devices.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6: System
Power up and testing:
Signature Driver Controller modules.
Signature series detectors and bases on a Signature Driver
Controller module circuit..
Conventional 2-wire smoke detectors connected to SIGAUM modules.
Signature series input modules.
Signature series output modules.
Read: The following EST3 Installation Sheets:

3-SSDC, 3-SDDC Signature Controller modules and 3-SDC


Signature Data Circuit Card
P/N 270491.

Read: Signature Series Component Installation Manual P/N


270497.

As you read this self-study module, pay particular attention to


the following:

5.6

The 3-SSDC and 3-SDDC are local rail modules (LRMs) that
plug into the chassis rails and provide hinged standoffs for
control/display (LED/switch) modules.

The 3-SSDC comes with one 3-SDC Signature data card


that plugs into the P3 connector on the rear of the 3-SSDC.
This 3-SDC connects to the signature circuit (loop) via the
TB1 connector at the top of the 3-SSDC for SIGA
connections. P4 is not used for 3-SSDC applications.

The 3-SDDC comes with one or two 3-SDC Signature data


cards that plug into the P3 and P4 connectors on the rear
of the 3-SDDC. The 3-SDC installed into P3 connects to the
signature circuit (loop 1) via the TB1 connector at the top
of the 3-SDDC for SIGA connections. The 3-SDC installed
into P4 connects to the signature circuit (loop 2) via the
TB2 connector at the bottom of the 3-SDDC for SIGA
connections when a second loop is desired.

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Each 3-SDC supports 125 Signature Series detector and


125 Signature Series module addresses.

The Signature detectors and modules reside on a single


Class A or Class B data communication line called the
Signature data line (or circuit).
A maximum of ten Signature data lines or circuits can be
installed into a single EST3 cabinet.

The front and back views of the 3-SSDC and 3-SDDC are
shown in Figure 5-1.

3-SSDC

3-SDDC

3-SDC
Signature
Data
Card

Front

Back

Back

Figure 5-1: 3-SSDC or 3-SDDC front and back views

EST3 Self Study Course

5.7

Signature driver controllers

Figure 5-2 shows the front view and pin-out of the 3-SSDC
and the 3-SDDC.

Figure 5-2: 3-SSDC or 3-SDDC front view and pin-out


Figure 5-3 shows the back view of the 3-SSDC and 3-SDDC.

P1

P4

P3

3-SDC
Signature
Data
Card

3-SDC
Signature
Data
Card

Installed
for Loop2
of 3-SDDC
(no connection
for 3-SSDC)

Installed
for Loop1
of 3-SSDC and
3-SDDC

P2

Back
View

Figure 5-3: 3-SSDC or 3-SDDC back view

5.8

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Note: Each EST3 cabinet, depending on the availability of slots,

can support up to a total of 10 addressable 3-SSDC (3-SDDC)


and/or 3-AADC circuits (loops). This means that if your cabinet
already has five 3-AADC circuits, you can only add five
Signature circuits, to reach the maximum of ten.

Each Signature data line supports up to 124 T taps.

The maximum resistance that is allowed for each


Signature data line is 79.

The maximum capacitance that is allowed for each


Signature data line is 0.5 F.

As shown in Figure 5-2, J3 (a 6-pin modular 3-RS232 RJ11


jack) is mounted on the 3-SSDC or 3-SDDC for uploading
or downloading data directly from/to this module and
your 3-SDU applications environment.

The projects Signature device configuration database


to/from the 3-SDU may be uploaded/downloaded directly
into the 3-SSDC or 3-SDDC via J3 in the single-step
download communications mode of the 3-SDU. This
database may also be downloaded through J5 on the 3CPU1 or 3-CPU3 via the network communications mode of
the 3-SDU.

The 3-SSDC and 3-SDDC support only Signature Series


devices; therefore, it is important to familiarize yourself with
the function and applications of these devices.
The Signature Series Component Installation Manual (P/N
270497) and the installation sheets shipped with the SIGA
devices are excellent sources of reference when wiring and
configuring a signature line.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.9

Signature driver controllers

Signature Series detectors


Signature Series detectors, smoke and heat, are electronically
addressable, intelligent analog devices that constantly
monitor any changes in the environment and notify the
Signature driver controller (3-SSDC or 3-SDDC) of status and
events.
These detectors are capable of combining data from their
various sensor elements and analyzing that data over a
preset period of time using a sophisticated algorithm to
accurately determine the detectors status or condition. The
result is a 30% faster response time to alarm conditions and a
90% reduction in nuisance alarms.

Figure 5-4: A typical Signature Series detector


Signature Series detectors are divided into two groups: smoke
detectors and heat detectors. First lets discuss the four types
of smoke detectors, and then well examine the two types of
heat detectors.
Signature Series smoke and heat detectors are identical in
physical shape and size. Signature Series detectors share
other common features. Accordingly, our discussion here
begins with a description of common features.
Note: It is important to understand that all Signature detectors
use a single detector address. See the Installation and Service
manual, Appendix A, Figure A-7 for details on the addresses
available for signature devices.

5.10

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

As shown in Figure 5-5, each detector (smoke or heat) has two


recessed LEDs: one red and one green. When the device is in
normal condition, verification supervision is indicated by a
flashing green LED. The red LED flashes during an alarm
condition.

Figure 5-5: SIGA detector LED indicators


Another important characteristic of the Signature Series
detectors is their ability to perform self-diagnostics and
maintain individual history files within their on-board
microprocessors and in the 3-SSDC or 3-SDDC controllers.
Self-diagnostics: Each Signature Series device is capable of
storing a variety of historical data and the results from selfdiagnostic tests.

Historical data includes hours of operation, last maintenance


date, sensitivity values, number of alarms, and number of
troubles. Each detector also knows its serial number identity
and its programmed device address. The smoke detectors
measure their environment every eight minutes and maintain
a four hour average as the adjusted reference level. Through
this procedure, a smoke detector can determine when they
are in alarm and when they are in need of maintenance.
Additionally, the detectors and modules perform their own
self-diagnostic testing. When a problem develops the
Signature device notifies the panel of its trouble state. In
addition to this, a more specific report of the trouble is
available in the Trouble Files that can be viewed using the
SDU diagnostic function or the SIGA-PRO. The SIGA-PRO is a
portable Signature device program and service tool.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.11

Signature driver controllers

Signature Series smoke detectors


SIGA-IS - ionization smoke detector

Gray
Contains one ionization-sensing element, combined with a
second element (time) in an on-board algorithm.
Caution: SIGA-IS smoke detectors should not be used in duct

applications or applications where airflow is a problem.


SIGA-PS - photoelectric smoke detector

Gray
Contains one photoelectric-sensing element, combined with a
second element (time) in an on-board algorithm.
SIGA-PHS photoelectric/fixed temperature smoke detector

Silver

5.12

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

The SIGA-PHS is commonly called the 3D detector. This


detector contains two sensing elements: photoelectric and
135 F fixed-temperature heat. These sensing elements are
combined with a third element (time) in an on-board
algorithm.
SIGA-IPHS ionization, photoelectric and ambient temperature
smoke detector

Gold
The SIGA-IPHS is commonly called the 4D detector. This
detector contains three sensing elements: ionization,
photoelectric, and 65 F above ambient temperature heat.
These sensing elements are combined with a fourth element
(time) in an on-board algorithm.
The 4D multi-sensor smoke detector is the most advanced
smoke detector in the fire alarm industry. Combining the
outputs of three sensors and time through the on-board
algorithm results in the fastest, most accurate response to fire
within the industry.
This detector is virtually resistant to false alarms when
manufacturer specifications and recommendations are
followed.

Signature Series heat detectors


As we begin with our discussion of heat detectors, there are
some characteristics that should be made clear. First, heat
detectors are not life safety devices. Second, heat detectors
do not have some of the features available in smoke
detectors. Heat detectors do not have:

Sensitivity adjustment.
Differential sensing.
Environmental compensation.

Signature Series heat detectors are intelligent devices and can


make decisions as well as maintain their own history and selfdiagnostic information.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.13

Signature driver controllers


SIGA-HFS fixed temperature heat detector

H E AT
D
N OT A L I FE ET
S

R
TO T Y DEV ICE
C
E FE
A

Gray
Contains one 135 F fixed-temperature heat-sensing element,
combined with a second element (time) in an on-board
algorithm.
SIGA-HRS rate-of-rise & fixed temperature heat detector

H E AT
D
N OT A L I FE ET
S

R
TO T Y DEV ICE
C
E FE
A

Gray
Contains two sensing elements: 135 F fixed-temperature
heat and a 15 F per minute rate-of-rise heat. These sensing
elements are combined with a third element (time) in an onboard algorithm.

5.14

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Signature Series bases

Figure 5-6: Signature Series base


Signature Series bases are compatible with all Signature
Series detectors. There are four types of base:

SIGA-SB - standard base.


SIGA-RB - relay base.
SIGA-IB - isolator base.
SIGA-AB4 Audible (Sounder) base.

The first three bases are available in two models. For example,
the standard base is available as either the SIGA-SB or the
SIGA-SB4. The SIGA-SB fits only in a North American 1-gang
box. The SIGA-SB4 fits the North American 1-gang box or a
standard 4-inch by 1 1/2-inch deep octagon box. This also
applies the SIGA-RB (SIGA-RB4) and SIGA-IB (SIGA-IB4) bases.

SIGA-SB and SB4 standard bases


All Signature Series detectors are designed to fit onto SIGA-SB
and SIGA-SB4 bases. These bases can support an optional
remote LED alarm indicator (SIGA-LED). The SIGA-LED is
designed to support typical air duct installations where
remote alarm annunciation is required.
These bases provide a tamper-resist mechanism that locks
the detector to the base. All of the Signature Series bases have
this mechanism.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.15

Signature driver controllers

Figure 5-7 illustrates the base and shows the typical wiring for
the SIGA-SB or SIGA-SB4 with Remote SIGA-LED connected.

Remote LED
(SIGA-LED)

Maximum resistance
per wire must NOT
exceed 10 ohm

- +
6

DATA IN (-)

DATA IN (+)
From Signature Controller
or Previous Device

DATA OUT (-)


DATA OUT (+)
To Next Device

Figure 5-7: Typical SIGA-SB or SIGA-SB4 application


Note: The data in and data out lines are connected to the
Signature data line. This terminology (data in and data out)
applies to the Signature data line in all subsequent wiring
diagrams.

SIGA-RB and RB4 relay bases


All Signature Series detectors are designed to fit onto SIGA-RB
and SIGA-RB4 bases. These bases incorporate a 30 Vdc, 1.0 A,
pilot-duty, dry-contact relay that may be used to control
external appliances. This relay:

5.16

Activates when the detector in this base goes into an


alarm condition.

May transfer to the activated state during shipment or


installation because it is mechanically latched.

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

WARNING: When a detector is removed from its SIGA-RB base,

do not touch the gold terminal (terminal #5 on the base).


Touching this terminal may cause the relay base to energize.
If this happens, the relay remains energized until you re-install
the detector.
Figure 5-8 illustrates this base and shows typical wiring for the
SIGA-RB or SIGA-RB4. Contact designations are shown with
the relay de-energized.

NormallyClosed

Common

NormallyOpen

DATA IN (-)

CONTACT RATING
1.0 Amp @ 30 VDC
(Pilot Duty)

5 6

DATA IN (+)
From Signature Controller
or Previous Device

DATA OUT (-)


DATA OUT (+)
To Next Device

Figure 5-8: Typical SIGA-RB or SIGA-RB4 application

SIGA-IB and IB4 isolator bases


All Signature Series detectors are designed to fit onto SIGA-IB
and SIGA-IB4 bases. These bases contain switching circuitry
that will open the Signature data line in the event of a short
circuit.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.17

Signature driver controllers

In a Class B circuit, a short is isolated from the 3-SSDC(1) or 3SDDC(1) by opening the data line at the SIGA-IB base located
electrically closest to the short, on the 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1)
side of the short. In a Class A circuit, a short is isolated
between the two SIGA-IB bases on both sides of the short
located electrically closest to the short.
Figure 5-9 illustrates this base and shows typical wiring of the
SIGA-IB or SIGA-IB4.

DATA IN (-)

DATA IN (+)
From Signature Controller
or Previous Device

DATA OUT (-)


DATA OUT (+)
To Next Device

Figure 5-9: Typical SIGA-IB or SIGA-IB4 application


Note: The negative sides of the data in/out connections are
wired to different terminals than the ones on the SIGA-SB or
SIGA-RB bases.

SIGA-IM isolator module


It is important to note here that a SIGA-IM isolator module is
also available for Signature applications. The SIGA-IM protects
Class A Signature data lines from collapse due to a short. This
module requires one module address and is assigned a
custom message to indicate the short. When a short occurs in
a Class A signature data line, all the SIGA-IMs open within 23
seconds. At 10-second intervals, beginning at both ends, the
SIGA-IMs close to provide power to the next SIGA-IM. If a SIGAIM detects a short when it closes, it reopens within 10
seconds.

5.18

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

From Signature Controller


or Previous Device

DATA IN (+)
DATA IN (-)

Green LED
(Normal)

4 3 2 1

DATA OUT (+)


DATA OUT (-)

Figure 5-10: SIGA-IM isolator module

SIGA-AB4 audible (sounder) base


All Signature Series detectors are designed to fit onto SIGAAB4 base. The SIGA-AB4 audible detector base provides a
configurable localized audible alarm at the base when its
detector goes into alarm.
Figure 5-11 illustrates the physical structure of the SIGA-AB4
base.

Figure 5-11: SIGA-AB4 base

EST3 Self Study Course

5.19

To Next Dev

Signature driver controllers

Figure 5-12 illustrates the SIGA-AB4 audible (sounder) base


wiring.

SIG-

DATAOUT

DATAIN

DATA+
IN/OUT

SIG+

From power supply + 24 Vdc


or previous base - 24 Vdc
From SIGA Loop controller
or previous device

+ 24 Vdc To next base


- 24 Vdc or EOL resistor

- SIGA in
- SIGA out
+ SIGA out

+ SIGA in

To next device

Figure 5-12: SIGA-AB4 base wiring


As shown in Figure 5-13, the SIGA-AB4 analog audible
(sounder) detector base output is field configurable for output
tone (steady or temporal) and output volume (low dBA or high
dBA).

To configure output
volume or tone, cut the
circuit board as shown.
5
DATAOUT

DATAIN

Tone setting:
Default is temporal.
DATA- DATA- DATA+
for
OUT Cut
IN
IN/OUTsteady.
SIG-

DATA+
IN/OUT

SIG+

Volume setting:
Default is high.
Cut for low.SIG+ SIG+ 24 Vdc
24 Vdc
- 24+Vdc

+ 24 Vdc
24 Vdc
- 24+Vdc

- 24
- SLC
inVdc
- SLC in

- 24 Vdc

Figure 5-13: SIGA-AB4 volume and tone settings


The SIGA-AB4 base can follow the state of the detector it
supports or it can be controlled and configured for other
operating modes through the 3-SDU. This base does not
require a separate address. It shares the address of the
detector it supports.

5.20

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Typical wiring for SIGA bases


Typical or general wiring for the SIGA bases is shown in Figure
5-14.

Class A Circuit Example


SIGA-SB(4)

SIGA-RB(4)

SIGA-IB(4)

Insulated Shield

SIGA Loop Controller

Figure 5-14: Typical SIGA base wiring

SIGA-SD super duct detector

The Signature intelligent analog addressable products provide


an intelligent SIGA-SD Super Duct detector, shown in Figure 515.

Figure 5-15: SIGA-SD super duct detector

EST3 Self Study Course

5.21

Signature driver controllers

The SIGA-SD Super Duct smoke detector utilizes fully


integrated intelligent analog addressable Sensor technology
and provides:
Smaller footprint: 1.9D x 8.7W x 5.45H.
Extended airflow range: 100 to 4,000 feet per minute.
Extended temperature range: 20oF to 158oF.
Easy installation.
The SIGA-SD Super Duct smoke detector features are shown
in Figure 5-16.
Inlet
Sampling
Port

Exhaust
Port

Easy to
Remove
Cover

Wiring Terminals
(See installation sheet for wiring details)

Power and Alarm


LEDs

Figure 5-16: SIGA-SD super duct detector features


Provides optional remote test stations:
Remote LED indicator.
Remote LED with key switch test.
Provides air-sampling tubes lengths of 8, 18, 24, 36, 42, 60, 78,
and 120 inches.
The SIGA-SD status LEDs are visible through cover:
Power (green).
Alarm (Red).
Provides On-Board Alarm Relay:
2 Amp @ 30 Vdc.
Form C Relay follows LED.

5.22

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Signature Series modules


Two types of SIGA modules are available for EST3 applications,
the standard SIGA modules and the M Series SIGA modules.
The standard SIGA modules, which are designed to be
mounted in a North American 2-1/2-inch deep 1-gang box or
a standard 4-inch square box, 1-1/2-inch deep with a 1-gang
cover. The M Series SIGA modules, which are designed to be
mounted on the SIGA-UIO Series motherboards. In either case,
the module terminal blocks will accommodate AWG 14, 16,
and 18 wire.
As shown in Figure 5-17, Signature loop data line connections
are the same for all modules. Where:

Data-in is always at terminals 3 and 4.


Data-out is always at terminals 1 and 2.
Terminals 2 and 4 (even) are always positive (+).
Terminals 1 and 3 (odd) are always negative ().
TB2
8

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

3 2 1

Green LED
(Normal)

TB1
DATA IN (+)

DATA OUT (+)

DATA IN (-)

DATA OUT (-)

From Signature Controller


or Previous Device

To Next Device

Figure 5-17: SIGA module data connections

EST3 Self Study Course

5.23

Signature driver controllers

The M Series modules simply mount into the three SIGA-UIO


motherboards, shown in Figure 5-18.

1 2 3 4
TB1

TB7
4
3
2
1

1 2 3 4
TB2

P1

P2

TB15
4
3
2
1

TB9

TB8

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

UIO-2
1 2 3 4
TB1

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4
TB3

TB2

1 2 3 4
TB4

1 2 3 4
TB5

1 2 3 4
TB6

TB14
4
3
2
1

TB7
4
3
2
1

P1

P3

P2

P5

P4

P6

TB15
4
3
2
1

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

UIO-6
1 2 3 4
TB1

TB7
4
3
2
1

1 2 3 4

P1

1 2 3 4
TB3

TB2

1 2 3 4
TB4

P3

P2

1 2 3 4
TB5

1 2 3 4
TB6

P5

P4

P6

TB15

TB8

J P1A

TB9

J P1B

1 2 3 4

TB10

J P2A

J P2B

1 2 3 4

TB11

JP 3A

JP 3B

1 2 3 4

TB12

JP4A

JP4B

1 2 3 4

TB13

J P5A

4
3
2
1

J P5B

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

UIO-6R

Figure 5-18: SIGA-UIO series motherboards.


Each SIGA modules onboard microprocessor enables the
module to be programmed at the factory to perform distinct
groups of functions. These are called personalities, and each is
identified by a personality code. In some cases, a modules
personality code may be changed in the 3-SDU during the
system configuration process. Before we discuss the SIGA
modules, lets review the SIGA module personality codes.

5.24

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Figure 5-19 shows the Signature loop data line connections


for the M-Series SIGA modules. Where:

Data-in is always at terminals 3 and 4.


Data-out is always at terminals 1 and 2.
Terminals 2 and 4 (even) are always positive (+).
Terminals 1 and 3 (odd) are always negative ().

From Loop Controller module


terminals or Data Out
terminals from previous
device.

1 2

DATA IN +

3 4

TB1

1 2

3 4

TB 2

DATA IN TB7
4
3
2
1

P1

P2

TB 15

DATA OUT +
TB 9

TB 8

DATA OUT

4
3
2
1

To Data In terminals of
next device or Loop
Controller module return
terminals when Class A.

1 2

3 4

1 2

3 4

Figure 5-19: M-Series SIGA module data connections

EST3 Self Study Course

5.25

Signature driver controllers

SIGA module basic personality codes


Rules for assigning personality codes
As previously discussed, the specific function of a module is
determined by its personality code. Here are some important
points about the SIGA module personality codes:

All modules are assigned a default personality code at the


factory.

For some modules, the assigned codes are fixed, that is,
they cannot be changed.

For other modules, the personality code may be accepted


by the programmer or changed to meet the function
required.

When selectable, personality codes are assigned through


the 3-SDU. This is the case for modules that may be used
in more than one application.

Each module must be assigned a personality code in


order to operate.

The 3-SDU will only let you assign personality codes that
pertain to the specific SIGA module, and will assign only
one code per device address.

Descriptions of the personality codes


The following is a list of the most common personality codes
presently used for Signature modules.
Code 1: N/O alarm latching, Class B:

Configures inputs of the module for a Class B normallyopen contact signal initiating device.
Alarm signal sent to loop controller upon contact closure.
Alarm condition is latched until panel is reset.
Example application: manual pull-station.

Code 2: N/O alarm delayed latching, Class B:

5.26

Operates like Code 1 except that contact closure must be


maintained for at least 16 seconds before an alarm status
is generated.
Typically used with non-retarded waterflow alarm
switches.

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Code 3: N/O active non-latching, Class B:

Contact closure causes generation of an active status


instead of an alarm status.
Non-latching.
Normally used to monitor fans, dampers, and doors.

Code 4: N/O active latching, Class B:

Closure causes an active status.


Latches at the module.
Normally used to monitor supervisory or tamper circuits.

Code 5: Riser selector (single Input):

Configures the single input signal module for:

24 Vdc power riser.


25 Vrms or 70 Vrms audio riser.

Code 6: Riser selector (single input) ring-tone:

Configures the single input signal module for a telephone


riser.
Enables the ring-tone generator.

Code 7: Riser detector (dual input):

Used for dual channel input, and supports:

24 Vdc power riser.


25 Vrms or 70 Vrms audio riser.

Code 8: Dry contact input:

Configures the module for Form C dry relay contact


operation.
Used for control of external appliances.

Code 9: N/O alarm latching, Class A:

Configures the module for Class A, dry contact initiating


devices.
Upon contact closure, alarm signal is sent to the
controller.
Alarm condition is latched.

Code 10: N/O alarm delayed latching, Class A:

EST3 Self Study Course

Same as Code 9 except that contact closure must be


maintained for approximately 16 seconds.
Used for non-retarded waterflow alarm switches.

5.27

Signature driver controllers


Code 11: N/O active non-latching, Class A:

Same as Code 9 except that contact closure generates an


active status instead of alarm condition.
Non-latching.
Used for Class A supervising modules.

Code 12: N/O active latching, Class A:

Same as Code 11 except that the active status is latching.


Code 13: 2-wire smoke non-verified, Class B:

Configures the SIGA-UM for monitoring 2-wire smokes that do


not require verification.
Code 14: 2-wire smoke verified, Class B:

Configures the SIGA-UM for monitoring 2-wire smokes that do


require verification.
Code 15: Signal output, Class A:

Configures the SIGA-UM for connection to a Class A


notification appliance circuit.
Code 16: Signal output, Class B:

Configures the SIGA-UM for connection to a Class B


notification appliance circuit.
Code 20: 2-wire smoke non-verified, Class A:

Same as Code 13 except wiring is Class A.


Code 21: 2-wire smoke verified, Class A:

Same as Code 14 except wiring is Class A.

5.28

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Signature Series manual pull stations


Signature Series manual pull-stations are addressable devices
on the Signature data line. Each manual pull-station is
retrofitted with a module that requires one or two module
addresses. Personality codes are factory-assigned and fixed
for all Signature Series manual pull stations for US
applications. European applications provide the option of a
soft or hard short selection, which is not discussed in this
lesson.

SIGA-278 manual pull station

LIFT THEN
PULL HANDLE
PULL FOR

FIRE

Figure 5-20: SIGA-278 manual pull fire alarm station


The SIGA-278 is:

A normally-open dry contact module.

Constructed of high impact plastic with a steel back plate.

Dual action, in that two physical actions are required by


the user to initiate an alarm.

A single module that requires one module address.

Personality Code 1 is factory assigned and fixed. As you will


see later, personality code 1 is assigned to normally-open,
alarm latching, Class B fire alarm pull stations. When the
handle is pulled, the alarm condition is latched.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.29

Signature driver controllers

A single input module is attached to back of the SIGA-278.


Figure 5-21 shows the typical wiring of the SIGA-278. Note
that terminals 8 and 7 are pre-wired at the factory. Do not
change these connections.

REAR VIEW of SIGA-278

TB2
87

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

4 3 2 1

Green LED
(Normal)

TB1

DATA IN (+)
DATA IN (-)
From Signature Controller
or Previous Device

DATA OUT (+)


DATA OUT (-)
To Next Device

Figure 5-21: Typical SIGA-278 application

5.30

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

SIGA-270, 270F, and 270B manual pull stations

SIGA-270

SIGC-270F

SIGC-270B

Figure 5-22: SIGA-270, SIGA-270F, and SIGA-270B manual pull


stations
The SIGA-270 series manual pull stations share the following
characteristics with the SIGA-278 pull stations:

Normally-open dry-contact.
Single address module typically connected as in Figure 520.
One module address is required.
Personality code 1 is factory assigned.

All the SIGA-270 series fire alarm stations are:

EST3 Self Study Course

Single action: one user action initiates an alarm.


Constructed of cast zinc with a steel back plate.

5.31

Signature driver controllers

The following labeling scheme appears on the SIGA-270 series


manual pull stations:

SIGA-270 - English labeling.


SIGA-270F - French labeling.
SIGA-270B - English and French labeling.

SIGA-270P and 270PB manual pull stations

SIGA-270P

SIGC-270PB

Figure 5-23: SIGA-270P and 270PB manual pull stations


This manual pull-station is a normally-open, dry contact
device that provides for a pre-alarm condition. Through
programming, pulling the single action handle (input 1 - stage
one) activates the alarm LED and displays event on the 3-LCD
display without sounding any notification appliances.
Qualified personnel within the proprietary facility, who receive
this signal, proceed to investigate the scene to determine if an
alarm condition exists. If an alarm condition exists, a key must
be inserted and turned (input 2 - stage two) in the lock,
activating the notification appliances.
The stage two key must be ordered separately (P/N 276-K2).
This key can only be inserted after the handle is pulled.

5.32

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

All of the SIGA-270P series fire alarm stations have these


characteristics:

Normally-open, dry contact

Single action: only one user action is needed to initiate an


alarm.

Require two module addresses.

Personality code 1 (input 1 - stage one) is factory assigned


(normally-open, alarm latching, Class B).

Personality code of 1 (input 2 - stage two) is factory


assigned.

Note: Within the 3-SDU environment, when configuring a pull


station, the device type is PULL. However, the device types
used for the SIGA-270P and -270PB pull stations are:

Input 1 (first address) STAGEONE.


Input 2 (second address) STAGETWO.

The following labeling scheme appears on the SIGA-270P and


SIGA270PB Manual Pull Stations:

SIGA-270P: English labeling.


SIGA-270PB: English and French labeling.

The SIGA-270P and -270PB pull stations have a dual module


attached (two module addresses) at the rear of the device.
REAR VIEW
of
SIGA-270P,
SIGC-270PB

TB2

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

3 2 1

Green LED
(Normal)

TB1

DATA IN (+)

DATA OUT (-)

DATA IN (-)

DATA OUT (+)

From Signature Controller


or Previous Device

To Next Device

Figure 5-24: Typical SIGA-270P and 270PB application

EST3 Self Study Course

5.33

Signature driver controllers

Remaining SIGA modules


The remaining Signature modules are intelligent, analog
addressable components that reside on a Signature data line.
Some types are used to connect Class A or Class B normallyopen alarm, supervisory, or monitor type dry-contact initiating
circuits to the 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1) loop controllers. Other
types are used to activate a supervised output circuit on a
riser bus upon command from the 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1).
All modules in the Signature Series:

Have a green and red LED that operate the same as those
on the Signature detectors.

Have their addresses established during initial power-up


and the configuration process in the 3-SDU.

Have a factory assigned personality code that may or


may not be changed.

Use one or two module addresses. The exception is the


SIGA-REL Releasing Module, which has six module
addresses.

There are two types of modules available for GE Security, EST3


applications.

The standard SIGA Series modules.


The M Series SIGA modules.

The operation and attributes for both types are the same.

SIGA-CT1 single Input module


The SIGA-CT1 is used to connect a Class B, normally-open
alarm, supervisory, or monitor type dry-contact initiating
device circuit (IDC) to the 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1) Signature
data line.
Note: The SIGA-CT1 does not support conventional smoke
detectors.

The SIGA-CT1 requires one module address and may be


assigned one of the following personality codes:

Code 1: N/O alarm latching, Class B - factory assigned


default.

Note: This code may be changed to code 2, 3, or 4 through the


3-SDU.

5.34

Code 2: N/O alarm delayed latching, Class B.

Code 3: N/O active non-latching, Class B.

Code 4: N/O active latching, Class B.

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

The maximum input resistance per wire for the SIGA-CT1 is


25 . The EOL resistance is 47 k. Maximum input circuit
capacitance is 0.1 F.
The SIGA-CT1 is designed to monitor a single input alarm,
supervisory or monitor circuit. It may be configured as an
Alarm, Supervisory or Monitor device type in the 3-SDU. It
may be used for non-retarded waterflow alarm switches, or
for monitoring fans, dampers, doors, and tamper switches.
Typical N.O. Initiating Device

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor
Style B (Class B)
TB2
8 7

SIGA-CT1

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

Green LED
(Normal)

4 3 2 1

TB1

DATA IN (+)

DATA OUT (+)

DATA IN (-)

DATA OUT (-)

From Signature Controller


or Previous Device

To Next Device

Figure 5-25: Typical SIGA-CT1 application

SIGA-CT2 and SIGA-MCT2 dual input modules


The SIGA-CT2 and SIGA-MCT2 dual input modules are used to
connect up to two Class B, normally-open alarm, supervisory,
or monitor type, dry-contact initiating device circuits (IDC).
However, they do not support conventional 2-wire smoke
detectors.
The SIGA-CT2 and SIGA-MCT2 have two input circuits and
require two module addresses.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.35

Signature driver controllers

Each of the two SIGA-CT2 or SIGA-MCT2 inputs may be


assigned one of the following personality codes:

Code 1: N/O alarm latching, Class B - factory assigned


default.

Note: This code may be changed to code 2, 3, or 4 through the


3-SDU.

Code 2: N/O alarm delayed latching, Class B.

Code 3: N/O active non-latching, Class B.

Code 4: N/O active latching, Class B.

Note: One of the dual module inputs can be alarm, and the
other input can be supervisory or monitor.

Electrical specifications:

Maximum input resistance per wire is 25 .


EOL resistance is 47 k.
Maximum input circuit capacitance is 0.1 F.
Typical N.O. Alarm IDC
(Personality Code 1 or 2)

INPUT 1

INPUT 2

Typical N.O. Supervisory IDC


(Personality Code 3 or 4)

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

TB2
Style B (Class B)

8 7 6 5

SIGA-CT2

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

4 3 2 1

Green LED
(Normal)

TB1
DATA IN (+)

DATA OUT (+)

DATA IN (-)

DATA OUT (-)


To Next Device

From Signature Controller


or Previous Device

Figure 5-26: Typical SIGA-CT2 application


The applications shown in Figures 5-26 and 5-27 emphasize
the fact that either module can manage two different inputs:
one alarm, and one supervisory. In this case, input 1 would
have a different personality code than input 2. Input 1 could
be configured with personality code 1 (ALARM), while input 2
could be assigned personality code 3 (SUPERVISORY). On the
other hand, both inputs can be of the same type using the
same personality code. Signature modules are designed to
offer maximum flexibility.

5.36

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers


Typical N.O. Initiating Device
Alarm IDC Personality Code 1 or 2

Supervisory IDC Personality Code 3 or 4

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor
Style B (Class B)
IDC Circuit
INPUT 1

Data In

+
-

Signature
Data
Circuits
Data Out

+
-

1 2 3 4

4
3
2
1

Style B (Class B)
IDC Circuit
INPUT 2
SIGA-MCT2

Module

TB14
TB7

SIGA-UIO(R)
Series
Motherboard

Green LED
Normal
Red LED
Alarm/Active

TB15

Figure 5-27: Typical SIGA-MCT2 application

SIGA-MM1 monitor module


The SIGA-MM1 Monitor Module may be connected to a Class B
supervisory or monitor circuit only. All the electrical
parameters for the SIGA-CT1 apply to the SIGA-MM1 module.
However, there are three important points to note here. The
SIGA-MM1:

Can only be used for supervisory or monitoring


applications where latching activation is not required.

Has a factory fixed personality code of 3 (N/O active, nonlatching) which cannot be changed.

Requires one module address.

Note: The SIGA-MM1 is a specialized SIGA-CT1 module limited


to supervisory and monitor point applications. Using SIGACT1s in your applications has the added advantage of being
an alarm device type also. This enables you to have a single
module type in stock to support systems you service.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.37

Signature driver controllers


Typical N.O. Supervisory or Monitor Circuit
UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor
Style B (Class B)
TB2
8

SIGA-MM1

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

Green LED
(Normal)

3 2 1

TB1

DATA IN (+)

DATA OUT (+)

DATA IN (-)

DATA OUT (-)

From Signature Controller


or Previous Device

To Next Device

Figure 5-28: Typical SIGA-MM1 application

SIGA-WTM waterflow / tamper dual input module


The SIGA-WTM is a special purpose model of the SIGA-CT2. It
is specifically designed for waterflow (retarded and nonretarded) applications for alarm, and tamper switch
monitoring within the same module.
The electrical parameters are the same as those given for the
SIGA-CT2. The SIGA-WTM has two inputs and requires two
module addresses. Both inputs of the SIGA-WTM have specific
personality codes that are factory assigned. Input 1 (first
address) may be assigned one of the following personality
codes:

Code 1: N/O alarm latching, Class B (default).


Code 2: N/O alarm delayed latching, Class B. (16 second
retard).

Input 2 (second address) has a factory-fixed personality code


that cannot be changed. This is code 4, N/O active latching,
Class B.
Input 2 may also be configured within the 3-SDU as one of
four device types:

5.38

Gatevalve (default).
Power.
Tamper.
Temperature.

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Typical N.O. Waterflow


Circuit (Personality Code 2,
Factory-Assigned)

INPUT 1

Typical N.O. Supervisory/Tamper


Switch Circuit (Personality Code 4,
Factory-Assigned)
INPUT 2

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

TB2
Style B (Class B)

8 7 6 5

SIGA-WTM

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

Green LED
(Normal)

4 3 2 1

TB1
DATA IN (+)
DATA IN (-)
From Signature Controller
or Previous Device

DATA OUT (+)


DATA OUT (-)
To Next Device

Figure 5-29: Typical SIGA-WTM application


Note: You may have noticed that up to this point, all of the
modules have been for Class B applications only. This holds
true for all modules except the SIGA-UM and SIGA-MAB
(discussed later).
Note: The SIGA-WTM is a specialized SIGA-CT2 module.
Similarly to the SIGA-MM1, using a SIGA-CT2 in your
applications enables you to have a single module type in stock
to support systems you service.

SIGA-CR and SIGA-MCR control relay modules


The SIGA-CR and SIGA-MCR provide one addressable Form C
dry-contact relay to control external appliances such as fans,
doors, elevator recall or equipment shutdown. The system
firmware ensures that the relay is in the proper on/off state.
Upon command from the 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1) loop
controller the relay energizes.
The SIGA-CR:

Requires one module address.

Has a factory-fixed personality code of 8, dry-contact


output that cannot be changed.

Note: The control relay module must be installed in the same


room as the device it is controlling.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.39

Signature driver controllers


(Contacts shown de-energized)
Common

NormallyOpen

NormallyClosed

TB2
8 7 6

SIGA-CR

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

Green LED
(Normal)

4 3 2 1

TB1
DATA IN (+)

DATA OUT (+)

DATA IN (-)

DATA OUT (-)

From Signature Controller


or Previous Device

To Next Device

Figure 5-30: Typical SIGA-CR application

(Contacts shown de-energized)


Normally-Open

Common

Data In

Normally-Closed

SIGA-MCR
Module

2 3 4

+
-

Signature Loop Controller


Data Circuit

4
3
2
TB14

+
Data Out
-

TB7

SIGA-UIO(R)
Series
Motherboard

Green LED
Normal
Red LED
Alarm/Active

TB15

Figure 5-31: Typical SIGA-MCR application

5.40

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

SIGA-CR2 control relay module


The SIGA-CR2 provides one addressable Form A dry-contact
relay, with dual normally-open contacts, to control external
appliances such as fans, doors, elevator recall or equipment
shutdown. The system firmware ensures that the relay is in
the proper on/off state. Upon command from the 3-SSDC(1) or
3-SDDC(1) loop controller the relay energizes.
The SIGA-CR2:

Requires one module address.

Has a factory-fixed personality code of 8, dry-contact


output that cannot be changed.
2A @ 24 Vdc (pilot duty) or 0.5A @ 120 Vac (pilot duty).
Note: The control relay module must be installed in the same
room as the device it is controlling.

Normally-Open

Normally-Open

TB2
8
7
8 7

SIGA-CR2

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

4 3 2
4

Green LED
Normal

TB1

DATA IN (+)

DATA OUT (+)


DATA OUT-)(

DATA IN ( -)
Signature Loop Controller
or Previous Device

To Next Device or
Signature Loop Controller
Class Return

Figure 5-32: Typical SIGA-CR2 application

EST3 Self Study Course

5.41

Signature driver controllers

SIGA-CC1 and SIGA-MCC1 single input signal modules


The SIGA-CC1 and SIGA-MCC1 modules are used to connect a
supervised output circuit to the riser. The riser input may be
24 Vdc for polarized audible and visual notification appliances.
The riser input may also be 25 Vrms or 70 Vrms for audio
notification circuits or firefighter telephone circuits. The SIGACC1 or SIGA-MCC1 do not supervise the input riser. The source
modules (PSMON or AMP) of the fire alarm panel must do this.
Personality code 5: riser selector (single input) is the factory
fixed default personality code for these modules. This code
may be changed during the configuration process within the
3-SDU. Code 5 provides:

24 Vdc NAC.
25 Vrms or 70 Vrms audio circuit.

Personality code 6: riser selector (single input) with ring tone


provides a firefighter telephone circuit.
The SIGA-CC1 and SIGA-MCC1 each requires one module
address. The electrical parameters for these modules are:

24 Vdc, maximum 2A.


25 Vrms audio, maximum 50W.
70 Vrms audio, maximum 35W.
EOL resistor in all cases are 47 k.
Maximum resistance is determined by type of output riser
supported.
Maximum capacitance all cases is 0.1 F.

Note: The polarity shown in Figure 33 at terminals 9 and 10 in

the supervisory condition reverses on alarm.

Note: The SIGA-CC1 and SIGA-MCC1 have built in ring-tone


generators for telephone circuits. A separate ring tone riser is
not needed.

Figure 5-33 shows the connections of the single output to a


typical audio evacuation circuit or 24 Vdc NAC. Note the
polarity of terminals 9 and 10. With personality code 5, the
ring-tone generator is disabled. The output circuit is
supervised for opens or shorts.
In Figure 5-34 the SIGA-CC1 supports a firefighter telephone
circuit, and personality code 6 configures the module as a
telephone riser selector. When the telephone handset is
plugged in, the module generates its own ring-tone signal. The
module, as programmed, also sends a signal to the control
panel to indicate that an off-hook condition is present. When
the system operator responds, the ring-tone generator is
disabled.

5.42

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

Typical
Speaker
Circuit:

Personality
Code 5

Typical
Notification
Appliance
Circuit:
Style Y (Class B)

Personality
Code 5

+
-

+
-

+
-

+
-

+
-

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

+
-

TB3

10 9

SIGA-CC1

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

8 7 6 5

Green LED
(Normal)

4 3 2 1

TB2

TB1
RISER OUT (+)
RISER OUT (-)

From UL/ULC Listed


Audio or Power Source

RISER IN (+)
RISER IN (-)

From Signature Controller


or Previous Device

DATA IN (+)
DATA IN (-)

To Next Module or UL/ULC


Listed Supervising Device.

DATA OUT (+) To Next Device


DATA OUT (-)

Figure 5-33: Typical SIGA-CC1 application, personality code 5

Personality
Code 6

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

Typical
Telephone
Circuit:

Style Y (Class B)

TB3

10 9

SIGA-CC1

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)

8 7 6 5

TB2

Green LED
(Normal)

4 3 2 1

TB1
RISER OUT (+)
RISER OUT (-)

To Next Device or EOL Resistor


Supplied with UL/ULC Listed
Control Panel

DATA OUT (+)


DATA OUT (-)

To Next Device

From UL/ULC Listed RISER IN (+)


Control Panel RISER IN (-)
From Signature Loop
Controller or Previous Device

DATA IN (+)
DATA IN (-)

Figure 5-34: Typical SIGA-CC1 application, personality code 6

EST3 Self Study Course

5.43

Signature driver controllers

Typical Notification Appliance Circuits


UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

Personality
Code 6

Personality
Code 5

+ +

+ +

+ +

_ _

_ _

_ _

SIGA-MCC1

1 23 4

4
3
2
1

Green LED (Normal)


Red LED (Actice)

473387352

TB7
CAT NO.

DATA OUT

SIGA-MCC1

4
3
2
1

E D W A R DS S Y S T E M S T E CH NO L O G Y

DATA IN
Signature
Data
Circuit

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

RISER 1 IN
RISER 1 OUT

TB14

UIO6
Connections
Only

SIGA-UIO(R) Series Motherboard


4
3
2
1

TB15
1 23 4
RISER 1 OUT

RISER 1 IN

UIO2R and UIO6R


Connections
Only

Figure 5-35: Typical SIGA-MCC1 application

SIGA-CC1S and SIGA-MCC1S Single Input Auto-Sync


Signal Module
The SIGA-CC2 and SIGA-MCC2 Single Input Auto-Sync signal
module has a factory fixed default personality of 25, autoSync Output. These modules are functionally the same as
SIGA-CC1 and SIGA-MCC1 with the addition of built-in
synchronization. These modules require one address.

5.44

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

SIGA-CC2 and MCC2 dual input signal modules


The SIGA-CC2 and SIGA-MCC2 dual input signal modules are
used as dual riser select modules to connect one of two risers
to an output notification or audio evacuation circuit.
The SIGA-CC2 and SIGA-MCC2 modules:

Require two module addresses.

Use personality code 7 - riser selector (dual input). This is


factory-fixed and is the only code that applies to the SIGACC2 or SIGA-MCC2 applications.

Support 24 Vdc for NAC and 25 Vrms or 70 Vrms audio


systems.

Do not supervise the input risers.

Do supervise the output riser.

The SIGA-CC2 and SIGA-MCC2 are ideal for dual channel audio
applications. Each output is monitored for opens and shorts.
In audio applications, to switch input 1 (ALERT) to the outputs
you must turn on the first address. To switch input 2 (EVAC) to
the outputs you must turn on both module addresses.
(Personality Code 7)

Typical
Speaker
Circuit:

(Personality Code 7)

Typical
Notification
Appliance
Circuit:

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

+
-

+
-

+
-

+
-

+
-

+
-

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

CH2 (INPUT 2) RISER IN (+)


CH2 (INPUT 2) RISER IN (-)
From UL/ULC Listed
Audio or Power Source

Style Y (Class B)

TB4
14 13 12 11

10 9

CH2 (INPUT 2) RISER OUT (+)


CH2 (INPUT 2) RISER OUT (-)
To Next Module
TB3 or UL/ULC Listed
Supervising Device

SIGA-CC2

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)
8 7

TB2
From UL/ULC Listed
Audio or Power Source
CH1 (INPUT 1) RISER IN (+)
CH1 (INPUT 1) RISER IN (-)
DATA IN (+)
DATA IN (-)
From Signature
Controller or
Previous Device

6 5

4 3

Green LED
(Normal)

2 1

TB1
CH1 (INPUT 1) RISER OUT (+)
CH1 (INPUT 1) RISER OUT (-)
To Next Module
or UL/ULC Listed
Supervising Device
DATA OUT (+)
DATA OUT (-)
To Next Device

Figure 5-36: Typical SIGA-CC2 application

EST3 Self Study Course

5.45

Signature driver controllers

Personality Code 5

Typical Audible
NAC Circuit

Personality Code 5

Typical Visible
NAC Circuit

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

Style Y (Class B) NAC Circuit


1 2

Data In

SIGA-MCC1 Module

+
Channel 1 Riser 1 Out
-

+
-

Signature Loop Controller


Data Circuit

2
1

TB14

1
Data Out

UIO6
Connections
Only

+
-

TB7

+
-

Channel 1 Riser 1 In

+
+ Channel 2 Riser 1 Out
4

GSA

SIGA-UIO(R) Series
Motherboard

3
2

Green LED (Normal)


Red LED (Actice)

Channel 1 Riser 1 In

+ Channel 2 Riser 1 In
-

TB15

+
-

Motherboard Jumpers

+
-

Channel 1 Riser 1 Out

UIO2R and UIO6R


Connections
Only

Figure 5-37: Typical SIGA-MCC2 application

SIGA-IO and SIGA-MIO Input /Output module


The SIGA-IO and SIGA-MIO modules provide a configurable
input / output module and uses one address.
These modules support the following personality code
applications:
[31] Normally Open, Monitor Input/Output, Class B.
[32] Normally Closed, Monitor Input/Output. Class B.
[33] Normally Open, Single Class B Input (Alarm
Latching)/Output.
[34] Normally Closed, Class B Single Input (Alarm
Latching)/Output.
[35] Normally Open, Single Class B Input (Delayed Alarm
Latching)/Output.

5.46

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

[36] Normally Closed, Single Class B Input (Delayed Alarm


Latching)/Output.
[37] Normally Open, Single Class B Input (Active NonLatching)/Output.
[38] Normally Closed, Single Class B Input (Active NonLatching)/Output.
[39] Normally Open, Single Class B Input (Active
Latching)/Output.
[40] Normally Closed, Single Class B Input (Active
Latching)/Output.
Typical N.O. Alarm, Supervisory or
Monitor Initiating Device Circuit

Normally Open
or
Normally Closed
Dry Contact
Relay

UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor

NOMEX Isolation Barrier

TB2

8
8

7
7

SIGA-IO

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)
TB1

4
4

Green LED
(Normal)

DATA IN (+)
DATA IN (-)
From Signature Loop Controller
or Previous Device

DATA OUT (+)


DATA OUT (-)
To Next Device
or Class A return

Figure 5-38: Typical SIGA-IO application

EST3 Self Study Course

5.47

Signature driver controllers


Typical N.O. Alarm, Supervisory or
Monitor Initiating Device Circuit
UL/ULC Listed
47 K ohm EOL
Resistor
Class B only

Unused
SIGA-MIO Module

1 2 3 4

Data In

+
-

Signature Loop Controller


Data Circuit

Data Out

+
-

4
3
2
1

4
3
2
1

Unused

TB14
SIGA-UIO2R or UIO6R
Series Motherboard

TB7

4
3
2
1

Unused

TB15
Remove Motherboard Jumpers

1 2 3 4
Unused

Normally-Open
or
Normally-Closed
Dry Contact
Relay

Figure 5-39: Typical SIGA-MIO application

SIGA-UM and SIGA-MAB universal Class A/B I/O


module
The SIGA-UM and SIGA-MAB support the following
applications:

Dual input Class B IDC circuits.

Single input Class A or Class B IDC circuits.

Single input signal Class A or Class B notification appliance


or audio circuits.

Single input Class A or Class B 2-wire smoke and initiating


devices on one circuit.

Form C dry contact relay.

Note: It is important to note here that the SIGA-MAB M series


module will not emulate a SIGA-CR or SIGA CT2.

The SIGA-UM and SIGA-MAB are considered to be master


modules. Either can perform both Class A and Class B
operations. Both are compatible with 2-wire smokes and
other conventional IDC circuits. Furthermore, both can
perform almost all of the functions of the other Signature
modules.

5.48

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

The SIGA-UM jumpers look like this.

The jumper is placed on posts 1 and 2 in all operation modes


except when the SIGA-UM is being used as a control relay
module (SIGS-CR). For personality code 8 (dry-contact output),
the jumper must be on posts 2 and 3. Remember that the
SIGA-MAB does not support control relay operation.
Both the SIGA-UM and SIGA-MAB use two module addresses.
In addition to the control relay mode for the SIGA-UM, the
SIGA-UM and SIGA-MAB support the following modes of
operation.

Input signal module, single riser select only, Class B or


Class A

Input Module, Class B single (both) or dual (SIGA-UM only),


Class A, single only

The personality code and EOL for both of these modules is


determined by the programmed configuration of the modules.
To correlate the personality codes with the module
configuration, consider the following:

A personality code of 1 (N/O alarm latching, Class B) is


factory set for both addresses, but may be changed
during the configuration process within the 3-SDU.

The SIGA-UM and SIGA-MAB each require two module


addresses.

In Class A operation, the maximum resistance per wire is


12.5 .

Refer to the EST3 ULI/ULC Compatibility List (P/N 3100427) for


a list of compatible devices for SIGA-UM and SIGA-MAB
applications
There are many configurations for the SIGA-UM module and
the SIGA-MAB module. We will restrict our discussion to the
most common application, that of supporting 2-wire smokes.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.49

Signature driver controllers

Style D (Class A)
+

Style B (Class B)

UL/ULC Listed
22 K ohm EOL
Used for Class A Only

IN

OUT

UL/ULC Listed
15 K ohm EOL
Used for Class B Only

Not Used
SMOKE DETECTOR
POWER (+24 Vdc)

TB4

TB3

JP1
16 15 14 13

321

12 11 10 9

SIGA-UM

Red LED
(Alarm/Active)
8 7

4 3

Typical Initiating Device


(Do not mix Initiating Device types
with Personality Code 14 or 21)

Green LED
(Normal)

TB1

TB2
Not Used
DATA IN (+)
DATA IN (-)
From Signature Controller
or Previous Device

DATA OUT (+)


DATA OUT (-)
To Next Device

Figure 5-40: Typical SIGA-UM application, 2-wire smokes

Typical N.O. Initiating Device


(Personality Codes 13 and 20 only)
UL/ULC Listed
15 K ohm EOL
Used for Class B Only

473387356

CAT NO.

SIGA-MAB

JP2
JP1

E DW A R D S S Y S T E M S T E CHN OL O GY

1 23 4

Class A circuits Only

SIGA-MAB

4
3
2
1

TB14

4
3
2
1

24 Vdc Smoke Detector Power


24 Vdc Smoke Detector Power
from Signature Loop Controller
or previous device

SIGA-UIO(R) Series Motherboard

TB15

24 Vdc Smoke Detector Power

123 4

24 Vdc Smoke Detector Power


from Signature Loop Controller
or previous device

Figure 5-41: Typical SIGA-MAB application, 2-wire smokes

5.50

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Note: The JP1 and JP2 jumpers on the SIGA-MAB module must

be installed for 2-wire smoke operations, Class A or B.

Observe the following parameters when using either of the


these modules:

2-wire smokes (Class B) require a 15 k EOL.

2-wire smoke (Class A) requires a 22 k EOL between


terminals 15 and 16.

When 2-wire smokes are run with verification (personality


codes 14 or 21) no other type of initiating devices may be
on the loop.

A maximum of 15 SIGA-UMs supporting 2-wire smokes


may be used on a single Signature data line.

A maximum of 30 2-wire smokes may be supported by a


single SIGA-UM.

SIGA-CCR and SIGA-MCRR control reversing relay


modules
The SIGA-CRR and SIGA-MCRR control reversing relay modules
are a specially designed module that is used to power and
activate the SIGA-AB4 sounder base on a zone or system
bases. This module requires one module address and uses
personality code 8. When this module energizes it reverses the
24 Vdc output. A typical SIGA-CRR and SIGA-AB4 application
for zone alarm signaling is shown in Figure 5-42.
JP1 24 Vdc Monitor

SIGA-RM1

DATA+OUT

DATA-IN

DATA-OUT

SIGA-

SIGA+

Last
Detector

DATA+OUT

DATA-IN

DATA-OUT

SIGA-

SIGA+

First
Detector

8 7

6 5

4 3

2 1

From Signature Loop


Controller or previous device
DATA IN +

DATA OUT +

DATA IN AUX RISER


+ 24 Vdc

- 24 Vdc

DATA OUT To next device or


Class A return

Polarity shown in ACTIVE state


8
8

7
7

SIGA-CCR
4
4

DATA IN +

DATA OUT +

DATA IN From Signature Loop


Controller or previous device

DATA OUT To next device or


Class A return

Figure 5-42: Typical SIGA-CRR zone alarm signaling


application

EST3 Self Study Course

5.51

Signature driver controllers

A typical SIGA-CRR and SIGA-AB4 application for system alarm


signaling is shown in Figure 5-43.
JP1 24 Vdc Monitor

SIGA-RM1

DATA+OUT

DATA-IN

DATA-OUT

SIGA-

SIGA+

DATA+OUT

Last
Detector

DATA-IN

DATA-OUT

SIGA-

SIGA+

First
Detector

8 7

From Signature Loop


Controller or previous device
DATA IN +

DATA OUT +

DATA IN AUX RISER


+ 24 Vdc

- 24 Vdc

DATA OUT To next device or


Class A return

Polarity shown in ACTIVE state


8
8

7
7

8
8

SIGA-CCR
4
4

7
7

G1M-RM

4
4

DATA IN +

DATA OUT +

DATA IN From Signature Loop


Controller or previous device

DATA OUT To next device or


Class A return

Figure 5-43: Typical SIGA-CRR system alarm signaling


application

10 11

6254A-003
EOL Relay
Required for
Supervision

DATA-IN
DATA+OUT

DATA-OUT

SIGA-

SIGA+

SIGA-AB4

Signature Loop Controller


Data Circuit
Data In +

8 7

SIGA-CT1
4 3 2 1

UL/ULC Listed
24 Vdc
Power Supply

+
-

Data In

2 3 4

SIGA-MCRR
Module

2 3 4

+
-

Signature Loop Controller


Data Circuit

4
3

TB14

+
Data Out
-

SIGA-UIO(R)
Series
Motherboard

TB7

4
3
2

Optional SIGA-MCRR or
SIGA-MCR Module for
disabling/disconnecting
an SIGA-AB4 audible base.

TB15

Figure 5-44: Typical SIGA-MCRR and SIGA-AB4 application


SIGA-APS auxiliary power supply

5.52

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

SIGA-RM1 and SIGA-MRM1 riser monitor modules


The SIGA-RM1 and SIGA-MRM1 riser monitor modules enable
you to monitor 12 Vdc. 24 Vdc or 25 Vac risers in EST3
applications. This module requires one module address and
uses a factory fixed personality code 23. When this module
energizes it reverses the 24 Vdc output. Typical SIGA-RM1 and
SIGA-MRM1 applications are shown in Figures 5-45 and 5-46.
JP1 Jumper must be installed into
12 Vdc, 24 Vdc or 25 Vac position.

The SIGA-RM1 must be the


last device installed on the riser.

SIGA-RM1

12 Vdc, 24 Vdc or 25 Vac


Riser not polarity sensitive
DATA IN (+)
DATA IN (-)
From Signature Loop Controller
or Previous Device

DATA OUT (+)


DATA OUT (-)
To Next Device or
Class A return

Figure 5-45: Typical SIGA-RM1 riser monitor application


12 Vdc, 24 Vdc or 25 Vac
Riser Not Polarity Sensitive
Appropriate jumper must
be installed for 12 Vdc,
24 Vdc or 25 Vac applications,
see installation sheet.

The SIGA-MRM1 must


be the last device installed
on the riser.
SIGA-MRM1 module

1 2 3 4

Data In +

4
3
2
1

Signature Data Circuit

Data Out +

4
3
2
1

TB14
TB7

JP1

SIGA-UIO2R or UIO6R
Series Motherboard

4
3
2
1
TB15
1 2 3 4

Figure 5-46: Typical SIGA-MRM1 riser monitor application

EST3 Self Study Course

5.53

Signature driver controllers

SIGA-APS auxiliary power supply


Read: The following Installation Sheets:

SIGA-APS (-220) Auxiliary Power Supply

P/N 387342.

The SIGA-APS auxiliary power supply can supply power for the
EST3 amplifiers in remote locations. This SIGA-APS can also
supply 24 Vdc power to a remote annunciator panel within
the EST3 system environment.
Note: The SIGA-APS has two 24 Vdc, 3.2A output circuits. Each
of these outputs supports one SIGA-AA Series amplifier or a
remote annunciator.

24 VDC
NAC1 Power
24 VDC
NAC2 Power

AC POWER
SOURCE

SIGA OUT
SIGA IN
To Battery

Figure 5-47: SIGA-APS auxiliary power supply

SIGA-AAxx auxiliary amplifiers


Read: The following Installation Sheets:

SIGA-AA30 and SIGA-AA50 Audio Amplifiers P/N 387343.

Two Signature amplifiers are available:

SIGA-AA30 30 Watt amplifier


SIGA-AA50 50 Watt amplifier.

EST3 audio outputs can be extended using these amplifiers.


These amplifiers use two module addresses and emulate a
SIGA-CC2 (personality code 7), where the first address is for
channel 1 and the second address is for channel 2. The
operation of this amplifier (channel select and AMPON) is the
same as the SIGA-CC2.
The two pairs of TB1 and TB2 terminals accept input preamp
signals from an EST3 audio source (3-ZAxx amps or 3-ASU),
where:

5.54

TB1-IN and TB1-OUT accept the channel 1 preamp riser.


TB2-IN and TB2-OUT accept the channel 2 preamp riser.

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Note: If the preamp risers are wired Class B, a 47 k EOL


resistor is required on the TB1-OUT and TB2-OUT terminals of
the last SIGA-AA amplifier.
Note: Jumper JP3 (under the daughterboard) sets the
amplifier for the appropriate backup operating mode.
The SIGA-AAxx amplifier audio output can be connected
directly to a speaker zone, without need of an output control
module. However, SIGA-CC1s and SIGA-CC2s may be used to
switch the amplified audio output to individual branch
speaker zones.
Note: A maximum of 10 SIGA-CC1s or SIGA-CC2s may be
connected to a single SIGA-AA amplifier output riser.
Caution: Exceeding the maximum of 10 SIGA-CC1s or SIGA

CC2s will cause the panel to go into trouble.

Backup Mode
Jumper
Backup Mode LED
Daughterboard Active LED

Amp Normal LED

Power Amp Enabled LED

Audio Output
Channel 1
Audio
IN and OUT

Audio Return
Class A Only

Channel 2
Audio
IN and OUT

Backup
Amp
SIGA Data
Riser

Output Voltage
Selection Junper

From
24 VDC
Source

Figure 5-48: SIGA-AAxx auxiliary amplifier


Figure 5-49 shows a typical SIGA-AAxx amplifier and SIGA-APS
power supply application of a dual-channel audio system that
is directly supporting a speaker zone.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.55

Signature driver controllers

AUDIO RISER

SIGA-AA30 or SIGA-AA50

47k
EOL

Channel 1 Preamp Riser


with appropriate EOL

Channel 2 Preamp Riser


with appropriate EOL

SIGA DATA RISER


To Next SIGA Device

SIGA DATA RISER

SIGA-APS

24 VDC

AC
Source

SIGA DATA
RISER

Figure 5-49: Typical SIGA-AAxx / SIGA-APS application

5.56

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

SIGA-SEC2 Security Loop Module


The SIGA-SEC2 Security Loop Module is an intelligent analogaddressable device that interfaces up to two security loops to
a 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1) Signature loop controller. The SIGASEC2 requires two device addresses. Personality Codes
downloaded to this module during the 3-SDU system
configuration process allow the system designer to configure
each SIGA-SEC2 channels security loop application.
Security applications are not discussed in this course. Refer to
the SIGA-SEC2 Security Loop Module (P/N 387632) installation
sheets shipped with this module for details.
TYPICAL APPLICATIONS
TB1

TB2

SIGA DATA IN

SIGA DATA OUT

47k
EOL

+
CHANNEL 1 INPUT

+
CHANNEL 2 INPUT

47k
EOL

BASIC SECURITY

Tamper
Alarm
47k
EOL

Tamper
Alarm
47k
EOL

N/C with TAMPER

Alarm
Tamper
47k
EOL

Alarm
Tamper
47k
EOL

N/O with TAMPER

Figure 5-50: Typical SIGA-SEC2 applications

EST3 Self Study Course

5.57

Signature driver controllers

SIGA-MD Motion Detector Module


The SIGA-MD Motion Detector is an intelligent analogaddressable device that interfaces a motion detector and a
configurable security input circuit to a 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1)
Signature loop controller. This motion detector module
requires two device addresses.
The first channel monitors PIR and tamper switch in the
motion detector. The second channel provides the security
input. Personality Codes downloaded to this module during
the 3-SDU configuration process allow the system designer to
configure this channel security loop for security applications.
Security applications are not discussed in this course. Refer to
the SIGA-MD Motion Detector (P/N 387633) installation sheets
shipped with this module for details.

CHANNEL 1 INPUT

+
SIGA DATA IN

47k
EOL

+
SIGA DATA OUT

1 2 3 4 5 6

TB1

Green Normal LED


Red Active LED

Tamper Switch

7 Curtain
Infrared Light
Reflector

Figure 5-51: Typical SIGA-MD applications

5.58

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

SIGA-REL Releasing Module


The SIGA-REL Releasing Module supports a variety of fire
suppression applications. It is an intelligent analogaddressable device that interfaces the fire suppression
subsystem to the EST3 systems 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1)
Signature loop controller. This releasing module requires six
device addresses.
The SIGA-REL Releasing module is a network component that
consists of:

Two supervised releasing circuits.

Two supervised pre-releasing circuits.

One supervised manual releasing input circuit.

One supervised abort circuit for a normally-open abort


switch.

One first alarm output relay (Form C contacts).

This module contains an intelligent microprocessor and


controls operation for:

Deluge sprinkler applications.

Pre-action sprinkler applications.

Automatic fire extinguishing or suppression applications.

Selectable abort modes.

This module controls the release of gas and other fire


suppression agents though release solenoids.
Fire suppression applications for this releasing module are not
discussed in this course. Refer to the SIGA-REL Technical
Reference Manual (P/N 387348) for details regarding SIGA-REL
installation and application.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.59

Signature driver controllers

Typical SIGA-REL Releasing Module Application


Manual
Release
Circuit

Abort
Circuit

First
Alarm
Output

TB3

TB2

1 2 3 4

+
SIGA DATA IN
+
SIGA DATA OUT
-

1 2 3

4
3
2
1

TB6

24 Vdc IN
+
24 Vdc OUT
+

4
3
2
1
TB1

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4
TB4

TB5

Release
Circuit 2

Prerelease
Circuit 2

Release
Circuit 1

Prerelease
Circuit 1

47k
EOL

Releasing
Solenoids

47k
EOL

Figure 5-52: Typical SIGA-REL applications

5.60

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Example 3-SSDC(1) / 3-SDDC(1) application


Figure 5-53 shows a typical 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1) Class A
application. Figure 5-54 shows a typical 3-SSDC(1) or 3SDDC(1) Class A application using SIGA-IMs. Figure 5-55 shows
a typical 3-SSDC(1) or 3-SDDC(1) Class B application.
Remember the following points:

Shielding is only required for the Signature data line in


very high noise level environments.

Each Signature data line supports 125 Signature detectors


and 125 Signature module addresses.
A maximum of 10 Signature data circuits can be installed
in a single cabinet.
Accordingly, each cabinet can support up to 1250
Signature detectors and 1250 device addresses.
When using SIGA-UM modules to support 2-wire smokes,
each SIGA-UM can support up to 30 compatible 2-wire
smokes.

SIGA-PS

SIGA-IS

SIGA
DATA
RISER
Source

When using SIGA-UM modules to support 2-wire smokes,


each Signature data line can support a maximum of 15
SIGA-UMs supporting 2-wire smokes
SIGA-CC1

SIGA-PHS

SIGA DATA RISER


Class A Return

SIGA-CT1

SIGA-HRS

SIGA-UM

SIGA-IPHS SIGA-CT2 SIGA-CR

SIGA-HFS

SIGA-CC2

SDC #1 Smoke Power

Figure 5-53: Typical 3-SSDC(1) and 3-SDDC(1) Class A


application

EST3 Self Study Course

5.61

Signature driver controllers


SIGA-IM

SIGA-PS

SIGA-IS

SIGA-PHS

SIGA DATA RISER


Class A Return

SIGA
DATA
RISER
Source

SIGA-IM

SIGA-HRS

SIGA-CT1

SIGA-IPHS SIGA-CT2

SIGA-IM

SIGA-HFS

SIGA-IM

SIGA-CC2

SDC #1 Smoke Power

Figure 5-54: Typical 3-SSDC(1) and 3-SDDC(1) Class A


application with SIGA-IM isolator modules
SIGA-HRS
SIGA-UM

SIGA-CC2
SIGA-HFS

SIGA-PS

SIGA-CC1

SIGA-PHS

SIGA-CT1

SIGA-IPHS SIGA-CT2

SIGA-CR

SIGA-IS

SIGA
DATA
RISER
Source

SDC #1 Smoke Power

Figure 5-55 Typical 3-SSDC(1) and 3-SDDC(1) Class B


application

5.62

EST3 Self Study Course

Signature driver controllers

Module evaluation
This concludes Module 5 of the EST3 Self-Study Course. Return
to the objectives stated at the beginning of this module. Study
them carefully to ensure you are comfortable with each
objective. If not, return to that section and review it. When you
are satisfied, take the EST3 Module 5 Exam.

EST3 Self Study Course

5.63

Signature driver controllers

5.64

EST3 Self Study Course

Module 6

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Summary

This module introduces you to the audio and telephone


system components of the EST3 Network. This module also
explains their application to audio message distribution and
emergency voice paging.
Content
Introduction to module 6 6.2
Key items 6.3
Objectives 6.4
3-ASU audio source unit 6.5
EST3 amplifiers 6.18
3-ASU/FT audio source unit with firefighter telephone 6.24
Module evaluation 6.32

EST3 Self Study Course

6.1

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Introduction to module 6
We live in an era of high rise buildings, multiple building
complexes, and massive shopping malls. The enormous
amount of floor space in these structures creates a need to
control panic and the movement of people during life safety
emergencies.
Let us suppose, for example, that a fire occurred on one floor
of a large multi-level office building. Obviously, a general
alarm would cause all the people in the building to evacuate.
This would immediately produce a dangerous situation in two
ways. First, the people in immediate danger, on the fire floor,
would be delayed or even blocked in their attempt to
evacuate. Second, the mass movement of people in a
confined space could (and often does) result in injury or death.
Ordinary notification Appliances (i.e., lights, horns, and bells)
cannot control the movement of large numbers of occupants.
Emergency voice paging was introduced to give the
occupants of these types of facilities specific verbal
instructions on evacuation. Audio systems are an integral part
of EST3. One-way communication is established with the basic
paging system using a microphone, amplifier, and speakers.
Automatic tone signaling and recorded voice messages are
also available. Two-way communication is accomplished
through the firefighter telephone system.
The EST3 system offers a unique, state-of-the-art audio
system. It is specifically designed to meet the diversified fire
system audio requirements found in the industry today. EST3
combines eight prioritized channels of multiplexed, digital
audio on a single-wire pair with the flexibility of zoned
amplifiers. It is capable of delivering up to eight messages or
signals simultaneously. Furthermore, this audio system
provides local, remote, and firefighter phone paging. Finally, it
features an integral tone generator and an integral digital
voice message playback unit.
In this module you are introduced to the components of the
EST3 audio system, their installation procedures, and their
basic operation.
Associated study

Use the following technical reference manuals as associated


study material for this module:
EST3 Installation and Service Manual (P/N 270380).
EST System Operations Manual (P/N 270382).
Related EST3 Installation Sheets as specified.

6.2

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Key items
Key points to look for:

Audio source unit (3-ASU).


Firefighter telephone control unit (3-FTCU).
Zone amplifiers.
Backup amplifiers.
Audio channels and signal priorities.
Default and custom message distribution.
Pre-announcement tone.

Key terms to learn:

EST3 Self Study Course

3-ASU Audio Source Unit controller board.


3-ASU Audio Source Unit panel assembly.
3-ASU front panel controls and indicators.
3-ASU microphone assembly.
3-FTCU Firefighters Telephone controller board.
3-FTCU Firefighters Telephone master handset panel
assembly.
Rail chassis interface board.
3-ASU Audio channel types.
3-ASU Page modes.
3-ZAxx series zoned amplifiers.
3-ZAxx series zoned amplifier configurable NAC Circuits.

6.3

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Objectives
Upon completion of this module you will be able to:

1. Identify the 3-ASU audio source unit and describe its


function, and features.
2. Install the 3-ASU/Chass4 and 3-ASU/FT assemblies.
3. Identify and describe the function of the three
components of the 3-ASU.
4. Identify and describe the function of the 3-FTCU
firefighters telephone control unit.
5. Describe the operation of a typical firefighter telephone
circuit.
6. Describe the operation of the five paging modes.

6.4

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

3-ASU audio source unit


Audio source unit (3-ASU): The 3-ASU is the primary audio
component of the fire command center. It is the primary
source of all audio signals distributed by the EST3 audio
network. Audio sources include local and remote paging,
firefighter telephone paging, digital voice and tone messages.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 1:

Audio subsystem description.


Network audio riser wiring.
Amplifiers.
Backup amplifiers.
3-ASU Audio Source Unit.
Audio signal priority.
Special audio source unit page modes.
Automatic messaging.
Firefighter phone.
Audio applications.
Audio channels.
Firefighter phone system.

Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 4:

Centralized audio applications:


All topics.

Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 5:


Installation:
Adjusting amplifier output levels.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6: Power
up and testing:
3-ASU Audio Source Unit.
3-FTCU Firefighter Telephone Unit.
3-ZAxx Audio Amplifiers.
Amplifier transfer panel (ATP).
Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets:

3-ASU Audio Source Unit


P/N 270482.
3-ASU/FT Audio Source Unit with
Firefighters Telephone (3-FTCU) P/N 270481.
3-ZA20A, 3-ZA20B, 3-ZA40A 3-ZA40B
Zoned Audio Amplifiers
P/N 387463.
3-ZA95 Zoned Audio Amplifier
P/N 387516.

The audio source unit is configured in two ways. The first is the
3-ASU/3-CHAS4 chassis assembly that contains the 3-ASU,
rail chassis interface card, 3-ASU panel/cover assembly and a
four-position rail assembly for optional LRMs, as shown in
Figures 6-1 and 6-2. The second configuration is the 3-ASU/FT
chassis that is discussed later.

EST3 Self Study Course

6.5

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

As you can see, the 3-ASU is comprised of three components:

3-ASU controller card, located behind the panel/cover


assembly.
Rail chassis interface card and ribbon cable.
3-ASU panel/cover assembly.

J3

J4

BIN

J2

CIN
AIN
J6
AOUT
DIN
J5

J7
BOUT

J1

READY TO
PAGE

ALL CALL

PAGE TO
EVAC

PAGE TO
ALERT
ALL CALL
MINUS
COUT

PAGE B Y
PHONE

J8
J8

DOUT
J9

J9

J1 1
J1 0

Figure 6-1: 3-ASU/3-CHAS4 chassis drawing

Figure 6-2: 3-ASU/3-CHAS4 chassis assembly


Note: The rail chassis interface card in mounted on the halffootprint on the back-right of the chassis with the
interconnecting ribbon cable running to the 3-ASU controller
card, as shown in Figure 6-3.

6.6

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Note: The 3-ASU panel/cover assembly houses the paging


microphone and related control panel with the page mode
selection switches.
The 3-ASU controller card is the heart of the EST3 audio
network. It contains a microprocessor unit and can also
accommodate the installation of expandable memory for prerecorded voice or tone messages. The 3-ASU comes from the
factory with a standard 2 minute on board flash memory.
Four optional PCMCIA modules are available for memory
expansion:

3-ASUMX/12 - 12 minute prerecorded audio memory card.

3-ASUMX/32 - 32 minute prerecorded audio memory card.

3-ASUMX/64 - 65 minute prerecorded audio memory card.

3-ASUMX/100 - 100 minute prerecorded audio memory


card.

The 3-ASU mounts on six spacers located on the left-most


foot-print on the back of the chassis. Power and data
communications with the cabinets 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 are
made through the rail chassis interface card. The rail chassis
interface card mounts on the right-most foot print on the
back of the chassis. Interconnection between the 3-ASU and
rail chassis interface card are made via a ribbon cable as
shown in Figure 6-3.
A UD IO DA T A
P R IM A RY

S EC ON D AR Y

TE LE PH ONE

P AG E
O UT

RE M OT E M I C
KE Y

A U DI O

TB1

AU X

RX TX

14

J1

J2

J3

J4

CIN
AIN
AOUT
J5

J3

TO 3-ASU
DISPLAY
3-ASUMX
EXPANSION
MEMORY

J6
DIN

J7
BOUT

J1

J2

3-ASU
AUDIO SOURCE UNIT
Controller Card

BIN

TR RX TX

RIBBON CABLE
Rail
Chassis
Interface
Card
COUT

DOUT

J8

J9

J4
[3ASUPC.CDR]

Figure 6-3: Installed 3-ASU controller board with rail chassis


interface card.

EST3 Self Study Course

6.7

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

As shown in Figure 6-4, TB1 is located at the top of the 3-ASU


controller card. This is where the network audio riser (Primary
Audio Data) is connected.

3-CPU1 PANEL CONTROLLER


Connect to TB2 on 3-CPU Module
20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10

ASU Audio
Source
Connected
to Audio OUT
for
Standalone
Applications
without the
RS-485 card

Network Audio Riser

REMOTE
MICROPHONE
PTT

AUDIO DATA
PRIMARY SECONDARY

LOW LEVEL
PAGE OUT

From Remote
3-FTCU

To next
panes
3-CPU1
Module
Audio
Input

CONNECT SHIELD TO
CHASSIS GROUND
FROM
AUXILIARY
AUDIO
SOURCE
REMOTE MIC

PAGE
OUT

TELEPHONE

KEY

AUDIO

AUX

14

TR RXTX

AUDIO DATA
PRIMARY S E C O N DA R Y

T E L E P H ON E

PAGE
O UT

REMOTE MI C

KEY

AUD IO

AUX

RXTX

14
TB1

J1

3-ASU
[3ASUIN3]

Figure 6-4: 3-ASU controller boards TB 1 connections.


This terminal board supports:

6.8

Audio riser to the 3-CPU1 (TB2 Audio A In) in the ASUs host
cabinet and subsequently to other cabinet 3-CPU1 or 3CPU3.

Telephone Page input for telephone pages originating at


remote ASU controller.

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Low Level Page output terminals for pages originating at


this ASU controller

Remote microphone input terminals. The SAN-MIC II, the


3-REMICA and the 3-REMCIP remote microphones are
designed for this function.

Auxiliary audio input when using a remote audio source


such as a tape player.

Note: The 3-ASU audio output is connected to the 3-CPU1 or


3-CPU3 Audio A Out TB2 terminals in non-network,
standalone applications when the optional RS-484(R, A or B)
card is not present.
Note: The 3-ASU is used in older 3-CPU applications support a
Class B audio network riser only. When it is used in 3-CPU1
and 3-CPU3 applications it supports Class A and B network
audio.
J1 on the 3-ASU is a 6-pin 3-RS232 jack for downloading
prerecorded audio messages from the 3-SDU directly into the
3-ASU.
Note: Audio message data for 3-ASU operations may be
directly downloaded into the 3-ASU via J1 in the 3-SDUs
single step communications mode or over the network via J5
on the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 in the 3-SDUs network
communications mode.

As previously stated the 3-ASUMX cards provide memory


expansion. Without the 3-ASUMX, the 3-ASU controller card
can store up to 2 minutes of prerecorded audio voice and
tone messages in its onboard memory.
Figure 6-5 shows the rail chassis interface card.

EST3 Self Study Course

6.9

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

J3

J4

CIN
AIN
AOUT
J5

BIN

J2

J6
DIN

J7
BOUT

J1

COUT

DOUT

J8

J9

Figure 6-5: Rail chassis interface card


As you have seen in Figure 6-3, the 3-ASU card is mounted on
the back of the chassis. The rail chassis interface card is used
to interface the 3-ASU with the power and data
communications channels of the rail assembly.
The last standard component of the 3-ASU/3-CHAS4 is the
front panel assembly, which houses the microphone and
paging control switches. This assembly is mounted directly
over and connected to the 3-ASU card via a ribbon cable.
Note: The four-position rail assembly provides for the
installation of up to four optional LRMs.

6.10

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

A typical rail chassis interface card connection to a rail


assembly as shown in Figure 6-6.
Chassis #1

Where:
Top Rail
J8 AIN
J9 BIN

Bottom Rail

J11 BOUT

Top Rail

J10 AOUT

Bottom Rail

Chassis #2

J8 CIN
J9 DIN

J11 DOUT
J10 COUT

Top Rail

Bottom Rail

J2 AIN

J3 CIN

J4 BIN

J1 to 3-ASU

Rail
Chassis
Interface
Card

J6 DIN

J5 AOUT

J7 BOUT
J1 to 3-ASU

Chassis #3

Top Rail

Rail
Chassis
Interface
Card
J8 COUT

Rail Chassis Interface


card is mounted under
3-CHAS7 Chassis along
with 3-ASU card.

J9 DOUT

Bottom Rail

Figure 6-6: Typical rail chassis interface card to rail assembly


connections

EST3 Self Study Course

6.11

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

During the 3-SDUs configuration process, the eight channels


of the 3-ASU are assigned channel types. These are:
PAGE priority 1 highest channel 1 default.
EVAC priority 2 channel 2 default.
ALERT priority 3 channel 3 default.
AUXILIARY priority 4 channel 4 default.
GENERAL priority 5 lowest channel 5 default.
Note the priority assignments for each channel type listed
above.
Assigning channel types: By default the 3-SDU assigns the first
five channel types as indicated above. The channel types may
be changed during the 3-SDUs configuration process. The
PAGE and AUXILIARY channel type attributes are only
assigned to a single channel. The EVAC and ALERT channel
type attributes may be assigned to multiple channels when
controlled egress is required in multistory or multi-building
applications. The GENERAL channel type attributes may be
assigned to up to four channels.

During the 3-SDUs configuration process four default


messages are automatically created. These are:
PRE the default pre-page message for the PAGE
channel.
EVAC the default evacuation message for the EVAC
channel.
ALERT the default alert message for the ALERT channel.
NORMAL the default normal message for the GENERAL
channel.
Caution: The 3-SDU only creates a labeled audio file area for

these four default messages. You need to record an audio file


for each of these default messages. The 3-SDU does not
permit you to download your audio files into the 3-ASU unless
these audio messages have been created.
During the 3-SDUs configuration process custom messages
may be defined and created in addition to the four default
messages. There is no limit to the audio messages you create,
other than that the total of the prerecorded messages audio
you record should not exceed the memory capacity on the 3ASU you plan to download to. Since you must specify the
memory size when configuring the 3-ASU you will be
prompted when you exceed the limit.

6.12

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Audio signal priority: As previously discussed, each of the eight 3-

ASU channels is assigned a type and a priority. When more


than one channel is commanded as the audio source to a
given amplifier, the amplifier connects to the channel with the
highest priority and the selected prerecorded audio message
is heard.
The 3-ASU is capable of providing eight simultaneous source
channels (audio signals) to the EST3 system amplifiers.
Nevertheless, 3-SDU programming decides the actual signal
to be broadcast by any given amplifier. For example, suppose
a particular amplifier broadcasts the evacuation signal to its
speaker circuits and you wish to page to this area. Paging
takes the priority over the evacuation signal. The evacuation
signal resumes its broadcast after you finish paging.

Prioritizing channels is especially meaningful when performing


selective evacuations, such as floor of incident, floor above
and floor below. In this case, you can send an alert message
to all the floors and the evacuation to the desired floor. With
the prioritized channels, only the evacuation message is heard
on the desired floors without special programming
calculations.
Its important to remember that audio in the EST3 system
consists of three components; the amplifier, the audio channel
and the desired message file. When programming the EST3
audio responses, you will need to turn on the amplifier to the
desired audio channel, and then turn on the desired audio
message to the same channel. This will require two output
statements in the applications program.
The four default messages provide a convenient feature in
broadcasting audio within the EST3 audio system. In that,
during the programming process if you turned an amplifier on
to a specific channel but did not select a custom message, the
3-ASU automatically sends and broadcasts that channels
default message.

EST3 Self Study Course

6.13

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 3: 3-ASU

operating instructions.
As you read this section, remember that the first five channels
have a pre-assigned types:

Page: channel 1.
Evacuation: channel 2.
Alert: channel 3.
General: channel 4.
Auxiliary: channel 5.

The remaining three channels are unassigned. While


configuring the 3-ASU in the 3-SDU, you can reassign these
channels and assign those that were originally unassigned.
Also remember that four default messages are provided:

The default preannounce message before paging.

The default evacuation message when custom


evacuation messages are not desired.

The default alert message when custom alert messages


are not desired.

The default normal message when custom normal (or


general) messages are not desired.

Paging
Ready to
Page

All Call
All Call
Minus
Phone
Page

EVAC

Alert

Figure 6-7: 3-ASU panel/cover assembly

6.14

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

There are several switches that control paging and the paging
modes on the 3-ASU panel/cover assembly. A page level
meter is located above the Ready to Page LED. This meter
shows the relative signal strength (paging volume) while
paging is in progress. Each of this panels switches activates a
specific paging mode:

All call page to all areas.


All call minus pages to all areas not currently receiving
an evacuation or alert message.
Phone Page under control of the 3-ASU panel controls,
enables paging to selected areas from a remote
firefighters telephone.
Page to evacuation (EVAC) pages to areas currently
receiving an evacuation message only.
Page to alert (Alert) pages to areas currently receiving an
alert message only.

When a paging mode is selected, the Green Ready to Page


LED flashes during the pre-announcement tone. When the
system is ready for the page the Ready to Page LED goes
steady.
Figure 6-8 shows the 3-ASU audio source unit control panel.
Page Level Meter - LEDs
Indicates paging volume. Speak at
level that causes right-most LED
to flicker occasionally.

Ready To Pages - LED


Paging
Ready to
Page

All Call
All Call
Minus
Phone
Page

Flashes during pre-announce tone.


Steady when ready to page

All Call - Switch/LED


Sends a page to entire system
(facility).

All Call Minus - Switch/LED


Sends a page to facility areas
not receiving EVAC or Alert.

Phone Page - Switch/LED


Activates remote firefighters
telephone to paging channel.

EVAC

EVAC - Switch/LED

Alert

Sends a page to facility areas


currently receiving an Evacuation
message.

Alert - Switch/LED
Sends a page to facility areas
currently receiving an Alert
message.

Figure 6-8: 3-ASU control panel controls and indicators

EST3 Self Study Course

6.15

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Note: When the pre-announcement tone is not selected during

the 3-SDUs configuration process, no default PRE message is


required and the Ready to Page LED simply goes steady.
Pre-announcement tone: A tone or voice message that is

broadcast on the speaker circuits before paging to alert the


occupants of a forthcoming page. The pre announcement
message is selected during the process of configuring the 3ASU in the 3-SDU. In that, it can be set to be always active,
active only during alarm events or never active.
After you are finished paging, you turn off the page mode
selection by pressing the selected mode switch a second time.
Take note of the following operator functions of the 3-ASU
control panel:

The All Call switch activates the all call mode. This mode is
used to send a page to the entire facility. In this mode, the
page is switched to all eight channels by the 3-ASU.
Pressing this switch a second time exits this mode.
Note: When the operator presses the push-to-talk switch
in this mode, his or her message is broadcast on all
channels and all amplifiers are activated by a command
from the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3.

6.16

The EVAC switch activates the page to evacuate mode.


This mode is used when you want to page only to those
areas that are currently broadcasting the evacuation
message. In this mode the page is switched to those
amplifiers current connected to the EVAC channel. The
page mode with its higher priority channel takes control of
these amplifiers. Pressing this switch a second time exits
this mode and returns the amplifiers to broadcasting the
evacuation message.

The Alert switch activates the page to alert mode. This


mode is used when you want to page only to those areas
that are currently broadcasting the alert message. This
mode operates the same as the EVAC mode with the page
channel taking control of the amplifiers currently
broadcasting alert messages while in this mode. Pressing
this switch a second time exits this mode.

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

The All Call Minus switch activates the all call minus
mode. This mode is used when you want to page to all
areas not receiving the evacuation or alert messages.
This time the page channel takes control of the amplifiers
not receiving an alert or evacuation message.

The Phone Page switch activates the page-by-phone


mode. This switch permits the panel operator to switch in
an active remote firefighter telephone to the paging
channel.

The function of the EST3 audio system is to provide general or


selective area voice or tone evacuation, alert, page or other
messages to alert and instruct occupants within a protected
facility of an emergency event.
The source signal coming out of the 3-ASU is a digital
multiplexed signal. Prior to being sent to a speaker circuit,
these signals are decoded, producing analog audio signals,
which are then amplified by specially designed EST3
amplifiers.

EST3 Self Study Course

6.17

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

EST3 amplifiers
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 1: System
Overview:
Audio Applications.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 5:
Installation:
Adjusting amplifier output levels.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6: Power

up and testing:
3-ZAxx Audio Amplifiers.

Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets:

3-ZA20A, 3-ZA20B, 3-ZA40A 3-ZA40B


Zoned Audio Amplifiers
3-ZA95 Zoned Audio Amplifier

P/N 387463.
P/N 387516.

The EST3 Zoned Audio Amplifier modules receive and decode


audio messages from the eight multiplexed audio channels
coming from the 3-ASU. Upon command from the 3-CPU1 or
3-CPU3, one of these messages on the selected channel is
amplified and broadcast to the speaker circuit connected to
the amplifiers output. The audio output of the EST3 zoned
amplifiers may be wired Class A or Class B.
The 3-ZA20(A or B) and 3-ZA40(A or B) amplifiers enable you to
confirm and annunciate EVAC and ALERT channel activation
through 3-SDU programming.
The command and control signals to the amplifier are based
upon programming developed in the 3-SDU. The audio signals
coming from the 3-ASU are sent to the Audio A IN terminals of
the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 (refer back to Figure 6-4), which in turn
places the signals on the rail via its optional RS485 card. In
standalone configurations, where the 3-RS485 card is not
present, the 3-ASU audio is connected directly to the rail via
the Audio A OUT terminals of the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3. The
zoned amplifiers receive the audio signals from the rail
assembly.
Note: The SIGA-AAxx amplifiers are also available for EST3
applications. These amplifiers were discussed in Module 5.

6.18

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

During this lesson, pay particular attention to the following


amplifier features and functions:

The amplifiers are available in 20 Watt and 40 Watt


versions. These are single slot local rail modules (LRMs).

A 95 Watt (3-ZA95) amplifier is a local rail module and has


no 24 Vdc notification appliance circuits for optional
visible, audible or common alarm applications. The 3-ZA90
takes up two slots.

Supervised 25 Vrms or 70 Vrms outputs are available via


jumper selection on the all of these zoned amplifiers.

Each amplifier has an integral, onboard 1 kHz temporal


tone generator. The tone is used in event of a fault in the
network audio system when the standalone mode is
selected.

Each amplifier may be 3-SDU configured as a standby


(backup). A backup amplifier automatically replaces any
normally configured amplifier that fails. Only one amp per
cabinet may be configured as a backup. If you are using a
backup amplifier, it must be equal in wattage to the
highest-powered amplifier it is backing up.

Each amplifier may be wired Class A or Class B to a single


speaker zone. No output module or output zone on a
traditional card is required.

The 3-ZA20 and 3-ZA40 amplifiers have an independently


configured and programmed 24 Vdc, 3.5A Class A or Class
B NAC output. This NAC circuit can be configured for
visible, audible or common alarm output operation. This
NAC output typically is used to support strobe circuits. The
3-ZA90 amplifiers do not have this NAC output.
Note: The 3-ZA20 and 3-ZA40 amplifiers are provided in
two versions. The 3-ZA20A and 3-ZA40A versions support
a Class A or Class B audio and NAC circuits. The 3-ZA20B
and 3-ZA40B versions support a Class B audio and NAC
circuits only.

EST3 Self Study Course

These zoned amplifiers draw power from the primary or


booster power supplies through the rail assembly. The
remotely located SIGA-AAxx amplifiers get power form a
remote source (e.g. an SIGA-APS auxiliary power supply).

6.19

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

When using SIGA-CC2s to switch amplifier branch output


circuits:

A maximum of ten SIGA-CC1s or SIGA-CC2s may be


connected to the output of the 3-ZA20 or 3-ZA40
amplifier.

A maximum of ten SIGA-CC1s or SIGA-CC2s may be


connected to the output of the 3-ZA90 amplifier.

As previously stated the 3-ZA20 and 3-ZA40 amplifiers are


local rail modules that use one module space each. These
amplifiers have the hinged standoffs for mounting one
control/display module via J1 on the amplifier. The 3-ZA95
amplifier uses two module spaces. This module has hinged
standoffs that support two control/display modules via J2 and
J3.

Front

Back

Figure 6-9: 3-ZA20A, 3-ZA20B, 3-ZA40A, or 3-ZA40B amplifier


module

6.20

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

70V

TOP

25V

TX RX

OUTPUT
GAIN
ADJUSTMENT

J1

70V 25V
JP 1
JP 2
1

Main Board

REAR

FRONT

Figure 6-10: 3-ZA20A, 3-ZA20B, 3-ZA40A, or 3-ZA40B amplifier


drawing.

TOP

25V

1
2
3

70V

JP1 & JP2


JP1

J2

JP2

J3

TB1

FRONT

Figure 6-11: 3-ZA90 amplifier drawing.

EST3 Self Study Course

6.21

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

During this lesson, pay particular attention to:

Backup amplifier operation in the event of a failed


amplifier.

Amplifier operation in the event of a network data riser


failure.

Amplifier operation in the event of a network audio riser


failure.

Automatic audio messaging.

Maximum resistance, capacitance, and wire size values of


these EST3 amplifiers.

Figures 6-12 through Figure 6-14 show typical EST3 amplifier


applications, where:

The audio output riser and NAC output circuit may be


Class A or Class B, dependent on the amplifier type
selected.

The EOL resistor for both the NAC and audio output
circuits (Class B) is 15 k.
NAC Strobe Circuit
+
F
I
R
E

F
I
R
E

F
I
R
E

15 K ohm EOL Resistor


3-ZA20B and 3-ZA40B
Amplifiers only

Class A Return
3-ZA20A and 3-ZA40A
Amplifiers only
24VDC 24VDC
NAC/B NAC/A

NOT USED

3-ZA20A, 3-ZA20B, 3-ZA40A and 3-ZA40B


Zoned Audio Amplifier Module

BACK-UP

NAC/A

+ S

NAC/B

+ S

Speaker Circuit

15 K ohm EOL Resistor


3-ZA20B and 3-ZA40B
Amplifiers only

Class A Return
3-ZA20A and 3-ZA40A
Amplifiers only

Figure 6-12: Typical 3-ZA20A, 3-ZA20B, 3-ZA40A and 3-ZA40B


applications

6.22

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

3-ZA95 Zoned Audio


Amplifier Module

BACK-UP

NAC/A

+ S

NAC/B

+ S

15 K ohm EOL Resistor


Class B only

Speaker Circuit

Class A Return

Figure 6-13: Typical 3-ZA95 applications


NAC Circuit field wiring for 3-ZA20A, 2-ZA20B, 2-ZA40A and 3-ZA40B only.

Class A Return

Class A Return

24VDC 24VDC
NAC/B NAC/A

NOT USED

24VDC 24VDC
NAC/B NAC/A

NOT USED

Class A Return

24VDC 24VDC
NAC/B NAC/A

NOT USED

Primary
Amplifiers

BACK-UP

NAC/A

+ S

NAC/B

+ S

BACK-UP

NAC/A

+ S

NAC/B

+ S

Zone 1 Speaker Circuit


field wiring
Class A or Class B

BACK-UP

NAC/A

+ S

NAC/B

+ S

Zone n Speaker Circuit


field wiring
Class A or Class B

Figure 6-14: Typical backup amplifier applications (all types)

EST3 Self Study Course

6.23

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

3-ASU/FT audio source unit with firefighter telephone


Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 1: System
Overview:
Audio subsystem description.
Firefighter phone system.
Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets:

3-ASU Audio Source Unit


P/N 270482.
3-ASU/FT Audio Source Unit with
Firefighters Telephone (3-FTCU) P/N 270481.

The 3-ASU/FT is comprised of the 3-ASU Audio Source Unit


and 3-FTCU Firefighter Telephone unit mounted in the same
chassis. This chassis configuration does not have a rail
assembly. Figure 6-15 show both assemblies installed in a
chassis assembly.

Figure 6-15: 3-ASU/FT chassis assembly


Figure 6-16 shows a drawing of both assemblies fully
installed. The 3-FTCU unit holds the master telephone handset
and telephone circuit controls. This system provides totally
independent two-way communication between the fire
command control station and remote firefighter telephone
stations or jack telephones, located throughout a protected
facility.

6.24

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

CONNECT

READY TO
PAGE

REVIEW PENDING

ACK

0 calls pending

ALL CALL

unit: ok

PAGE TO
EVAC
DISCONNECT

REVIEW CONNECTED

PAGE TO
ALER T
AL L CAL L
MINUS

PAGE BY
PHON E

Figure 6-16: 3-ASU/FT panel/cover assemblies drawing


When a firefighter takes the remote telephone off the hook or
plugs into a telephone jack, a visual and audible incoming call
signal is generated at the fire command station.
The individual originating the call hears a busy tone until he is
connected to the system. The fire command station operator
manually connects the incoming phone call to the phone riser
to complete the call. Up to five remote telephones may be
connected as a party line to the riser simultaneously.

Figure 6-17: 3-ASU/FT component parts.


Excluding the chassis assembly, the 3-ASU/FT consists of five
components:

EST3 Self Study Course

The 3-ASU controller card.


The 3-FTCU controller card.
The 3-ASU panel/cover assembly.
The 3-FTCU panel/cover assembly.
The rail chassis interface card and ribbon cables.

6.25

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Figure 6-18 shows a drawing of the 3-ASU, 3-FTCU and rail


chassis interface cards that are mounted on the back of the
chassis. The proper ribbon cable connections are also shown.
As previously stated, the 3-ASU panel/cover assembly is
installed on the top of the 3-ASU controller board. The 3-FTCU
display assembly is installed on the top the 3-FTCU controller
board in the same manner.
AUDIO DATA
PRIMARY S E CO N DA R Y

T EL E PH ON E

PAGE
OUT

REMOTE MIC
KEY
AUDIO

AUX

RX TX

14

TB1

TX RX

TB1

J1

J2

3-ASU
AUDIO
SOURCE
UNIT

J2

J1

J3

3-ASUMX
EXPANSION
MEMORY

TO 3-ASU
DISPLAY
PANEL

J3

J4

CIN
AIN
AOUT

3-FTCU
FIREFIGHTERS
TELEPHONE
CONTROL
UNIT

J5

J2

RIBBON CABLES
P/N 250195-00
J3

TO 3-FTCU
DISPLAY
PANEL

BIN

TR RX TX

J6
DIN

J7
BOUT

J1

RAIL
CHASSIS
INTERFACE
CARD
COUT

DOUT

J8

J9

J4

Figure 6-18: 3-ASU/FT chassis installation


Cabinet and field wiring for the 3-ASU and rail chassis
interface cards were discussed earlier in this lesson. For the
following discussion we will focus on the 3-FTCU card
connections.
As you can see in Figure 6-19 and Figure 6-20, TB1 provides
for the field connections of the EST3 system telephone riser.
This telephone circuit requires a separate, hardwired riser, as
it is not multiplexed over the network audio riser. The 3-FTCU
card supervises the telephone riser.
1

1
3
4

2 3 4

COMMON
PHONE RISER

TELEPHONE RISER

CLASS A PHONE
RISER RETURN

CLASS A TELEPHONE
RISER RETURN

5
6
7
8
9
10

Figure 6-19: 3-FTCU TB 1 field connections

6.26

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Figure 6-20 shows a typical telephone line, using a


SIGA-CC1 (personality code 6) to monitor a telephone
jack. This figure shows only one remote phone
installation for simplification. More telephone jacks
and SIGA-CC1s may be added as long as the
maximum allowable riser length of the telephone line
is not exceeded.

47KEOL
RESISTOR
Twisted-Pair
10 9

SIGA-CC1
4 3 2 1

8 7 6 5

To Signature
Data Circuit

15K EOL
Resistor on Last CC1
of riser, Class B only

Telephone Riser
Twisted-Shielded Pairs
Connect Shields to
Earth Ground
No Connection

Class A
Return

10

TB1
TX RX

3-FTCU

Figure 6-20: Typical telephone riser to CC1 application.

EST3 Self Study Course

6.27

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Observe the following aspects of Figure 6-20:

The telephone riser can be Class A or Class B.


15 k EOL for telephone riser (Class B).
47 k EOL for telephone circuits at CC1 outputs.
18 AWG twisted-shielded pair wire.
Five active phones on the line at any one time.
Maximum telephone riser length is 4,000 feet.

Read: EST3 System Operations Manual > Chapter 4: 3-FTCU


operating instructions.

Lets take a closer look at the 3-FTCU display and controls to


gain a better understanding of telephone operation from the
fire command center. In the right center of the 3-FTCU panel,
you see a LCD display that displays all the activity on the
telephone riser.
Figure 6-21 shows the display in the normal condition (no
telephone activity or telephone riser troubles).

CONNECT

REVIEW PENDING

ACK

0 calls pending

unit: ok
DISCONNECT

REVIEW CONNECTED

To answer call, LIFT PHONE HANDSET and,


Press CONNECT to select call pending
Press REVIEW PENDING to scroll calls pending connection
Press ACK to silence phone call-in buzzer
Press DISCONNECT to terminate a call
Press REVIEW CONNECTED to select active calls for disconnect

Figure 6-21: 3-FTCU display and controls

6.28

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

The top, pending calls section of the normal display indicates


no calls at the present time. The black portion of the display is
the title. The system status is shown at the bottom of the
display.
As shown in Figure 6-22, when a local fault occurs on the
telephone system, the fault indication will appear at the
bottom of the display. The system status changed to trouble
and an indication of the local trouble is shown such as:
handset off hook. System faults are more accurately displayed
on the 3-LCD panel to aid in troubleshooting. In this example,
the 3-FTCU system status screen shows trouble, but the exact
problem may not be indicated on this LCD. However the
systems 3-LCD panels message will be more specific about
the nature of the trouble.
0 CALLS PENDING
HANDSET OFF HOOK
EMERGENCY TELEPHONE

UNIT: TROUBLE

Figure 6-22: Telephone local fault display


Lets review the Firefighters Telephone panel controls:

EST3 Self Study Course

The Connect Switch connects the incoming calls from the


calls pending list to the Master telephone handset.

The Review Pending Switch scrolls the pending incoming


calls on the calls pending list prior to connection to the
Master telephone handset.

The ACKnowledge Switch acknowledges the incoming


calls and silences the call-in buzzer prior to connection.

The Disconnect Switch disconnects connected calls from


the connected call list from the Master telephone handset.

The Review Connected Switch scrolls the connected calls


on the connected calls list prior to disconnection from the
Master telephone handset.

Instruction Placard contains a easy access set of


operating instructions for the Firefighters Telephone.

6.29

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

During a fire alarm condition, when incoming calls may begin


to occur, the screen will change as illustrated in Figure 6-23. In
this case, the number of incoming calls is always listed on the
top line of the display. Identification of the incoming call is
listed in the reversed text portion. Multiple incoming calls are
displayed on the screen in a slow sequence. In that, the
reverse text area slowly sequences through all pending
incoming calls. The bottom of the display shows the number
of calls that have been connected by the operator. At the
same time, the incoming calls buzzer sounds.

2 CALLS PENDING
1ST FLR STAIRWELL
O CALLS CONNECTED

Figure 6-23: Incoming calls display


To answer an incoming call:
1. Silence the buzzer by acknowledging each incoming call
with the ACK switch.
2. If multiple calls are being shown on the display:

Press the Review Pending switch once to stop the


identifier sequencing.

Subsequently pressing of the Review Pending switch


steps the display through the list of incoming calls.

3. When the desired call appears in the reversed text


window, stop pressing the Review Pending switch.
4. Press the Connect switch to answer the selected call. This
connects the incoming call to the master handset.
5. The call identifier moves the select phones call
identification from the reverse text window to the
connected calls list at the bottom of the display, as shown
in Figure 6-24.

6.30

EST3 Self Study Course

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

1 CALLS PENDING
WEST BASEMENT
1 CALLS CONNECTED
1ST FLR STAIRWELL

Figure 6-24: First call connected


The connected call list is displayed under the call connected
counter. The remaining calls identifier is in the calls pending
window. This may be connected also, as up to five calls may
be active on the line at one time.
To disconnect a call:
1. Press the Review Connected switch until the connected
call identifier to be disconnected is displayed in reverse
text connected calls list.
2. Press the Disconnect switch:

Call is removed from the calls connected list.


Call is placed on the calls pending list.

3. When the firefighter hangs up the remote phone, the call


is removed from the calls pending list.
4. After hanging up the master handset at the 3-FTCU, all
connected calls are transferred to the calls pending list. If
the remote phones are not hung up within 20 seconds, the
call-in buzzer sounds again.
When paging by remote phone is desired:
1. Establish a phone connection with the remote phone from
which the paging will originate.
2. Set up the areas to receive the page using the 3-ASU page
functions or through previously configured speaker zone
selection on a control/display panel.
3. Press the 3-ASU Phone Page switch.
4. Disconnect when the paging is completed.

EST3 Self Study Course

6.31

Emergency voice paging and audio systems

Module evaluation
This concludes Module 6 of the EST3 Self-Study Course. Return
to the objectives stated at the beginning of this module. Study
them carefully to ensure you are comfortable with each
objective. If not, return to that section and review it. When you
are satisfied, take the EST3 Module 6 Exam.

6.32

EST3 Self Study Course

Module 7

EST3 supplementary components

Summary

This module introduces you to supplementary components that


support EST3 Network applications.
Content
Introduction to module 7 7.2
Key items 7.3
Objectives 7.4
EST3 ancillary modules 7.5
3-LDSM 7.5
3-LRMF 7.7
3-OPS off-premises notification signaling module 7.8
3-MODCOM, 3-MODCOMP modem communicator module
7.13
3-SAC security access control module 7.21
CRC and CRCXM card reader controller 7.25
KPDISP keypad display module 7.34
Remote annunciator cabinets 7.38
Envoy series graphic annunciator 7.43
CDR-3 zone coder 7.46
EST3 compatible printers 7.48
Module evaluation 7.50

EST3 Self Study Course

7.1

EST3 supplementary components

Introduction to module 7
You have now learned all the major components of the EST3
system. As you have seen, the majority of these components
are modular in design to facilitate ease of installation. In
addition, you have studied the advanced audio and firefighter
telephone systems specifically designed for the EST3 product
line.
In this module you will be introduced to the supplementary
components available for the EST3 system. These include the
off-premises notification module, printers, ancillary modules,
zone coders, graphic annunciators and remote annunciators.
This is the final lesson in the EST3 self-study course. Upon
satisfactory completion of this course, you may complete
certification for EST3 by registering for the EST3 Network
Programming and Applications Course through the GE
Training Department in Bradenton, Florida.
Associated study

Use the following technical reference manuals as associated


study material for this module:
EST3 Installation and Service Manual (P/N 270380)

7.2

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

Key items
Key points to look for:

3-LDSM LED display support rail module.


3-LRMF local rail module filler module (blank).
3-OPS off premises signaling module.
3-MODCOM modem communicator module.
3-SAC security access control module.
CRC card reader controller.
KPDISP keypad display module.
3-LCDANN, 3-6ANN, and 3-10ANN remote annunciator
cabinets.
Envoy series graphic annunciator.
CDR-3 zone (bell) coder.
PT1-S impact printer.

Key terms to learn:

EST3 Self Study Course

3-ANNCPU1 remote annunciator controller module.


3-ANNSM remote annunciator support module for
control/display module support.
3-EVPWR graphic annunciator power module.
3-EVDVR graphic annunciator driver module.
Three reverse polarity circuit.
Single reverse polarity circuit.
Local energy municipal box.
Contact ID.
SIA DCS.
SIA P2 (3/1).
SIA P3 (4/2).
TPA protocol.
SAC bus.
CRC Configurable input security circuits.

7.3

EST3 supplementary components

Objectives
Upon completion of this module you will be able to:

1. Identify the various EST3 supplementary components.


2. Describe the features and function of each supplementary
component.
3. Install each supplementary component.
4. Describe the operational and configuration aspects of the
remote annunciator cabinets.
5. Describe equipment and programming requirements for
graphic annunciator applications.
6. Describe the operational and programming aspects of the
3-MODCOM.
7. Describe the operational and programming aspects of the
3-SAC, CRC and KPDISP.
8. Describe the operational and configuration requirements
and aspects the CDR-3 zone coder.
9. Describe the operational and configuration aspects the
compatible PT1-S impact printer.

7.4

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

EST3 ancillary modules


3-LDSM
Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets:

3-LDSM LED Display Support Local


Module
P/N 270485

Rail

The 3-LDSM is a local rail module specifically designed to


support the EST3 control/display modules. It is used when
there are empty slots available and not enough other local rail
modules within a panel to support the number of
control/displays modules desired.

Back View
Figure 7-1: 3-LDSM LED display support local rail module
Installed on the rail assembly, the 3-LDSM provides the hinged
standoffs and connector for mounting any of the EST3
control/display modules. This module provides the logic
required by the supported control/display modules to
communicate over the rail.

EST3 Self Study Course

7.5

EST3 supplementary components

TX
RX

P1

J1

P2

BACK

FRONT

Figure 7-2: 3-LDSM LED display support module front and


back views

7.6

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

3-LRMF
The 3-LRMF Local Rail Filler Module supports a blank plate
that fills empty slots on the rails. Additionally, the 3-LRMF
presents a uniform appearance when used with the
windowed door, lobby enclosures (3-CAB5, 3-CAB7, 3-CAB14
and 3-CAB21). This module helps reduce the entry of foreign
objects into the cabinet for both the lobby and remote
enclosures.

Blank
Cover
Plate

P2

BACK

FRONT

Figure 7-3: 3-LRMF Local Rail Filler module front and back
views with blank cover door

EST3 Self Study Course

7.7

EST3 supplementary components

3-OPS off-premises notification signaling module


Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 6: Power
up and testing:
3-OPS Off-premises signaling module.
Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets:

3-OPS Off Premises Signal Module

P/N 270494

The 3-OPS Off-Premises Signaling module is a local rail


module that provides reverse polarity circuits for off premises
notification of alarm, supervisory, and trouble conditions. The
module has three configurations. A descriptions or each
configuration follow.

Figure 7-4: 3-OPS off premises signaling module back view

7.8

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

3
TX
RX

P1

J1

JP1

JP1 Settings

System Normal
Contact
Configuration

2 and 3

Closed

2 and 2

Open

P2

BACK

FRONT
Figure 7-5: 3-OPS off-premises signaling local rail module
front and back views with jumper settings

EST3 Self Study Course

7.9

EST3 supplementary components

Three reverse polarity circuit configuration


The 3-OPS can be configured in three ways. The first
configuration provides three independent reverse polarity
circuits. As shown in Figure 7-6, the reverse polarity circuit
configuration transmits alarm, supervisory, and trouble
conditions within the EST3 network to a compatible receiver.

3-OPS
Off-Premise
Signaling
Module

TB 1

Trouble relay is
terminals 1 and 2
Dedicated line to
reverse polarity
ALARM receiver
Dedicated line to
reverse polarity
TROUBLE receiver
Dedicated line to
reverse polarity
SUPERVISORY receiver

Figure 7-6: 3-OPS Modules three reverse-polarity circuit


configuration
The existence of an alarm condition within the EST3 network
causes the alarm circuit to reverse polarity in the first
configuration. This notifies personnel at the receiver site that
an alarm condition exists on the protected premises. The
same thing happens in the event of a supervisory or trouble
condition in the EST3 network. Loss of circuit continuity
indicates a circuit trouble on the panel. The trouble relay also
activates in the event of a trouble.
As you look at Figure 7-6, bear in mind that there are some
points that apply to all three circuits:

7.10

Polarity is shown in normal state.


Maximum line resistance is 1.5 k.
Current range is 2.6 mA to 9.5 mA.

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

Single reverse polarity circuit configuration


The second configuration is the single circuit off-premises
alarm notification shown in Figure 7-7.

3-OPS
Off-Premise
Signaling
Module

TB 1
10

Jumper JP 1
in position 1 and 2

Dedicated line to
reverse polarity
ALARM receiver

Figure 7-7: Single reverse polarity circuit configuration


As shown in Figure 7-7, only the alarm circuit is being used
and is run through the trouble relay. In this case, an alarm
causes the circuit to reverse polarity. Panel trouble conditions
are indicated by a loss of circuit continuity. This occurs
because the trouble relay activates, opening the circuit, in the
event of a panel trouble. Some other important points about
this configuration are:

EST3 Self Study Course

JP1 jumper must be in positions 1 and 2.


Use only the alarm circuit in this configuration.
Polarity is shown in normal state.
Maximum line resistance: 1.5 k.
Current range: 2.6 mA to 9.5 mA.

7.11

EST3 supplementary components

Local energy municipal box configuration


The third configuration is shown in Figure 7-8. In this case, the
3-OPS is set up to support a local energy municipal box.

3-OPS
Off-Premise
Signaling
Module

10

TB 1
Trouble relay is
terminals 1 and 2
+

Master Box

Municipal Circuit

Figure 7-8: Local energy municipal configuration


In this configuration, the trouble relay is a configurable NO/NC
dry-contact relay. Configuration is accomplished through the
J1 jumpers located on the front of the 3-OPS module.
Some notes about the configuration in Figure 7-8:

250 mA into a 14.5 trip coil.


Circuit is supervised for opens and is not power-limited.
Polarity is shown in normal state.
Trouble relay will activate on system trouble.

The J1 jumper settings for the trouble relay are:

Normally open: jumper in 2 and 3.

Normally closed: jumper in 1 and 2 required for single


circuit alarm configuration.

Always open: remove jumper entirely.

A 15 K ohm EOL resistor is required across TB1 terminals 3


and 4 when the 3-OPS is configured for Local Energy
Municipal Box and not wired to a municipal circuit.
The 3-OPS module also has hinged standoffs to support a
control/display module.

7.12

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

3-MODCOM, 3-MODCOMP modem communicator module


Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 2:
Security applications:
3-MODCOM modem communicator module.
Multiple 3-MODCOM modules.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 5:

Installation:
3-MODCOM modem communicator module.
Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets::

3-MODCOM, 3-MODCOMP modem Communicator Module


P/N 387476.

The 3-MODCOM and 3-MODCOMP require a separate


certification from the EST3 Self-Study course you are currently
taking. EST3 and 3-MODCOM(P) certification are required
prerequisites to the factory based, EST3 Synergy Enabled
Certification course (P/N 3100330). 3-MODCOM(P) certification
may be obtained by taking the EST3 Synergy Enabled 3MODCOM self-study course (P/N 3100340). Go to our course
catalog at the GE Security WEB site or contact GE Security
Training for details.

Figure 7-9: 3-MODCOM Modem Communicator LRM


with Control/LED Display module

EST3 Self Study Course

7.13

EST3 supplementary components

The 3-MODCOM and 3-MODCOMP Modem Communicators


incorporate modem and dialer functions into the integrated
EST3 system architecture. These EST3 modules are Local Rail
Modules (LRMs) that employ the snap-fit technology used for
the other EST3 LRMs. These 3-MODCOM LRMs easily install on
the chassis rail slots in the EST3 cabinet enclosures.
The integrated EST3 system architecture employs the 3MODCOM(P) LRMs as:
A modem to download and maintain Access Control and
Keypad Display data into the integrated EST3 system.
A dialer to report Fire, Security and Access Control
premises events to a Central Station monitoring service
and/or a pager.
As a modem, the 3-MODCOM(P) enables the downloading of
information (such as, access control and keypad display
applications data) into the integrated EST3 system from a
remote site (e.g. from an end-users PC).
As a dialer, the 3-MODCOM(P) sends alarm, supervisory and
trouble information to a remote site (e.g. Central Monitoring
Station) using one or two phone lines. This information can be
reported in a dual or split format.
The 3-MODCOMP Modem Communicator provides the same
modem/dialer functions as the 3-MODCOM with the addition
of also sending information to individually predefined pagers
or cell phones.
Both the 3-MODCOM and 3-MODCOMP are standard type,
single-slot LRMs, which support mounting any of the four EST3
Control/LED display modules as shown in Figure 7-9.
These 3-MODCOM or 3-MODCOMP is shipped with two 7 foot,
8-position flat telephone cables with an 8-position modular
plug on both ends (P/N 3601377). Line supervision is
configurable for both MODCOM phone lines, where line
supervision may be enabled or disabled for each phone line.
One end of each cable plugs directly into the two jacks at the
top of the MODCOM (shown in Figure 7-10 and Figure 7-11).
The other end of each cable plugs directly into a
corresponding RJ31X or RJ38X telephone jack, which is
obtained locally and wired to a switched telephone network.
In Canada use CA31A or CA38A telephone jacks.

7.14

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

Two 8-position modular phone plugs

J1 Control/LED
display panel
ribbon cable
connection
Ds1 and Ds2
LEDs annunciate
line ringing and
data exchange

Back View

Front View

Figure 7-10: 3-MODCOM Modem Communicator LRM front


and back views

EST3 Self Study Course

7.15

EST3 supplementary components

Surge
Protector

TIP
(Green)

Phone
Line 1

RJ31X 8-pin
Modular Connector

Phone
Line 2
(Wired
same as
Phone
Line 1)

Yellow

5
6

RJ31X 8-pin
Modular Connector

5
6

Black

Premises
Phones

Supplied 7-foot, 8-position


flat telephone phone
cables (P/N 3601377)
J20

J21

J20 and J21 positions


are based on viewing
the MODCOM module
from the front

Figure 7-11: Typical MODCOM interconnection using RJ31X


connectors
CAUTION: Failure to use an RJ31X or RJ38X jack violates FCC
and NFPA regulations. A telephone connected directly to an
incoming phone line can cause TELCO trouble and can
possibly prevent the dialer from connecting to the Central
Monitoring Station during an emergency.
These jacks must be installed within 5 feet of the cabinet that
houses the MODCOM. Note that each MODCOM phone line
has an LED to annunciate line ringing and data exchange.
Both MODCOM modules are compatible with one/two loop
start line on public switched telephone network, with pulse or
touch-tone (DTMF) dialing. Both MODCOM modules have an
onboard Bell 103 and V.32 bis compliant, 14.4K-baud modem.

7.16

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

These MODCOM modules can be configured to detect and


answer:
Any Ring.
Normal Ring.
Long-Long Distinct Ring.
Short-Long-Short Distinct Ring.
Short-Short Long Distinct Ring.
Only MODCOM phone line 1 (J 20 left plug viewed from front)
contains a ring detection circuit and can be used to receive
incoming calls.
These 3-MODCOM and 3-MODCOMP modules are not plugand-play. They are easily configurable and programmable
using the 3-SDU to meet a variety of modem and dialer
applications. You can configure and program either MODCOM
for the following applications:
1-Line Dialer.
2-Line Dialer.
Modem.
Modem with 1-Line Dialer.
Modem with 2-Line Dialer.
Both the 3-MODCOM and 3-MODCOMP support the following
transmission protocols:
Contact ID, which consists of numeric codes with several
optional parameters, such as:
[EventCode][Partition][DeviceNumber][User]

SIA DCS, which consists of ASCII Text codes with several


optional parameters, such as:
[Date][Time][UserID][AlarmCode][Device][User][Partition]

SIA P2 (20 pulses/round 3/1), which consists of numeric


codes of four digits, containing a 3-digit account and a 1-digit
event code:
[EventCode]

SIA P3 (4/2 double round), which consists of4-digit account


and a 2-digit numeric event codes:
[EventCode]

EST3 Self Study Course

7.17

EST3 supplementary components

The 3-MODCOMP also supports Telelocator Alphanumeric


Protocol (TAP) for pager and cell phone applications. TAP
consists of two fields of up to 59 characters separated by a
carriage return (CR):
[PagerID] CR [ASCCI Text Message]

where the message is generally the event type and device


location within the protected facility.
Note: In all cases, the Account Code would be part of the
transmission to the Central Monitoring Station or Pager
Service.
In addition to its role as a dialer, performing status
transmissions to a Central Monitoring Station, the dialer
provides a modem, which can receive application data from
remote PCs. This mode enables you to download keypad
display and access control application data into the
integrated EST3 system. The MODCOM receives data from the
remote source over the phone lines and transfers it to the 3CPU1 or 3-CPU3. The 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 then distributes the
appropriate data to the Card Reader Controller and Keypad
Display modules via the 3-SAC module and SAC bus of the
EST3 cabinet you are connected to and over the EST3 Network
Data Riser to other nodes with 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 and 3-SAC
module configurations.
Figure 7-11 shows a 3-MODCOM functional block diagram
when installed into an EST3 system. This drawing may aid in
your understanding of the MODCOM operating capabilities.
The MODCOM microprocessor handles all handshaking and
data transfers over the rail to and from the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3.
This microprocessor contains static and flash RAM and
provides the platform for the MODCOM microcode and
database applications software.
The analog Interface circuit enables transmit and receive
operations at 14.4K baud.
The Digital Signal Processor logic handles or manages the
MODCOM telecommunication functions. This logic controls
the receiver and transmitter amplifiers, switches between the
phone lines, detects incoming calls on Phone Line 1 (J20) and
establishes the protocol and parameters for MODCOM
operations.

7.18

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

3-CPU1
or
3-CPU3
Class A
Return

RS-485
Rail

Phone Line 1 (J20)


Voltage, Current and
Ring Detection
with Line Seize Relay

RX
AMP

8-Position Phone Jack

Phone Line 2 (J21)


Voltage and Current
Detection
with Line Seize Relay
8-Position Phone Jack

Hook Switch
and
Gyrator Ckt.

Line
XFORMER
TX
AMP

3-CPU1
or
3-CPU3

Network Data Riser


to
other Nodes
3-CPU1
or
3-CPU3

3-LCD

MicroProcessor,
Digital Signal Processor,
14.4K Baud Analog Interface Ckt.
and
Static and Flash RAM
3-SAC

3-KPDISP

SAC Bus
CRC

Figure 7-12: 3-MODCOM and 3-MODCOMP Functional Block


Diagram
The 3-MODCOM is programmable and can support up to 255
premise accounts communicating with up to 80 receivers
(Central Monitoring Stations) in any of the four protocols. Each
receiver would be configured to support a dedicated protocol.
In addition to these four protocols the 3-MODCOMP can
communicate with pagers or cell phones via the TAP protocol.
Each of the MODCOM phone line circuits contains a line seize
relay which cuts off any ongoing call and disconnects the line
from any telephone. Each phone line circuit contains a < 10V
voltage detection circuit to determine loss of the phone line
during on-hook periods. Each phone line circuit also contains
a <10 mA current detection circuit to determine loss of the
phone line during off-hook periods.
Note: Only Phone Line 1 (J20) has a ring detection circuit to
detect incoming calls, which initiate a connection.
Up to 10 MODCOM modules can be installed within a
networked EST3 system. These can be in a single node or
distributed throughout the network nodes. Multiple
MODCOMs are used to provide redundant communications
with the Central Station, as a backup for critical
communications links and/or to provide dedicated security
transmission hardware.

EST3 Self Study Course

7.19

EST3 supplementary components

When using multiple MODCOMs for redundant


communications both are configured and programmed to
transmit the same messages to different receivers at a
Central Monitoring Station or to different receivers at different
Central Monitoring Station locations.
MODCOM modules can be configured and programmed to
backup one another. In this way, Central Monitoring Station
or paging (TAP) communications is guaranteed. Using backup
configured MODCOM modules enables you to create a
dynamic failover operation. This means that when a
communication failure or trouble occurs on one of the
MODCOMs, the EST3 system switches from accounts on the
MODCOM in trouble to matching accounts on its backup
MODCOM.
A dedicated Central Monitoring Station dialer MODCOM can
be configured and programmed in multiple tenant integrated
system applications where there may be a high volume of
Access Control and Keypad Display modem traffic. In this
case, the first MODCOM may be used for this modem
communications (Access Control and Keypad Display Data)
and the second may be used for Central Station dialer
communications.

7.20

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

3-SAC security access control module


Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 2:
Security applications:
3-SAC Security Access Control module.
SAC bus.
Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 3: Access

control applications:
3-SAC Security Access Control module.
SAC bus.

Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 5:


Installation:
3-SAC Security Access Control module.
Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets::

3-SAC Security Access Control module

P/N 387624..

The 3-SAC require a separate certification from the EST3 SelfStudy course you are currently taking. 3-SAC certification is
obtained from the factory based, EST3 Synergy Enabled
Certification course (P/N 3100330). Go to our course catalog
at the GE Security WEB site or contact GE Security Training for
details.
TB1 unused

TB2 RS-484
SAC Bus
Connector
Front View

Back View

Figure 7-13: 3-SAC security access control LRM front and back
views

EST3 Self Study Course

7.21

EST3 supplementary components

The 3-SAC Security Access Control module is high speed RS485 bus controller that integrates the Card Reader Controllers
(CRC) and the Keypad Displays (KPDISP) into the integrated
EST3 System Architecture.
The 3-SAC is single-slot Local Rail Module that easily installs
into an expansion slot on an EST3 rail assembly. This module
supports mounting one of the four optional Control/LED
display modules.
This 3-SAC module can be configured for either a Class A or
Class B 3-SAC bus configuration.
As shown in Figure 7-14, when configured for Class A
operation, each 3-SAC LRM can support up to a total of 30
card reader controllers (CRCs) and/or keypad displays
(KPDISPs).

3-SAC
SAC Bus SAC Bus

A A B B

Up to 30 devices
CRC

KPDISP

CRC

Figure 7-14: 3-SAC Class A bus wiring


As shown in Figure 7-15, when configured for Class B
operation, each 3-SAC LRM can support up to a total of 62
CRCs and/or KPDISPs, in two loops of 31 devices each.

7.22

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

3-SAC
SAC Bus SAC Bus

A A B B

Up to 31 devices
CRC

KPDISP

CRC

120 ohm EOL


Resistor
CRC

KPDISP

CRC

120 ohm EOL


Resistor

Up to 31 devices
Figure 7-15: 3-SAC Class B bus wiring
Each EST3 Cabinet (node) within an integrated system may
contain up to two 3-SAC LRMs. However, the total number of
SAC devices within an EST3 system cannot exceed 4,000.
Each 3-SAC bus may be up to 4,000 feet long (14 to 22 AWG
wire), with supervised, power limited wiring.
Each 3-SAC bus communications baud rate is configurable so
you can establish optimal performance. The selectable baud
rates are:
14.4 K baud.
19.2 K baud.
28.8 K baud.
56.7 K baud (default).
76.8 K baud.
115.2 K baud.
As shown in Figure 7-16, in dialer applications, an event at a
device on the 3-SAC bus is sent to the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 for
processing via the 3-SAC LRM and then the appropriate event
message is sent to the Central Monitoring Station via the 3MODCOM.

EST3 Self Study Course

7.23

EST3 supplementary components

CRC

TELCO

KPDISP

CRC

RSRS-485 33-SAC Data Bus

3
3
-M
M
O
O
D
D
C
C
O
O
M
M

3
S
A
C

RSRS-485 Chassis Rail Data Bus

3
C
P
U

3
C
P
U

(1 or 3)

(1 or 3)
Network Data Riser

Figure 7-16: 3-SAC integrated system event processing


Other system events are also processed by the 3-CPU1 or 3CPU3 and subsequently sent to the Central Monitoring Station
via the 3-MODCOM. The event messaging is determined
through the 3-SDU configuration and programming process.
The CRC and Keypad Display database applications may be
downloaded via the 3-MODCOM modem or the 3-CPU1 or 3CPU3 RJ11 connector.

7.24

EST3 Self Study Course

3
C
P
U

(1 or 3)

EST3 supplementary components

CRC and CRCXM card reader controller module


Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 3: Access
Control applications:
CRC card reader controller.
CRC options.
Output circuit.
Card reader.
Lock.
Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets::

CRC and CRCXM card Reader controller


CRCRL CRC accessory relay

P/N 387625.
P/N 3100294.

The CRC and CRCXM require a separate certification from the


EST3 Self-Study course you are currently taking. CRC and
CRCXM certification is obtained from the factory based, EST3
Synergy Enabled Certification course (P/N 3100330). Go to
our course catalog at the GE Security WEB site or contact GE
Security Training for details.
The CRC and CRCXM card reader controller modules perform
access control processing within the EST3 integrated system.
The CRC and CRCXM Card Reader Controllers interface the
card readers for a protected facility's doors into the integrated
EST3 System and control the doors. The CRC controller and
Card Reader combination allows only individuals with a valid
code (PIN number) to gain access to the protected premises.

EST

Figure 7-17: CRC card reader controller and associated card


reader

EST3 Self Study Course

7.25

EST3 supplementary components

The CRC controller performs all access control processing


decisions, stores a complete database and grants or denies
access without external communications.
The CRC and CRCXM card reader controller accommodates
two card readers (inside and outside) and associated 12 Vdc
locks (electric strike or maglock) for one door.
Each CRC controller has a maximum capacity of 8,000
cardholders, while the CRCXM controller has a maximum
capacity of 36,000 cardholders. Both the CRC and CRCXM
controllers can handle up to 1,200 Schedules, Holidays and
Access Levels, supporting multiple companies. Each CRC or
CRCXM has a maximum capacity of 255 Schedules, Holidays
and Access Levels per company. Each CRC controller can
store an event history of up to a maximum of 5,000 events,
while the CRCXM can store up to 20,000 events.
Both the CRC and CRCXM controllers have two input circuits
that may be custom configured for monitor or security
applications.
Both controllers have provisions for jumper selectable 24 Vdc
power from the EST3 system or external supply, or 16.5 Vac
power from an external supply. Both provide power for their
associated card reader. Both controllers have provisions for
an internal 12 Vdc, 1.2 AH battery, which is purchased
separately.
Both the CRC and CRCXM controllers provide a set of custom
configurable NO/NC dry contact connections for automatic
door opener (default), fan or damper control, and door holder
control.
Both controllers have an optional internal sounder (CRCSND),
which mounts in its cover and can operate or sound when the
door is opened without a request or to indicate that the door
has been left open.

Figure 7-18: Optional CRCSND Sounder

7.26

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

Both controllers provide a super degrade mode which


maintains its entire database, options and schedules when
communications with the 3-SAC and/or 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 are
lost.
Both the CRC and CRCXM controllers can be configured to
automatically disarm the door being controlled. Both
controllers provide varying degrees of access, which are
configurable.
The proximity cards and keys used in EST3 integrated
applications are listed with the equipment and each comes
pre-coded and ready to use. Both controllers store the entire
code (site code plus individuals code) and existing customer
cards for a given compatible card reader may be used in
retrofit facilities.
Both controllers support a wide variety of industry standard
Wiegand card reader technologies:
Proximity.
Wiegand pin.
Magnetic Strip.
Barcode.
Keypad.
Smart Card.
Biometric.
Compatible readers, from a variety of venders, are supported:
GE Security
HID
Motorola Indala
Dorado
Sensor Engineering
Keri
Radio Key
As shown in Figure 7-19, the CRC and CRCXM modules have a
Tamper Switch and provisions for a 1.2 AH backup battery.
The compatible backup battery types are listed in the CRC
Technical Reference Manual (P/N 3100132).

EST3 Self Study Course

7.27

EST3 supplementary components


CRC Terminal Strip Connector
Battery
Connection

Tamper
Switch

Figure 7-19:CRC with cove off


As shown in Figure 7-20, the CRC and CRCXM modules may be
powered by 16.5 Vac or 24 Vdc. Also note that the types of
source power and lock operation are jumper selectable.

Continuous Power
for MAG LOCK

Intermittent Power
for STRIKE LOCK

JP1 - OUTPUT LOAD


JP2 - INPUT SOURCE

16.5 Vac Power


from Transformer

16.5 VAC IN
16.5 VAC IN

24 Vdc Power
from panel
or external source

1
2

+24 VDC OUT

-24 VDC IN

-24 VDC OUT

From
Power Source
or
previous CRC
or KPDISP

+24 VDC IN

TB2

To next CRC
or KPDISP

Figure 7-20:CRC power connections and jumper selections

7.28

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

As shown in Figure 7-21, TB1 terminals 5 and 6 deliver


switched power to the locks. Where:
Electric Strike - powered to open door.

Lock Power
Lock Ground

Mag Lock - power removed to open door.

To
Electric Strike
or
Mag Lock

Figure 7-21:CRC lock power connections


As shown in Figure 7-22, the CRC also has a configurable
onboard Form C relay (TB1 - terminals 7, 8 and 9), which
provides control contacts. Observe that by default it is set to
Access Door Motor Control within the 3-SDU.

EST3 Self Study Course

7.29

7
7

Common
Normally Closed

Normally Open

EST3 supplementary components

8
8

9
9

Configurable Form C Relay


dry contacts for control of
Fire Alarm devices,
Fans/dampers or
handicap devices

Figure 7-22:CRC configurable Form C relay connections


As shown in Figure 7-23, TB1 terminals 10 through 16 provide
the compatible card reader connections.

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EST3 Self Study Course

Reader Power
Reader Ground
Data 0
Data 1
Red LED A
Green LED B
Sounder

EST3 supplementary components

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Figure 7-23:CRC compatible card reader connections


Figure 7-24 shows a table of some of the compatible card
reader connections to the CRC.

Manufacturer

Terminal
10
Reader
Power

Terminal
11
Reader
Ground

Terminal
12
Data 0

Terminal
13
Data 1

Terminal
14
Red LED

Terminal
15
Green LED

Terminal
16
Sounder

GE Security
HID
Motorola Indala
Dorado
Sensor Engineering
Keri
Radio Key

Red
Red
Red
Red
Red
Red
Red

Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black
Black

Green
Green
Green
Green
Green
Green
Green

White
White
White
White
White
White
White

Brown
Brown
Brown
Brown
Violet
Brown
Brown

Orange
Orange
------Brown
Orange
Orange

Yellow
Yellow
Blue
Yellow
Blue
Blue
Blue

Figure 7-24:CRC compatible card reader terminal connections

EST3 Self Study Course

7.31

EST3 supplementary components

SAC Bus from


3-SAC or
previous CRC
or KPDISP

-RS-485 IN
-RS-485 OUT

+RS-485 OUT

+RS-485 IN

Figure 7-25 shows the TB1 terminals 17 through 20, which


provide the CRCs SAC Bus connections.

17 18 19 20

SAC Bus to 3-SAC


Class A return,
to next CRC or KPDISP,
or 120 ohm EOL
if last device on bus

Figure 7-25:CRC SAC bus connections


As shown in Figure 7-26, TB1 terminals 21 through 23 provide
configurable input circuits, which may be used for door
contacts, motion detectors, Request-To-Exit buttons and
security devices (illustrated in Figure 7-27).

7.32

EST3 Self Study Course

Circuit 2 IN
Common Circuit Ground
Circuit 1 IN

EST3 supplementary components

21 22
21
22 23
23

47 K ohm EOL
47 K ohm EOL

Figure 7-26:CRC configurable input circuit connections

Configurable Application

Configurable Personality

Figure 7-27:CRC input circuit configurable applications and


personalities

EST3 Self Study Course

7.33

EST3 supplementary components

KPDISP keypad display module


Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 2:
Security applications:
KPDISP keypad display.
KDC keypad display configuration program.
ACDB/KDC operation.
Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets::

KPDISP keypad display

P/N 3100054.

The KPDISP keypad display requires a separate certification


from the EST3 Self-Study course you are currently taking.
KPDISP certification is obtained from the factory based, EST3
Synergy Enabled Certification course (P/N 3100330). Go to
our course catalog at the GE Security WEB site or contact GE
Security Training for details.
The KPDISP Keypad Display is a control and display module
used for security and fire applications. Although primarily
designed for the security market, the KPDISP is popular for fire
only applications. It can be used in Life Safety Fire
applications, in the US Market Local Mode, where a global
reset is acceptable and it offer low cost remote annunciation
of fire events.
Note: This module does not acknowledge individual alarm
events or their restoration as required in the US Market
Proprietary Mode.

Figure 7-28:KPDISP Keypad Display

7.34

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EST3 supplementary components

The KPDISP Keypad Display consists of an 8-line by 21character backlit LCD display, a backlit telephone style
keypad, a variable tone sounder and an internal processor.
The KPDISP has a removable hinged cover with space for
operation instructions.
The KPDISP supports up to two displayed languages, which
are selected in the 3-SDU from those available for the EST3.
The KPDISP Display access requires a password, enabling the
qualified user to:
Arm or disarm security partitions.
Review off-normal point events.
Bypass or include points.
Perform life safety functions
The user simply interacts with KPDISP menu driven displays to
view event information, status, or to choose commands.
Menu commands are custom configurable, within the 3-SDU,
by the system programmer on a user-by-user basis. Where
each user can be granted or denied access to any configured
partition controlled by the KPDISP.
The KPDISP module also contains a variable-tone sounder.
This sounder is programmed, using the 3-SDU, to emit tones
of a specific frequency and duration, providing audible
feedback to the user.
KPDISP user privileges are also configured by the 3-SDU and
also by the KPDICP-CF keypad display configuration software
or the ACDB access control database software. The KPDISPCF software is available at the GE Security web site at no
additional cost. The four ACDB database software versions
are purchased separately for fully integrated fire, security and
access control applications and then given to the user to
support his or her day-to-day operations.
Access to the KPDISP keypad is password protected with a
configurable 7-integer password. Passwords are configured
and assigned on a user-by-user basis by the KPDICP-CF
keypad display configuration software or the ACDB access
control database software.
The KPDISP keypad is shipped with a service or construction
password of 0000000. This service password is removed
when desired passwords are downloaded into the KPDISP
from the KPDISP-CF or ACDB. The service password provides
limited control, enabling you to view events and silence the
panel.

EST3 Self Study Course

7.35

EST3 supplementary components

Figure 7-29:KPDISP Keypad Display opened view

-24 Vdc IN
-24 Vdc OUT
+24 Vdc IN
+24 Vdc OUT

Unlike the CRC, the KPDISP Keypad Display wiring is simply a


matter of its 24 VDC riser and its RS-485 SAC bus.

From
From
Power
Source or
previous CRC
or KPDISP

To next CRC
or KPDISP

Figure 7-30:KPDISP Keypad Display 24 Vdc riser wiring

7.36

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EST3 supplementary components

+ SAC Bus IN
+ SAC Bus OUT
- SAC Bus IN
- SAC Bus OUT

RS-485 SAC Bus


from 3-SAC,
previous CRC
or KPDISP

RS-485 SAC Bus


to next CRC,
KPDISP, 3-SAC
Class A return
or 120 ohm EOL,
if last device
and Class B

Figure 7-31:KPDISP Keypad Display RS-485 3-SAC Bus wiring

EST3 Self Study Course

7.37

EST3 supplementary components

Remote annunciator cabinets


Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets::

3ANNCPU1 Annunciator Controller module


P/N 387464
3ANNSM Annunciator Support module
P/N 387312
3-RLCM/D, 3-6ANN/D and 3-10AMM/D Remote
Annunciator Cabinet Doors
P/N 387310
3-RLCM/D-E, 3-6ANN/D-E and 3-10AMM/D-E Remote
Annunciator Cabinet Doors
P/N 387553
6ANN/B(-S) and 10ANN/B(-S) Remote
Annunciator Cabinet Wallboxes
P/N 387586

There are three basic types of remote annunciator panels:

3-LCDANN - provides front panel control functions only.

3-6ANN (/B or /B-S) - provides front panel control


functions and four optional custom programmable
control/display module positions.

3-10ANN (/B or /B-S) - provides front panel control


functions and eight optional custom programmable
control/display module positions.

These three remote annunciators are shown in Figures 7-32


and 7-33. Each remote annunciator panel resides on the EST3
network without the need for a PC interface panel controller
and has the same functionality as any EST3 cabinet node.
Each remote annunciator operates on the same 3-RS485
network wiring and provides the same network
control/message routing as any other EST3 node.
3-10ANN

3-6ANN

3-LCDANN

Figure 7-32: EST3 remote annunciators

7.38

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EST3 supplementary components

3-LCDANN

3-6ANN

3-10ANN

Figure 7-33: EST3 remote annunciators drawing


As you can see in Figures 7-32 and 7-33, each of these remote
annunciators contains a 3-LCD panel mounted on a 3ANNCPU1. The 3-LCD panel features and operations are the
same as those mounted on the 3-CPU1 and 3-CPU3 in
conventional cabinets as described in self-study Module 2 of
this self-study course.
There are some differences between the conventional 3-CPU1
and 3-CPU3 and the remote annunciators 3-ANNCPU1. First,
the 3-RS485 feature is not optional to the 3-ANNCPU1, since it
is only used in network systems where a conventional cabinet
with 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 exists. The RS-485 is installed on the 3ANNCPU1 daughter board along with 24 Vdc distribution.
Secondly, the remote annunciator enclosure does not have an
on-board power supply and requires that 24 Vdc power be
wired directly to it from an external source. The third
difference is that there is no rail assembly within the remote
annunciator enclosure.

EST3 Self Study Course

7.39

EST3 supplementary components

Figure 7-34 shows a back view of the 3-6ANN remote


annunciator inner door assembly with 3-ANNCPU1 and four
3-ANNSM modules installed.
3-ANNSM modules

TX RX

TX RX

TX RX

TX RX

RX TX

RX TX

RX TX

RX TX

TB1

3-ANNCPU1 with
piggyback
daughter card
(back view)

Inner door
assembly

Interconnecting ribbon cables


provide rail type interface

Figure 7-34: 6-ANN remote annunciator, inner door assembly


As shown above, the 3-ANNCPU1s daughter card assembly
provides:

The RS485 interface for the remote annunciator.


The network data riser and power connections through
TB1.
The distribution of24 Vdc power and data through the
interconnecting ribbon cables.

The 3-ANNCPU1 module functions as the local bus master,


supervising all bus traffic within the remote annunciator
cabinet. Each optional control/display module added to this
enclosure requires a 3-ANNSM support module. These support
modules provide for the ribbon cable connections for the local
bus. This module is basically the same as the 3-LDSM,
providing a base hardware layer slot location for the operator
layer panels.

7.40

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

The TB 1 connections are shown in Figure 7-35, where:

Network data riser A - terminals 7 and 8.


Network data riser B - terminals 9 and 10.
Earth ground - terminal 1, connected to back box.
Externally supplied 24 Vdc power - terminals 2 and 3 or 4
and 5.
Ground lead
P/N 250163

NETWORK B

SPARE
NETWORK A

24 VDC

EARTH GROUND

To backbox

24 Vdc

10

Ferrite clamp
(supplied)

Figure 7-35: 3-ANNCPU1 TB 1 connections


Note: The ferrite clamp is supplied with your remote
annunciator. It should be installed around the 24 Vdc power
wiring and as close to the enclosure wall as possible.

Refer to the specification and installation sheets supplied with


you remote annunciator and related components for details
on installation and wiring.
The remote annunciator supports the four types of
control/display modules described in Module 2 of this selfstudy course:

24-LED module.
12 LED/ 12 SW module.
24 LED/12 SW module.
3 LED/3 SW x 6 module.

As shown in Figure 7-36, the assembly of the control/display


modules and support modules is a simple three-step process.
Figure 7-37 illustrates the installation of these assemblies into
the inner door assembly. Install the lower retainer bracket,
insert modules into the lower retainer bracket (starting with
the 3-ANNCPU1), install the upper retainer bracket and then
make the ribbon cable connections. Use the 3-ANNBF filler for
unused spaces.

EST3 Self Study Course

7.41

EST3 supplementary components

Insert ID label

Mount display

Connect ribbon cable

Installation

Ribbon Cable
P/N 250186
Verify all pins mate
with connector

Faceplate connector
on module
Connector pins on
rear of faceplate

Figure 7-36: Mounting the LED/switch display

3-ANNSM

3-ANNCPU

4
TX R X

TX R X

TX R X

TX R X

RX TX

RX TX

RX TX

RX TX

2
1

Inner door

Lower module retainer bracket

3-ANNSM or 3-ANNCPU module


and operator layer panel

Upper module retainer bracket

Supplied retainer bracket nut

Figure 7-37: Installing remote annunciator module assemblies

7.42

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

Envoy series graphic annunciator


The Envoy graphic annunciator provides the ability to display
system alarm, supervisory, trouble, or monitor status in an
easy to understand, graphic format using an LED configurable
matrix. The EST3 Envoy graphic annunciator is available in
three basic sizes:

EV1 - 96 LED Max. - 17.5 in x 10.5 in graphic/text


presentation area

EV2 - 160 LED Max. - 17.5 in x 15.75 in graphic/text


presentation area

EV3 - 256 LED Max. - 17.5 in x 26.25 in graphic/text


presentation area

Figure 7-38 illustrates the Envoy graphic annunciator panel


utilizing a 3-6ANN remote annunciator as the controller.

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Alarm System Ann unciator

BLDG 02

BLDG 01

BLDG 03

BLDG 04
BLDG 07

BLDG 06

BLDG 05

BLDG 08

Figure 7-38: Envoy graphic annunciator


As shown in Figure 7-39, the Envoy graphic annunciator can
be configured with just the 3-ANNCPU1 controller. In this case,
the 3-ANNCPU1 is mounted on a 3-EVPWRA assembly within
the graphic annunciator enclosure.

EST3 Self Study Course

7.43

EST3 supplementary components

24 Vdc
power riser

+
-

24 Vdc power riser to


next power module

J6

3-EVPWR
Power Module

J5

P2

P1

Download interconnection

Input
from
CPU
Output
to
drivers

J5

3-ANNCPU
Remote Annunciator CPU

TB1

P3

RS-485 network data riser from


previous panel

Output from CPU

RS-485 network data riser to next


panel

Ribbon cable Interconnection


for up to 11 3-EVDVR modules

J3
OUT

J1
IN

3-EVDVR
Driver Module

LEDS
1

8 9

LEDS
LEDS
16 17
24

SWITCHES
12

Figure 7-39: Graphic annunciator with 3-ANNCPU1


As you can see, connections between the 3-ANNCPU1
command module and the Envoy graphic annunciator are
made using the 3-EVPWR power module and the 3-EVDVR
LED switch control driver modules.
The power module distributes the 24 Vdc power,
interconnects the 3-ANNCPU1 ribbon cable bus to the driver
modules for LED switch control functions, and provides for
download from the SDU. Up to 11 driver modules drive the
graphic LEDs and switches via the three 8-pin connectors for
24 graphic LEDs and one 12-pin connector for 12 graphic
switches.

7.44

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

Figure 7-40 shows the graphic annunciator panel when


configured with a 3-6ANN remote annunciator cabinet.
24 Vdc
power riser +

+ 24 Vdc power riser to


- next power module

RS-485 network data riser


to next panel
RS-485 network data riser
from previous panel
J6

3-EVPWR
Power Module

J5

P2

P1

Input
from
CPU
Output
to
drivers

Output from 3-ANNCPU

Ribbon cable interconnection for


up to 11 3-EVDVR modules

J3
OUT

J1
IN

3-EVDVR
Driver Module

LEDS
1

LEDS
89

LEDS
16 17
24

SWITCHES
12

Figure 7-40: Graphic annunciator with 3-6ANN remote annunciator

EST3 Self Study Course

7.45

EST3 supplementary components

CDR-3 zone coder


Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 5:
Installation.
Connecting a CDR-3 Zone Coder for coded tone output.
Read: Related EST3 Installation Sheets::

CDR-3 Bell Coder

P/N 3100023

The CDR-3 zone or bell coder is used to produce a code


sequence specifying the area of incident within a facility,
thereby providing faster fire brigade response in proprietary
systems, without undue alarm to the facility occupants. Each
desired zone is assigned a code within the SDU during the
object configuration process.
The CDR-3 provides predefined coded output information in
response to off-normal responses from active zone groups.
The CDR-3 coded tone output is connected to the 3-ASU
auxiliary input in emergency voice applications.
Figure 7-41 illustrates a typical EST3 CDR-3 application where
a coded audio output is desired. In this case, coded
information is fed into the CDR-3 Coder RS-232 input from the
3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 RS-232 port that is configured for coder
operation (Port 1 in Figure 7-41). When a zone group alarm is
received, the duration relay is energized and the march-time
tone and relay start. After a four-second delay, the coded tone
output begins. This coded tone is input to the 3-ASU AUX input
and subsequently distributed over the systems audio
network. When this code sequence ends there is a twosecond delay before the duration relay deactivates.
The CDR-3 has two outputs:

Coded dry contacts.


Supervised, coded 1000 Hz audio tone.

The coded outputs may be from one to four digits and last
four rounds. Each digit can contain from one to nine pulses.
When a three-digit code is used, one of the digits may be
extended up to 15 pulses.
The CDR-3 coder assembly must be mounted on the half
footprint of a 3-CHAS7 chassis. Jumpers JP1 and JP2 enable
the configuration of the bell code and temporal relay
contacts. The eight SW1 segments let you configure the coder
operation attributes and set the baud rate.

7.46

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

Coder operation must also be setup in the 3-SDU where:

The system is configured for proprietary mode.

The primary and alternate first alarm message routes


must be set for all cabinets.

The 3-CPU1s RS-232 port must be configured for


CDR/Printer operation.

The printer parity setting must be changed from no parity


to even parity when the CDR-3 shares the port with a
printer.

3-CPU1 TB2

3-PSMON TB1

AUDIO AUDIO AUDIO AUDIO


A IN A OUT B IN B OUT R
B B
X
1

NETWORK
A A

T
X
1

R
T
X
1

C
O
M
1

R T
X X
2 2

R
T
X
2

C
O
M
2

DB25 Male Connector


Rear View
for Printer
Connected to
AUDIO A OUT
in non-network
single cabinet
systems
without
RS485 Card

JP4

JP1

TB2
UP
TB1

SW1

IOP3A
Isolator
RS 232
Card

JP2

JP3

TB3

CDR-3 Coder

10 k EOL

AUDIO DATA

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

AUX

PAGE
OUT
REMOTE MIC

47 k EOL

3-ASU TB1

10 k EOL

SW1

3 2 1

SIGA-CT1

Refer to the
CDR-3
Installation
sheets
for details on
switch and jumper
settings

Configured as
a nonlatching
input circuit
with a Monitor
device type.

TB1
SIGA DATA RISER IN

SIGA DATA RISER OUT

From 24 Vdc Power Source


To 24 Vdc NAC Circuit

Figure 7-41: Typical CDR-3 Coder application configured for coded


audio output

EST3 Self Study Course

7.47

EST3 supplementary components

EST3 compatible printers


Read: EST3 Installation and Service Manual > Chapter 5:
Installation.
Connecting the PT-1S impact printer.

The PT-1S Impact Printer, shown in Figure 7-42, is a 9-pin, dot


matrix serial printer that is compatible with EST3 systems. This
freestanding printer utilizes standard form feed paper, and
provides an 80-character width line.

LINE FORM TOP SELECT


FEED FEED SET

ALARM

POWER

PITCH

MODE
SYSTEM PRINTER
PT1-P

[CPT1SX.CDR]

Figure 7-42: PT-1S impact printer


As you read this section, please note:

Printer uses 3-RS232 serial protocol.


Printer uses 2400-baud rate*.
Prints 232 characters per second.

Note: This 2400 baud rate is recommended in the PT-1S


literature. As you will see the Installation manual
recommends a baud rate of 9600 baud. Also, the default
baud rate for the 3-RS232 port in the 3-SDU, when configured
for printer operation, is 4800 baud. Make sure you select the
baud rate that provides optimal performance for your
application.
The PT-1S printer is designed for applications that require a
hardcopy record of the network activity.
The PT-1S must be located, in the same room and within 20
feet of the 3-CPU1 or 3-CPU3 to which it is connected. Further,
the PT-1S must have a separate, uninterrupted power supply
(UPS) to meet NFPA requirements.

7.48

EST3 Self Study Course

EST3 supplementary components

PT-1S front panel controls

Line feed: advances the paper one line.

Form feed: advances paper to next page.

Top of form: sets top margin.

Pitch: adjusts print character size to 10, 12, or 17


characters per inch (recommended setting is 10 CPI).

Select switch/light: printer on line/printer off line (printer


must be off line to manually set paper at a page break).

PT-1S front panel LED indicators

Alarm: printer problem (paper out, off line).


Power: printer turned on.
Mode: print quality.

PT-1S modes

EST3 Self Study Course

NLQ: near letter quality; slowest print speed, (not


recommended).

Utility: draft quality; medium print speed (recommended


setting).

HSD: high-speed draft; fastest print speed.

7.49

EST3 supplementary components

Module evaluation
This concludes Module 7 of the EST3 Self-Study Course. Return
to the objectives stated at the beginning of this module. Study
them carefully to ensure you are comfortable with each
objective. If not, return to that section and review it. When you
are satisfied, take the EST3 Module 7 Exam.
This also concludes the EST3 self-study program. When all
exams are satisfactorily completed you are eligibility to attend
the factory-based EST3 Network Programming Course.

7.50

EST3 Self Study Course