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Idiom: under close scrutiny

Meaning: Someone or something that is under (close) scrutiny is being watched or examined
carefully. This means to study someone or something closely or thoroughly.
Example: The police are keeping the suspect under close scrutiny.
Idiom: lay it on the line
Meaning: If you speak frankly and make something very clear, you lay it on the line.
Example: The boss laid it on the line and told Jimmy that if he arrived late for work again he would
lose his job.
Idiom unmitigated disaster
Meaning: An unmitigated disaster is a complete failure or a total catastrophe.
Example: The organization of the tournament was an unmitigated disaster!
Idiom: pick or choose ones battles wisely.
Meaning: that one shouldnt fight over silly little things that are not worth fighting over; to be
clever/smart about which arguments you enter into and to save your fighting for the more important
issues in life.
Example: Any fool can criticize, complain, condemn and most fools do.
Picking your battles is impressive and fighting them fairly is
essential.
Example: As your manager I am advising you to choose your battles carefully it is not a good thing to
pick a fight with our loyal customers.

Idiom: a picture is worth a thousand words


This proverb means that images or pictures tell you much more than words do. Here is an example
of how this English idiom could be used:
1. When I looked at the photograph and saw her smiling face, I knew how happy Aya was. That
picture was worth a thousand words.
In other words, the photograph said more than any words could have expressed.

Word: Vicissitude
Meaning: a change or variation occurring in the course of something.
Idiom: beat around the bush
Someone who beats around the bush, does not feel comfortable talking about a
certain subject, talks about all kinds of other things and does not get to the point.
Here are some sample sentences using this English idiom:

1. I am not interested in what you did on the weekend. Stop beating around the
bush and answer my question.
2. Get to the point, Phil. Dont beat around the bush!
3. I knew that she had something important to tell me, but, for three hours, she just
beat around the bush.

Idiom: to be a cut above


Meaning: Something that is a cut above is superior or better than something else.
Example: The workmanship of this dress is a cut above.
Idiom: to fit like a glove
Meaning: When something fits very well or fits perfectly, it fits like a glove.
Example: Her wedding dress fit like a glove because she lost a lot of weight since
she started going to the gym.
Idiom: cut the chase
Meaning: Sometimes, for whatever reason, people get lost in details - they talk
about all kinds of things, perhaps even engage in unnecessary small talk, but they
dont get to the important issues which need to be discussed. These are people who
find it difficult to cut to the chase. The English idiom to cut to the chase means: to
talk about the important and relevant things, in other words to stop talking about
unimportant and irrelevant things. Here are two sample sentences to demonstrate
the use of this English idiom:
1.
He called me into his office and, after about 30 minutes of small talk, I had to
tell him to cut to the chase.
2.
Okay, Carl. Cut to the chase. How much money do you need?
Idiom: Accident waiting to happen
Meaning: The English idiom an accident waiting to happen refers to a foreseeable
accident or problem. In other words,a bad or dangerous situation that one can see
happening before it actually occurs. There are many things in this world that people
think are accidents waiting to happen.
Example: Her bad habit of using her cellphone while driving is an accident waiting
to happen.

Chronological order: Arranging or sequencing something according to the time that


it happened.

Example: Arrange these documents in chronological order. In order of time from the
earliest to the latest.

1.

Idiom: We are not on the same page or we are on the same page

Meaning: This is used to express a misunderstanding or miscommunication between


two people.
If people are on the same page, they have the same information and are thinking
the same way.
Example:
1. I wanted you to attend the meeting not to buy the supplies that we need for our
company event. We are not on the same page again! You misunderstood me.
2. I am happy to finally work with a person who is the same as I am we are always
on the same page when it comes to work ideas.
2.
3.
4.
Idiom: Take a French leave or French escape
Meaning: If you leave an official or social event without notifying the person who
invited you, you take French leave.
Example: Is Bill coming back for the closing speech or has he taken French leave?
Idiom: no strings attached
Example: If something is given without expecting anything in return, it is given with
"no strings attached."
Example: They will let you try the product for free with no strings attached. If you
don't like it, there is no pressure to buy it or give them anything in return.
5.

impeccable (adjective) exemplary, flawless

Example: (If your grades were as impeccable as your brothers, then you too would
receive a car for a graduation present.)
Positive expression
6.
acquiesce
say as: ak- WEE- yes
(action word) to agree without protesting

Example: Though Mr. Cooper wanted to stay outside and work in his garage, when
his wife told him that he should go inside to eat his dinner, he acquiesced to her
demands.
avarice
(n.) excessive greed
Example: The bankers avarice led him to amass an enormous personal fortune.

7.

Idiom: Signed, sealed and delivered.

Meaning: When an agreement or contract is signed, sealed and delivered, all the
legal documents are in order. All the requirements are submitted. Nothing further
needs to be done. The deal or agreement has already been completed.
Example:
1.
It is hoped that the agreement will be signed, sealed and delivered before
the end of the week.
2.
Finally the contract is signed, sealed and delivered we were able to close the
deal with them do we have a new partner in our business.
.Idiom: put your feet up
Meaning: Time to relax
Example: At last that's over now I can put my feet up for a while.
8.

Idiom: run a tight ship

Meaning: to manage a team or company in a very strict manner


Example: The manager of this restaurant chain run a tight ship
9.
Idiom: There's no smoke without fire. OR
Where there's smoke, there's fire.
Meaning: This idiom means that when people suspect something, there is normally
a good reason for the suspicion, even if there is no concrete evidence. There is
usually some truth behind every rumor.
Example: Im going to withdraw all my money from that bank. I read an article that
the bank was in financial trouble, and where there's smoke there's fire.
10.

Idiom: Add Fuel to the fire

Meaning: If you add fuel to the fire or flames, you do or say something that makes a
difficult situation even worse.

Example: He forgot their wedding anniversary, and his apologies only added fuel to
the flames.
11.

Idiom: you eat, sleep and breathe something,

Meaning: If you eat, sleep and breathe something, you are so enthusiastic and
passionate about it that you think about it constantly.
Example: He's an enthusiastic golfer; he eats, sleeps and breathes it!
Enthusiastic: Excited or energetic
12.

Idiom: Tone it down a notch.

Meaning: calm down or lower your voice.


Example: Your voice is too loud specially while you are using your phone I cannot
focus on my work please tone it down a notch.
Notch: Higher or lower level
Turn it UP a notch: higher level
Turn it DOWN a notch: lower level
You can also use this expression when it comes to the volume of the television or
radio
13.

Best foot forward: To be really impressive or to make a good impression.

Example: this is my first time to meet my boss so I will put my best foot forward.
14.
Idiom: Birds of the same feathers flock together
Meaning: People of the same type seem to attract one another and gather together.
Example: I saw the boy who stole my bag with that gang of trouble makers last
night - well, birds of a feather flock together, they say.
Idiom: All talk no action
Meaning: The English expression to be all talk and no action is used to describe
people who only talk about doing things but never really do them. The following
examples show how this idiom can be used:
1. Bill is always talking about dieting, but, in the end, he is all talk and no action.
2. The banks have talked about changing how they do business, but are they all talk
and no action?
3. Are our politicians all talk and no action?

Idiom: Save for the rainy days


Meaning: To save money for a time when it might be needed for an emergency.
Example: Always save money for the rainy days you will never know what kind of
emergency might happen.
Idiom: Strike while the iron is hot
Meaning: Maximize your opportunities while you can.
When you have an opportunity to do something, do it before you lose your chance.
To act on an opportunity promptly while favorable conditions exist.
Example: We should strike while the iron is hot and order some immediately while
the items are on sale, before they change the offer.
Idiom: No pain no gain
Meaning: If you want to improve, you must work so hard that it hurts. Related with
sports and physical exercise.
Player: I can't do any more push-ups. My muscles hurt.
Coach: No pain, no gain. Come on, everybody! Run one more lap! No pain, no gain!
Examples:
1.
This is the best time in the last ten years to buy a house. Strike while the iron
is hot.
2.
Ask Lisa for a favor now, while she's in a good mood. Strike while the iron is
hot.
Idiom/Expression: Big fish in a small pond
Meaning: This term refers to an important or highly-ranked person in a small group
or organization.
Example: He could get a job with a big company but he enjoys being a big fish in a
small pond.
Example 2: I think I can do better in a much bigger company. I am looking for
growth I feel like I am a big fish in a small pond in this startup company they are not
giving me enough credit for my effort.
Keep one's head above water
1.
Literal meaning: To keep from drowning when swimming or floating. (See
also get one's head above water.)
I was so tired I could hardly keep my head above water.
2. Figurative meaning: to manage to survive, especially financially. We have so little
money that we can hardly keep our heads above water. It's hard to keep your head
above water on this much money.
3. Figurative meaning 2: to keep up with one's work. It's all I can do to keep my
head above water with the work I have. I can't take on any more. We have so many
orders that we can hardly keep our heads above water.
Figurative: Departing from the literal meaning or using figures of speech such as a
metaphor.

Renege on
Meaning: To fail to carry out some promise or commitment.
Example: If I had known that you would renege on your contract, I never would have
hired you.
Pronounce as: US pronunciation: Ri-neg
UK/Brit: Ri-neyg
Word: Clandestine
Pronounce as: Clan-DES-teenachill
Meaning: kept secret or done secretively, especially because it is illicit or not legal.
Example: He is a married man that is why he meets his mistress clandestinely or in
secret.
Idiom: hold all the aces
Meaning: A person or company who holds all the aces is in a very strong position
because they have more advantages than anyone else.
Example: With low production costs and excellent transport facilities, they seem to
be holding all the aces.
Heterogeneous: It may refer to a society or group that includes individuals of
differing ethnicities, cultural backgrounds, sexes, or ages. It is a mixture of varying
types of people.
Example: The Philippines is considered a melting pot of varying people it is a
heterogeneous society.
Homogeneous: of the same kind; alike.
Example: A homogeneous society shares a common language, ethnicity and culture.
Japan and South Korea are examples of homogeneous societies. Within these
societies, the immigrant population is low.
Immigrant: a person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country.
Idiom: my way or the highway
Meaning: If you say to someone it's my way or the highway, you are telling them
that either they accept to do as you say or they leave the project.
Example: You don't have much choice when someone says: 'it's my way or the
highway.'!
Idiom: Iron fist/ hand in a velvet glove
Meaning: This expression is used to describe someone who, behind an appearance
of gentleness, is inflexible and determined. This is used to describe a person who
looks polite but when it comes to implementing rules he or she is very strict.
Example: To impose the necessary reforms, the leader used persuasion followed by
force - an iron fist in a velvet glove.
Idiom: Skating on thin ice ( this is a negative expression)
Meaning: If you are skating on thin ice, you are doing or saying something that
could cause disagreement or trouble.

Example: Don't mention that subject during the negotiations or you could be skating
on thin ice.
Goodwill: the established reputation of a business this is considered as an asset as
well and can be sold.
This affects the value of the company.
Sony has a very high goodwill they have a high value when it comes to their brand
name.
Damage Control: The action taken to limit the damaging effects of an accident or
error.
It means to take actions to minimize the effect of something bad that's happened.
Limiting or "controlling" the amount of damage.
Example: The PR team of the senator is good at their job they were able to maintain
his good through damage control they prevented the scandal from spreading.

Idiom: game plan


Meaning: A game plan is a strategy or plan.
Example: They're not sure what their game plan is for the upcoming election.
Visceral
Say as: Vee-se-rall
Meaning: : coming from strong emotions and not from logic or reason. To be really
emotional.
Example: When a person is experiencing depression he has a tendency to be more
visceral rather than realistic. A small problem will make him crumble.
Crumble: to break down completely: to stop functioning
Example: I am afraid of losing the person I love I will surely crumble if that will
happen to me.
Idiom: Achilles heel
Meaning: This expression refers to a vulnerable area or a weak spot this is a
weakness that could cause one's downfall or failure.
In short the weakness of the person.
Origin: If you are familiar with the movie Troy starring Brad Pitt he depicted the
story of Achilles. was a Greek hero of the Trojan War and the central character and
greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad. When Achilles was born his mother Thetis tried to
make him immortal, by dipping him in the river Styx. However, he was left

vulnerable at the part of the body by which she held him, his heel[5] (see Achilles
heel, Achilles' tendon).
Example: He's extremely intelligent, but his inability to speak in public is his Achilles
heel because of his stage fright.
Another way of saying this or a similar expression: That is my kryptonite.
Origin: The substance that weakens Superman. Due to his popularity as a superhero
this saying became really famous there was even an American song written about
this.
Whimsical: Acting in a very capricious manner. Doing what you want just because
you want it. Your acts are not based on reason and logic when you are whimsical
usually this is a sign of abuse of power or selfishness.
This is a negative word
Example: She will not be a good team manager. Her decisions are purely whimsical
she has the tendency to abuse her authority or discretion.
Arbitrary: based on random choice or personal whim, rather than any reason or
system. Abusive or autocratic when it comes to using the power.
Example: In a democratic society people the voice of the people prevails over the
arbitrary demands of the President.
Autocratic: taking no account of other people's wishes or opinions; domineering.
Unsolicited Advice: An advice that was not asked by the person you are giving
advice to. Given or supplied without being requested or asked for.
Example: I appreciate your effort in telling me what I should do but I am not asking
for your advice so do not tell me what to do. Stop giving me unsolicited advices.
Tone it down a notch: Make it lower or make
Idiom: Born with a silver spoon in your mouth
MEANING: born to wealth and comfort, born rich
EXAMPLE: The student in our history class was born with a silver spoon in his mouth
and has never worked in his life.
Condone: To forgive a mistake
Example: I cannot condone your action this time because I want you to correct your
errors.
Idiom: explore all avenues
Meaning: If you explore all avenues, you try out every possibility in order to obtain a
result or find a solution.
Example: We can't say it's impossible until we've explored all avenues.
Idiom: Walk on eggshells
Meaning: If you walk on eggshells with someone, you are careful not to hurt or
offend them.
Example: She's so sensitive; you have to walk on eggshells with her all the time.

Idiom: Eat your words


Meaning: If you eat your words, you have to admit that what you said before was
wrong.
Example: After predicting disastrous results, he had to eat his words when he saw
the success of the new product.
Idiom: get your act together
If you get your act together, you organize your affairs better than you have done
previously and deal with things more efficiently.
Jack's plan won't work unless he gets his act together.
Idiom: Gentlemans agreement
Meaning: When an agreement is neither written nor signed, because the two parties
trust each other completely, it is called a gentleman's agreement.
Example: It was a gentleman's agreement. I can't change my mind now!
Idiom: rags to riches
Meaning: If a person goes from rags to riches, they start off being very poor and
become very rich and successful.
Example: By renovating old houses in the right places, he went from rags to riches.
Idiom: get a raw deal
Meaning: If you say that someone got a raw deal, you think they were treated
unfairly or badly.
Example: When Gary lost his job after organizing the merger, he really got.
a raw deal!
Idiom: Dont count your chickens before they hatch
Meaning: Don't rely on something you are unsure about; making plans based on
assumptions can lead to disappointment.
Example: Louis was already planning his winning celebration before the race
started, but he counted his chickens before they hatched as he ended up receiving
last place.
Hatch: to break an egg so a baby animal can come out.
Assumptions: Believing that something is true even if it is not based on proof.
Idiom: Keep your options open
Meaning: When you keep your options open, you postpone making a decision so
that you can choose among several possible courses of action.
Example: The offer sounds good, but keep your options open until you're sure it's
the best choice.
Idiom: weigh the pros and cons
Meaning: If you weigh the pros and cons, you consider the advantages and
disadvantages, the arguments for or against something.

Example: They weighed the pros and cons of the house before signing.
Idiom: point of no return
Meaning: When you reach the point of no return, you have no option but to continue
what you have started, because you have gone so far that it is impossible to go
back.
Example: I've resigned from teaching and decided to become a writer. Now I've
reached the point of no return and must work on the book I am writing.
Idiom: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Meaning: If you are between the devil and the deep blue sea, you are in a situation
where there are to equally unpleasant alternatives.
Example: When the new product didn't take off, the management was caught
between the devil and the deep blue sea : develop a new marketing campaign or
drop the product.
Let us call it a day: to stop working and go home; to say that a day's work has been
completed.
Example: I'm tired. Let's call it a day. The boss was mad because Tom called it a day
at noon and went home.
Expression: Wrap something up
Meaning: to complete work on something; to bring something to an end.
Example: I will wrap the job up this morning. I'll call you when I finish.
I can wrap up this little project in a week.
Expressions for meetings
Interrupting
May I have a word?
If I may, I think...
Excuse me for interrupting.
May I come in here? Hold that though I just need to clarify something
Giving Opinions
I (really) feel that...
In my opinion...
The way I see things...
If you ask me,... I tend to think that...
My perspective about this matter is
Asking for Opinions
Do you (really) think that...
(name of participant) can we get your input?
How do you feel about...?
Commenting on Other Opinions

I never thought about it that way before.


Good point!
I get your point.
I see what you mean.
Agreeing with Other Opinions
Exactly!
That's (exactly) the way I feel.
I have to agree with (name of participant).
Disagreeing with Other Opinions
Up to a point I agree with you, but...
(I'm afraid) I can't agree
Advising and Suggesting
We should...
Why don't you....
How/What about...
I suggest/recommend that...
Clarifying
Have I made that clear?
Do you see what I'm getting at?
Let me put this another way...
I'd just like to repeat that...
Requesting Information
I'd like you to...
Would you mind... I wonder if you could...
Asking for Repetition
I didn't catch that. Could you repeat that, please?
I missed that. Could you say it again, please?
Could you run that by me one more time?
Asking for Clarification
I'm afraid I don't quite understand what you are getting at.
Could you explain to me how that is going to work?
I don't see what you mean. Could we have some more details, please?
Asking for Verification
Do you mean that...?
Is it true that...?
Asking for Spelling
Would you mind spelling that for me, please?
Asking for Contributions for Other Participants
What do you think about this proposal?
Would you like to add anything, (name of participant)?
Has anyone else got anything to contribute?
Are there any more comments?
Correcting Information
Sorry, that's not quite right.
I'm afraid you don't understand what I'm saying.
That's not quite what I had in mind.

That's not what I meant.


Keeping the Meeting on Time
Well, that seems to be all the time we have today.
Please be brief.
I'm afraid we've run out of time.
I'm afraid that's outside the scope of this meeting.
Let's get back on track, why don't we?
That's not really why we're here today.
Why don't we return to the main focus of today's meeting.
We'll have to leave that to another time.
We're beginning to lose sight of the main point.
Keep to the point, please.
I think we'd better leave that for another meeting.
Offering Assistance?
1.
Do you need my help with that?
2.
Do you know how to use that? If not I can teach you how to use that.
3.
Let us try to do it together so next time both of us are more familiar with this
machine
4.
Have you tried reading the manual? If it is not clear to you let us try to
operate it together

Sometimes you need a few seconds to think of the right word or plan your next
sentence. Luckily, there are many phrases in English for delaying. Here are ten of
them.
Ten Expressions to Use In Speaking And Writing
1.
Well, you see...
2.
Now, let me see.
3.
Just a moment / Just a second
4.
Hang on a moment / second / mo / sec
5.
How shall I put it?
6.
What's the word for it..
7.
Now, let me think...
8.
Let me get this right...
9.
It's on the tip of my tongue..
10.
(Now) that's an interesting question...
Idiom: put your cards on the table
Meaning: If you put your cards on the table, you speak honestly and openly about
your feelings and intentions.

It is time to tell me the truth spout your cards on the table


How To Use These Phrases In Your English
1.
All of the phrases finish with high intonation to show that you are going to
continue speaking with your answer or contribution in just a second.
2.
Phrases 1 and 2 are very common expressions that English people use all the
time. You should not pause for more than a second or two after saying them.
3.
Phrases 3 and 4 are actually asking the listener to wait. In phrase 4, we often
shorten 'moment' to 'mo' and 'second' to 'sec' in informal speech.
4.
Phrase 5 suggests that the speaker knows what to say but wants to organize
the words to make them less unpleasant or annoying to the listener.
5.
We say phrase 6 when we are trying to remember one particular word. If we
still can't remember after another two seconds we often explain what the word
means and hope that the listener can tell us what the word is.
6.
Phrases 7 and 8 are used for requesting the listener to wait for one or two
seconds. You can only wait a few seconds after saying these.
7.
Phrase 9 means that we really think we know the word that we are searching
our memory for but can't remember it at this moment.
8.
Phrase 10 is often used by politicians when they are asked a difficult or
embarrassing question. Very often, they change the subject and avoid answering
altogether.
Often when we are debating with other people, or writing academic essays, we want
to introduce ideas that we know others agree on. Here are ten phrases.
Ten Expressions to Use In Speaking And Writing
1.
It's common knowledge that...
2.
It's a fact (that)..
3.
Anyone will tell you..
4.
Everybody knows that...
5.
It's a well-established fact that
6.
Few people would deny that..
7.
It's no secret that...
8.
I think we can all accept / agree that..
9.
It is generally assumed that...
10.
It has been scientifically proven that...
How To Use These Phrases In Your English
1.
In phrases 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 the speaker is introducing ideas that everybody
agrees are true.
2.
The other 5 phrases are a little less strong, saying that a few people might
disagree, but nearly everybody does agree with your statement.
3.
Phrases 1, 5, 6 and 10 are good opening phrases for a discursive essay. You
can use one of these phrases to establish the importance of the topic before
introducing an aspect of the topic that is not agreed.
4.
Phrases 3, 4, 7 and 8 are often used in spoken discussions or debates.
5.
Phrase 10 is saying that somebody has done an experiment that proves your
statement to be true. If using this in writing you may want to refer specifically to
scientist or the experiment itself in your next sentence.

In general, serendipity is the act of finding something valuable or delightful when


you are not looking for it. In information technology, serendipity often plays a part in
the recognition of a new product need or in solving a design problem. Web surfing
can be an occasion for serendipity since you sometimes come across a valuable or
interesting site when you are looking for something else.
Sometimes somebody asks you a question and you don't want give the answer. If
you know the answer but you don't want them to know, you can use one of these
ten phrases.
Ten Expressions to Use In Speaking And Writing
1.
No comment.
2.
I'm not at liberty to say.
3.
Wait and see.
4.
Let me get back to you.
5.
I'm sorry, that's confidential.
6.
(Sorry) That's personal.
7.
I'd rather not talk about it.
8.
Mind your own business.
9.
Never mind.
10.
I'll tell you when you're older.
How To Use These Phrases In Your English
1.
No comment
Phrase 1 is often used by politicians and celebrities when they are asked difficult or
embarrassing questions by journalists.
2.
I'm not at liberty to say.
3.
Wait and see.
We use phrases 2 and 5 to say there is a rule that prevents you giving information.
Phrase 3 is refusing to tell somebody something about the near future. We often use
it when we are preparing a surprise for somebody.
Phrase 6 is telling the other person that you consider the information to be private.
You are also criticising the other person for asking.
Phrase 7 is a more polite way to say that the information is private and you don't
want to talk about it.
Phrases 8 and 9 are not very polite and are criticising the other person for asking for
private information.
Parents often say phrase 10 to their children to avoid answering difficult or
embarrasing questions. Usually they have no intention of ever answering the
question.
Think of the mind as a river: the faster it flows, the better it keeps up with the
present and responds to change. The faster it flows, also the more it refreshes itself
and the greater its energy. Obsessional thoughts, past experiences (whether
traumas or

successes), and preconceived notions are like boulders or mud in this river, settling
and hardening
there and damming it up. The river stops moving; stagnation sets in. You must wage
constant war on this tendency in the mind.
Robert Greene, The 33 Strategies of War
Business English: Making Appointments
Being able to make, change and cancel appointments is an important skill in
business English. Here are some expressions you can use to do this concisely and
clearly.
Asking for an appointment
(formal situations)
I would like to arrange an appointment to discuss.
Please would you indicate a suitable time and place to meet?
(neutral)
Would it be possible to meet on (date) at your / our offices to discuss?
(informal)
Can we meet (up) to talk about?
Suggesting a time
(neutral)
Would Tuesday suit you?
Would you be available on Tuesday?
(informal)
What about?
Let's say
Agreeing to an appointment
(formal)
Thank you for your email. I would be available to discuss. on (date) at (time and
place)
(neutral / informal)
Tuesday sounds fine. Shall we say around (time) at (place)?
Saying a time is not convenient
(formal)
Unfortunately, I will be away on business during the week of July 6 11, so I will be
unable to meet you then. However, if you were available in the following week, I
would be glad to arrange a meeting with you.
I will be out of the office on Wednesday and Thursday, but I will be available on
Friday afternoon.
Cancelling an appointment
(formal)
Unfortunately, due to some unforeseen business, I will be unable to keep our
appointment for tomorrow afternoon.
Would it be possible to arrange another time later in the week?
(neutral)
Im afraid that I have to cancel our meeting on Wednesday, as something
unexpected has come up.
Would you be free to meet early next week?

Apologizing
I apologize for any inconvenience. (formal)
I'm sorry about cancelling. (informal)
Asking for confirmation
Please confirm if this date and time is suitable / convenient for you. (neutral)
Can you let me know if this is OK for you? (informal)
Writing to someone you don't know
If you don't know the person, you'll need to give some background information
about yourself or your company.
I am and I would be interested to meet you to discuss
I would be grateful if you could indicate a convenient time to meet during this week.
I look forward to hearing from you
Template 1
We should be useful and add value before expecting something out of our new
connections. Use this follow up email template after meeting someone to
demonstrate that value:
Hi [First Name],
Glad we got to meet at [event]. I checked out your website afterwards and loved
your take on creating high performance teams. Have you tried using
[recommendation]? I use that framework with my team and it has been incredibly
successful.
Happy to chat more about it or send over some templates and examples if youre
interested.
Again, it was great meeting you at [Name of Networking Event], and I hope to see
you again soon.
[Signature]
In this kind of e-mail you are showing that you pay attention really well because you
were able to think about something that can be useful to the person you just met.
Template 2
Hi [First Name],
It was great meeting at [name of event]. I remember you mentioning that youre
trying to revamp [project] next quarter, and I thought I would share a book that I
used to exceed my own target goals by [result]. Its called [Name of Book], and I
just sent you the Kindle version of it. Hope you like it!
Happy to discuss the book or my own approach if youd like. Just let me know!
[Signature]

Draft: Sales follow up

Say Louisa is now a prospect and we are busy salespeople attempting to close a
deal with Louisa. If we notice that a prospect is re-opening one of our emails or
proposals, we can send this useful follow up:
Hi Louisa,
Last we spoke, you requested that I get in touch in a few months to discuss how
[Company Name] can help your business achieve [goal]. I may be a few weeks
early, but I thought I would check in.
Have you given any additional consideration to my proposal? Id be happy to chat
on the phone and answer any questions that may have come up.
What does your schedule look like this week to talk?
E-mail after a meeting:
Something you can send if a client is not returning your call:
Dear _______,
[Name], Im writing to follow up. Im not sure what our next step is.
Let me know what makes sense as a next step, if any?
Thanks for your input.
[Signature]
Need to get a meeting scheduled?
[Name],
Im writing to follow up on my email. I didnt hear back from anyone on the team. If
it makes sense to talk, let me know how your calendar looks.
If not, who is the appropriate person for me to talk to?
Thanks for your help,
[Signature]
Hey again, NAME,
I know your inbox is probably a busy place, so I just wanted to send a quick followup email. I'd love to chat with you about having INSERT THE PERSON'S COMPANY'S
NAME AND THE THING YOU WANT.
Would love to chat,
[Signature]
Idiom: Take a raincheck
Meaning: say this when politely refusing an offer, with the understanding that one
may accept it at a later date. (reschedule)
Example: Is it okay if we take a raincheck? Something urgent in the office came up
so I am not available for lunch.
Annie: i was just calling to see if you wanted to have lunch tomorrow.
Mary: oh, I'm Sorry I have a meeting at that time, can I take a rain check?....
Expression: the bottom line

Meaning: the final result or the final output or outcome.


Example: "Although we worked hard on this deal, the bottom line is we didn't make
the sale, so it was a complete failure."
Expression: an old hand
Meaning: A person who has long experience, especially in one place
Example: "He can help us set up a company in Beijing. He's been working in China
for many years and speaks Chinese fluently. He's an old China hand."
Expression: it's a jungle out there
Meaning: it's a difficult market with many, tough competitors
Example: "Do you think a new company can survive without a unique product? It's a
real jungle out there!"
savvy - smart and knowledgeable
Example: "He's a savvy investor so there is a high probability this project will be
successful."
Expression: Cut throat
Meaning: "Cut-throat" is used to describe something that is very intense, aggressive
and merciless. Usually this expression describes competition among people in a
certain field.
Example: In business school, the competition was cut-throat.
The competition in getting the promotion in our company is cut throat you have to
show the boss that you deserve the position.
Idiom: Blood sweat and tears
Meaning: A project or action which involves blood, sweat and tears requires a lot of
effort and hard work.
Example: His success wasn't due to luck; it was blood, sweat and tears all the way.

How to say no politely to a person


1. Vague but effective: Thank you for asking, but that isnt going to work out for
me.
2. Its not personal: Thank you for asking, but Im not doing any interviews while
Im writing my book.

3. Ask me later: I want to do that, but Im not available until April. Will you ask me
again then?
4. Let me hook you up: I cant do it, but Ill bet Shelly can. Ill ask her for you.
5. Keep trying: None of those dates work for me, but I would love to see you. Send
me some more dates.
6. Try me last minute: I cant put anything else on my calendar this month, but Id
love to do that with you sometime. Will you call me right before you go again?
7. Gratitude: Thank you so much for your enthusiasm and support! Im sorry Im
not able to help you at this time.
8. Just No: Thanks, Ill have to pass on that. (Say it, then change topic.)
More informal use it to say no to a close person.
9. Gracious: I really appreciate you asking me, but my time is already committed.
10. Im Sorry: I wish I could, but its just not going to work right now.
11. It is Someone Elses Decision: I promised my coach (therapist, husband, etc.) I
wouldnt take on any more projects right now. Im working on creating more balance
in my life.
12. My Family is the Reason: Thanks so much for the invite, thats the day of my
sons soccer game, and I never miss those.
13. I Know Someone Else: I just dont have time right now. Let me recommend
someone who may be able to help you.
14. Im Already Booked: I appreciate you thinking of me, but Im afraid Im already
booked that day.
15. Setting Boundaries: Let me tell you what I can do Then limit the
commitment to what will be comfortable for you.
16. Not No, But Not Yes: Let me think about it, and Ill get back to you.
17. I am Willing But Look at My Workload Style: Im currently working on the Smith
report, the Jones report and the Macklemore report. How would you like me to
prioritize this new project?
Explanation: This particular phrase is especially helpful when dealing with a
superior, who you cant very well Just Say No to. Instead, show your willingness to
do the work but ask for an executive recommendation on how best to balance your
various obligations. You are not complaining about how overloaded you are and
whining for a way out; you are being a responsible employee and making sure you
do your job to the best of your ability (while also letting your boss(es) know just how
much you have on your plate).
18. Let Them Know You Wish You Could Help
Saying no can be softened by simply prefacing it with your desire to helpits
always easier to hear bad or disappointing news when its couched in good
intentions.
Say: Thanks for thinking of me for this opportunity. I really wish I was in a position
to take advantage of it because your organization and mission sound terrific.
However, Ive recently decided to focus on cultivating more speaking opportunities,
so Im limiting my writing commitments. If only there were more hours in the week!

Your Name

Your position to the company


Dear (name of your boss),
I would like to request approval for the upcoming project that I will make beginning
on (date) (please underline the date). Since the project is time consuming, I will
focus more on that project and but still promise to do the task I was assigned to.
The total cost of this project will be (the cost),
This project will help our company to grow in the future and I hope you will not miss
out on this. Sincerely,
(Your name and signature)
English Skills: 14 Ways of Giving Your Opinion
Posted on June 16, 2014
http://www.dreamstime.com/-image21000280In life were often asked to give our
opinion, or in some cases, we give our opinion even if it hasnt been asked for!
Sometimes we can be very direct with our opinion and it wont upset the other
person. However, more often than not we need to be careful how we share our
thoughts so as not to offend or hurt the other persons feelings. This can be
especially true in business where cultural differences can have a detrimental effect
on business dealings.
The British are especially careful when giving their opinion (in business, that is).
They often dont want to cause offence and consequently, will start their sentences
using certain expressions to soften the blow. A number of my clients have said that
the British are very polite and considerate in their dealings with colleagues and
clients. So much so, that the British way of doing business is often admired.
In this post, Id like to share with your some common expressions we have of giving
ones opinion. I have used Liz Potters excellent article for Macmillan Dictionarys
blog as the main structure and made some changes to it.

14 Ways of Giving Your Opinion


1. I think
This is the most common and general way of giving an opinion. You can use it both
informally and formally.
Example: I think if you offer a consistently good service to your clients, they will
keep coming back to you
.
2. I reckon
This is a more informal way of giving your opinion:

Meaning of reckon: To conclude


Example: I reckon it will be much faster to get to London by train.
3. In my opinion (4) In my view:
These expressions are more formal and are often used when talking about
important issues
Example: In my view, they made a huge mistake in not selling the company when
they had the chance.
Example: In my opinion, the Bank of England should not raise interest rates this
year.
5. It seems to me (6) All things considered:
When youve thought about a situation carefully you could use either of these two
expressions
Example: It seems to me that they are spending more money than they need to to
attract new talent into the company.
Example: All things considered, I think we made a wise choice in recruiting James.
7. If you ask me
This is used when your opinion is critical. Sometimes, people say this even when
their opinion hasnt been asked for! If you ask me,..
Example: If you ask me, she has spoilt her children far too much.
8. To be honest (9) To tell you the truth (10) To be frank
All three expressions are a way of giving your opinion when you know that people
may not like what you have to say
Example: To tell you the truth, your father was right when he said that you
undersold the company.
Example: To be honest, I preferred it when you were blonde.
Example: To be frank, I thought her acting was simply terrible.
11. Frankly speaking
You would use this expression to give your opinion in a more familiar and forthright
way.
Example: Frankly speaking, I dont know what she sees in him.

12. Personally
This is used to emphasize that you are giving your own opinion
Example: Personally, I think the CEO should apologize for his appalling behavior at
the shareholders meeting.

13. To my mind (14) As far as Im concerned


When you realize that other people may not agree with you would use either of
these expressions:
Example: To my mind, private education is better than state education.
As far as Im concerned, tennis is a much more interesting sport than football. Word:
Vicissitude
Meaning: a change or variation occurring in the course of something.
Idiom: beat around the bush
Someone who beats around the bush, does not feel comfortable talking about a
certain subject, talks about all kinds of other things and does not get to the point.
Here are some sample sentences using this English idiom:
1. I am not interested in what you did on the weekend. Stop beating around the
bush and answer my question.
2. Get to the point, Phil. Dont beat around the bush!
3. I knew that she had something important to tell me, but, for three hours, she just
beat around the bush.

Idiom: to be a cut above


Meaning: Something that is a cut above is superior or better than something else.
Example: The workmanship of this dress is a cut above.
Idiom: to fit like a glove
Meaning: When something fits very well or fits perfectly, it fits like a glove.
Example: Her wedding dress fit like a glove because she lost a lot of weight since
she started going to the gym.
Idiom: cut the chase
Meaning: Sometimes, for whatever reason, people get lost in details - they talk
about all kinds of things, perhaps even engage in unnecessary small talk, but they
dont get to the important issues which need to be discussed. These are people who
find it difficult to cut to the chase. The English idiom to cut to the chase means: to
talk about the important and relevant things, in other words to stop talking about
unimportant and irrelevant things. Here are two sample sentences to demonstrate
the use of this English idiom:
1.
He called me into his office and, after about 30 minutes of small talk, I had to
tell him to cut to the chase.
2.
Okay, Carl. Cut to the chase. How much money do you need?

Idiom: Accident waiting to happen


Meaning: The English idiom an accident waiting to happen refers to a foreseeable
accident or problem. In other words,a bad or dangerous situation that one can see
happening before it actually occurs. There are many things in this world that people
think are accidents waiting to happen.
Example: Her bad habit of using her cellphone while driving is an accident waiting
to happen.

Chronological order: Arranging or sequencing something according to the time that


it happened.
Example: Arrange these documents in chronological order. In order of time from the
earliest to the latest.

1.

Idiom: We are not on the same page or we are on the same page

Meaning: This is used to express a misunderstanding or miscommunication between


two people.
If people are on the same page, they have the same information and are thinking
the same way.
Example:
1. I wanted you to attend the meeting not to buy the supplies that we need for our
company event. We are not on the same page again! You misunderstood me.
2. I am happy to finally work with a person who is the same as I am we are always
on the same page when it comes to work ideas.
2.
3.
4.
Idiom: Take a French leave or French escape
Meaning: If you leave an official or social event without notifying the person who
invited you, you take French leave.
Example: Is Bill coming back for the closing speech or has he taken French leave?
Idiom: no strings attached
Example: If something is given without expecting anything in return, it is given with
"no strings attached."

Example: They will let you try the product for free with no strings attached. If you
don't like it, there is no pressure to buy it or give them anything in return.
5.

impeccable (adjective) exemplary, flawless

Example: (If your grades were as impeccable as your brothers, then you too would
receive a car for a graduation present.)
Positive expression
6.
acquiesce
say as: ak- WEE- yes
(action word) to agree without protesting
Example: Though Mr. Cooper wanted to stay outside and work in his garage, when
his wife told him that he should go inside to eat his dinner, he acquiesced to her
demands.
avarice
(n.) excessive greed
Example: The bankers avarice led him to amass an enormous personal fortune.

7.

Idiom: Signed, sealed and delivered.

Meaning: When an agreement or contract is signed, sealed and delivered, all the
legal documents are in order. All the requirements are submitted. Nothing further
needs to be done. The deal or agreement has already been completed.
Example:
1.
It is hoped that the agreement will be signed, sealed and delivered before
the end of the week.
2.
Finally the contract is signed, sealed and delivered we were able to close the
deal with them do we have a new partner in our business.
.Idiom: put your feet up
Meaning: Time to relax
Example: At last that's over now I can put my feet up for a while.
8.

Idiom: run a tight ship

Meaning: to manage a team or company in a very strict manner


Example: The manager of this restaurant chain run a tight ship

9.
Idiom: There's no smoke without fire. OR
Where there's smoke, there's fire.
Meaning: This idiom means that when people suspect something, there is normally
a good reason for the suspicion, even if there is no concrete evidence. There is
usually some truth behind every rumor.
Example: Im going to withdraw all my money from that bank. I read an article that
the bank was in financial trouble, and where there's smoke there's fire.
10.

Idiom: Add Fuel to the fire

Meaning: If you add fuel to the fire or flames, you do or say something that makes a
difficult situation even worse.
Example: He forgot their wedding anniversary, and his apologies only added fuel to
the flames.
11.

Idiom: you eat, sleep and breathe something,

Meaning: If you eat, sleep and breathe something, you are so enthusiastic and
passionate about it that you think about it constantly.
Example: He's an enthusiastic golfer; he eats, sleeps and breathes it!
Enthusiastic: Excited or energetic
12.

Idiom: Tone it down a notch.

Meaning: calm down or lower your voice.


Example: Your voice is too loud specially while you are using your phone I cannot
focus on my work please tone it down a notch.
Notch: Higher or lower level
Turn it UP a notch: higher level
Turn it DOWN a notch: lower level
You can also use this expression when it comes to the volume of the television or
radio
13.

Best foot forward: To be really impressive or to make a good impression.

Example: this is my first time to meet my boss so I will put my best foot forward.
14.

Idiom: Birds of the same feathers flock together

Meaning: People of the same type seem to attract one another and gather together.
Example: I saw the boy who stole my bag with that gang of trouble makers last
night - well, birds of a feather flock together, they say.
Idiom: All talk no action
Meaning: The English expression to be all talk and no action is used to describe
people who only talk about doing things but never really do them. The following
examples show how this idiom can be used:
1. Bill is always talking about dieting, but, in the end, he is all talk and no action.
2. The banks have talked about changing how they do business, but are they all talk
and no action?
3. Are our politicians all talk and no action?

Idiom: Save for the rainy days


Meaning: To save money for a time when it might be needed for an emergency.
Example: Always save money for the rainy days you will never know what kind of
emergency might happen.

Idiom: Strike while the iron is hot


Meaning: Maximize your opportunities while you can.
When you have an opportunity to do something, do it before you lose your chance.
Idiom: No pain no gain
Meaning: If you want to improve, you must work so hard that it hurts. Related with
sports and physical exercise.
Player: I can't do any more push-ups. My muscles hurt.
Coach: No pain, no gain. Come on, everybody! Run one more lap! No pain, no gain!
Examples:
1.
This is the best time in the last ten years to buy a house. Strike while the iron
is hot.
2.
Ask Lisa for a favor now, while she's in a good mood. Strike while the iron is
hot.
Idiom/Expression: Big fish in a small pond
Meaning: This term refers to an important or highly-ranked person in a small group
or organization.
Example: He could get a job with a big company but he enjoys being a big fish in a
small pond.
Example 2: I think I can do better in a much bigger company. I am looking for
growth I feel like I am a big fish in a small pond in this startup company they are not
giving me enough credit for my effort.

Keep one's head above water


Literal meaning: To keep from drowning when swimming or floating. (See also get
one's head above water.)
I was so tired I could hardly keep my head above water.
. Figurative meaning: to manage to survive, especially financially. We have so little
money that we can hardly keep our heads above water. It's hard to keep your head
above water on this much money.
3. Figurative meaning 2: to keep up with one's work. It's all I can do to keep my
head above water with the work I have. I can't take on any more. We have so many
orders that we can hardly keep our heads above water.
Figurative: Departing from the literal meaning or using figures of speech such as a
metaphor.
Renege on
Meaning: To fail to carry out some promise or commitment.
Example: If I had known that you would renege on your contract, I never would have
hired you.
Pronounce as: US pronunciation: Ri-neg
UK/Brit: Ri-neyg
Word: Clandestine
Pronounce as: Clan-DES-teenachill
Meaning: kept secret or done secretively, especially because it is illicit or not legal.
Example: He is a married man that is why he meets his mistress clandestinely or in
secret.
Idiom: hold all the aces
Meaning: A person or company who holds all the aces is in a very strong position
because they have more advantages than anyone else.
Example: With low production costs and excellent transport facilities, they seem to
be holding all the aces.
Heterogeneous: It may refer to a society or group that includes individuals of
differing ethnicities, cultural backgrounds, sexes, or ages. It is a mixture of varying
types of people.
Example: The Philippines is considered a melting pot of varying people it is a
heterogeneous society.
Homogeneous: of the same kind; alike.
Example: A homogeneous society shares a common language, ethnicity and culture.
Japan and South Korea are examples of homogeneous societies. Within these
societies, the immigrant population is low.
Immigrant: a person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country.
Idiom: my way or the highway
Meaning: If you say to someone it's my way or the highway, you are telling them
that either they accept to do as you say or they leave the project.

Example: You don't have much choice when someone says: 'it's my way or the
highway.'!
Idiom: Iron fist/ hand in a velvet glove
Meaning: This expression is used to describe someone who, behind an appearance
of gentleness, is inflexible and determined. This is used to describe a person who
looks polite but when it comes to implementing rules he or she is very strict.
Example: To impose the necessary reforms, the leader used persuasion followed by
force - an iron fist in a velvet glove.
Idiom: Skating on thin ice ( this is a negative expression)
Meaning: If you are skating on thin ice, you are doing or saying something that
could cause disagreement or trouble.
Example: Don't mention that subject during the negotiations or you could be skating
on thin ice.
Goodwill: the established reputation of a business this is considered as an asset as
well and can be sold.
This affects the value of the company.
Sony has a very high goodwill they have a high value when it comes to their brand
name.
Damage Control: The action taken to limit the damaging effects of an accident or
error.
It means to take actions to minimize the effect of something bad that's happened.
Limiting or "controlling" the amount of damage.
Example: The PR team of the senator is good at their job they were able to maintain
his good through damage control they prevented the scandal from spreading.

Idiom: game plan


Meaning: A game plan is a strategy or plan.
Example: They're not sure what their game plan is for the upcoming election.
Visceral
Say as: Vee-se-rall
Meaning: : coming from strong emotions and not from logic or reason. To be really
emotional.
Example: When a person is experiencing depression he has a tendency to be more
visceral rather than realistic. A small problem will make him crumble.
Crumble: to break down completely: to stop functioning

Example: I am afraid of losing the person I love I will surely crumble if that will
happen to me.
Idiom: Achilles heel
Meaning: This expression refers to a vulnerable area or a weak spot this is a
weakness that could cause one's downfall or failure.
In short the weakness of the person.
Origin: If you are familiar with the movie Troy starring Brad Pitt he depicted the
story of Achilles. was a Greek hero of the Trojan War and the central character and
greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad. When Achilles was born his mother Thetis tried to
make him immortal, by dipping him in the river Styx. However, he was left
vulnerable at the part of the body by which she held him, his heel[5] (see Achilles
heel, Achilles' tendon).
Example: He's extremely intelligent, but his inability to speak in public is his Achilles
heel because of his stage fright.
Another way of saying this or a similar expression: That is my kryptonite.
Origin: The substance that weakens Superman. Due to his popularity as a superhero
this saying became really famous there was even an American song written about
this.
Whimsical: Acting in a very capricious manner. Doing what you want just because
you want it. Your acts are not based on reason and logic when you are whimsical
usually this is a sign of abuse of power or selfishness.
This is a negative word
Example: She will not be a good team manager. Her decisions are purely whimsical
she has the tendency to abuse her authority or discretion.
Arbitrary: based on random choice or personal whim, rather than any reason or
system. Abusive or autocratic when it comes to using the power.
Example: In a democratic society people the voice of the people prevails over the
arbitrary demands of the President.
Autocratic: taking no account of other people's wishes or opinions; domineering.
Unsolicited Advice: An advice that was not asked by the person you are giving
advice to. Given or supplied without being requested or asked for.
Example: I appreciate your effort in telling me what I should do but I am not asking
for your advice so do not tell me what to do. Stop giving me unsolicited advices.
Tone it down a notch: Make it lower or make
Idiom: Born with a silver spoon in your mouth
MEANING: born to wealth and comfort, born rich
EXAMPLE: The student in our history class was born with a silver spoon in his mouth
and has never worked in his life.

Condone: To forgive a mistake


Example: I cannot condone your action this time because I want you to correct your
errors.
Idiom: explore all avenues
Meaning: If you explore all avenues, you try out every possibility in order to obtain a
result or find a solution.
Example: We can't say it's impossible until we've explored all avenues.
Idiom: Walk on eggshells
Meaning: If you walk on eggshells with someone, you are careful not to hurt or
offend them.
Example: She's so sensitive; you have to walk on eggshells with her all the time.
Idiom: Eat your words
Meaning: If you eat your words, you have to admit that what you said before was
wrong.
Example: After predicting disastrous results, he had to eat his words when he saw
the success of the new product.
Idiom: get your act together
If you get your act together, you organize your affairs better than you have done
previously and deal with things more efficiently.
Jack's plan won't work unless he gets his act together.
Idiom: Gentlemans agreement
Meaning: When an agreement is neither written nor signed, because the two parties
trust each other completely, it is called a gentleman's agreement.
Example: It was a gentleman's agreement. I can't change my mind now!
Idiom: rags to riches
Meaning: If a person goes from rags to riches, they start off being very poor and
become very rich and successful.
Example: By renovating old houses in the right places, he went from rags to riches.
Idiom: get a raw deal
Meaning: If you say that someone got a raw deal, you think they were treated
unfairly or badly.
Example: When Gary lost his job after organizing the merger, he really got.
a raw deal!
Idiom: Dont count your chickens before they hatch
Meaning: Don't rely on something you are unsure about; making plans based on
assumptions can lead to disappointment.

Example: Louis was already planning his winning celebration before the race
started, but he counted his chickens before they hatched as he ended up receiving
last place.
Hatch: to break an egg so a baby animal can come out.
Assumptions: Believing that something is true even if it is not based on proof.
Idiom: Keep your options open
Meaning: When you keep your options open, you postpone making a decision so
that you can choose among several possible courses of action.
Example: The offer sounds good, but keep your options open until you're sure it's
the best choice.
Idiom: weigh the pros and cons
Meaning: If you weigh the pros and cons, you consider the advantages and
disadvantages, the arguments for or against something.
Example: They weighed the pros and cons of the house before signing.
Idiom: point of no return
Meaning: When you reach the point of no return, you have no option but to continue
what you have started, because you have gone so far that it is impossible to go
back.
Example: I've resigned from teaching and decided to become a writer. Now I've
reached the point of no return and must work on the book I am writing.
Idiom: between the devil and the deep blue sea
Meaning: If you are between the devil and the deep blue sea, you are in a situation
where there are to equally unpleasant alternatives.
Example: When the new product didn't take off, the management was caught
between the devil and the deep blue sea : develop a new marketing campaign or
drop the product.
Let us call it a day: to stop working and go home; to say that a day's work has been
completed.
Example: I'm tired. Let's call it a day. The boss was mad because Tom called it a day
at noon and went home.
Expression: Wrap something up
Meaning: to complete work on something; to bring something to an end.
Example: I will wrap the job up this morning. I'll call you when I finish.
I can wrap up this little project in a week.
Expressions for meetings
Interrupting
May I have a word?

If I may, I think...
Excuse me for interrupting.
May I come in here? Hold that though I just need to clarify something
Giving Opinions
I (really) feel that...
In my opinion...
The way I see things...
If you ask me,... I tend to think that...
My perspective about this matter is
Asking for Opinions
Do you (really) think that...
(name of participant) can we get your input?
How do you feel about...?
Commenting on Other Opinions
I never thought about it that way before.
Good point!
I get your point.
I see what you mean.
Agreeing with Other Opinions
Exactly!
That's (exactly) the way I feel.
I have to agree with (name of participant).
Disagreeing with Other Opinions
Up to a point I agree with you, but...
(I'm afraid) I can't agree
Advising and Suggesting
We should...
Why don't you....
How/What about...
I suggest/recommend that...
Clarifying
Have I made that clear?
Do you see what I'm getting at?
Let me put this another way...
I'd just like to repeat that...
Requesting Information
I'd like you to...
Would you mind... I wonder if you could...
Asking for Repetition
I didn't catch that. Could you repeat that, please?
I missed that. Could you say it again, please?
Could you run that by me one more time?
Asking for Clarification
I'm afraid I don't quite understand what you are getting at.

Could you explain to me how that is going to work?


I don't see what you mean. Could we have some more details, please?
Asking for Verification
Do you mean that...?
Is it true that...?
Asking for Spelling
Would you mind spelling that for me, please?
Asking for Contributions for Other Participants
What do you think about this proposal?
Would you like to add anything, (name of participant)?
Has anyone else got anything to contribute?
Are there any more comments?
Correcting Information
Sorry, that's not quite right.
I'm afraid you don't understand what I'm saying.
That's not quite what I had in mind.
That's not what I meant.
Keeping the Meeting on Time
Well, that seems to be all the time we have today.
Please be brief.
I'm afraid we've run out of time.
I'm afraid that's outside the scope of this meeting.
Let's get back on track, why don't we?
That's not really why we're here today.
Why don't we return to the main focus of today's meeting.
We'll have to leave that to another time.
We're beginning to lose sight of the main point.
Keep to the point, please.
I think we'd better leave that for another meeting.
Offering Assistance?
1.
Do you need my help with that?
2.
Do you know how to use that? If not I can teach you how to use that.
3.
Let us try to do it together so next time both of us are more familiar with this
machine
4.
Have you tried reading the manual? If it is not clear to you let us try to
operate it together

Sometimes you need a few seconds to think of the right word or plan your next
sentence. Luckily, there are many phrases in English for delaying. Here are ten of
them.

Ten Expressions to Use In Speaking And Writing


1.
Well, you see...
2.
Now, let me see.
3.
Just a moment / Just a second
4.
Hang on a moment / second / mo / sec
5.
How shall I put it?
6.
What's the word for it..
7.
Now, let me think...
8.
Let me get this right...
9.
It's on the tip of my tongue..
10.
(Now) that's an interesting question...
Idiom: put your cards on the table
Meaning: If you put your cards on the table, you speak honestly and openly about
your feelings and intentions.
It is time to tell me the truth spout your cards on the table
How To Use These Phrases In Your English
1.
All of the phrases finish with high intonation to show that you are going to
continue speaking with your answer or contribution in just a second.
2.
Phrases 1 and 2 are very common expressions that English people use all the
time. You should not pause for more than a second or two after saying them.
3.
Phrases 3 and 4 are actually asking the listener to wait. In phrase 4, we often
shorten 'moment' to 'mo' and 'second' to 'sec' in informal speech.
4.
Phrase 5 suggests that the speaker knows what to say but wants to organize
the words to make them less unpleasant or annoying to the listener.
5.
We say phrase 6 when we are trying to remember one particular word. If we
still can't remember after another two seconds we often explain what the word
means and hope that the listener can tell us what the word is.
6.
Phrases 7 and 8 are used for requesting the listener to wait for one or two
seconds. You can only wait a few seconds after saying these.
7.
Phrase 9 means that we really think we know the word that we are searching
our memory for but can't remember it at this moment.
8.
Phrase 10 is often used by politicians when they are asked a difficult or
embarrassing question. Very often, they change the subject and avoid answering
altogether.
Often when we are debating with other people, or writing academic essays, we want
to introduce ideas that we know others agree on. Here are ten phrases.
Ten Expressions to Use In Speaking And Writing
1.
It's common knowledge that...
2.
It's a fact (that)..
3.
Anyone will tell you..
4.
Everybody knows that...
5.
It's a well-established fact that
6.
Few people would deny that..
7.
It's no secret that...
8.
I think we can all accept / agree that..

9.
10.

It is generally assumed that...


It has been scientifically proven that...

How To Use These Phrases In Your English


1.
In phrases 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 the speaker is introducing ideas that everybody
agrees are true.
2.
The other 5 phrases are a little less strong, saying that a few people might
disagree, but nearly everybody does agree with your statement.
3.
Phrases 1, 5, 6 and 10 are good opening phrases for a discursive essay. You
can use one of these phrases to establish the importance of the topic before
introducing an aspect of the topic that is not agreed.
4.
Phrases 3, 4, 7 and 8 are often used in spoken discussions or debates.
5.
Phrase 10 is saying that somebody has done an experiment that proves your
statement to be true. If using this in writing you may want to refer specifically to
scientist or the experiment itself in your next sentence.
In general, serendipity is the act of finding something valuable or delightful when
you are not looking for it. In information technology, serendipity often plays a part in
the recognition of a new product need or in solving a design problem. Web surfing
can be an occasion for serendipity since you sometimes come across a valuable or
interesting site when you are looking for something else.
Sometimes somebody asks you a question and you don't want give the answer. If
you know the answer but you don't want them to know, you can use one of these
ten phrases.
Ten Expressions to Use In Speaking And Writing
1.
No comment.
2.
I'm not at liberty to say.
3.
Wait and see.
4.
Let me get back to you.
5.
I'm sorry, that's confidential.
6.
(Sorry) That's personal.
7.
I'd rather not talk about it.
8.
Mind your own business.
9.
Never mind.
10.
I'll tell you when you're older.
How To Use These Phrases In Your English
1.
No comment
Phrase 1 is often used by politicians and celebrities when they are asked difficult or
embarrassing questions by journalists.
2.
I'm not at liberty to say.
3.
Wait and see.
We use phrases 2 and 5 to say there is a rule that prevents you giving information.
Phrase 3 is refusing to tell somebody something about the near future. We often use
it when we are preparing a surprise for somebody.

Phrase 6 is telling the other person that you consider the information to be private.
You are also criticising the other person for asking.
Phrase 7 is a more polite way to say that the information is private and you don't
want to talk about it.
Phrases 8 and 9 are not very polite and are criticising the other person for asking for
private information.
Parents often say phrase 10 to their children to avoid answering difficult or
embarrasing questions. Usually they have no intention of ever answering the
question.
Think of the mind as a river: the faster it flows, the better it keeps up with the
present and responds to change. The faster it flows, also the more it refreshes itself
and the greater its energy. Obsessional thoughts, past experiences (whether
traumas or
successes), and preconceived notions are like boulders or mud in this river, settling
and hardening
there and damming it up. The river stops moving; stagnation sets in. You must wage
constant war on this tendency in the mind.
Robert Greene, The 33 Strategies of War
Business English: Making Appointments
Being able to make, change and cancel appointments is an important skill in
business English. Here are some expressions you can use to do this concisely and
clearly.
Asking for an appointment
(formal situations)
I would like to arrange an appointment to discuss.
Please would you indicate a suitable time and place to meet?
(neutral)
Would it be possible to meet on (date) at your / our offices to discuss?
(informal)
Can we meet (up) to talk about?
Suggesting a time
(neutral)
Would Tuesday suit you?
Would you be available on Tuesday?
(informal)
What about?
Let's say
Agreeing to an appointment
(formal)
Thank you for your email. I would be available to discuss. on (date) at (time and
place)
(neutral / informal)
Tuesday sounds fine. Shall we say around (time) at (place)?
Saying a time is not convenient

(formal)
Unfortunately, I will be away on business during the week of July 6 11, so I will be
unable to meet you then. However, if you were available in the following week, I
would be glad to arrange a meeting with you.
I will be out of the office on Wednesday and Thursday, but I will be available on
Friday afternoon.
Cancelling an appointment
(formal)
Unfortunately, due to some unforeseen business, I will be unable to keep our
appointment for tomorrow afternoon.
Would it be possible to arrange another time later in the week?
(neutral)
Im afraid that I have to cancel our meeting on Wednesday, as something
unexpected has come up.
Would you be free to meet early next week?
Apologizing
I apologize for any inconvenience. (formal)
I'm sorry about cancelling. (informal)
Asking for confirmation
Please confirm if this date and time is suitable / convenient for you. (neutral)
Can you let me know if this is OK for you? (informal)
Writing to someone you don't know
If you don't know the person, you'll need to give some background information
about yourself or your company.
I am and I would be interested to meet you to discuss
I would be grateful if you could indicate a convenient time to meet during this week.
I look forward to hearing from you
Template 1
We should be useful and add value before expecting something out of our new
connections. Use this follow up email template after meeting someone to
demonstrate that value:
Hi [First Name],
Glad we got to meet at [event]. I checked out your website afterwards and loved
your take on creating high performance teams. Have you tried using
[recommendation]? I use that framework with my team and it has been incredibly
successful.
Happy to chat more about it or send over some templates and examples if youre
interested.
Again, it was great meeting you at [Name of Networking Event], and I hope to see
you again soon.
[Signature]
In this kind of e-mail you are showing that you pay attention really well because you
were able to think about something that can be useful to the person you just met.
Template 2
Hi [First Name],

It was great meeting at [name of event]. I remember you mentioning that youre
trying to revamp [project] next quarter, and I thought I would share a book that I
used to exceed my own target goals by [result]. Its called [Name of Book], and I
just sent you the Kindle version of it. Hope you like it!
Happy to discuss the book or my own approach if youd like. Just let me know!
[Signature]

Draft: Sales follow up


Say Louisa is now a prospect and we are busy salespeople attempting to close a
deal with Louisa. If we notice that a prospect is re-opening one of our emails or
proposals, we can send this useful follow up:
Hi Louisa,
Last we spoke, you requested that I get in touch in a few months to discuss how
[Company Name] can help your business achieve [goal]. I may be a few weeks
early, but I thought I would check in.
Have you given any additional consideration to my proposal? Id be happy to chat
on the phone and answer any questions that may have come up.
What does your schedule look like this week to talk?
E-mail after a meeting:
Something you can send if a client is not returning your call:
Dear _______,
[Name], Im writing to follow up. Im not sure what our next step is.
Let me know what makes sense as a next step, if any?
Thanks for your input.
[Signature]
Need to get a meeting scheduled?
[Name],
Im writing to follow up on my email. I didnt hear back from anyone on the team. If
it makes sense to talk, let me know how your calendar looks.
If not, who is the appropriate person for me to talk to?
Thanks for your help,
[Signature]
Hey again, NAME,
I know your inbox is probably a busy place, so I just wanted to send a quick followup email. I'd love to chat with you about having INSERT THE PERSON'S COMPANY'S
NAME AND THE THING YOU WANT.

Would love to chat,


[Signature]
Idiom: Take a raincheck
Meaning: say this when politely refusing an offer, with the understanding that one
may accept it at a later date. (reschedule)
Example: Is it okay if we take a raincheck? Something urgent in the office came up
so I am not available for lunch.
Annie: i was just calling to see if you wanted to have lunch tomorrow.
Mary: oh, I'm Sorry I have a meeting at that time, can I take a rain check?....
Expression: the bottom line
Meaning: the final result or the final output or outcome.
Example: "Although we worked hard on this deal, the bottom line is we didn't make
the sale, so it was a complete failure."
Expression: an old hand
Meaning: A person who has long experience, especially in one place
Example: "He can help us set up a company in Beijing. He's been working in China
for many years and speaks Chinese fluently. He's an old China hand."
Expression: it's a jungle out there
Meaning: it's a difficult market with many, tough competitors
Example: "Do you think a new company can survive without a unique product? It's a
real jungle out there!"
savvy - smart and knowledgeable
Example: "He's a savvy investor so there is a high probability this project will be
successful."
Expression: Cut throat
Meaning: "Cut-throat" is used to describe something that is very intense, aggressive
and merciless. Usually this expression describes competition among people in a
certain field.
Example: In business school, the competition was cut-throat.
The competition in getting the promotion in our company is cut throat you have to
show the boss that you deserve the position.
Idiom: Blood sweat and tears

Meaning: A project or action which involves blood, sweat and tears requires a lot of
effort and hard work.
Example: His success wasn't due to luck; it was blood, sweat and tears all the way.

How to say no politely to a person


1. Vague but effective: Thank you for asking, but that isnt going to work out for
me.
2. Its not personal: Thank you for asking, but Im not doing any interviews while
Im writing my book.
3. Ask me later: I want to do that, but Im not available until April. Will you ask me
again then?
4. Let me hook you up: I cant do it, but Ill bet Shelly can. Ill ask her for you.
5. Keep trying: None of those dates work for me, but I would love to see you. Send
me some more dates.
6. Try me last minute: I cant put anything else on my calendar this month, but Id
love to do that with you sometime. Will you call me right before you go again?
7. Gratitude: Thank you so much for your enthusiasm and support! Im sorry Im
not able to help you at this time.
8. Just No: Thanks, Ill have to pass on that. (Say it, then change topic.)
More informal use it to say no to a close person.
9. Gracious: I really appreciate you asking me, but my time is already committed.
10. Im Sorry: I wish I could, but its just not going to work right now.
11. It is Someone Elses Decision: I promised my coach (therapist, husband, etc.) I
wouldnt take on any more projects right now. Im working on creating more balance
in my life.
12. My Family is the Reason: Thanks so much for the invite, thats the day of my
sons soccer game, and I never miss those.
13. I Know Someone Else: I just dont have time right now. Let me recommend
someone who may be able to help you.
14. Im Already Booked: I appreciate you thinking of me, but Im afraid Im already
booked that day.
15. Setting Boundaries: Let me tell you what I can do Then limit the
commitment to what will be comfortable for you.
16. Not No, But Not Yes: Let me think about it, and Ill get back to you.
17. I am Willing But Look at My Workload Style: Im currently working on the Smith
report, the Jones report and the Macklemore report. How would you like me to
prioritize this new project?
Explanation: This particular phrase is especially helpful when dealing with a
superior, who you cant very well Just Say No to. Instead, show your willingness to
do the work but ask for an executive recommendation on how best to balance your
various obligations. You are not complaining about how overloaded you are and
whining for a way out; you are being a responsible employee and making sure you

do your job to the best of your ability (while also letting your boss(es) know just how
much you have on your plate).
18. Let Them Know You Wish You Could Help
Saying no can be softened by simply prefacing it with your desire to helpits
always easier to hear bad or disappointing news when its couched in good
intentions.
Say: Thanks for thinking of me for this opportunity. I really wish I was in a position
to take advantage of it because your organization and mission sound terrific.
However, Ive recently decided to focus on cultivating more speaking opportunities,
so Im limiting my writing commitments. If only there were more hours in the week!

Your Name
Your position to the company
Dear (name of your boss),
I would like to request approval for the upcoming project that I will make beginning
on (date) (please underline the date). Since the project is time consuming, I will
focus more on that project and but still promise to do the task I was assigned to.
The total cost of this project will be (the cost),
This project will help our company to grow in the future and I hope you will not miss
out on this. Sincerely,
(Your name and signature)
English Skills: 14 Ways of Giving Your Opinion
Posted on June 16, 2014
http://www.dreamstime.com/-image21000280In life were often asked to give our
opinion, or in some cases, we give our opinion even if it hasnt been asked for!
Sometimes we can be very direct with our opinion and it wont upset the other
person. However, more often than not we need to be careful how we share our
thoughts so as not to offend or hurt the other persons feelings. This can be
especially true in business where cultural differences can have a detrimental effect
on business dealings.
The British are especially careful when giving their opinion (in business, that is).
They often dont want to cause offence and consequently, will start their sentences
using certain expressions to soften the blow. A number of my clients have said that
the British are very polite and considerate in their dealings with colleagues and
clients. So much so, that the British way of doing business is often admired.
In this post, Id like to share with your some common expressions we have of giving
ones opinion. I have used Liz Potters excellent article for Macmillan Dictionarys
blog as the main structure and made some changes to it.

14 Ways of Giving Your Opinion


1. I think
This is the most common and general way of giving an opinion. You can use it both
informally and formally.
Example: I think if you offer a consistently good service to your clients, they will
keep coming back to you
.
2. I reckon
This is a more informal way of giving your opinion:
Meaning of reckon: To conclude
Example: I reckon it will be much faster to get to London by train.
3. In my opinion (4) In my view:
These expressions are more formal and are often used when talking about
important issues
Example: In my view, they made a huge mistake in not selling the company when
they had the chance.
Example: In my opinion, the Bank of England should not raise interest rates this
year.
5. It seems to me (6) All things considered:
When youve thought about a situation carefully you could use either of these two
expressions
Example: It seems to me that they are spending more money than they need to to
attract new talent into the company.
Example: All things considered, I think we made a wise choice in recruiting James.
7. If you ask me
This is used when your opinion is critical. Sometimes, people say this even when
their opinion hasnt been asked for! If you ask me,..
Example: If you ask me, she has spoilt her children far too much.
8. To be honest (9) To tell you the truth (10) To be frank
All three expressions are a way of giving your opinion when you know that people
may not like what you have to say
Example: To tell you the truth, your father was right when he said that you
undersold the company.

Example: To be honest, I preferred it when you were blonde.


Example: To be frank, I thought her acting was simply terrible.
11. Frankly speaking
You would use this expression to give your opinion in a more familiar and forthright
way.
Example: Frankly speaking, I dont know what she sees in him.

12. Personally
This is used to emphasize that you are giving your own opinion
Example: Personally, I think the CEO should apologize for his appalling behavior at
the shareholders meeting.
13. To my mind (14) As far as Im concerned
When you realize that other people may not agree with you would use either of
these expressions:
Example: To my mind, private education is better than state education.
As far as Im concerned, tennis is a much more interesting sport than football.