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Final Paper: Annotated Bibliography.

All the papers, with the exception of those that are taken from the
class list, address directly the question of how to infer human condition
from the evidence of stone making; there are some extras such as
Davison case of Australia which I wanted to use exemplary, a case
study in which the discussion about development of a technology. I
have not read the whole article but it gives me a variant toward which
the paper can incline, i.e. between cognitive capacities and language
as its specific, and technological development and stone making as its
specific. I would like to treat a form of this meta-argument as my
second paper to be able to see where the discussion can develop. Most
of the paper taken from the class list provide a background for the
analysis, except from Mcbrearty, S., & Brooks that might actually provide
an interesting counterpoint. The problem with the latter is that I might not
be able to read in its totality for this paper, if there is a problem with that I
have extra paper that relate directly to the stone/tool making part of the
case, and some directly about language that I can replace that one with.
Barnard, Philip J. (2011). Current Developments in Inferring Cognitive
Capabilities from the Archaeological Traces Left by Stone Tools: Caught
between a Rock and a Hard Inference. Stone Tools and the Evolution of
Human Cognition, edited by April Nowell & Iain Davidson, 2010.
Boulder (CO): University Press of Colorado. ISBN 978-1-6073-2030-2.
Cambridge Archaeological Journal, 21(01), 143-145.
doi:10.1017/s0959774311000126
Davidson, I., & Mcgrew, W. C. (2005). Stone Tools And The Uniqueness Of
Human Culture. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 11(4), 793817. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9655.2005.00262.x
Davidson, I. (2010). The Colonization of Australia and Its Adjacent Islands
and the Evolution of Modern Cognition. Current Anthropology, 51(S1).
doi:10.1086/650694
Klein, R. G. (2000). Archeology and the evolution of human behavior.
Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, 9(1), 17-36.
doi:10.1002/(sici)1520-6505(2000)9:13.0.co;2-a
Mcbrearty, S., & Brooks, A. S. (2000). The revolution that wasn't: A new
interpretation of the origin of modern human behavior. Journal of Human
Evolution, 39(5), 453-563. doi:10.1006/jhev.2000.0435
Sterelny, K. (2011). From hominins to humans: How sapiens became
behaviourally modern. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B:
Biological Sciences, 366(1566), 809-822. doi:10.1098/rstb.2010.0301

Stout, D. (2011). Stone Toolmaking and the Evolution of Human Culture


and Cognition. Culture Evolves, 197-214.
doi:10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199608966.003.0012
Stout, D. (2011). Possible Relations between Language and Technology
in Human Evolution. Stone Tools and the Evolution of Human Cognition,
edited by April Nowell & Iain Davidson, 2010. Boulder (CO): University
Press of Colorado. ISBN 978-1-6073-2030-2 Cambridge Archaeological
Journal, 21(01), 143-145. doi:10.1017/s0959774311000126