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May 2015

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Architecting Tomorrows Smart Cities


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One Smart City at the Time
Powering the Smart City of
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Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision

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Partnerships Will Help Smart


Cities Deal With Privacy And
Security Issues

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Editors Note
By Sue Marek
Editor-in-Chief /// FierceWireless

Editors Note
Paving the Way for
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Transportation
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The vision of the smart city of tomorrow holds an


enormous amount of promise. Picture a densely
populated city that is safer, more efficient and much
more environmentally conscious than todays urban
corridors.

these smart city platforms. But the wireless network


of the future will have to be much more sophisticated
than today and include more than just cellular
technology. In fact, most experts believe that the
wireless network framework of tomorrow will include
a mixture of cellular, Wi-Fi, short range sensors,
M2M communications and more. These various
technologies will be necessary in order to provide
the type of seamless connectivity that is necessary to
deliver mission-critical communications.

But migrating a citys energy grid, transportation


system, water supply and more to much more efficient
platforms that are interconnected is an extremely
complex undertaking that requires the cooperation of
many different players. And figuring out how to do this
in a way that is financially viable is even more difficult. But seamless connectivity is only the beginning.
Potentially, wireless networks of tomorrow will need
Nevertheless, experts say that there are some early
to support simple devices with low data rates as well
developments in the smart city arena that are
as much more bandwidth intensive devices that will
promising. According to a 2014 report from IHS
require much higher speed.
Technology, private-public partnerships are going to be
a necessity when deploying smart city initiatives.
In this ebook from FierceWireless, we look at how
mobile technology combined with machine to machine
Of course, wireless operators believe that the wireless
(M2M) technology will transform the cities of the
network will be the underlying framework for many of future and create a more sustainable lifestyle. n

Efficient, Healthier and


Faster One Smart City
at the Time
Powering the Smart City
of the Future
Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

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Paving the Way for Next-Generation Transportation


The connected car will play a vital role in easing traffic congestion, lessening pollution
and increasing safety. Which helps explain why it has become one of the most important
battlegrounds in the Internet of Things.

Editors Note
Paving the Way for
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Transportation

By Colin Gibbs

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The Internet of Things is a massive phenomenon


that has expanded to touch a wide variety of vertical
markets. And one of the biggest battlegrounds is the
connected car, which promises to transform the way we
move from place to place in smart cities and beyond.
Auto makers, operating system providers, carriers and
manufacturers of mobile devices all are vying to position
themselves at the center of connected car ecosystems
that are still in their infancy.

Smartphone as connected car hub

Consumers seem to be leaning toward the smartphonebased model largely in these early days because
theyve grown accustomed to using mobile apps for
entertainment, navigation and other purposes. But
that model doesnt help app developers take advantage
of some of the functionality and features a car-based
system can offer things like the car battery and sound
system, sophisticated controls on the steering wheel,
much larger screens and external GPS antennas that
There are two distinct models for the connected
provide more accurate location information.
car, said Derek Kerton principal analyst of The Kerton
Positioning the smartphone as the hub of a connected
Group, and there are powerful camps pushing either
model through. In the first model, the cars built-in (or car brings its own advantages, however. Many
after-market) technology serves as the hub that connects consumers use their devices as their primary way
of accessing vital information such as calendar and
various components; in the second, the smartphone
contacts, and mobile navigation apps such as Waze are
and the operating system that powers it -- is the
often superior to car-based systems.
centerpiece. So mobile heavyweights such as Apple,
Google, Samsung and the major carriers are competing But car makers have some big advantages, Kerton
against each other as well as against auto manufacturers. noted: Theyre ultimately responsible for the safety of

Powering the Smart City


of the Future
Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

Architecting Tomorrows Smart Cities // May 2015

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the vehicles they make, which gives them some legal


leverage to play the role of gatekeeper for what goes
into the car. Additionally, they install the sensors and
cameras that are at the heart of the advanced driver
assistance systems (ADAS) that control functions
such as adoptive cruise control and automatic
braking features that may not require a smartphone
connection at all. Connected car systems generally
have both a stand-alone embedded app platform as
well as an integrated platform for smartphone apps,
and GMs move last year to embrace Android Auto and
Apple CarPlay may indicate the two ecosystems will
increasingly overlap. But wireless carriers are likely to
once again find themselves playing the relatively small
role of simply providing connectivity.

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assistance and support for some smartphone apps,


among other things; many also offer a head-up display
projected on the windshield. And as the number of
features has grown, so have the options for connectivity:
AT&T powers most built-in systems in North America,
and Verizon Wireless which provides connectivity for
Hyundais Blue Link system recently introduced an
after-market product that can be installed on most cars
manufactured in the past 20 years. Car makers are also
beginning to leverage LTE for intra-vehicle and vehicleto-vehicle communication, Lanctot said, and some have
begun to issue software updates via Wi-Fi or over the air
through cellular connections.

Carriers want to be the entire back end, but


Carriers want to be the entire back end, but car makers car makers have their own ideas about that.
They want to manage the back end.
have their own ideas about that. They want to manage

the back end, said Roger Lanctot, associate director


of Strategy Analytics Global Automotive Practice. Its
been hard for carriers to play an added-value kind of a
role. Carriers that can provide top-notch coverage and
service, and that can leverage Voice over LTE and HD
Voice, may be able to maximize their role in the value
chain, Lanctot said.

ROGER LANCTOT, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF STRATEGY


ANALYTICS GLOBAL AUTOMOTIVE PRACTICE

Multiple connections and technologies are laying the


foundation for a variety of scenarios that can increase
safety, ease congestion and minimize pollution. Some of
the most compelling of these use cases include:

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Editors Note
Paving the Way for
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Transportation
Sponsored Content:

Efficient, Healthier and


Faster One Smart City
at the Time
Powering the Smart City
of the Future
Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

Beyond single-vehicle systems

Trucking companies are hoping to use a combination


The first connected cars came to market nearly ten years of radar, GPS and other wireless solutions to enable
ago in the form of General Motors OnStar-enabled
platooning, whereby multiple trucks automatically
autos, which issued automated crash notifications in the
remain several meters apart at a precise distance as
form of phone calls via an onboard modem. In recent
they travel. The concept, which uses both a human
years, common telematics systems have expanded
driver and computers, is aimed at increasing safety as
to include streaming media, navigation, roadside
well as lowering fuel costs by reducing the amount of
>> Paving the Way for Next-Generation Transportation

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wind drag on each truck. Once it gains traction among


Ford is planning to sell cars that can read traffic signs
transportation companies, platooning could conceivably
and adjust the speed automatically according to
expand to private users who opt to join convoys.
speed limits, and BMW is developing a technology
that will deliver information posted on variable
Volvo is partnering with Ericsson and the sporting
message signs and deliver it directly to a display
goods manufacturer POC to develop bicycle helmets
on the cars dashboard. And the Utah Department
that communicate with its connected cars. The feature
of Transportation is experimenting with sensors
uses popular bicycling apps and the Volvo cloud to alert
embedded in traffic signals and pavement to gather
both parties of potential collisions. The driver is made
data that can be used to ease congestion. Youre
aware of the cyclists location through the cars head-up
going to see more and more communication from
display, while the cyclist is warned through a helmetthe roadside to the car, and between cars, using
mounted alert light.
smartphones or embedded modems, Lanctot said.
A 2.2-mile long limited-access road in Montgomery
Most cars will have both.
County, Va., is being used as a testing track for a
variety of next-generation transportation technologies
The connected car is still very much in its early days,
and applications. The Virginia Smart Road features
and many of its features and components including
in-pavement sensors that can measure moisture,
the autonomous car are years away from fully coming
temperature, vibration and strain, and allows researchers to market. But the business models and partnerships
to create snow, fog and other weather conditions.
that will lay the foundation for the industrys growth are
The road is operated and maintained by the Virginia
being forged today. Carriers, OS providers and mobile
Department of Transportation and is slated to be
app developers are moving aggressively to ensure they
extended to 5.7 miles eventually.
play a part in that growth. n

>> Paving the Way for Next-Generation Transportation

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Editors Note
Paving the Way for
Next-Generation
Transportation
Sponsored Content:

Efficient, Healthier and


Faster One Smart City
at the Time
Powering the Smart City
of the Future
Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

Architecting Tomorrows Smart Cities // May 2015

Sponsored Content

Efficient, Healthier and Faster One Smart City


at a Time
By Vanja Subotic, Senior Product Manager, InterDigital

Many market research reports predict large


growth in the Smart Cities arena whether by city
numbers, annual investments in the Smart City
projects or the number of the overall connected
Internet of Things (IoT) devices. What is even
more interesting is that the Smart City concept
covers such a wide range of solutions focused
on providing services that improve the lives of
city inhabitants. Based on the application, Smart
Cities market can be segmented into Smart
Transport, Smart Energy, Smart Healthcare,
Smart Homes and Buildings, etc. Furthermore,
the worlds population that lives in an urban
environment is expected to grow substantially,
while there is also a large aging population. With
these facts at hand, the cities that we live in will
need to dramatically change and improve to create
a more sustainable future for today and future
generations.
With the constant evolution of the Machine to
Machine (M2M) and IoT space, many of the

technical constraints are becoming less of a


challenge. However, with Smart Cities specifically,
challenges are often more fundamental in nature.
For example, all cities are unique. As pointed
out by Machina Research in their recent report
on Understanding the Drivers Behind Smart
Cities, there are certain Smart City services and
applications that are standard and portable, but
in many cases implementations will need to be
adjusted according to each citys requirement.
A lot will depend on whether the city is located
in a developed or a developing country, or the
actual size and type of the city. However, what
is encouraging is that across highly developed
countries like South Korea or more developing
countries like China, it is not a matter of if, but
when Smart City initiatives will launch.
While many view Smart Cities as the long tail of
the growing M2M and IoT market due to such
versatility of applications, cities themselves, and
sometimes political or regulator aspects, there is

a clear need to manage the quality of life of a large


and growing urban population. This is why many
cities have started experimenting with the Smart
City concepts. It is difficult to predict how smart
our cities will become 5, 10, 20 years from now,
but InterDigital, along with its partners, is excited
to take on the challenge whether it is to help
with interoperability, cross-vertical cooperation,
standardization, or simply making each one of us
a little more efficient, healthier and faster - one
Smart City at a time.
Currently, InterDigital is actively taking on
challenges in the Smart Cities arena with its
oneMPOWERTM platform, the most mature
oneM2MTM standards-based application
enablement platform in the industry today. The
company is already defining new frontiers on an
industry-wide level as well, for example with the
United Kingdom oneTRANSPORTTM initiative.
Visit www.interdigital.com to learn more about
InterDigitals M2M / IoT solutions. n
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Powering the Smart City of the Future


City managers and utility companies are looking at smart meters to reduce costs and detect
power outages.

Editors Note

By Jason Bovberg
Paving the Way for
Next-Generation
Transportation
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Faster One Smart City
at the Time

Energy efficiency is fundamental to the smart city


concept. Some cities are already transforming their
energy grid, some are looking into solutions, and some
are still a long way off. Whereas London and San
Francisco are retrofitting residential and commercial
buildings to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and
introducing vehicle-charging mechanisms, Dubai and
Singapore are more concerned with transportation,
parking, and trash removal. Every city has a different
starting point, but the energy grid is evolving in some
capacity in every potential smart city.
The most basic approach to viewing smart cities is
looking at the different products and services that make
up the city. Just as the smart home contains individual
smart products, the smart city contains smart street lights,
smart parking meters, smart trash-removal systems, smart
transportation systems, and smart utility systems (e.g.,
water, waste water, gas, electricity). Also just like a smart

home, the infrastructure that makes up a smart city is


more than just a collection of individual products.

Powering the Smart City


of the Future

Connectivity enables the


connection of the infrastructure
to other connected products and
services.

Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

TOM KERBER, SMART HOME ANALYST AT PARKS


ASSOCIATES

Each of these individual verticals has huge potential


to add connectivity-enabled, value-added services that
improve functionality, reduce cost, and improve revenue,
said Tom Kerber, smart home analyst at Parks Associates.

Energy Opportunities Today


Opportunities for integration arent limited to connecting
the various parts of the city infrastructure. Connectivity

Architecting Tomorrows Smart Cities // May 2015

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enables the connection of the infrastructure to other


connected products and services, Kerber said.
Smart products in the home that are integrated into
the demand-management platform operated by the
local utility is a current example of a broader view of
connectivity.
Cities can also significantly
improve both their efficiency and
the level of service they offer to
their residents by using digital
technology to measure, analyze,
and manage their energy use in real-time.
OLIVIER PAUZET, VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKET STRATEGY
AT SIERRA WIRELESS

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administrators to remotely control light fixtures, regulate


energy use, and monitor the status of each light. The
City of Los Angeles recently announced that it would
implement a Philips system that will connect each light
point to a web-based system. The software provides
the current lighting status, auto-notifies administrators
of faults, and produces accurate information about
the energy usage of each street light. Such a system
can provide significant energy savings to municipal
customers: LED lighting combined with intelligent
controls can deliver savings of up to 80 percent.
An interesting development for current and future
smart cities is the impulse to find ways to reduce power
consumption for some of the things they pay for directly.
The most obvious example goes back to street lighting,
said Matt Hatton, founder of Machina Research. In
some cities, street lighting accounts for 40 percent of
total expenditures, and there are savings of upwards of
50 percent to be made from implementing new LED
lighting along with connected capabilities, which allows
for adaptive lighting.

The opportunities for connecting city services with


other industries operating within the city is nearly
endless. Connecting with smart products, local retailers,
and service providers will enable many new business
models to enhance energy usage for everyone involved in However, according to Hatton, most cities arent really
the partnership.
responsible for their energy grids. Its typically the
utilities, which are looking first and foremost at ways of
Cities can also significantly improve both their
reducing losses, he said. These can be technical losses,
efficiency and the level of service they offer to their
which can be as high as 50 percent, and higher in some
residents by using digital technology to measure,
instances. Theyre also interested in reducing nonanalyze, and manage their energy use in real-time, said
technical losses such as fraud, and theyre implementing
Olivier Pauzet, vice president of market strategy at Sierra
smart meters to do that. Also, lots of smart-meter
Wireless.
deployments are regulatory-driven, aimed at reducing
An example of this kind of digital tech is connected
electricity usage, or load balancingshifting usage to offlighting management systems, which allows city
peak times.
>> Powering the Smart City of the Future

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Transportation
Sponsored Content:

Efficient, Healthier and


Faster One Smart City
at the Time
Powering the Smart City
of the Future
Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

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The Future of Energy


At the edge of the smart grid, advanced residential
meters with communication modules can offer better
service, including more detailed data collection and ondemand reads. With two-way cellular or mesh network
capabilities, Pauzet said, utilities have the real-time
data they need to improve load-balancing and power
management. These types of solutions can be set up to
allow businesses and consumers to monitor how much
electricity they use, when they use it, and how much it
costs, which in turn helps improve behaviors around
power consumption and conservation.
Beyond the utility, the monitoring of power transmission
lines, substations, and distributed networks is advancing
rapidly. Many utilities are finding that deploying 2G,
3G, and 4G wireless connectivity in their metering,
monitoring, and surveillance equipment is an easier, more
reliable solution than ever before, Pauzet said.
Smart grid technologies can detect and isolate power
outages, often containing them before they become
large-scale blackouts. They also enable distributed
power generation (such as small hydro, biomass, or solar
panels installed on individual houses), which is critical
for the success of alternative, renewable energy sources
and reducing overall system load, Pauzet added. In the
end, these technologies will result in improved service
levels for customers, lower-cost power, enhanced capital
management, and better use of the underlying resource.
The integration of distributed energy resources creates
a great opportunity and a huge challenge for the grid.
Local utilities will need to transform themselves to
operate the local distribution network in a similar way
>> Powering the Smart City of the Future

that the ISO operates the transmission grid today,


Kerber said. Adopting a distribution system operator
model ensures that the grid will remain stable as the
market moves from central to distributed generation.
Distributed generation also creates an opportunity
behind the meter.

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Editors Note

In some cities, street lighting


accounts for 40 percent of total
expenditures, and there are
savings of upwards of 50 percent
to be made from implementing
new LED lighting along with
connected capabilities, which allows for
adaptive lighting.

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Transportation
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at the Time
Powering the Smart City
of the Future

MATT HATTON, FOUNDER OF MACHINA RESEARCH

As smart products continue to enter homes in larger


numbers, local energy management systems will
incorporate storage, choreograph connected loads, and
optimize energy efficiency.

Zero Loss
According to Kiva Allgood, Qualcomms senior
director of global market development, one of the great
visions of the smart city is to evolve toward a zero-loss
system. A lot of cities dont have consistent power,
she said. Wired tech makes things difficult, but thanks
to wireless/cellular coverage with batteries in current
systems, that tech has come so far that we can start
looking at zero-loss concepts. Its not difficult, and the
technology exists today. n

Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

Architecting Tomorrows Smart Cities // May 2015

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oneMPOWERTM Platform for Smart Cities

InterDigitals oneMPOWER platform provides M2M/IoT application enabling


services that include connectivity, device, data, and transaction management
resulting in faster time-to-market, scalable application development and lower
operation costs. Both scalable and secure horizontal M2M/IoT solution, it is
the most mature oneM2M standards-based platform in the industry today.

www.interdigital.com

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Pervasive Wireless Connectivity is Critical to


Smart City Vision
High-capacity wireless networks will include macrocells, microcells, Wi-Fi and more.

Editors Note

By Jason Bovberg

Paving the Way for


Next-Generation
Transportation
Sponsored Content:

Efficient, Healthier and


Faster One Smart City
at the Time

When considering the smart city vision, one of the


obvious features is the wireless networking framework
that will both enable smooth communication among
citizens and bolster the technological infrastructure.
Many experts envision a sophisticated network that
not only includes cellular but also Wi-Fi, short range
sensors, machine-to-machine (M2M) communications,
and more.
The smart city of the future
must and will have citywide
connectivity for both people and
devices (such as sensors).
JESSE BERST, CHAIRMAN OF THE SMART CITIES COUNCIL

The goal of the networked society is that coverage is


universal for citizens, said Anders Svensson, head of
4G solutions, Ericsson North America, so that the

members of that society can get mobile broadband


access. But a further goal is communication within the
smart citys technology. The smart city of the future
must and will have citywide connectivity for both
people and devices (such as sensors), said Jesse Berst,
chairman of the Smart Cities Council. The networked
society we are now entering is inclusive, equitable, and
empowering, Svensson added.
On one hand, that means building high-capacity
networks, including large macro cells that provide wide
coverage and smaller micro cells that can fill in where
buildings or tunnels block radio connectivityas well
as complementary Wi-Fi hotspots in public areas for
alternate access. On the other hand, the empowered
smart city will also be characterized by smart wireless
communication built into the underlying infrastructure.

Powering the Smart City


of the Future
Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

Common standards for management, orchestration,


and end-to-end security are still being developed, said
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Svensson. The implementation of all this in todays


At Qualcomm, we call that event management based on
smart cities uses technologies such as 2G, 3G, 4G,
intelligent connectivity. Thats the city of the future.
Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and proprietary technologies. Such
technologies are selected for various uses case based
The implementation of all this
on differences in technical characteristics and the
in todays smart cities uses
need ensure security and reliability. The flexibility of
technologies such as 2G, 3G, 4G,
technology choices enables fast deployment, but there
Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and proprietary
is an opportunity to improve the efficiency of wireless
technologies.
networks as well as the management of the M2M devices.

The Characteristics of a Smart City


When you think about what cities spend most of their
money on, and where their capital expenditures are, its
infrastructure and city services such as water, gas, safety,
and lighting. And perhaps the key characteristic of a
smart city is that this infrastructure is maintained by an
intelligent, networked communications system.
The communications system of the future is intelligent
enough to understand when a utility needs to be
serviced, or when a light post needs to be maintained,
said Kiva Allgood, senior director of global market
development at Qualcomm. And that information goes
back to the city so that it can become more effective and
efficient, based on the information thats perceived from
the infrastructure and the system.
That fundamental concept of an intelligent system
that provides dynamic feedbackof touching a system
only when it needs to be touched rather than touching
it every dayapplies to a great number of use cases.
Imagine a vision in which all of a citys work systems
are basically predictive, Allgood said. Thats a big
leap forward, not just sensing but intelligently sensing.
>> Pervasive Wireless Connectivity is Critical to Smart City Vision

ANDERS SVENSSON, HEAD OF 4G SOLUTIONS, ERICSSON


NORTH AMERICA

Its a city that becomes more in concert with its


surroundings. Citizens might even have apps on their
phones to help with crowd-sourcing (Theres a
pothole on Main Street or Someone sprayed graffiti
at Broadway and Poplar), and that information
goes directly to a work crew or is integrated into the
maintenance workflow system. You actually have an
interconnected system whose components live and
breathe together, Allgood said. Its built on knowledge,
on established algorithms, and is intelligent enough to
prevent something from happening or divert something
from going wrong.

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Transportation
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Efficient, Healthier and


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at the Time
Powering the Smart City
of the Future
Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

The Birth of a Smart City


Smart cities that have implemented intelligent
connectivity have similar origins. First, they generally
begin with a leadership team that is very forwardthinking, with a strong technology platform.
Governmental leadership is really a cornerstone of
successful smart cities, Allgood said.
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Second, consolidation of technology across departments


is essential. A smart city should be very focused on the
concept of reuse, repurpose, reimagine, Allgood said.
Think about a light post. What else can that light post
do for the city? Can you install Wi-Fi? Can you use
it for small cells to get additional backhaul capacity?
Can you use it for early-warning signals for tornadoes
or pollution? Can you use it for geospatial location for
firearms?

Wireless role
The wireless network of the smart city will evolve
to support massive deployment of MTC and M2M
communications, Svensson said, enabling use cases
such as monitoring and automation of buildings and
infrastructure, smart agriculture, logistics, racking, and
fleet management.
Potential enhancements in store for the wireless network
of the future are as follows:

The communications system of


architecturally simple devices that use a lowthe future is intelligent enough to
complexity transmission modes and lower data rates
understand when a utility needs
bandwidth-limited peak rates and half-duplex
to be serviced, or when a light
operation
post needs to be maintained.
KIVA ALLGOOD, SENIOR DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL MARKET
DEVELOPMENT AT QUALCOMM

sensors that can run on battery power for many years


long transmission ranges for devices in remote
locations

Third, these cities have a clear understanding of the


monetization componenthow a networked society
is going to add sufficient value back to the city. As an
example, Allgood said, Big Belly Solar is already
in 1,500 cities, delivering big waste containers with
solar compacting technology on top, leveraging 3G
communication with a modem and an ultrasonic
sensor inside that determines when container needs to
be picked up. In real time, this tech provides routing
capability to maintenance workers, who only go to the
containers that need maintenance. In such a scenario,
efficiency pays for the containers and the technology
inside.
>> Pervasive Wireless Connectivity is Critical to Smart City Vision

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scalable networks that can connect either a large or a


small number of M2M devices
well integrated device-to-device communication and
capillary networks

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Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

Berst contends that the broad trend is toward


multipurpose networks. Today, most cities have spotty
wireless coverage and multiple networks, he said. We
might never reach the day when a single network can
serve all of a citys needs, but multipurpose networks are
the futuremultiple departments sharing the costs and
sharing the network. n
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Partnerships Will Help Smart Cities Deal


With Privacy And Security Issues
Cities must balance convenience with consumer privacy when implementing
smart city strategies.

Editors Note

By Jim Barthold

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Transportation
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Faster One Smart City
at the Time

Todays smart city is like a grade schooler in a university


library; theres a deep trough of information at its
fingertips but only a shallow comprehension of how
to access and make use of that information. As the city
matures and better understands whats needed to become
genuinely smart, that information will become more
accessible, including how to best secure the data thats
retrieved while protecting consumer privacy.
We dont have smart cities yet and we dont have the
governance and organizational structures to support
the future vision of the smart city, said Ruthbea Yesner
Clarke, research director-smart cities, for research firm
IDC. In many cases (cities are) subsumed by data. Youre
going to have a lot more information from all these devices
and you need a lot of ways to manage it.
Smart cities are expected to gather information from
public and private data reservoirs to monitor traffic,
read water meters, control the electrical grid and assist
public safety.

The biggest obstacle smart cities face is that, in general,


most cities use technology that is less sophisticated than
whats in the hands of the general public. Because of this
technology disparity, cities are really starting to be
concerned about the security of this data that cannot
necessarily be protected with old operating systems and
passwords, Clarke said.
The city must upgrade its technology and install
safeguards to protect the integrity of the data it gathers.
You have to have a citywide cyber security policy
and a citywide data privacy policy and a citywide
database architecture, said Jesse Berst, chairman of the
Smart Cities Council. You cant trust your individual
departments to each get it right. The fire department and
public works and water utility cant all be cyber security
experts.

Powering the Smart City


of the Future
Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

Cities must also tread lightly when it comes to the


public they want to serveeven if their best intentions
Architecting Tomorrows Smart Cities // May 2015

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are to provide a service thats a convenience such as


Harrisburgs use of license plate recognition to allow
authorized consumers to park anywhere within the city.
In that instance, drivers are trading a bit of privacy for the
convenience of finding an available spot within the city.

Cities can benefit from the experience that the (wireless)


industry has in this space. There are best practices that
folks can look to as well as a lot of experience that can be
leveraged from the private sector, Marinho said.

Privacy, though is going beyond convenience.


Convenience implies a smaller type of tradeoff, Clarke
said. The Harrisburg parkers are clearly being tracked;
thats the point of the program (but) thats maybe a
privacy concern. We have a lot to do around really
being transparent in the government about how data is
collected, how its used, and how its attached to your own
personal information.

Those vendors take that enormous cost of security and


they amortize it over tens of thousands of customers as
opposed to (the city) needing to go build it, Berst said.
The Amazons, Microsofts of the world and their cloud
material has great redundancy.

Cities can benefit from the experience that


the (wireless) industry has in this space.
There are best practices that folks can look
to as well as a lot of experience that can be
leveraged from the private sector.
JOHN MARINHO, VICE PRESIDENT OF CYBERSECURITY
AND TECHNOLOGY AT CTIA

Smart cities also tap wireless devices as databanks of


consumer information. Despite outward appearances,
data that comes from those devices and flows across
airwaves to network access points isnt any more of
a security risk than data running on wires, said John
Marinho, vice president of cybersecurity and technology
at CTIAas long as the cities adhere to established
wireless industry best practices.

FierceWireless

Editors Note

Cities should also lean on their vendors.

Marinho suggested that cities can also tap the expertise


of willing wireless service providers as well as the data
security companies with which they work.
You want to leverage those folks that have a lot of
experience with this field, he said. There is a wealth
of tools regarding security that the industry has made
available. In the case of privacy there are industry-best
practices that folks should apply.
Vendors should also see smart cities as an opportunity
to reuse their technology and expand their businesses
from dozens of private customers to hundreds and
even thousands of public entities, suggested a Gartner
Research report, Smart Cities Will Include 10 Billion
Things by 2020 Start Now to Plan, Engage and Position
Offerings, authored by Anurag Gupta, Bettina TratzRyan and Peter Middleton.

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Faster One Smart City
at the Time
Powering the Smart City
of the Future
Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

City governments are fostering citizen and business


innovation by giving guidance for data governance and
smart city objectives, leaving TSP (Technology and
Service Providers) strategists with opportunities to build

>> Partnerships Will Help Smart Cities Deal With Privacy And Security Issues

Architecting Tomorrows Smart Cities // May 2015

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engagement and risk models into their strategies, the


report stated.
We dont have smart cities yet. We
have a handful of leading cities that are
experimenting with some smart city
implementations.
RUTHBEA YESNER CLARKE, RESEARCH DIRECTOR-SMART
CITIES, FOR RESEARCH FIRM IDC

While not specifically addressing security and privacy


concerns, the report offered a road map for how cities can
develop commercial partnerships with the vendors that
serve those private customers.

A majority of investments will come from the private


sector, the report said so governments can trust the
private player to build and operate the project.
It goes back to making sure that youre touching all of
the key elements that need to be addressed; that youre
leveraging folks that have experience in this space; that
youre working with folks that have a track record for
doing this, Marinho said.
The best news is that cities are still in the early stages of
what promises to be a long-term learning experience.
We dont have smart cities yet. We have a handful of
leading cities that are experimenting with some smart city
implementations, Clarke said. n

FierceWireless

Editors Note
Paving the Way for
Next-Generation
Transportation
Sponsored Content:

Efficient, Healthier and


Faster One Smart City
at the Time
Powering the Smart City
of the Future
Pervasive Wireless
Connectivity is Critical to
Smart City Vision
Partnerships Will Help
Smart Cities Deal With
Privacy And Security
Issues

>> Partnerships Will Help Smart Cities Deal With Privacy And Security Issues

Architecting Tomorrows Smart Cities // May 2015