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PROCESSINGELECTRICARCFURNACEDUST P f/G o--/O 7g A5 6 o

INTOSALEABLECHEMICALPRODUCTS
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BYPRODUCTS OF STEEL W~W=ACT~FE
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CAN ADDTO PLANT REVEWE~

The modern steel industry uses electric arc furnace (EAF) technology to
manufacture steel. A major drawback of this technology is the production of
BENEFITS EAF dust, which is listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a
l Eliminates need to dispose of hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. The
annual disposal of approximately 0.65 million tons of EAF dust in the United
hazardouswaste
States and Canada is an expensive, unresolved problem for the steel industry.
l No need to transport hazardous
waste off-site for processing EAF dust byproducts are generated during the manufacturing process by a
l Reduced energy requirements variety of mechanisms. The dust consists of various metals (e.g., zinc, lead,
cadmium) that occur as vapors at 1,600C (EAF hearth temperature): these
. Production of saleable products
vapors are condensed and collected in a baghouse. The production of one
from former waste products ton of steel will generate approximately 25 pounds of EAF dust as a byproduct,
. Frees landfill space which is currently disposed of in landfills.

The Technology Solution

Drinkard Metalox, Inc. (DMI) has developed a unique technology to completely


APPLICATIONS process EAF dust into saleable products using a hydro metallurgical process.
Applies throughout the steel The process technology is based on digestion of EAF dust, followed by a
industry, where 65,000 tons of series of steps to isolate and retrieve the individual components. The DMI
electric arc furnace dust are
generated each year in
North America.

This technology will


benefit the steel
industry because it
produces a
saleable product at
a reasonable price,
lowering energy
costs and the need
to truck furnace
dust off site
for processing.
technology saves energy by eliminating the need for furnace treatment, where-
as the competing Waelz kiln process requires two furnace treatment steps to
adequately separate EAF dust. The DMI technology reduces waste by making
saleable chemicals from materials that otherwise would be landfilled or have
very low value. Unlike the Waelz process, the DMI process will be implemented
on-site at a steel mill, thereby eliminating the expense and risk of transporting
hazardous waste.
NICEa-NationalIndustrial
Current Status Competitivenessthrough Energy,
Environment,Economics:
An innovative, cost-sharing program
Pilot plant production runs began in July 1997, and have now been completed. to promote energy efficiency, clean
DMI now has a Letter of Intent with a major steel company to install a full-scale, production, and economiccompeti-
on-site demonstration unit. Assuming contract negotiations are successful, DMI tivenessin industryThisgrantprogram
provides funding to state and
expects to begin construction in 1998, with plant operations beginning in 1999. industry partnerships for projects
that demonstrateadvancesin energy
efficiency and clean production
technologies.Awardeesreceivea
one-time grant of up to $400,000.
Grants fund up to 50% of total
project cost for up to 3 years.

PARTNERS

Current Energy Use (Btu) 776 billion Drinkard Metalox, Inc.,


Charlotte,NC
With Proposed Technology 106 billion
Energy Savings 670 billion NICE3
North CarolinaOfficeof Waste
Reduction

FORMOREINFORMATION
NICE3Website:
http://www.oit.doe.gov/Access/nice3/
CO, EMISSIONSC02E~i~~~~~~
FROM FROM
NICE3programcontact:
SteveBlazek
PRODUCTION ENERGYUSE SLAG TOTAL ; GoldenFieldOffice,DOE
Current Waste (tons) 12,300 .28,400 86,000 j 1617ColeBoulevard
44,600 : Golden,CO80401
(303) 275-4723
(303) 275-4273(fax)
Steve-blazek@nrel.gov
FredGallagher
DrinkardMetalox,Inc.
2226NorthDavidsonStreet
Charlotte,NC282051830
(704)332-8173
(704) 272-0356(fax)
E-mail:METALOX@aol.com

Officeof Industrial Technologies


EnergyEfficiencyand Renewable
Energy
U.S. Departmentof Energy
Washington,DC. 20585

DOE/GO-l 0098-560
April 1998
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