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INSTALLATION MANUAL

FOR

SG-SMARTS

Swaco, A Division of M-I L.L.C.


A Smith/Schlumberger Company
5950 North Course Drive
Houston, Texas 77072

Tel: 281-988-1868
Fax: 281-988-1888
MANUAL PART #90-90-844 (Rev. A)

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE

1.1 DESCRIPTION OF THE MAJOR COMPONENTS 6


1.1.1 CPU box 6
1.1.2 F.O.C. module 7
1.1.3 Barrier box 7
1.1.4 Drillers monitor 8
1.1.5 Satellite box 8
1.2 FIBER OPTICS 8
1.3 INSTALLATION 9
1.3.1 Fiber optics 9
1.3.2 F.O.C. module 9
1.3.3 Repeater box 10
1.3.4 C.P.U. box 10
1.3.5 Barrier box 10
1.3.6 Drillers monitor 10
1.3.7 Satellite box 11
1.3.8 Intrinsically safe horn 11
1.3.9 Horn disabled warning light 11
1.3.10 Circular chart recorder 11
1.3.11 Remote monitor printer 11
1.3.12 Printer 11
1.3.13 Slave monitors 12
APPENDIX A PXR105 CIRCULAR CHART RECORDER 14
1.0 SCOPE 14
2.0 SETUP 14
2.1 Electrical connections 14
2.2 Familiarization with controls and displays 14
2.3 Installing the pens 16
2.4 Installing charts 16
3.0 CONFIGURATION 17
4.0 CALIBRATION 21
APPENDIX B PX105 CIRCULAR CHART RECORDER 21
1.0 SCOPE 21
2.0 SETUP 21
2.1 Electrical connections 21
2.2 Familiarization with controls and displays 22
2.3 Installing the pens 23
2.4 Installing charts 23
3.0 OPERATION 24
4.0 CONFIGURATION 24
5.0 CALIBRATION 27
APPENDIX C REMOTE OFFICE CRT 27
1.0 SCOPE 27
2.0 INSTALLATION PROCEDURES 28

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2.1 Removing the cover 28
2.2 Disk drive installation 28
2.2.1 Hard disk drive (HDD) (80-16-748) 28
2.2.2 Floppy disk drive (FDD) (80-16-744) 29
2.3 Add on card installation 29
2.4 Parallel port cable installation 29
2.5 Hold down clamp installation 29
2.6 Mounting brackets 30
3.0 COMPONENT PREPLACEMENT PROCEDURES 31
3.1 Changing the filter (80-30-220) 31
3.2 Power supply (70-74-091) 31
3.3 Power supply pin assignments 32
APPENDIX D PANASONIC PRINTER 33
STEP 1 CONNECTING 33
STEP 2 INSTALLING RIBBON CASSETTE (80-71-525) 34
STEP 3 PAPER INSTALLATION 35
APPENDIX E SLAVE MONITOR MODEL KV-13TR28 35
1.0 SCOPE 35
2.0 SETTING UP THE T.V. 36
3.0 ELECTRICAL ADJUSTMENTS USING THE REMOTE CONTROL 37
APPENDIX F SLAVE MONITOR MODEL KV-13M10 38
1.0 SCOPE 38
2.0 SETTING UP THE T.V. 38
3.0 ELECTRICAL ADJUSTMENTS USING THE REMOTE CONTROL 38
APPENDIX G SLAVE MONITOR MODEL KV-13M20 40
1.0 SCOPE 40
2.0 SETTING UP THE T.V. 40
3.0 ELECTRICAL ADJUSTMENTS USING THE REMOTE CONTROL 41
APPENDIX H CIRCUIT BOARD SETUP 42
1.0 SCOPE 42
2.0 CMOS SETUP FOR THE 386DX AND PENTIUM CPU 42
APPENDIX I 44
GLASS VERSATILE LINK TYPE FIBER OPTIC 44
CONNECTOR TERMINATION INSTRUCTIONS
1.0 STRIP OUTER JACKET (CABLE STRIPPER TOOL) 44
2.0 INSTALL CRIMP RING 44
3.0 STRIP BUFFER (FIBER STRIPPER TOOL) 44
4.0 INSTALL VERSATILE LINK-PIN CONNECTOR 44
5.0 CLEAVER FIBER 44
POSITIONER PLATE REPLACEMENT 45
CLEANING DIAMOND BLADE AND ANVIL 45
APPENDIX J 45
PLASTIC VERSATILE LINK TYPE FIBER OPTIC 45
CONNECTOR TERMINATION INSTRUCTIONS
1.0 CONNECTORING 45
2.0 STRIPPING OUTER JACKET 45

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3.0 INSTALLING CONNECTOR 46
4.0 POLISHING THE FIBER 46
APPENDIX K 47
GLASS ST TYPE FIBER OPTIC CONNECTOR 47
TERMINATION INSTRUCTIONS
1.0 INSTALL STRAIN RELIEF BOOT 47
2.0 STRIP OUTER JACKET (CABLE STRIPPER TOOL) 47
3.0 STRIP BUFFER (FIBER STRIPPER TOOL) 48
4.0 INSTALL CABLE ANCHOR (CRIMP TOOL) 48
5.0 INSTALL CRIMP SLEEVE (CRIMP TOOL) 48
6.0 INSTALL FERRULE ASSEMBLY 49
7.0 CLEAVE FIBER (ST-2 CLEAVE TOOL) 50
8.0 POSITION STRAIN RELIEF BOOT 50
9.0 POSITIONER PLATE REPLACEMENT 50
10.0 CLEANING DIAMOND BLADE AND ANVIL 50

APPENDIX L BIT TRACKING 51


1.0 THEORY OF OPERATION 51
2.0 HARDWARE INSTALLATION 53
2.1 Preparation 54
2.2 Installation 54
3.0 TAGGING SENSORS 55
4.0 CALIBRATION 55
4.1 Calculating the calibration value 55
4.2 Calibrating bit tracking 57
5.0 BIT TRACKING NOTES 58

APPENDIX M INSTALLATION AND IDENTIFICATION DRAWINGS 59


Level I 96-27-025 60
Level II 96-27-125 61

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INSTALLATION PROCEDURES
FOR S.M.A.R.T. SYSTEM

1.0 OVERVIEW OF SYSTEM

The SWACO Geolograph S.M.A.R.T. System is a state of the art data acquisition system
that is used to monitor variables around a drilling rig. It is designed to be intrinsically
safe for operation in hazardous areas.

1.1 DESCRIPTION OF THE MAJOR COMPONENTS

Refer to drawing 96-27-025 for the major components of Level 1 or drawing 96-27-125
for the major components of Level 2. Since Level 1 and Level 2 only differ in the
amount and types of sensors used, the description of the major components will be the
same for both.

1.1.1 CPU BOX

The CPU Box (Central Processing Unit) controls how all the major components
communicate with each other. It is responsible for acquiring the data from the satellite
box or boxes and relaying that information to the monitors. It is also responsible for
controlling the horn, the alarm indication light (if applicable), and the circular chart
recorders. Inside the box is an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) that supplies power to
all of the other units except those located in the remote trailers or offices. This UPS
generates the voltages 5VDC and 12VDC. It is battery backed up, so that in case of a
power outage, it will maintain these voltages under a full load for more than 30 minutes.
It also has a 110 VAC output that can be used to maintain power to the circular chart
recorder during these outages. The card cage, located to the right of the UPS, is an 8 slot,
common buss backplane. Into these slots are plugged the main control boards for the
unit. These cards can be plugged into any of the slots. Because of the lengths of cables
that plug into these cards, they should be located as follows:

FIRST CARD serial I/O card. This card is the serial controller card and is responsible
for the communication between the CPU box and monitors, satellites, or other devices.
*SECOND CARD 4 channel D/A card. This card takes the signals from the CPU card
and converts them to 0 10VDC signals to send to a recorder
THIRD CARD CPU card. This card contains the microprocessor and as such controls
the rest of the system.
FOURTH CARD RAM/ROM card. This card contains the solid state disk drives used
to hold the software program and some of its data files.
FIFTH CARD relay card. This card takes the signals from the CPU card and converts
them to relay contact closures to turn on alarms, lights or other devices.

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*In some installations the 4 channel D/A card is removed and replaced by an 8 channel
D/A card. In this case, the 8 channel card would be placed between the RAM/ROM card
and the relay card.

Below the card cage is the J-Box Interface Board. This board takes the +5VDC and the
+12VDC from the UPS and puts them on field terminatable connectors. The +12 volts
are sent through self resetable fuses to the connectors P4, P5, and P6. This voltage is
used for the satellite boxes. The +5 volts is used to generate other voltages via the on-
board DC-DC converters. The larger of the DC-DC converters is a special 12VDC 1%
output. This voltage goes to P6 and is used to power the drillers monitor only. The
other two DC-DCs use the 5 volts to generate +24VDC that is connected to P7, P8, P9,
and P10. This is used by the satellite boxes. With a four channel D/A card installed, the
signals for the recorder output come through the trim pots R12-R15 (used to trim the
voltage if the full 0-10 volt output is not needed) and then are sent to connector P11. The
signals for the relay output come through the connector P12 via the ribbon cable
connected to the relay card. The relays for the horn and the alarm light are sent to P13.
The other relays go to P15. P16 is for future expansion.

With an eight channel D/A card installed, a Y cable is used and the signals for both the
relay card and the eight channel card come through P12. The signals for the relays stay
the same, but the outputs to the recorders now go to P16 and no longer go through the
trimmers and P11. Note: the middle connector of the Y cable must connect to P12 of the
breakout board.

Below the UPS is the 8 channel breakout board. This board takes the serial signal from
the serial I/O card and sends it to a standard RS-232 type 25 pin D-connector.

1.1.2 F.O.C. MODULE

A F.O.C. module will plug into the D-Connectors on the 8 channel breakout board and
convert the RS-232 signal to an optical signal. These are a universal communication
module which means they can be used on any device with RS-232 output. If they are
plugged into the 8 channel breakout board or the satellite board, they will pick up the
power they need from the connector. If they are used on other devices they will need to
be powered through the connector P2 with the power supply (70-74-497).

1.1.3 BARRIER BOX

To maintain the intrinsic safety of the system, all power for the units in hazardous areas
must go through approved safety barriers. These barriers are located in the barrier box.
There are two types of barriers used, one rated to 12VDC and one rated to 24VDC. As
implied by their ratings, the 12 volt ones are used to barrier the 24 volts to the Satellite
box and the horn.

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1.1.4 DRILLERS MONITOR

The drillers monitor (96-27-041) is an intrinsically safe computer. It will take the
signals from the CPU box and convert them into graphics and numbers to be displayed on
its liquid crystal display (LCD). Located inside the box are three circuit boards and the
LCD. The larger board is the monitor interface board. This board brings in the fiber
optic signal from the barrier box and converts it back into an RS-232 signal, sending it
through P3 to the monitor CPU. The +12 volts comes into this board and goes to a DC-
DC where it is converted to +5 volts and sent through P2 to the monitor CPU. Also on
this board is the keypad converter chip that brings in the key strokes from the keypad
through P6, translates them and sends them to the monitor CPU via P2. This board also
generates the voltages to control the brightness of the LCD, which is done via the
potentiometer on the front panel connected to P7. the signals to drive the LCD are
generated on the mini module/LCD board, then sent out J3 to P4 on the monitor interface
board, which is the top board of the two stacked boards, does all the calculation, storing,
and manipulating of the data. The mini module/LCD controls the way the display is
generated.

1.1.5 SATELLITE BOX

Refer to drawing 96-27-030. The satellite box is an intrinsically safe microcontroller


capable of bringing in analog and digital signals and converting them to a RS-232 signal.
Across the bottom of the board are 8 connectors labeled CHAN 0 through CHAN 7, these
are used for the analog inputs. On the lower right side are two connectors labeled
DIGITAL 0 and DIGITAL 1 that are used for the digital inputs. Refer to wiring diagram
(96-27-027) for proper wiring connections. The inputs from the sensors are sent through
the microcontroller where they are converted to a RS-232 signal. This signal is sent to a
F.O.C. module via the 25 pin D-connector and then on to the CPU box.

1.2 FIBER OPTICS

A new concept for this system is the used of fiber optic cable for the transmission of the
communication signals between major components. This cable was used to eliminate the
problems of noise in the system. The way fiber optics works is by sending pulses of light
down a carrier (in this case a plastic rod or glass fiber) instead of electrical current or
voltage. Because the signal is light, it cannot be affected by electrical noise caused by
lightning, generators, motors, or ground loops. Because no carrier is a perfect transmitter
of light, some of the lights energy is lost traveling the length of the carrier. These limits
the distance a signal can be sent. Other factors affecting distance are the number of
connections made and the number and radius of bends in the cable. The light signal tends
to travel in the center of the carrier. Every time it encounters a bend in the cable it
bounces off the wall and loses some of its energy. The sharper the bend, the more energy
it loses. Each connection is a source of energy loss due to the fact you cant make a
perfect termination of the fiber.

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The plastic cable is rated at a maximum distance of 300 feet. If longer runs are needed
repeater boxes (96-27-062 refer to section 1.3.3 for installation procedures) can be
added to give an additional 300 feet per box.

The glass cable is rated at a maximum distance around 3000 feet. A repeater box can
also be used to increase the distance if needed.

1.3 INSTALLATION

Refer to drawing 96-27-027 for proper wiring of sensors and communication lines up to
the Barrier box.

1.3.1 FIBER OPTICS

The fiber optics is the twin plastic zip cord inside the blue cable if it is plastic or the
orange cable if it is glass. One of the fibers is marked with either white dots (plastic) or
white writing (glass) down the length of it to help orient transmit and receive. If you
connect the marked cable to the transmitter at one end, then the marked cable must go to
the receiver at the other end. Refer to Appendix I for proper connectoring of the Glass
Fiber Optics and Appendix J for the plastics fiber optics.

1.3.2 F.O.C. MODULE

The F.O.C. Module is used for serial communications between all the components of the
S.M.A.R.T. system, except for the drillers monitor which has F.O. transmitter and
receiver at the other end. The blue one is the receiver and the black one is the transmitter.
The board is also marked as to which is which. When the modules are plugged into
either the Satellite board or the 8 channel breakout board, they need no external power. If
they are used anywhere else they will have to have power applied to the power jack P2
located next to the F.O. transmitter. This voltage can be any D.C. voltage between 7 and
14 volts with at least 80 milliamps of current.

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1.3.3 REPEATER BOX

The repeater box is a junction box with two connectors for plugging in F.O.C. modules
and one for power. The light signal is brought into one F.O.C. module where it is
converted to voltage amplified and sent to the other F.O.C. Module where it is converted
back to light and sent down the line. It does not matter which F.O.C. module is
connected to what device as long as you remember to connect transmit to receive and
vice versa for each cable.

The repeater box will have to have 12 V.D.C. power brought to the power connector for
the unit to work. Refer to figure 2.

1.3.4 C.P.U. BOX

The C.P.U. box comes with 4 mounting tabs so it can be attached directly to a wall. It
can be mounted on an optional stand (96-27-028) that can also be used to mount the
barrier box. This stand will fold with both boxes in place for easy transportation.

Only the A.C. connections need to be made now. All other connections will be covered
in their corresponding sections. The main A.C. input will connect to the terminal strip on
the middle left side of the base plate. Follow the directions on the decal for A.C. in. The
terminals marked A.C. out are for the uninterruptible A.C. output which can be used by
the recorder.

1.3.5 BARRIER BOX

Refer to drawing 96-27-027 for proper wiring of the barrier box.

1.3.6 DRILLERS MONITOR

Refer to drawing 96-27-027 for proper wiring of the drillers monitor to the barrier box.
The 12 volts needed for the monitor must come from the P6 of the CPU interface board.
Red wire to +, black wire to -. (Note: P6 has the + and reversed from the rest of the
connectors to further identify it as the connector for monitor only). The fiber optic cable
for the monitor will go to a D-connector connected to either PORT 4, PORT 5, PORT 6,
OR PORT 7 of the 8 channel breakout board.

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1.3.7 SATELLITE BOX

Refer to drawing 96-27-027 for proper wiring of the satellite box to the barrier box. The
12 volts needed for the satellite can come P3, P4, or P5 of the CPU interface board. Red
wire to +, black wire to -. The 24 volts for the Satellite boxes can come from P7, P8, or
P9, or P10. white wire to +. The is picked up through the black wire on the 12 volts.
The fiber optic cable for the satellite box will go to a D-connector connected to either
PORT 0, PORT 1, PORT 2, or PORT 3 of the 8 channel breakout board.

1.3.8 INTRINSICALLY SAFE HORN

Refer to drawing 96-27-027 for proper wiring of the horn lines up to the barrier box. The
cable from the horn barrier is connected to the position marked HORN on P13 of the
CPU interface board. Red wire to +, black wire to -.

NOTE: this is 24 VDC output to drive the intrinsically safe horn only. DO NOT APPLY
ANY EXTERNAL VOLTAGES TO THESE TERMINALS.

1.3.9 HORN DISABLED WARNING LIGHT

Located on the lower left corner of the C.P.U. interface board (96-52-137) is connector
P13. The lower three connections are labeled RELAY 1. This relay is toggled every
time the horn is disabled or enabled. A signal up to 24 VDC 2 Amp. Maximum may be
switched through the relay control a light or another relay.

1.3.10 CIRCULAR CHART RECORDER

The signals to drive the recorder come from P11 of the CPU interface board if using a 4
channel card or from P16 of the CPU interface board if using an 8 channel card. Located
behind the chart plate in the recorder, there are two terminal strips for signal inputs. The
recorder is shipped ready to work with the system. The configuration is stored in battery
backed memory with a 10 year life. As it is configured, the displays on the front panel
show the percent of the incoming signal. Example: if trip tank is being displayed and is
calibrated to 50 units full scale. When the pen shows 25 units, the display will read 50.

Refer to Appendix A for installation and configuration information of the model PXR105
and Appendix B for the model PX 105.

1.3.11 REMOTE MONITOR

The remote monitor consists of a monitor C.P.U. box, a keyboard, a V.G.A. monitor, and
a F.O.C. module with adapter hardware. All connections on the C.P.U. box will be made
on the back. Each connector is keyed to only fit in one spot. After located the equipment
in the appropriate locations, make the following connections:

1. 15 pin connector from V.G.A. monitor to 15 pin connector on C.P.U. box

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2. A.C. power cord to C.P.U. box
3. A.C. power cord to V.G.A. monitor
4. 6 pin mini-DIN connector from keyboard to 6 pin mini-DIN on C.P.U. box
5. 9 pin D-connector on 9-25 adapter to either 9 pin connector on C.P.U. box
6. 25 pin D-connector on 9-25 adapter to F.O.C. module
7. wall adapter to one pin jack on F.O.C. module
8. Fiber optic cable to F.O.C. module.

1.3.12 PRINTER

The basic unit ships without a printer or the necessary cables. To install a printer, you
will need to order 1 each of:

1. 80-67-401 printer
2. 80-06---2 cable printer parallel 12ft min.
3. 96-27-052 cable assy. Parallel to C.P.U.
4. LIT00308 paper computer 1 ply 8.5 x 11.

NOTE: item 3 is only needed if the monitor C.P.U. box has not already been modified for
printer. Refer to appendix B for installation procedures.

Refer to appendix C for printer setup.

1.3.13 SLAVE MONITORS

Slave monitors are remote video displays without any keyboard input. They must be
connected to a remote monitor assembly and can only display what is being shown on
that monitor. To install a slave monitor, you will need:

1. 80-59-452 monitor color 13 in Sony Trinitron


2. 80-67-051 P.C.B converter V.G.A to N.T.S.C
3. 80-01-095 adaptor B.N.C Fem to phone plug
4. 80-01-096 adaptor tee B.N.C. fem-male-fem
5. YKM99008 connector B.N.C RG54/U co-axial
6. YMA01006 cable c0-axial 75 ohm (order the required footage)

For the V.G.A. to N.T.S.C. board that uses the cable with a 15 pin D- connector on one
end and the round DIN connector on the other, refer to figure 3 to connect the cables. For
the V.G.A. to N.T.S.C. board that uses the cable with three 15 pin D-connectors, refer to
figure 4 to connect the cables. One item 3 is needed for each item 1 and one for item 2.
One item 5 is needed for each end of the cable. One item 4 is needed for each additional
item 1 added.

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NOTE: the V.G.A. to T.V. board shown in figure 4 requires software version 3.1 or
greater in the unit it is installed in.

To setup item 1, refer to appendix E for model number KV-13TR28, appendix F for
model number KV-13M10 and to Appendix G for model number KV-13M20. The
model number can be found on a label on the back of the monitor.

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APPENDIX A

PXR105 CIRCULAR CHART RECORDER

1.0 SCOPE

The following procedures are provided to assist in the operation and setup of the PXR-
105 circular chart recorder.

2.0 SETUP

2.1 ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS

2.1.1 Loosen captive knob on door and open. Swing chart plate forward
by loosening screw located in the middle of the right hand side.
2.1.2 The unit comes preset for 110 V.A.C. follow the instructions
below to change to 220 V.A.C. operation:
A. Locate protective cover on right hand side of main circuit
board.
B. Loosen the captive thumb screw and remove cover to the
extend of the attached grounding cable.
C. On the far right hand side of the circuit board is a handbag
style jumper. The lower position is for 110 V.A.C. operation
and the upper position is for 220 V.A.C. operation.
D. Set jumper for the appropriate voltage
E. Reinstall protective cover
2.1.3 The main A.C. input is connected to terminal strip TB1 located on
the right hand side of the main circuit board under the protective
cover. Remove the protective cover as described above and verify
the input is wired as follows:
A. Line input (black wire) to position marked MAIN INPUT L.
B. Neutral input (white wire) to position marked MAIN INPUT
N.
C. Ground wire to the ground lug on the chassis.
2.1.4 The D.C. signals from the main unit will connect to the two
terminal strips located on the bottom of the board to the left of the
A.C. input. The terminal block on the right is for the red pen and
the one on the left is the green pen. The positive input is position 2
and the negative is position 1 on both strips.

2.2 FAMILIARIZATION WITH CONTROLS AND DISPLAYS

NOTE: some switches are used for configuration only and will not operate during normal
operation.

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Pen Lift switch located inside the door, above the chart and used to raise and lower
the pens on alternate operations. When the pens are raised using the pen lift switch all
pens move to a position just outside the chart full scale.

NOTE: if the switch is not operated to lower the pens, they will automatically return to
their operating position after a five minute time-out.

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2.3 INSTALLING THE PENS

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APPENDIX B

PX105 CIRCULAR CHART RECORDER

1.0 SCOPE

The following procedures are provided to assist in the operation and setup of the PX-105
Circular chart recorder.

2.0 SETUP

2.1 ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS

2.1.1 Loosen captive knob on door and open. Swing chart plate forward
by loosening screw located in the middle of the right hand side.

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2.1.2 The unit comes preset for 110 V.A.C. follow the instructions
below to change to 220 V.A.C. operation:
A. Locate protective cover on right hand side of main circuit
board.
B. Loosen the captive thumb screw and remove cover to the
extent of the attached grounding cable.
C. On the far right hand side of the circuit board is a handbag
style jumper. The lower position is for 110 V.A.C. operation
and the upper position is for 220 V.A.C. operation.
D. Set jumper for the appropriate voltage
E. Reinstall protective cover
2.1.3 The main A.C. input is connected to terminal strip TB1 located on
the right hand side of the main circuit board under the protective
cover. Remove the protective cover as described above and verify
the input is wired as follows:
A. Line input (black wire) to position marked MAIN INPUT L
B. Neutral input (white wire) to position marked MAIN INPUT
N
C. Ground wire to the ground lug on the chassis.
2.1.4 The D.C. signals from the main unit will connect to the two terminal
strips located on the bottom of the board to the left of the A.C. input. The
terminal block on the right is for the red pen and the one on the left is the
green pen. The positive input is position 2 and the negative is position 1
on both strips.
2.2 FAMILIARIZATION WITH CONTROLS AND DISPLAYS

NOTE: some switches are used for configuration only and will not operate during normal
operation.

Pen lift switch located inside the door, above the chart and used to raise and lower the
pens move to a position just outside the chart full scale.

NOTE: if the switch is not operated to lower the pens, they will automatically return to
their operating position after a five minute time-out.

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APPENDIX C

REMOTE OFFICE CRT

1.0 SCOPE

The following procedures are provided to assist in the installation of drives, plug-in cards
and the hold-down clamp or the replacement of components to the Remote Office CRT.

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2.0 INSTALLATION PROCEDURES

2.1 REMOVING THE COVER

To remove the cover, proceed as follows:

2.1.1 Remove the two screws, one on each side, which secure the cover
to the card cage (see figure 7). Lift the lid to expose the interior of
the chassis.

2.2 DISK DRIVE INSTALLATION

To install a hard disk or floppy drive, refer to figure 8 and proceed as follows:

2.2.1 HARD DISK DRIVE (HDD) (80-16-748):

A. open the cover to the chassis


B. detach the mounting brackets by removing four screws
C. align the holes on the side of the HDD with those f the mounting brackets
D. attach the HDD to the mounting brackets with four 6-32 x screws
E. Connect one end of the 40 pin ribbon cable to the HDD. Match pin 1 of the cable
(marked with a red strip or an arrow on the connector) to pin 1 on the HDD.
F. Connect the power cable to the HDD.
G. Attach the mounting brackets to the chassis with four screws
H. If a C.P.U. board is installed, connect the other end of the 40 pin ribbon cable to
CN1 on the board. Match pin one of the cable to pin one on the board.

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2.2.2 FLOPPY DISK DRIVE (FDD) (80-16-744):

A. open the cover to the chassis


B. remove the cover for the floppy disk drive
C. insert the FDD with its front facing inward, into the mounting bracket
D. Connect the middle connector of the 34 pin ribbon cable. Match pin 1 of the
cable (marked with a red strip or an arrow on the connector) to pin 1 on the FDD.
E. Connect the power cable to the FDD.
F. Attach the FDD to the bracket with four screws
G. If a C.P.U. board is installed, connect the other end of the 34 pin ribbon cable to
CN2 on the board. Match pin one of the cable to pin one on the board.

2.3 ADD-ON CARD INSTALLATION

Located on the bottom of the chassis is the passive backplanes expansion slots. Remove
screw and blanking plate associated with the slot to be used. Gently insert your plug-in
cards making sure that they fit securely into the expansion slots. Using the blanking
plates screw, tighten the mounting bracket of the card to the chassis.

2.4 PARALLEL PORT CABLE INSTALLATION

Remove large blanking plate from back of the lid. Attach cable (96-27-052) to lid using
this hole. Attach the 26-pin connector to CN3 of C.P.U. board (96-52-148) observing pin
1 polarity.

2.5 HOLD DOWN CLAMP INSTALLATION

29
2.5.1. Insert the rubber buffers that have been provided into the hold-down clamp (see
figure 9). For XT-size cards, the narrow end should face upwards. For AT-size cards,
the wide end should face upwards.
2.5.2 When the rubber buffers are inserted, fasten the hold-down clamp to the card cage
with the two screws that are provided.

2.6 MOUNTING BRACKETS

2.6.1 The brackets may be attached to the chassis by inserting the 6 screws through the
left and right mounting brackets. Refer to figure 10.

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3.0 COMPONENT REPLACEMENT PROCEDURES
Should it be necessary to replace the filter, fan, power supply or backplane, please refer
to the following section?

3.1 CHANGING THE FILTER (80-30-220)

To change the filter, located at the front side of the chassis, see figure 11 and proceed as
follows:

3.1.1 Remove the two screws located at the bottom of the filter cover.
Gently, but firmly, pull the cover free of the chassis.
3.1.2 Remove the filter and replace it with a new one
3.1.3 Reinsert the filter and cover into the chassis.

3.2 POWER SUPPLY (70-74-091)

To connect the power supply, located on the front left side of the chassis, to the disk
drives and backplane, refer to figure 12 and do the following:

3.2.1 Secure the power supply to the chassis with the four screws
3.2.2 Connect the cables to the appropriate place in the system. P8 and P9
connectors are located on the backplane.

31
3.3 POWER SUPPLY PIN ASSIGNMENTS

The following diagram provides the pin assignments for the power supply, giving the
color of each wire which corresponds to the voltage. Refer to figure 13.

32
APPENDIX D

PANASONIC PRINTER

This is the procedure for setting up the Panasonic KX-P2023 Printer (80-67-401).

Note: the printer must have 110 Volts A.C.

For 220 Volt service an appropriate converter must be used.

CONNECTING

STEP 1

33
34
APPENDIX E

SLAVE MONITOR MODEL KV-13TR28

1.0 SCOPE

The following procedures are provided to assist in the operation and setup of the Sony
Color T.V. Model KV-13TR28 (80-59-452).

2.0 SETTING UP THE T.V.

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36
37
38
39
40
41
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43
APPENDIX I

GLASS VERSATILE LINK TYPE FIBER OPTIC CONNECTOR

TERMINATION INSTRUCTIONS

SAFETY NOTE: Wear eye protection during and dispose of fiber properly.

1.0 Strip outer jacket (cable stripper tool)


A. select the 1.6 cutting hole of the cable stripper
B. place 3 (75mm) of cable in designated cutting hole
C. apply quick squeezing action to cut cable
D. Remove cut portion of cable.

2.0 Install Crimp Ring


A. slide the crimp ring, large diameter first, onto the cable until it bottoms
completely onto the jacket
B. Holding cable and crimp ring in left hand and crimp tool in right, insert small end
of crimp ring completely into the front die nest of the crimp tool.
C. Crimp by fully squeezing the handles together and releasing.

3.0 Strip Buffer (fiber stripper tool)


A. Insert fiber through guide hole of the fiber stripper tool until tip of crimp ring is
fully seated in tool. If unable to insert fiber through the guide tube, tri tip of
buffer/fiber using scissors.
B. Holding cable securely, squeeze handles to cut buffer and pull straight to slightly
separate the buffer
C. Release handles and remove the tool
D. Using fingers, carefully slide bugger off fiber
E. Inspect fiber to cladding damage (i.e. white dusty appearance). (NOTE: if
damage has occurred, cut off crimp ring and repeat procedure from STRIP
OUTER JACKET. If stripper blade is worn, replace tool immediately.

4.0 Install Versatile Link-PIN Connector


A. Slide the connector body onto the fiber and push completely into the outer flange
of the crimp ring. Insert the connector/crimp ring completely into the rear die
nest of the crimp tool. Be sure the connector shoulder is flush against the edge of
the die nest.
B. Crimp in place by fully squeezing the handles together and releasing.

5.0 Cleaver Fiber (CT-2V Cleave tool)


NOTE: pads, diamond blade and anvil should be cleaned after every 50 cleaves.
Clean with a non-alcohol or oil base solvent.
A. Holding the cleave tool in a horizontal position, grip the handle while leaving
your index finger free.

44
B. Carefully insert the ferrule of the connector into the slot until the ferrule rests
securely against the connector adaptor.
C. Check to see that the fiber is positioned evenly between the two fiber clamps and
that the connector face is in proximity to the cleaving blade. If connector of fiber
is not positioned correctly, remove assembly and repeat steps 1 and 2.
D. Release your hold on the ferrule. The connector will remain in place since the
cleave tool is held in the horizontal position.
E. Using your index finger, SLOWLY depress the cleave tool trigger completely.
This motion activates the fiber clamps and diamond blade to cleave the fiber. The
connector will snap back slightly after the cleaving process.
F. Remove the cleaved connector assembly form the adaptor slot.
G. Release the trigger
H. Gently remove the remaining fiber from the fiber clamps by pulling top end of
fiber up through clamps so it does not touch the diamond blade or anvil.

POSITIONER PLATE REPLACEMENT

A. remove the two screws securing the positioner plate


B. remove the positioner plate
C. Depress and hold the trigger. Place desire positioner plate on the tool.
D. Insert and tighten the two screws. Release the trigger.

CLEANING DIAMOND BLADE AND ANVIL

A. Using a Phillips screwdriver, remove the positioner plate.


B. We small bristle brush with alcohol and slide gently over blade and anvil. DO
NOT LET THE METAL PORTION OF THE BRUSH COME INTO CONTACT
WITH THE BLADE. MAKE SURE ALCOLHOL DOES NOT DRIP ONTO
FIBER CLAMP PAD MATERIAL. Let dry thoroughly.
C. Replace positioner plate per instructions.

APPENDIX J

PLASTIC VERSATILE LINK TYPE FIBER OPTIC CONNECTOR TERMINATION


INSTRUCTIONS

1.0 CONNECTORING
Materials needed for the connectorizing procedure are:
1. polishing kit (96-27-084)
2. connector 1 pin male F.O.C. gray (65-01-051)
3. 16 gauge wire strippers

2.0 STRIPPING OUTER JACKET

The zip cord structure of the duplex cable permits easy separation of the channels. The
channels should be separated approximately 50 mm (2.0in) back from the ends to permit

45
connectoring and polishing. After cutting the cable to the desired length, strip off
approximately 7 mm (0.3 in) of the outer jacket with the 16 gauge wire strippers. Strip
both cables to equal lengths. This allows for easy and proper seating of the cable into the
connectors.

3.0 INSTALLING CONNECTOR

Place the connector over the end of the cable; the fiber should protrude about 3 mm (0.12
in) through the end of the connector. Carefully place a drop of super glue through the
hole at the other end of the connector.

4.0 POLISHING THE FIBER

After the glue has set, any excess fiber protruding from the connector end should be cut
off. The trimmed fiber should extend at least 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) from the connector end.
Insert the connector fully into the polishing fixture with the trimmed fiber protruding
from the bottom of the fixture. This plastic polishing fixture can be used to polish both
connectors simultaneously.

NOTE: The four dots on the bottom of the polishing fixture are wear indicators. Replace
the polishing fixture when any dot is no longer visible.

Place the 600 grit abrasive paper on a flat smooth surface. Pressing down on the
connector, polish the fiber and the connector using a figure eight pattern of strokes until
the connector is flush with the bottom of the polishing fixture. Wipe the connector and
fixture with a clean cloth or tissue.

46
Place the flush connector and polishing fixture on the dull side of the 3 micron pink
lapping film and continue to polish the fiber and connector for approximately 25 strokes.
The fiber end should be flat, smooth, and clean. The cable is now ready to use.

NOTE: Use of the pink lapping film fine polishing step results in approximately 2 dB
improvement in coupling performance over the 600 grit polishing alone. The fine
polishing step may be omitted in short length such as less than 150 feet. This will be
something you will have to get used to and decide for yourself if it is needed.

APPENDIX K

GLASS ST TYPE FIBER OPTIC CONNECTOR TERMINATION INSTRUCTIONS

SAFETY NOTE: Wear eye protection during cleaving and dispose of fiber properly.

1.0 INSTALL STRAIN RELIEF

Slide strain relief boot (tapered end first) onto cable and move up out of the way for easy
stripping. (NOTE: Boot may need trimming in order to slide onto the cable.)

2.0 STRIP OUTER JACKET (CABLE STRIPPER TOOL)

A. select cutting hole 1.6


B. Place 1 (24 mm) of cable in designated cutting hole.
C. Apply quick squeezing action to cut cable
D. Remove cut portion of cable
E. Repeat steps b, c and d until approximately 2-1/2 (57mm) of buffer/fiber is
exposed.

47
3.0 STRIP BUFFER (FIBER STRIPPER TOOL)

A. Separate fiber from yellow Aramid yarn strength members by pulling yarn back
along cable.
B. Insert fiber through guide hole of the stripper tool and insert cable completely into
the guide tube. If unable to insert fiber through guide tube, trim tip of buffer/fiber
using scissors. Also, if less than a meter of cable is used, it may be necessary to
wrap the cable around finger to avoid pulling out the fiber and yarn.
C. Hold cable securely, squeeze handles to cut buffer and pull straight to slightly
separate the buffer.
D. Release handles and remove the tool.
E. Using fingers, carefully slide buffer off fiber (i.e., less than 5/16 (8mm) of buffer
should be exposed)
F. Inspect fiber for cladding damage (i.e., white dusty appearance). NOTE: if
damage has occurred, cut the damaged portion of fiber, repeat procedure from
Strip Outer Jacket. If blade is worn, replace immediately.

4.0 INSTALL CABLE ANCHOR (CRIMP TOOL)

A. Pull Aramid yarn strands back over stripped fiber.


B. Holding yarn and fiber at very top, thread through the anchor so that the anchor is
seated on the cable.
C. Using the crimp tool, center large portion of cable anchor on crimp die.
D. Crimp the anchor towards the back of the larger diameter, refer to Figure 17.
Squeeze the handles together until they release.

E. Inspect cable anchor crimp.

5.0 INSTALL CRIMP SLEEVE (CRIMP TOOL)

A. Divide the yarn into approximately two equal halves.


B. Fold both halves of yarn back over the cable anchor so that they cover dimples
created by 1st crimp and are opposite each other. Fiber should be centered not
leaning against side of anchor.

48
C. Slide the crimp sleeve over the cable anchor until it rests firmly on the bottom
portion of the anchor and traps the yarn.
D. Align the crimp sleeve in the crimp tool by: positioning the crimp die pins over
the yarn halves, which are located under the crimp sleeve and also position so that
the pin crimp mark will line up with the crimp mark on the anchor, aligning the
bottom edge of the crimp sleeve with the edge of the die. Refer to figure 18.

E. Crimp in place by fully squeezing the handles together.

6.0 INSTALL FERRULE ASSEMBLY

A. Insure that the lock nut is correctly positioned on the ferrule assembly (threaded
end first onto back end of the ferrule assembly)
B. Slide the ferrule assembly onto the fiber until it rests securely in the crimp sleeve.
The slots on the side should be at a 900 angle to the crimp marks on the
anchor/crimp ring assembly.
C. Align the crimp sleeve in the crimp tool by: positioning the crimp die pins 900 to
the ferrule assembly slots and also by aligning the top edge of the crimp sleeve
with the edge of the die.
D. Crimp in place by fully squeezing the handles together. All three crimp marks
should be in a straight line opposite the ferrule assembly slots. Refer to figure 19.

49
7.0 CLEAVE FIBER (ST-2 CLEAVE TOOL)

NOTE: Pads, diamond blade and anvil should be cleaned after every 50 cleaves. Clean
with a non-alcohol or oil base solvent.

A. Holding the cleave tool in a horizontal position, grip the handle while leaving
your index finger free.
B. Carefully insert the ferrule of the connector into the slot until the ferrule rests
securely against the connector adapter. (see photo #6).
C. Check to see that the fiber is positioned evenly between the two fiber clamps and
that the connector face is in close proximity to the cleaving blade. If connector or
fiber is not positioned correctly, remove assembly and repeat steps 1 and 2.
D. Release your hold on the ferrule. The connector will remain in place since the
cleave tool is held in the horizontal position. (see photo #7).
E. Using your index finger, SLOWLY depress the cleave tool trigger completely.
This motion activates the fiber clamps and diamond blade to cleave the fiber. The
connector will snap back slightly after the cleaving process.
F. Remove the cleaved connector assembly from the adapter slot.
G. Release the trigger (see photo #8)
H. Gently remove the remaining fiber from the fiber clamps by pulling top end of
fiber up through clamps so it does not touch the diamond blade of anvil.

8.0 POSITION STRAIN RELIEF BOOT

A. Using scissors completely cut off the exposed yarn.


B. Slide strain relief boot into place over connector assembly. NOTE: the boot
should abut the connector nut (see photo #13)
C. Place the connector protective cap on ferrule tip. (see photo #14)

9.0 POSITIONER PLATE REPLACEMENT

A. Remove the two screws securing the positioner plate


B. Remove the positioner plate
C. Depress and hold the trigger. Place desire positioner plate on the tool
D. Insert and tighten the two screws. Release the trigger.

10.0 CLEANING DIAMOND BLADE AND ANVIL

A. Using a Phillips screwdriver, remove the positioner plate


B. Wet small bristle with alcohol and slide gently over blade and anvil. DO NOT
LET THE METAL PORTION OF THE BRUSH COME INTO CONTACT
WITH THE BLADE. MAKE SURE ALCOHOL DOES NOT DRIP ONTO
FIBER CLAMP PAD MATERIAL. Let dry thoroughly.
C. Replace positioner plate per instructions.

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APPENDIX L

BIT TRACKING

1.0 THOERY OF OPERATION

The SG-Smart Bit tracking sensor assembly is a pair of inductive proximity sensors
mounted on a bracket, so that they are both facing the same direction and are a set
distance apart (see figure 20). It is intended to be installed so that it faces the flat side of
the fast sheave (see figure 21). The supplied targets for the proximity sensors are
thick foam blocks with aluminum sheeting on the sides, cut into 6 x 3 (150mm x
88mm) rectangles. These targets are glued to the fast sheave, so that each target will be
centered across the mounting bracket as it passes by. Like the sensor bracket, the targets
will have their long edges perpendicular to the radius of the fast sheave. They should be
evenly spaced around the fast sheave (see figure 21). The number of targets (not all
targets need to be used) and the distance from the center of the fast sheave to the targets
are not important, as long as the gap between targets is longer than the targets.

51
When the block is being raised or lowered, the fast sheave rotates as the line goes up and
around it. The rotation is proportional to the distance the block has moved. In the
following description, remember that the sequence can start at any point. Starting with
the sensor assembly between targets is not necessary. The gap between the targets must
be large enough so that the next target will not trigger a sensor while another target is
triggering the other sensor. The entire process shown in figure 22 provides one
directional pulse to the SG-SMART system bit tracking satellite box.

The process of detecting a directional pulse occurs in this sequence (see figure 22).

A. The sensor assembly starts out between targets.


B. A passing target will trigger one of the proximity sensors first
C. This sensor will stay triggered until the other sensor is triggered.
D. Both sensors will stay triggered until the target completely passes the first sensor
the second sensor will be the only one triggered at this point.

52
E. The target will rotate past the second sensor also, and both sensors will not be
triggered during the gap between targets.

2.0 HARDWARE INSTALLATION

The installation kit contains:


1 carrying bag
1 bit tracking sensor assembly
1 sensor test assembly
1 male cap
1 5-pin female connector
500 ft 18/3 cable
1 putty knife
1 can or bottle of a cleaner or degreaser
1 roll of paper towels

53
2 tubes silicon adhesive
10 sensor targets
25 cable ties

2.1 PREPARATION

Connect the tester to the sensor and verify that the LED indicators on both proximity
switches light up. Wave a sensor target in front of the proximity switches and make sure
the LEDs go out when the target is in range. Keep the tester in the carrying bad, since it
will be needed again during installation of the targets. The 18/3 cable should be long
enough to reach the fast sheave at the top of the derrick. Connect the 18/3 cable to the 5-
pin female connector. Position 3 is positive, use the red wire. Position 2 is the signal
wire for the right proximity switch, use the black wire and position 4 is for the left, use
the white wire. Leave the other end of the 18/3 cable disconnected.

If the manufacturers specifications for the drill line and the fast sheave are not available,
you will need to measure the diameter to be used for calibration. Put a tape measure in
the carrying bag. See the calibration section for more information on the measurements
needed.

2.2 INSTALLATION

Select a good time to install the sensors. The work will be done at the top of the rig. It is
simplest to install the bit tracking sensors before the rig is standing. Installing during
slow drilling is good, since the fast sheave will be turning slowly, but will still bring the
next sensor location around within reach.

Cable: Run the 18/3 cable safely to the top of the rig, avoiding pinch points, moving
parts, etc., and securing it where necessary. If the rig is laid over, keep in mind how it
will be raised. The 5-pin connector should be at the end of the cable at the top of the rig.
At the top of the rig, tie the cable securely to provide strain relief. Leave enough cable to
make the connection to the sensor bracket assembly.

Sensor Bracket: select a place to clamp the sensor bracket, so that it faces the side of the
fast sheave as straight as possible. The proximity sensors will need to be 1 to 1-1/2
inches away from the sheave to leave space for the targets underneath the sensors. The
bracket should be far enough out from the center of the sheave to allow installation of the
desired number of targets. In determining the spacing, remember that each sensor is
approximately 6 inches long, and there should be at least 7 inch gaps between sensors.
Loop the chain around a pole or railing so that if the clamp comes loose, the sensor will
not fall to the rig floor. Avoid placing it so that it will fall toward the sheave or other
moving parts. Make sure the chain will not come loose as well. Check the full possible
range of motion in case the bracket swings on the chain. It may be helpful to pull the
bracket out of the way while installing the targets.

54
Targets: select locations for the targets. Avoid gluing targets over any slots in the sheave.
The targets should be spaced evenly around the sheave, and should all be the same
distance from the center. Keep in mind that the targets must pass directly underneath the
sensor bracket and that the bracket should be centered on the target as it passes the
bracket. Using the putty knife, scrape an area clean for each sensor on the side of the fast
sheave. Use the cleaning fluid and paper towels to clean the surface completely. Use the
silicone adhesive to glue the sensors in place.

Test: Verify that the sensors detect the targets by connecting the tester to the connector
on the sensor bracket. Make sure both of the proximity sensor LEDs light up, and that
the LEDs go off as the target passes under the sensors. When the sensor bracket is
adjusted properly, remove the tester and connect the 18/3 cable to the sensor bracket.

Connect the other end of the 18/3 cable to the two digital inputs in the bit tracking
satellite box. The red wire will go to the + positions on one of the digital inputs, the
black signal wire will go to the PROX position of a digital input, and the white signal
wire will go to the PROX position on the other input. Tag and calibrate bit tracking (see
following paragraphs for procedures).

Set the satellite board switch S4 positions 5 and 6 to ON. This is labeled as UNUSED,
but is now used for bit tracking.

NOTE: bit tracking will not work if the switches are not set correctly and the satellite
board has not been re-logged.

Verify that the bit and block locations increase as the block moves downward (deeper
into the hole). If not, swap the two digital inputs.

3.0 TAGGING SENSORS

Bit location and block location variables must be tagged to get bit tracking to work. Tag
one variable to one of the sensors and the other variable to the remaining sensor. It does
not matter which is which. Also, Hook load must be tagged for bit tracking to work.

NOTE: Hook load must be installed in the same Satellite Box as bit tracking.

4.0 CALIBRATION

4.1 CALCULATING THE CALIBRATION VALUE

The calibration value for the SG-SMART system is the number of directional pulses that
will be received by the system per increment of block movement.

Pulses per increment = lines x targets / 3.1415 / diameter

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Where:
Lines is the number of lines running through the block
Diameter is the diameter of the fast sheave with the cable wrapped around it

To calculate the total diameter of the fast sheave plus cable, measure from the inside edge
of the cable at one side of the fast sheave to the outside edge of the cable on the exact
opposite side of the fast sheave, as shown in figure 23. These numbers can be measured
directly, or calculated from the sheave and cable manufacturers specifications.

Another way of calculating the calibration value is to use table 1. Divide the number
given in this table by the measured diameter of the sheave to get the pulses-per-increment
calibration value.

CALIBRATING BIT TRACKING

1. Calculate the calibration value (pulses-per-increment) as shown above.


Either use the manufacturers specifications for the fast sheave and cable,
or measure directly at the fast sheave to determine the diameter.
2. Install the sensor for hook load, and connect the sensor to one of the
analog inputs in the bit tracking satellite box. Hook load is needed for bit
location. Block location will work correctly even if no hook load sensor is
installed.
3. From the calibration program, calibrate hook load, block location, and bit
location. Verify that downward movement causes block location to
increase, swapping the inputs at the bit tracking satellite box if necessary.
Set the zero location for block location to be at the top of the rig. Set the
current bit location.
4. From the user options screen in an SG-SMART monitor, set the minimum
slip weight. Verify that bit location does not change while the drill string
is in the slips, but that block location does change all the time.
5. Verify that the calibration value (pulses-per-increment) is correct.

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4.2 CALIBRATING BIT TRACKING

Install the bit tracking sensor assembly and sensor targets on fast sheave, connecting the
two digital signals to the two digital inputs in a bit tracking satellite box. Either use the
manufacturers specifications for the fast sheave and cable, or measure directly at the fast
sheave to determine the diameter, and calculate the calibration value (pulses per foot).

Install sensor for hook load, connecting the signal to one of the analog inputs in a bit
tracking satellite box.

Calibrate hook load, block location, and bit location. Verify that downward movement
causes block location to increase, swapping the inputs at the bit tracking satellite box if
necessary. Set the zero location for block location and set the current bit location.

Set minimum slip weight. Verify that bit location does not change with block location
while the drill string is in the slips.

Verify that the bit location and block location calibration value is correct.

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5.0 BIT TRACKING NOTES

Once the SG-SMART system is calibrated and ready for operation, the movement of the
block will be tracked automatically and displayed in the variable called BLOCK
LOCATION. The speed of the block will be displayed in the variable called BLOCK
RATE, in feet per minute. The location of the bit is displayed at BIT LOCATION,
and the speed of the bit (and the entire drill string) is displayed as PIPE VELOCITY.

In order to track bit movement as well as block movement, the hook-load sensor must be
set up and calibrated, and minimum slip weight must be set properly. Set the minimum
slip weight from the monitor program. The minimum slip weight should be set to a value
that is slightly higher than the block weight 10,000 pounds is usually enough. The
number used for block weight is the calibrated hook-load reading when the drill string is
set into the slips. The important point is to use a number that is enough higher than the
hook-load to allow for a small amount of jitter in the hook-load signal, to account for any
changed in the hook-load reading due to the block bouncing or picking up another joint.
The minimum slip weight should be much less than the hook-load reading during drilling.
The system uses the minimum slip weight value to determine when the block is
connected to the drill string. When the drill string is not connected to the block the bit
moves with the block. A good number for the minimum slip weight is essential for bit
tracking to work properly. Bit tracking will not work if any one of the three sensors
involved is not working properly: the hook-load sensor or either of the two directional
proximity sensors on the bit tracking sensor assembly.

An important effect that the use of the minimum slip weight has on bit location is that
when the drill string is very short (a few hundred feet), the hook-load remains below the
minimum slip weight and the system no longer detects changed in bit location. When
tripping in after a complete trip out of the hole, the bit location should be set to known
value after the drill string is beyond this threshold. During testing, the bit location often
returned to within two or three feet of the correct value after a complete trip out and back
in on its own. However, if the bit location is not set to a know value after it starts
tracking again (while tripping in); there is no way of knowing how far off it has gotten.

During a trip, a drifting effect of the block location is likely to be noticed. This
happens to both the block location and bit location, but is more noticeable on the block
location. The rig crew should be aware of the effect and should be advised to check the
bit and block locations after a complete trip, and set them if necessary. To illustrate what
is happening, consider the trip-out process. A stand is about to be pulled out and the drill
string is in the slips. When the weight of the drill string is put on the cable, the cable
stretches very slightly. As the drill string is lifted, the fast sheave rotates far enough to
pull the extra length of the stretched, even when the weight of the stand is removed from
the cable. The cable only relaxes (un-stretches) between the hook and the first wrap on
the draw works drum. As the block is lowered without the weight of the drilling string,
the cable relaxes as soon as it comes off the drum. Since it relaxes before it passes the
fast sheave, the fast sheave only rotates enough to pull the relaxed cable, which is usually
an inch or two shorter than the stretched cable, depending on the cable diameter, hook

58
load and the number of lines. During this process, the fast sheave rotated up in terms
of block movement by more than it rotated down. The system receives signals
indicating that the block position moved upward more than it moved downward, each
time a stand is pulled out during the trip. This drifting effect accumulates over the
entire trip out and can cause the block location to appear noticeably higher than the block
really is. A properly zeroed block location might drift upward by twenty of thirty feet
during an entire trip out from 10,000 feet. During the trip in, the opposite effect happens,
and the block location drifts back down to very near its value before the trip out.

Unlike the non-directional depth sensor, the bit tracking sensor does not need to have a
minimum bit weight to determine depth while drilling. This value is used to determine
when the bit is on bottom and actually drilling. In non-directional depth sensing, the
system ignores depth pulses which are received when the bit weight is below the
minimum bit weight.

Inside the bit tracking satellite box, the directional pulses received on the digital inputs
are accumulated and reported for the block location. The hook load must be connected to
one of the eight analog inputs in the bit tracking satellite box. This ensures that no
further changes are made to the bit location when the hook load drops below the
minimum slip weight. The signals from the two bit tracking proximity sensors should be
connected so that the block location operates this way. Thus, the zero point for bit
location is at the surface, and the zero point for the block location is at the top of the
derrick. This means that on a three stand rig when the block is at its lowest position, the
block location should read 90 feet. If the bit and block locations are working in reverse
(increasing when the block moves up and decreasing when the block moves down), swap
the digital connectors in the bit tracking satellite box.

The bit tracking satellite box is a modified version of a standard satellite box. The circuit
board has a capacitor (C13) removed from the component side, and a jumper wire
installed on the other side. The directional pulses occur at much higher rates than most
other digital signals, and this change adjusts the de-bouncing circuitry specifically for
these higher rates. Make sure this modification is in place on any board put into service
in a bit tracking satellite box. A board that has been modified for bit tracking will not
work with any satellite box software earlier than version 5.1. However, this board can be
used with standard satellite box software versions 5.1 and above.

APPENDIX M

INSTALLATION AND IDENTIFICATION DRAWINGS

Refer to the following drawings for proper installation of intrinsically safe components of
the S.M.A.R.T. System.

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60
61
62
63
64
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