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Landscapes of Change: Boccionis Stati danimo as a

General Theory of Models by Sanford Kwinter and


Unberto Boccioni

EVDA 621: Introduction to Design Theories


Critical Evaluation by Sumer Matharu (10047835), 27 Sep 2016

The reading Landscapes of Change: Boccionis Stati danimo as a General Theory of


Models by Sanford Kwinter and Umberto Boccioni is a study of the different varieties of
form genesis models described using Boccionis famous futurist paintings as a datum.
These models can be applied directly in Architecture.
The author provides a bio-scientific approach to describing the various scenarios through
which form can be generated. From the classical grid system [pg.53], to the Modern
Topological Theory [pg.58], to the theory of Catastrophe [pg.59] and the Epigenetic
Landscape. The different models are provided in a hierarchical order within their own
subgroups with the intent that they will be used in the generation of form, or rather, the
automation of form. To aggregate the resulting question, we must reiterate the authors
statement regarding the idea of the Catastrophe set [pg.61], What is interesting is that
the catastrophe set always has the same form (geometrically) even though the
catastrophe event-form (the specific unfolding) is unpredictable and open-ended. The
catastrophe set is, in fact, an example of a virtual form.[pg.61]. The question that arises
here is that every single time we apply the model of the pre-existing urban virtual form
and receive a result which is a different iteration each time within a particular set of
boundaries, are we in reality setting the groundwork for a perception catastrophe [pg.61]?
How do we ensure that we are not adding dimensions to go from n to n+1 [pg.61]?
Another instance that arises within the reading is where the author states that disorder
leads to order and vice versa. He states, In fact, forms represent nothing absolute, but
rather structurally stable moments within a systems evolution; yet their emergence (their
genesis derives from the crossing of a qualitative threshold that is, paradoxically, a
moment of structural instability.[pg.59]. At the onset of order, disorder becomes a
potential [pg.58] determined by the emergence of instability [pg.59]. How can we use this
potential for disorder, hence order, in order to successfully disrupt and positively change
the social, economic and political wellbeing of humanity while keeping in mind the motive
of a higher purpose, all within the context of Architecture and Urban Planning?

Bibliograpy
Sanford Kwinter and Umberto Bocciono, Landscapes of Change: Boccionis Stati
danimo as a General Theory of Models, in Assemblage, No. 19 (Dec. 1992), MIT
Press, pp 50-65.