You are on page 1of 70

MT 483

Engineering Economics

Introduction
Course Objectives

 Understand cost concepts and how to make an economic decision with


present economy studies

 Discuss time value of money for personal & professional finance issues
 Learn methods for determining whether an investment project is
acceptable (profitable) or not, and how to compare two or more
investment alternatives using these methods.

 Finally, develop models for breakeven analysis.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 2


Course Topics
 Chapter 1:
• Introduction to Engineering Economy
 Chapter 2:
• Cost Concepts and Design Economics
 Chapter 3:
• Cost-Estimation Techniques
 Chapter 4:
• The Time Value of Money
 Chapter 5:
• Evaluating a Single Project

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 3


Course Topics
 Chapter 6:
• Comparison and Selection among Alternatives
 Chapter 7:
• Depreciation and Income Taxes
 Chapter11:
• Breakeven and Sensitivity Analysis

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 4


MT-483 : Text Books

1. “Engineering Economy”,
William G. Sullivan, Elin M. Wicks, C.
Patrick Koelling. — Sixteenth edition, 2015.
ISBN-13: 978-0-13-343927-4,

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 5


MT-483 : Reference Books

1. Engineering Economy by DcGarmo, E. P., Sullivan G. W. and Bontadelli,


A. J., Macmillan publishing company, Latest Edition

2. Engineering Economic and Cost Analysis by Collier, A. C. and


Ledbetter B. W., Harper and Row Publishers, New York, Latest Edition

3. Principles of Engineering Economic Analysis, by White, A. J, Agee H.


M. And Case, E. K, John Wiley and Sons, Latest Edition.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 6


MT-483 : Engineering Economy
Grading Based on
 Assignments : 10%
 Quizzes : 15%
 Mid-Term : 30%
 Final : 45%
Violation of academic integrity
 First offense : zero score for the test (applies to
assignments as well)
 Second offense : failure of the course

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 7


Assignments
• Philosophy

– One of the best ways to learn something is through practice


and repetition

– Therefore, homework assignments are extremely important


in this class!

– Homework sets will be carefully designed, challenging, and


comprehensive. If you study and understand the homework,
you should not have to struggle with the exams

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 8


Assignments
Policy

– Homework in a week is due before first class of next week (at the beginning of
class).

– Homework turned in late will receive partial credit according to the following rules:

1. 10% penalty if turned in after class, but before 2:00 on the due date

2. 25% penalty if turned in after 2:00 on the due date, but by 2:00 the next school day

3. 50% penalty if turned in after 2:00 the next school day, but within one week

4. No credit if turned in after one week

– Your chances of scoring well in quizzes are directly proportional to the effort put
in doing the homework.
Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 9
MT 483
Chapter 1

Introduction to Engineering
Economy
Lect: 01
Introduction

Most engineering problem can have


multiple possible solutions

Engineering economy involves the


systematic evaluation of the economic merits
of proposed solutions to engineering problems.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 11


Introduction

To be economically acceptable (i.e., affordable),


the solutions to engineering problems
must demonstrate a positive balance of
long-term benefits over long-term costs

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 12


Introduction

 These solutions must also:


• Promote the well-being and survival of the organization,

• Embody creative and innovative technology and ideas,

• Permit identification and scrutiny of their estimated outcomes

• Translate profitability as the “bottom line” for measuring the


success of the project.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 13


Introduction

Engineering economy is the


dollars-and-cents side of the
decisions that engineers make
as they work to position
a firm to be profitable.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 14


Introduction

 Inherent to these decisions are trade-offs among


different types of costs and the performance provided by
the proposed design i.e:
• Response time
• Safety
• Weight
• Reliability, etc.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 15


Introduction

The mission of engineering economy is


to balance these trade-offs in the
most economical manner

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 16


Introduction

 For instance, if an engineer at a Motor Company invents a new


transmission lubricant that increases fuel mileage by 10% and
extends the life of the transmission by 30,000 miles, how much can
the company afford to spend to implement this invention?

Engineering economy can provide an answer

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 17


Introduction

 A few situations in which engineering economy can play a crucial


role in the analysis of project alternatives could be:
1. Choosing the best design for a high-efficiency gas furnace.

2. Selecting the most suitable robot for a welding operation on an


automotive assembly line.

3. Making a recommendation about whether jet airplanes for an overnight


delivery service should be purchased or leased.

4. Determining the optimal staffing plan for a computer help desk.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 18


Introduction

An engineer who is unprepared to excel at


engineering economy
is not properly equipped for his or her job

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 19


MT 483
Chapter 1

The Principles of Engineering


Economy
Lect: 02
The Principles of Engineering Economy
 PRINCIPLE: 1 - Develop the Alternatives
• Carefully define the problem!
• The alternative solutions need to be identified and then defined for
subsequent analysis.
• A decision situation involves making a choice among two or more
alternatives.
– Developing and defining the alternatives for detailed evaluation is
important because of their impact on the quality of the decision.
– Engineers and managers should place a high priority on this
responsibility.
– Creativity and innovation are essential to the process.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 21


The Principles of Engineering Economy
 PRINCIPLE: 2 - Focus on the Differences
• Obviously, only the differences in the future outcomes of the alternatives
are important.

• Outcomes that are common to all alternatives can be disregarded in the


comparison and decision.

– For example, if your feasible housing alternatives were two


residences with the same purchase (or rental) price, price would be
inconsequential to your final choice.

– Instead, the decision would depend on other factors, such as location


and annual operating and maintenance expenses.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 22


The Principles of Engineering Economy

Thus, the basic purpose of an engineering economic analysis is:


to recommend a future course of action based on the
differences among feasible alternatives.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 23


The Principles of Engineering Economy

 PRINCIPLE: 3 - Use a Consistent Viewpoint


• The prospective outcomes of the alternatives, economic and other, should
be consistently developed from a defined viewpoint (perspective).

• The perspective of the decision maker, which is often that of the owners
of the firm, would normally be used.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 24


The Principles of Engineering Economy
 PRINCIPLE: 4 - Use a Common Unit of Measure

• Using a common unit of measurement to enumerate as many of the


prospective outcomes as possible will simplify the analysis of the
alternatives.

• It is desirable to make as many prospective outcomes as possible directly


comparable.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 25


The Principles of Engineering Economy

 PRINCIPLE: 4 - Use a Common Unit of Measure……..


• For economic consequences, a monetary unit such as dollars / Rupee is
the common measure.

• You should also try to translate other outcomes (which do not initially
appear to be economic) into the monetary unit.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 26


The Principles of Engineering Economy

 PRINCIPLE: - 5 Consider All Relevant Criteria


• Selection of a preferred alternative (decision making) requires the use of a
criterion (or several criteria).

• The decision process should consider both the outcomes enumerated in


the monetary unit and those expressed in some other unit of
measurement or made explicit in a descriptive manner.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 27


The Principles of Engineering Economy

 PRINCIPLE: - 5 Consider All Relevant Criteria


• In engineering economic analysis, the primary criterion relates to the long-
term financial interests of the owners / organization.

• This is based on the assumption that available capital will be allocated to


provide maximum monetary return.

• Often, though, there are other organizational objectives you would like to
achieve with your decision, and these should be considered and given
weight in the selection of an alternative.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 28


The Principles of Engineering Economy

 PRINCIPLE: 6 - Make Risk and Uncertainty Explicit


• Risk and uncertainty are inherent in estimating the future outcomes of the
alternatives and should be recognized in their analysis and comparison.

• The analysis of the alternatives involves projecting or estimating the future


consequences associated with each of them. The magnitude and the
impact of future outcomes of any course of action are uncertain.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 29


The Principles of Engineering Economy

 PRINCIPLE: 6 - Make Risk and Uncertainty Explicit…….


• Even if the alternative involves no change from current operations, the
probability is high that today’s estimates of, for example, future cash
receipts and expenses will not be what eventually occurs.

• Thus, dealing with uncertainty is an important aspect of engineering


economic

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 30


The Principles of Engineering Economy
 PRINCIPLE: 7 - Revisit Your Decisions
• Improved decision making results from an adaptive process; to the extent
practicable, the initial projected outcomes of the selected alternative
should be subsequently compared with actual results achieved.

• A good decision-making process can result in a decision that has an


undesirable outcome. Other decisions, even though relatively successful,
will have results significantly different from the initial estimates of the
consequences.

• Learning from and adapting based on our experience are essential and are
indicators of a good organization.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 31


MT 483
Chapter 1

Engineering Economy and the


Design Process
Lect: 03
Engineering Economy and the Design Process

An engineering economy study is accomplished using


structured procedure and mathematical modeling techniques.

The economic results are then used in a decision situation that


normally includes other engineering knowledge and input.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 33


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
Table 1.1 : General Relationship between the Engineering Economic
Analysis Procedure and the Engineering Design Process

Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure Engineering Design Process


Step Activity
1. Problem recognition, definition, and evaluation. 1. Problem/need definition.
2. Problem/need formulation and evaluation.
2. Development of the feasible alternatives.
3. Synthesis of possible solutions (alternatives).
3. Development of the outcomes and cash flows for each
alternative.
4. Analysis, optimization, and evaluation.
4. Selection of a criterion (or criteria).
5. Analysis and comparison of the alternatives.
6. Selection of the preferred alternative. 5. Specification of preferred alternative.
7. Performance monitoring and post-evaluation of results. 6. Communication.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 34


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
 Problem Definition
• The first step of the engineering economic analysis procedure is problem
definition.

• A problem must be well understood and stated in an explicit form before


the project team proceeds with the rest of the analysis.

• It includes all decision situations for which an engineering economy


analysis is required.

• Once the problem is recognized, its formulation should be viewed from a


systems perspective. That is, the boundary or extent of the situation
needs to be carefully defined, thus establishing the elements of the
problem and what constitutes its environment.
Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 35
Engineering Economy and the Design Process
 Development of Alternatives
• The two primary actions in Step 2 of the procedure are:

1. Searching for potential alternatives.

2. Screening them to select a smaller group of feasible alternatives for


detailed analysis.

• The term feasible here means that each alternative selected for further
analysis is judged, based on preliminary evaluation, to meet or exceed the
requirements established for the situation.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 36


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.1
Defining the Problem and Developing Alternatives
• The management team of a small furniture-manufacturing company is
under pressure to increase profitability to get a much-needed loan from
the bank to purchase a more modern pattern-cutting machine. One
proposed solution is to sell waste wood chips and shavings to a local
charcoal manufacturer instead of using them to fuel space heaters for the
company’s office and factory areas.
a) Define the company’s problem. Next, reformulate the problem in a
variety of creative ways.
b) Develop at least one potential alternative for your reformulated
problems in Part (a). (Don’t concern yourself with feasibility at this
point.).
Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 37
Engineering Economy and the Design Process
 EXAMPLE 1: Solution (a)
• The company’s problem appears to be that revenues are not sufficiently
covering costs. Several reformulations can be posed:

1. The problem is to increase revenues while reducing costs.

2. The problem is to maintain revenues while reducing costs.

3. The problem is an accounting system that provides distorted cost


information.

4. The problem is that the new machine is really not needed (and hence
there is no need for a bank loan).

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 38


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
 EXAMPLE 1: Solution (b)
• Based only on reformulation 1, an alternative is to sell wood chips and
shavings as long as increased revenue exceeds extra expenses that may
be required to heat the buildings.

• Another alternative is to discontinue the manufacture of specialty items


and concentrate on standardized, high volume products.

• Yet another alternative is to pool purchasing, accounting, engineering, and


other white-collar support services with other small firms in the area by
contracting with a local company involved in providing these services.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 39


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
1. Developing Investment Alternatives

• There are usually hundreds of opportunities for a company to make


money.

• Engineers are at the very heart of creating value for a firm by turning
innovative and creative ideas into new or reengineered commercial
products and services.

• Most of these ideas require investment of money, and only a few of all
feasible ideas can be developed, due to lack of time, knowledge, or
resources.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 40


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
2. (a) Classical Brainstorming

• Classical brainstorming is the most well-known and often-used technique


for idea generation. It is based on the fundamental principles of deferment
of judgment and that quantity breeds quality.

• There are four rules for successful brainstorming:

1. Criticism is ruled out.

2. Freewheeling is welcomed.

3. Quantity is wanted.

4. Combination and improvement are sought.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 41


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
2. (a) Classical Brainstorming…....

• A classical brainstorming session has the following basic steps:

1. Preparation. The participants are selected, and a preliminary


statement of the problem is circulated.

2. Brainstorming. A warm-up session with simple unrelated problems is


conducted, the relevant problem and the four rules of brainstorming
are presented, and ideas are generated and recorded using checklists
and other techniques if necessary.

3. Evaluation. The ideas are evaluated relative to the problem.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 42


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
2. (b) Nominal Group Technique

• By correctly applying the NGT, it is possible for groups of people


(preferably, 5 to 10) to generate investment alternatives or other ideas for
improving the competitiveness of the firm.

• The basic format of an NGT session is as follows:


1. Individual silent generation of ideas
2. Individual round-robin feedback and recording of ideas
3. Group clarification of each idea
4. Individual voting and ranking to prioritize ideas
5. Discussion of group to achieve consensus

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 43


MT 483
Chapter 1

Engineering Economy and the


Design Process
……cont’d

Lect: 04
Engineering Economy and the Design Process
3. Development of Prospective Outcomes

• Step 3 of the engineering economic analysis procedure incorporates


Principles mentioned above and uses the basic cash-flow approach
employed in engineering economy.

• A cash flow occurs when money is transferred from one organization or


individual to another.

• Thus, a cash flow represents the economic effects of an alternative in


terms of money spent and received.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 45


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
3. Development of Prospective Outcomes………

• The key to developing the related cash flows for an alternative is


estimating what would happen to the revenues and costs, if the particular
alternative were implemented.

• The net cash flow for an alternative is the difference between all cash
inflows (receipts or savings) and cash outflows (costs or expenses) during
each time period.

Net Cash Flow = Cash Outflows - Cash Inflows

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 46


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
3. Development of Prospective Outcomes…….

• In addition to the economic aspects of decision making, nonmonetary


factors (attributes) often play a significant role in the final
recommendation. Examples of objectives other than profit maximization or
cost minimization that can be important to an organization include the
following:
1. Meeting or exceeding customer expectations
2. Safety to employees and to the public
3. Improving employee satisfaction
4. Maintaining production flexibility to meet changing demands
5. Meeting or exceeding all environmental requirements
6. Achieving good public relations or being an exemplary member of the community
Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 47
Engineering Economy and the Design Process
4. Selection of a Decision Criterion

• The selection of a decision criterion (Step 4 of the analysis procedure)


incorporates Principle 5 of Engineering Economy (consider all relevant
criteria).

• The decision maker will normally select the alternative that will best serve
the long-term interests of the owners of the organization.

• It is also true that the economic decision criterion should reflect a


consistent and proper viewpoint (Principle 3) to be maintained
throughout an engineering economy study.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 48


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
5. Analysis and Comparison of Alternatives

• Analysis of the economic aspects of an engineering problem (Step 5) is


largely based on cash-flow estimates for the feasible alternatives selected
for detailed study.

• A substantial effort is normally required to obtain reasonably accurate


forecasts of cash flows and other factors in view of, for example,
inflationary (or deflationary) pressures, exchange rate movements, and
regulatory (legal) mandates that often occur.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 49


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
5. Analysis and Comparison of Alternatives ……

• Clearly, the consideration of future uncertainties (Principle 6) is an


essential part of an engineering economy study.

• When cash flow and other required estimates are eventually determined,
alternatives can be compared based on their differences as called for by
Principle 2. Usually, these differences will be quantified in terms of a
monetary unit such as dollars.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 50


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
6. Selection of the Preferred Alternative

• When the first five steps of the engineering economic analysis procedure
have been done properly, the preferred alternative (Step 6) is simply a
result of the total effort.

• Thus, the soundness of the technical-economic modeling and analysis


techniques dictates the quality of the results obtained and the
recommended course of action.

• Step 6 is included in Activity 5 of the engineering design process


(specification of the preferred alternative) when done as part of a design
effort.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 51


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
7. Performance Monitoring and Post-evaluation of Results

• This final step implements Principle 7 and is accomplished during and after
the time that the results achieved from the selected alternative are
collected.

• Monitoring project performance during its operational phase improves the


achievement of related goals and objectives and reduces the variability in
desired results.

• Step 7 is also the follow-up step to a previous analysis, comparing actual


results achieved with the previously estimated outcomes.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 52


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
7. Performance Monitoring and Post-evaluation of Results……

• The aim is to learn how to do better analyses, and the feedback from post
implementation evaluation is important to the continuing improvement of
operations in any organization.

• Unfortunately, like Step 1, this final step is often not done consistently or
well in engineering practice; therefore, it needs particular attention to
ensure feedback for use in ongoing and subsequent studies.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 53


MT 483
Chapter 1
Examples of Engineering Economy
and the Design Process
Lect: 05
Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure

 A friend of yours bought a small apartment building for $100,000 in a college


town. She spent $10,000 of her own money for the building and obtained a
mortgage from a local bank for the remaining $90,000. The annual mortgage
payment to the bank is $10,500 ($875 per month).

 Your friend also expects that annual maintenance on the building and
grounds will be $15,000 ($1,250 per month). There are four apartments (two
bedrooms each) in the building that can each be rented for $360 per month.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 55


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure
Refer to the seven-step procedure in Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure
Table 1.1 to answer these questions: Step
1. Problem recognition, definition, and evaluation.
a) Does your friend have a problem? If
so, what is it? 2. Development of the feasible alternatives.
b) What are her alternatives? (Identify 3. Development of the outcomes and cash flows for each
at least three.) alternative.
4. Selection of a criterion (or criteria).
c) Estimate the economic 5. Analysis and comparison of the alternatives.
consequences and other required 6. Selection of the preferred alternative.
data for the alternatives in Part (b).
7. Performance monitoring and post-evaluation of results.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 56


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure

d) Select a criterion for discriminating among alternatives, and use it to


advise your friend on which course of action to pursue.

e) Attempt to analyze and compare the alternatives in view of at least one


criterion in addition to cost.

f) What should your friend do based on the information you and she have
generated?

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 57


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure

Solution (a): (Does your friend have a problem? If so, what is it?)

a) A quick set of calculations shows that your friend does indeed have a
problem. A lot more money is being spent by your friend each year
($10,500+ $15,000 = $25,500) than is being received
(4 × $360 × 12 = $17,280).

The problem could be that the monthly rent is too low. She’s losing $8,220
per year. (Now, that is a problem!)

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 58


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure

Solution (b): (What are her alternatives? Identify at least three.)

 Option (1): Raise the rent. (Will the market bear an increase?)

 Option (2): Lower maintenance expenses (but not so far as to cause


safety problems).

 Option (3): Sell the apartment building. (What about a loss?)

 Option (4): Abandon the building (bad for your friend’s reputation).

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 59


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure

Solution (c): (Estimate the economic consequences and other required


data for the alternatives)

 Option (1). Raise total monthly rent to $1,440+$R for the four
apartments to cover monthly expenses of $2,125. Note that the
minimum increase in rent would be:

 Expenses – Income = ($2,125 − $1,440) = $685 per month

 Or $685/4= $171.25 per apartment per month.

 Almost a 50% increase in rent!.


Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 60
Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure

Solution (c):

 Option (2). Lower monthly expenses so that these expenses are covered by
the monthly revenue of $1,440 per month. This would have to be
accomplished primarily by lowering the maintenance cost. (Mortgage cost is
fixed by the Bank.)

 Monthly maintenance expenses would have to be reduced to:

 Income – Mortgage = ($1,440 − $10,500/12) = $565 pm (from $1250 pm).

 This represents more than a 50% decrease in maintenance expenses.


Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 61
Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure

Solution (c):

 Option (3). Try to sell the apartment building for $X, which recovers
the original $10,000 investment and (ideally) recovers the $685 per
month loss ($8,220 ÷ 12) on the venture during the time it was
owned.

 Will she find a buyer willing to give her $10,685/- within a month?
Especially, when the building is obviously showing a loss!

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 62


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure

Solution (c):
 Option (4). Walk away from the venture and kiss your investment
good-bye.
 The bank would likely assume possession through foreclosure and may
try to collect fees from your friend. This option would also be very bad
for your friend’s reputation.
 Also your friend will face a loss of her initial investment of $10,000/-
and whatever foreclosure fees the Bank charges!
 Can you think of a better Option?

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 63


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure

Solution (d): (Select a criterion for discriminating among alternatives).


 One criterion could be to minimize the expected loss of money. In this
case, you might advise your friend to pursue a combination of Option
(1) & (2) or exercise Option (3).

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 64


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure

Solution (e): (Attempt to analyze and compare the alternatives in view of


at least one criterion in addition to cost)
 For example, let’s use “credit worthiness” as an additional criterion.
Option (4) is immediately ruled out. Exercising Option (3) could also
harm your friend’s credit rating.
 Thus, Options (1) and (2) or a combination of the two may be her only
realistic and acceptable alternatives.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 65


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.2 ……..
Application of the Engineering Economic Analysis Procedure
Solution (f): (What should your friend do based on the information you
and she have generated)?
 Your friend should probably do a market analysis of comparable
housing in the area to see if the rent could be raised (Option: 1).
 Maybe a fresh coat of paint and new carpeting would make the
apartments more appealing to prospective renters.
 If so, the rent can probably be raised while keeping 100% occupancy
of the four apartments.
 Economic benefit could be further balanced by reducing the annual
maintenance cost. (Option: 2)
Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 66
Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.3
Get Rid of the Old Clunker?

 Engineering economy is all about deciding among competing


alternatives. When the time value of money is NOT a key ingredient in
a problem, Chapter 2 should be referenced.

 If the time value of money (e.g., an interest rate) is integral to an


engineering problem, Chapter 4 (and beyond) provides an explanation
of how to analyze these problems.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 67


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.3 ………..
Get Rid of the Old Clunker?
 Consider the following situation: Linda and Jerry are faced with a
car replacement opportunity where the interest rate can be ignored.

 Jerry’s old clunker that averages 10 miles per gallon (mpg) of


gasoline, can be traded in toward a vehicle that gets 15 mpg.

 Or, as an alternative, Linda’s 25 mpg car can be traded in toward a


new hybrid vehicle that averages 50 mpg. If they drive both cars
12,000 miles per year and their goal is to minimize annual gas
consumption, which car should be replaced—Jerry’s or Linda’s? They
can only afford to upgrade one car at this time.

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 68


Engineering Economy and the Design Process
EXAMPLE: 1.3 ………..
Get Rid of the Old Clunker?
Solution:
 Jerry’s trade-in will save:
- (12,000 miles/year)/10 mpg − (12,000 miles/year)/15 mpg
= 1,200 gallons/year − 800 gallons/year
= 400 gallons/year.
 Linda’s trade-in will save:
- (12,000 miles/year)/25 mpg − (12,000 miles/year)/50 mpg
= 480 gallons/year − 240 gallons/year
= 240 gallons/year.
 Therefore, Jerry should trade in his vehicle to save more gasoline.
Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 69
Assignments / Self Study

Do problems 1.1, 1.2, 1.6, 1.8, 1.10, 1.11, from Chapter 1


of text book

Spring 2016 Engineering Economy : Chapter 1 70