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Kieron Peaty U_15 Architectural Professional Studies

Architectural Professional Studies Contents 1.0 Introduction 1.1 1.1.01 1.1.02 1.1.03 1.1.04 Context Project Setting Site Location Programme 3 4 5 6 Page

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Architectural Management 2.1 Architect 2.1.01 Role & Responsibilities 2.1.03 Designer/Client Relationship 2.1.04 Designer/Contractor Relationship 2.1.05 Pre-contract Issues 2.1.06 Project Planning 2.1.07 CDM Regulations 10 11 12 13 14 15

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Building Economics 3.1 3.1.01 3.1.02 3.1.03 3.1.04 3.1.05 3.1.06 3.1.07 3.1.08 Procurement Strategies Project Briefing & Cost Planning Project Drivers & Objectives Budget Funding Architects Fees Cost in Use Project Life-cycle 17 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

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Legal Issues 4.1 4.1.01 4.1.02 4.1.03 4.1.04 4.1.05 4.1.06 Planning Legislation Property Law Adjoing Owners & Boundaries Planning Process Conservation Area Legal Duties & Responsibilites 28 29 30 31 32 34

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Appendix 5.1 5.1.01 Planning Application Form 5.1.02 Conservation Area Demolition Consent 5.1.03 Hoardings Online Application Form 38 43 45

1.0

Introduction

This report provides professional context for the project proposal. It introduces the main project drivers. These include the client and consultants, procurement method and subsequent contract issues, and finally the issues relating to land and property law in the context of the proposal. The initial part of the report provides context setting of the project. Detailing site location, program and the client. The second part of the report demonstrates the project relationships between the architect, client, financiers and consultants. The building economics part conveys matter relating to the financing of the project and reflects upon the implications of decisions upon the project. The final part of the report covers legal issues, planning process and health and safety matters.

1.1.01

Urban Morphology & Development

1.1.01

Context

Context: The decision to act upon a broken society has been taken by Central Coalition Government following acts of rioting throughout Britain in August 2011. Investigations conducted by independent bodies determined that rioters were mainly youths from under-priviledged areas. The Coalition has convinced none state owned financial and business service providers/institutions to invest in the futures of youths from under-privileged backgrounds. in return for tax relief. The hope is that the investment will convince youths disillusioned by the future, job prospects and their place within society that there is hope of a better life. After consultation with the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, the Spitalfields and Banglatown ward has been chosen as one particular area to benefit from the implementation of such investment.
1.1.01 Urban Morphology & Development

1.1.02

Project Setting

1.1.02

Project Setting

1.1.03

Site Location

Site: The site is 21-25 Osborn Street, located at the southern tip of Brick Lane in the Spitalfields and Banglatown Ward the London Borough of Tower Hamlets The site was previously owned by the Truman Brewery until it was donated to Tower Hamlets Council to be developed for OSYEF.

1.1.03

Site Location

1.1.04

Client

Client: The Education Funding Agency (EFA), part of the Department for Education, came into effect on 1 April 2012 following the Coalition Governments announcement that more than 900 public bodies were to be reformed with the objective to make at least 2.6 billion in administrative savings and a further 30 billion savings by reducing programme and capital spending over the spending review period. (http://www.education.gov.uk/ aboutdfe/armslengthbodies/b00199952/the-educationfunding-agency). As a result the EFA were set up with the remit to deliver key functions. The EFA will be a single body responsible for the operation of the education and training funding system for those aged 3 to 19. This will provide, over time, a more joined-up service for young people, our customers and partners. As such the EFA will oversee the development of the facility from the inception phase through to completion on site. They will be the client. The EFA will also provide partial funding for the facility however, Barclays plc will provide the dominant share. Following the completion of the construction phase and subsequent handover the EFA will hand the facility over to the Tower Hamlets College who will run the facility.

1.1.04

Client

1.1.05

Program

Program: As an education centre the building will have three main definable spaces that are targeted to work in unison to assist with the development of the youths. The education spaces are split into 4 different sizes as required by the defined age groups: 1 group of 20 - 14-16 year olds 2 groups of 10 - 16-18 year olds 4 groups of 5 - 19 years olds 20 individuals - 20 year olds The counselling and support space is located on ground floor of the building. In this space the youths will be able to gain advice about general concerns such as struggles with the course requirements, housing or financial problems, but also more specialised counselling on a one to one basis for issues such as anger management or relationship advice. The recreation space is distributed over the three main floors. The dining and kitchen areas are the main heart of the building with views from above provided by the double height atrium. Lounge, workspace and seminar spaces are provided however this space has been designated with a degree of flexibility to provide performance and rehearsal space for the amateur dramatics groups.

1.1.05

Program

Architectural Professional Studies Contents 1.0 Introduction 1.1 1.1.01 1.1.02 1.1.03 1.1.04 Context Project Setting Site Location Programme 3 4 5 6 Page

2.0

Architectural Management 2.1 Architect 2.1.01 Role & Responsibilities 2.1.03 Designer/Client Relationship 2.1.04 Designer/Contractor Relationship 2.1.05 Pre-contract Issues 2.1.06 Project Planning 2.1.07 CDM Regulations 10 11 12 13 14 15

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Building Economics 3.1 3.1.01 3.1.02 3.1.03 3.1.04 3.1.05 3.1.06 3.1.07 3.1.08 Procurement Strategies Project Briefing & Cost Planning Project Drivers & Objectives Budget Funding Architects Fees Cost in Use Project Life-cycle 17 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

4.0

Legal Issues 4.1 4.1.01 4.1.02 4.1.03 4.1.04 4.1.05 4.1.06 Planning Legislation Property Law Adjoing Owners & Boundaries Planning Process Conservation Area Legal Duties & Responsibilites 28 29 30 31 32 34

5.0

Appendix 5.1 5.1.01 Planning Application Form 5.1.02 Conservation Area Demolition Consent 5.1.03 Hoardings Online Application Form 38 43 45 9

2.1.01

Role & Responsiblities

Role & Responsibilities: under section 2 of the Architects Registration Act 1938 an architect is defined as one who possesses with due regard to aesthetic as well as practical considerations, adequate skill and knowledge to enable him to originate, to design and build, to arrange for and supervise the execution of such buildings, or other works, calling for skill in design and planning as he might in the course of his business, reasonably be asked to carry out in respect of which he offers his services as a specialist. Studio 4D have been nominated as Project Architects by the client, the Education Fundaing Agency (EFA). The practice is a small to medium sized design firm that have been provided with the programme by the client. They have been tasked with undertaking preliminary scheme work that is to form the basis of the clients preliminary cost estimates to be posed to Barclays plc, as soon as possible. The EFA are the main Client and will also provide part of the funding for the project. Upon completion of the project the EFA will hand the facility over to the Tower Hamlets College. They will run the education facility in accordance with the programme with Barclays providing mentoring to the 20 year old youths as stated within the programme.

2.1.01

Role & Rsponsibilities

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2.1.02

Designer/Client Relationship

Designer/Client Relationship: The Client is classed as Public. The difficulty of the project is that the EFA are a new agency and there is a strong chance that the authority may not have been clearly defined. The bureaucracy surrounding this flagship project could potentially lead to an inefficient construction process. However, it is assumed that lessons have been learnt from the previous Governments BSF initiative. The main hurdle faced by the Client is to establish as early as possible an initial cost estimate to allow for funding to be secured thus preventing, in theory at least, unnecessary delays to the project programme. Studio 4D (Architects) have entered into a contract with the EFA to act as agent on the public clients authority. The architects role under this contract - agency as it may also be described - is special meaning that they act on behalf of the client to undertake the design of the proposed facility. Typically the appointment would be formalised with the use of the RIBAs Standard Form of Agreement for the Appointment of an Architect, which consists of three documents: 1 - Memorandum of Agreement 2 - Conditions of Appointment 3 - Schedules There are four Schedules: 1 - Information supplied by Client 2 - Service to be provided by Architect 3 - Fee arrangement 4 - Consultants, specialists, and others to be appointed. The Public client have their own Form of Agreement for consultants however the schedules and information required/provided within them do not differ greatly from the RIBAs standard. Typically, should a Design and Build procurement route be adopted the Client would become the Contractor, thus altering the struture of the relationship.

2.1.02

Designer/Client Relationship

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2.1.03

Designer/Contractor Relationship

Designer/Contractor Relationship: The relationship between the Architect and the Contrctor is greatly determined by the procurement strategy adopted by the EFA. A traditional procurement strategy has been adopted and a subsequent Standard contract undertaken, thus the Contractor will receive instructions relating to the design and construction of the building from the Contract Administrator (Studio 4D) and relavent consultants.

2.1.03

Designer/Contractor Relationship

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2.1.04

Pre-Contract Issues

Pre-contract issues: Upon completion of the concept phase, the Education Funding Agency is keen for Studio 4D to progress through the design stages and achieve the necessary consents from the relevant authorities. Following this the Client has also let it be known that it would be preferable for Pre-Costruction documentation to be produced and co-ordinated prior to the appointment of a Contractor and the commencement of work on site. The diagram demonstrates the primary consultants that will form the design team at the early design development stage and throughout the following pre-construction stages up to Tender stage. This is the result of instruction given to the EFA to break the project down into stages. Thus consultancy fees for the development of the design and construction information will be paid to consulting design team members prior to the commencement on site. Following this only Studio 4D will remain as an active member of the design team after the tender phase. They will act as Contract Administrator on the behalf of EFA, providing instruction to the chosen Contractor.

2.1.04

Pre-Contract Issues

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2.1.05

Project Planning

Project Timeline: The construction of the project is expected to take no longer than 14 months, however this is a nominal timeframe and will be consulted upon with the contractor at the tender stage. The anticipated program for site works is as follows. Site preparation Demolition of existing Groundworks & lift core Steelframe erection Pod wall erection First Fix Staircase Glazing installation Second Fix

2.1.05

Project Planning

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2.1.06

CDM Regulations

CDM Regulations: The Client will appoint a CDM coordinator to act on their behalf. The CDM co-ordinator will be responsible for ensuring that a planning supervisor is appointed and that the contractor is capable and possesses the necessary resources to carry out their responsibilities. The CDM co-ordinator will also be responsible for producing and maintaining, throughout the project, a suitable health and safety plan and the health and safety file. Studio 4D will be responsible for ensuring that the design can be constructed safely by the contractor and that the finished building can be safely occupied and maintained by Tower Hamlets College. The health and safety plan will form 2 stages. The CDM co-ordinator will supervise the plan during the pre-tender stage, whilst the contractor will take on the responsibility of maintaining the plan throughout the construction phase. Pre-tender, the plan will contain health and safety information such as that provided by the Client relating to matters of services locations in conjunction with design information, from the design team, relating to unavoidable risks in the construction phase. At the pre-tender stage the plan will serve to provide potential contractors with all information available at the time concerning health and safety matters derived from the design, thus enabling the competence of prospective contractors to be adequately assessed at the tender stage. At the construction stage the plan will detail the arrangements made to ensure the health and safety of those working on site during construction phases. The plan will detail the methods of managing risk during construction and the monitoring systems to be implemented to ensure the plan is abided by. The CDM co-ordinator will prepare the health and safety file for the benefit of Tower Hamlets College. The file will contain information such as; As built drawings Construction methods and materials utilised Maintenance instructions Manuals for plant, equipment and services The preparation of the file will be continuous throughout all stages of the project. Generally, information will be contributed by all parties concerned.
2.1.06 CDM Regulations

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Architectural Professional Studies Contents 1.0 Introduction 1.1 1.1.01 1.1.02 1.1.03 1.1.04 Context Project Setting Site Location Programme 3 4 5 6 Page

2.0

Architectural Management 2.1 Architect 2.1.01 Role & Responsibilities 2.1.03 Designer/Client Relationship 2.1.04 Designer/Contractor Relationship 2.1.05 Pre-contract Issues 2.1.06 Project Planning 2.1.07 CDM Regulations 10 11 12 13 14 15

3.0

Building Economics 3.1 3.1.01 3.1.02 3.1.03 3.1.04 3.1.05 3.1.06 3.1.07 3.1.08 Procurement Strategies Project Briefing & Cost Planning Project Drivers & Objectives Budget Funding Architects Fees Cost in Use Project Life-cycle 17 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

4.0

Legal Issues 4.1 4.1.01 4.1.02 4.1.03 4.1.04 4.1.05 4.1.06 Planning Legislation Property Law Adjoing Owners & Boundaries Planning Process Conservation Area Legal Duties & Responsibilites 28 29 30 31 32 34

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Appendix 5.1 5.1.01 Planning Application Form 5.1.02 Conservation Area Demolition Consent 5.1.03 Hoardings Online Application Form 38 43 45 16

3.1.01

Procurement Strategies

Procurement Strategies: deciding upon a method of procurement is a process of evaluation. 3 desirable objectives are considered from the project outset; 1. 2. 3. Time - speed or certainty of completion date Cost price level or cost certainty Quality functionality and performance

Only two objectives will be achievable at the expense of the third, thus the two most valued will determine the procurement route followed. The main factors to consider for each of the 3 procurement methods are as follows; Traditional - The design process separate from construction phase full documentation required prior to tender (incl. sub-contractor) - Relatively slow process separate phases (design & construction) - Reasonable certainty of cost - all documentation is provided at tender stage - Independent consultant required to act/ administer the contract (in most contract forms) - Risk spread amongst parties (consultants) less so for measurement - Traditional lump sum is more in clients favour Design & Build - Lump sum pricing - Relative speed and cost certainty - Contractor responsible for design - Client loses control over design process - no independent contract administrator - 2 stage tendering maintaining competitive element - Risk is with the contractor - Uncertainty over design and quality Management - Cost uncertain almost until completion - Early contractor involvement - Relative speed, work can start on site as detail design evolves - Relatively low risk in terms of design and quality - Relatively high risk with regard to time and cost - Risk essentially with the client
3.1.01 Procurement Strategies

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3.1.01

Procurement Strategies

Contract: the procurement method chosen by the Education Funding Agency is traditional. As a result the prefered contract will be a Standard Building Contract without quantities. Studio 4D and nominated sub-contractors will produce fully designed and detailed documentation prior to tender stage. It is not considered that a bill of quantities will be required and generally speaking at this early stage of the project Studio 4D do not foresee that the building will be particularly complex in nature, nor is it expected to contain extensively complex services thus no specialist works will be required to be undertaken.
3.1.01 Procurement Strategies

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3.1.01

Procurement Strategies

Sub-Contract: Studio 4D have given consideration to possible construction methods and materials to be utilised for the building of the facility and consider that there will be an element of sub-contractors design. Thus there will be Standard Building Contract with sub-contractors design. The use of a sub-contract will reduce risk for Studio 4D, Without it Studio 4D may end up detailing/designing elements that would be better served being produced by specialists (i.e. metal frame contractor - Metsec, timber frame contractor - Howarth)

3.1.01

Procurement Strategies

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3.1.02

Cost Planning

Cost: Initial cost estimates at the early stages of design development will be less reliable than those produced using tender documentation prior to construction. Simply put this will be the result of design decisions taken during the early stages of the project being tentative and thus less accurate. Generally, decisions and accuracy relating to cost will be determined by the level of information available at any given stage of the project. The levels of accuracy relating to cost estimates will fluctuate at varying stages of project development. With this in mind the Education Fundaing Agency wish to have one design phase led by Studio 4D and aided by nominated consultants. Fees for all consultants will be subsequently paid at the same time, namely the end of the design phase. At this point, following all necessary site investigations, the obtainment of consents and approvals, it is considered that there will be adequate information avaliable to allow for more exact cost estimations prior to tendering the project. The traditional procurement method allows for a greater degree of cost certainity than would be present if another method, such as management, were chosen. Although sitework may be delayed by comparison to a management procurement route, the project will still be progressed suitably before site commencement. Given the timing of the project, the design phase will finish and consultants fees paid prior to the end of the fiscal year at the end of March 2013. Work on site is anticipated to begin in February 2013.

3.1.02

Cost Planning

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3.1.03

Project Drivers

3.1.03

Project Drivers

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3.1.04

Budget

Budget: The building will be a flagship for the new youth education scheme. With the opportunities provided by the majority of funding being provided by a private institution, Barclays, Tower Hamlets Council and the Tower Hamlets College are keen for the building to be finished to a high standard. To provide as much opportunity for the scheme to suceed the facility will need to be welcoming to the youths using it on a daily basis, durable, energy efficient and have the highest quality finishes available throughout, both internally and externally. Support Education Recreation Circualtion/Seminar/Workspace Amenities Store Garden Total 113 372 115 516 73 33 105 1327sqm.

The guide price for the budget is 1,750 sqm thus the initial cost estimate for the building is 2.4 million.

3.1.04

Budget

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3.1.05

Funding

Funding: The project will be mainly funded by Barclays plc. They have an agreement with the goverment that they will receive tax relief in return for investment in the building proposal. The agreed percentage of funds to be contributed to the project by Barclays is 85%. Therefore with an estimated 2.4 million project cost Barclays will be investing 2.04 million. The remaining funds will be contributed by the Education Funding Agency. The EFA are a governement body set up with the remit to fund the education system for youths aged between 3-19 years old whilst also managing sixth form and college estates. The EFA will be adding the remaining 15% of the project cost, namely 360,000. If all goes well with the project the government have an agreement with Barclays for another two facilities to be built in Lewisham and Hackney.

3.1.05

Funding

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3.1.06

Architect Fees

Architects Fees: Typically the Architects fee is calculated as a percentage of the contract value. The diagrams shown that the smaller the contract value the higher the percentage will be. The fees attached to the project will be higher than a Design and Build contract simply because of the increased level of exposure to all elements of the project as a result of the traditional procurement route. Studio 4D will receive two separate fees for the provision of two separate scope of works. The first fee is attached to the design portion of the project. This will take into consideration the progressive stages of the project from development of the brief, conceptual design, detailed design to production information for tender. The second fee for the project is attached to contract administration during the construction phase. Fees will be paid to Studio 4D by the Client, Education Funding Agency upon completion and sign off of each of the two previously detailed scope of works.

3.1.06

Architects Fees

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3.1.07

Co s t i n U s e

Cost in Use: It is imperative that due consideration is given to issues of building cost once the project has been completed. As well as recurring costs relating to matters such as heating and cooling the building there will also be issues relating to the maintenance of the facility. Over a period of time the cost of maintenance may swell as the need to restore and/or replace faulty elements of the building grows. It is imperative that Studio 4D, as designers give due care and attention when considering the performance of the finished buiding and the materials used for construction and finishes. As such the building will utilise a heat recovery and ventilation system coupled with a ground source heat pump to reduce the need for excessive artificial heating and cooling of the building. This will maintain low recurring costs for the building maintenance. The proposed EPDM external finish is given a 20 year guarantee by product manufacturers Prelasti who also claim that their product has a life expectancy of 50 years. Maintenance costs for the external envelope may relate to cleaning of windows, etc. details of which will be handed over to Tower Hamlets College in the Health and Safety file. Internal finishes are intended to range from brickwork to timber thus it is not considered that there will uncessary maintenance costs other than those related to daily use of the building by the youths.

3.1.07

Cost in Use

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3.1.08

Project Life-Cycle

Project Lifetime: Once completed it is considered that the building will be utilised for its intended purpose for as long as it is of benefit to the local community. Barclays plc have signed a contract with Tower Hamlets College dictating the provision of mentoring services to the College for a period of 20 years. Thus the facility will exist for at least the duration of the 20 year period. The education cycle proposed is 6 years from the age of 14 to 20 years old. Ergo, it is conceivable that the merit of having such a facility in the area will not be fully understood for the duration of this initial six year period. The Education Funding Agency are aware that this project may eventually be the only one of its kind if it is deemed as being unsuccessful. Therefore, Studio 4D have been instructed to investigate materials for construction that are flexible and demountable to allow for the building to be reconfigured to facilitate larger numbers or alternative use should Tower Hamlets College decide at a later date to expand the functionality of the final building.

3.1.08

Project Life-cycle

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Architectural Professional Studies Contents 1.0 Introduction 1.1 1.1.01 1.1.02 1.1.03 1.1.04 Context Project Setting Site Location Programme 3 4 5 6 Page

2.0

Architectural Management 2.1 Architect 2.1.01 Role & Responsibilities 2.1.03 Designer/Client Relationship 2.1.04 Designer/Contractor Relationship 2.1.05 Pre-contract Issues 2.1.06 Project Planning 2.1.07 CDM Regulations 10 11 12 13 14 15

3.0

Building Economics 3.1 3.1.01 3.1.02 3.1.03 3.1.04 3.1.05 3.1.06 3.1.07 3.1.08 Procurement Strategies Project Briefing & Cost Planning Project Drivers & Objectives Budget Funding Architects Fees Cost in Use Project Life-cycle 17 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

4.0

Legal Issues 4.1 4.1.01 4.1.02 4.1.03 4.1.04 4.1.05 4.1.06 Planning Legislation Property Law Adjoing Owners & Boundaries Planning Process Conservation Area Legal Duties & Responsibilites 28 29 30 31 32 34

5.0

Appendix 5.1 5.1.01 Planning Application Form 5.1.02 Conservation Area Demolition Consent 5.1.03 Hoardings Online Application Form 38 43 45 27

4.1.01

Planning Legislation

Planning policy/legislation: There are a number of policies and legislation documents which will impact upon the project. Predominantly this is the result of the project site being with a conservation area and also the City Fringe. The following demonstrates some of the documentation that have/will impact upon the project. - At national level, the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 places a duty on Tower Hamlets to designate Conservation Areas in areas of special architectural or historic interest, and to formulate and publish proposals for the preservation and enhancement of its Conservation Areas. National policy for planning and the historic environment is set out in Planning Policy Guidance 15 (PPG15). - At the regional level, policy 4B.1 of the London Spatial Development Strategy (or London Plan) states that The Mayor will seek to ensure that developments ... respect Londons built heritage. - At local level, the new Local Development Framework (LDF) of Tower Hamlets states that the Council will protect and enhance the historic environment of the borough. This is described in detail in policy CP49 of the Core Strategy of the LDF. In addition, parties applying for consent should note policy CP46 to ensure that access issues are properly addressed in work carried out in a Conservation Area.

- The Conservation Area lies within the Banglatown and Brick Lane Sub-Area of the City Fringe Area Action Plan (AAP) in the LDF. The Area Action Plan states that Regeneration and new development must strive for design excellence which respects and enriches the sensitive townscape and the built heritage of the area. New buildings and public spaces must enhance the historical features of the City Fringe, including the numerous Conservation Areas, Listed Buildings, street patterns, and the Tower of London. Policy CFR1 of the City Fringe spatial strategy states that development in the City Fringe should ensure ... the preservation and enhancement of the historic environment of the Borough. -The LDF identifies 10 development sites in or around the Conservation Area. These include sites at the Bishopsgate Goodsyard, 32-42 Bethnal Green Road, the Cygnet Street Car Park, the former Shoreditch Station, Vallance Road, Cheshire Street, Allen Gardens North (as public open space), the Old Trumans Brewery, a site at 86 Brick Lane and 40-48 Fashion Street. - Large parts of the area are identified as an area of archaeological importance.

4.1.01

Planning Legislation

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4.1.02

Property Law

Boundaries: The site is 21-25 Osborn Street, Tower Hamlets. It was previously owned by the Truman Brewery. However, following an appeal by Tower Hamlets Council in January 2012 for private landowners in the borough to donate unused land fit for development, the Brewery offered the site. The Council were given the leasehold for the land, along with the permission of the Truman Brewery to develop the site to accommodate the new youth education facility. The site is fronted to the east by Osborn Street, which will provide the main access to the site. To the north the neighbouring building is the EDF Energy sub-station for East London. Whilst to the south there is an access road which could potentially be utilised for site offices or the delivery of materials.

4.1.02

Property Law

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4.1.03

Adjoining Owners & Boundaries

Party & Adjoining Walls: Tower Hamlets Council were informed by the Truman Brewery upon receipt of the land that there were no party wall concerns attached to the site. The area shown red on the diagram denotes neighbouring wall to the site but it is not considered to be an adjoining walls. This wall is to be taken as a boundary wall, which under the Party Wall Act Etc 1996 is not necessarily a party wall or a fence wall.

4.1.03

Adjoining Owners & Boundaries

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4.1.04

Planning Process

Planning Process: Tower Hamlets Council are fully aware of the project. They have already spent considerable time arranging for the flagship project to be built in their borough. However this will not mean that corners can be cut with regards to the obtainment of planning consent. Any proposal will have to be sensitive to the context of the area. The emphasis bestowed upon the scheme by the Coalition Government means that there is a degree of pressure upon Tower Hamlets Council to ensure that the project does not become tangled in the planning process. Thus it is hoped that the decision for Studio 4D to work closely with a planning supervisor will prevent any time delays. Studio 4D have been tasked with obtaining all necessary approvals and consents. This will include full planning consent for the project as well as conservation area consent, change of use and demolition in a conservation area consent. The Education Funding Agency are aware that planning approval will take between roughly 8-10 weeks to obtain thus they are keen for Studio 4D to press ahead with the design stage.

4.1.04

Planning Process

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4.1.05

Conservation Area

archaeological area: An EDF energy owned electricity sub-station neighbours the site to the north. It is a major power supply for the whole of east London. Tower Hamlets Council granted Conservation Area Consent in August 2008 for the demolition of the existing sub-station. The consent was part of a move to rebuild the facility so that it may cope with increased power requirements. Within the accompanying Officers Report it was stated that the existing buildings were not statutorily listed. The report also suggested that any proposal for the EDF site should take into account and be sensitive to the character of the surrounding area in terms of design, bulk, scale and use of materials. Planning consent (reference PA/08/01149) for the EDF site was granted in April 2009. As part of preparatory work prior to the commencement of construction of the new sub-station an archaeological investigation of the EDF site was undertaken. During the investigation remains of a post medieval well (probably 18th Century) and medieval (or more likely postmedieval) pit-falls. Given the need for archaeological investigations at the neighbouring substation there will be similar undertakings for the project site. The Tower Hamlets Code for Construction Practice states that, it is an offence to undertake works to scheduled Monuments or AAIs [Areas of Archaeological Interest] without first obtaining formal consent from the Secretary of State. (p39)

4.1.05

Conservation Area

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4.1.05

Conservation Area

Demolition: The buildings currently occupying the site are to be demolished. The site exists within the Brick Lane and Fournier Street Conservation Area. As such Studio 4D will complete an Application for Conservation Area Consent for Demolition in a Conservation Area Form for the demolition of the unlisted buildings/structures. Although consent is not required for the demolition of buildings under 115 cubic metres in size, it is considered that the existing buildings/structures occupying the site exceed this allowance. A specialist demolition contractor will be required to undertake the work, with special care given to neighbouring buildings. A method statement will be produced by the demolition contractor, detailing the works to be undertaken.

4.1.05

Conservation Area

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4.1.06

Legal Duties & Responsibilities

Foundations & Excavation: The project will not require deep excavational work. The youths proposed to use the facility are not expected to own cars or other such vehicles and would not need to utilise these as a means of travelling to the site for the sole reason that the building is aimed at educating local youths. As such there will be no need to provide underground car parking facilities, etc. This will allow for funds to be used above ground to provide the best building possible. The foundations for the building have not been confirmed at this early stage however preliminary consideration is that they will be piled foundations. The only neighbouring wall/building that will potentially be impacted upon is shown red in the diagram.

4.1.06

Legal Duties & Responsibilities

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4.1.06

Legal Duties & Responsibilities

Road Closure: Osborn Street is a narrow one way street. Delivery of materials to the site could be problematic. It may be possible for materials to be delivered into the service road to the south of the site, however the narrow nature of Osborn Street and the fact that it is in constant use by residents and visitors requireing access to Brick Lane provide a number of issues for consideration. Consultation with Tower Hamlets Council will be saught to gather inforrmation about the best way to deal with this issue. The simplest resolution may be for the delivery of materials to occur outside times of high traffic volume and peak daytime. There may be a need to arrange for the temporary closure of Osborn St during deliveries. Tower Hamlets Code for Construction states that, the contractor will carry out initial consultation with the London Borough of Tower Hamlets concerning the stopping up of roads and footpaths and the postinf of notices informing local residents, business and organisations. (p7) Other alternatives such as delivery during the evening/ night or early morning could be extremely detrimental to neighbouring businesses, particularly the City Hotel adjacent to the site.

4.1.06

Legal Duties & Responsibilities

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4.1.06

Legal Duties & Responsibilities

Tower Hamlets Code of Construction Practice (CoCP): The code sets out standards and procedures for managing the environmental impacts of constructing major projects and small scale construction alike within the LondonBorough of Tower Hamlets. The code is a comprehensive document providing considerable information relating to all conceivable aspects of a development/construction project within Tower Hamlets. Advice is given on issues relating to highways, disposal of waste, site boundaries, etc. It will be the responsibility of the Contractor to ensure that all relevant licenses and approvals have been obtained prior to the commencement of work on site. Planning consent for projects in Tower Hamlets is conditional upon compliance with the CoCP. Therefore the CoCP will have an impact upon the Osborn Street building project.

4.1.06

Legal Duties & Responsibilities

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Architectural Professional Studies Contents 1.0 Introduction 1.1 1.1.01 1.1.02 1.1.03 1.1.04 Context Project Setting Site Location Programme 3 4 5 6 Page

2.0

Architectural Management 2.1 Architect 2.1.01 Role & Responsibilities 2.1.03 Designer/Client Relationship 2.1.04 Designer/Contractor Relationship 2.1.05 Pre-contract Issues 2.1.06 Project Planning 2.1.07 CDM Regulations 10 11 12 13 14 15

3.0

Building Economics 3.1 3.1.01 3.1.02 3.1.03 3.1.04 3.1.05 3.1.06 3.1.07 3.1.08 Procurement Strategies Project Briefing & Cost Planning Project Drivers & Objectives Budget Funding Architects Fees Cost in Use Project Life-cycle 17 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

4.0

Legal Issues 4.1 4.1.01 4.1.02 4.1.03 4.1.04 4.1.05 4.1.06 Planning Legislation Property Law Adjoing Owners & Boundaries Planning Process Conservation Area Legal Duties & Responsibilites 28 29 30 31 32 34

5.0

Appendix 5.1 5.1.01 Planning Application Form 5.1.02 Conservation Area Demolition Consent 5.1.03 Hoardings Online Application Form 38 43 45 37

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