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ARCHITECTURE FOR

EVERYDAY LIFE
EVERYWHERE
EVERYONE
EVERYBODY
EVERY TIME
SUSTAINABILITY BY SWEDEN
Sveriges Arkitekter, Swedish Association of Architects
Produced by the Swedish Association of Architects, 2010
with support by the Delegation for sustainable cities
Project leader: Pehr-Mikael Sllstrm
Editor: Tomas Lauri, Katarina Nilsson
Translation: Roger Tanner, John Krause
Layout: Ina Flygare
Printer: TSRB Nanjing
ISBN 978-91-978353-5-0
Cover photo: Kastrup Sea Bath by White architects.
Photo: ke E:son Lindman
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Architecture and Sustainable Welfare 2
Architecture matters 3
Open to changes 8
Township without empty gestures 18
The magnetism of style 27
A system of the future 32
The Strategist 39
The Politician 41
The Planner 43
Examples from the municipalities: Planning for everyday life 46
Examples from practice: Sustainable architecture and planning 63
Directory of architects 107
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Architecture and sustainable welfare
Sweden is a nation with a long tradition oI comprehensive planning and oI using architectural
guidelines as a means oI enhancing the quality oI everyday liIe Ior our citizens while conserving our
natural resources Ior Iuture generations. In the 1960s and 1970s, to be sure, we had some very negative
experiences oI planning processes that damaged large parts oI our historical city centres, but we have
learned a lot Irom our mistakes. The Swedish Government is convinced that to build a sustainable
society, many parties must be involved and work together to fnd innovative and more resource-
eIfcient technical solutions to our social needs.
Architecture has a crucial role in this as a bridge between human needs and technical solutions.
But also as a means oI cultural development and oI communicating more sustainable liIestyles.
Architecture can make such liIestyles more attractive and easily accessible Ior everyone.
Opportunities Ior citizens to develop and be productive members oI society wherever they live are a
Iundamental aspect oI sustainability. Spatial organisation can include or exclude. We have a strong
belieI in the open society. It is our experience that this has resulted in a high degree oI participation,
initiative and responsibility at the local level, a sense oI trust and security which is the basis oI our
welIare. The right oI our citizens to participate in the spatial planning process is laid down in the law.
The development process may be time consuming, but makes it possible in the end to produce large
quantities oI high quality and even unique housing.
Today international delegations visit our urban development schemes and our way oI working is
regarded as a model by many. We believe that our approach to building sustainable cities, based on
great care Ior the quality oI everyday liIe oI citizens, is something that other countries can beneft
Irom. It is our experience that careIul planning and architecture are part oI the Ioundation oI a sound
economy in the long term. In a post-industrial society, increasingly dependent on access to knowledge,
the economy will fourish in places where people want to make their lives.
Sweden has long been a nation oI industrial exports. We are now entering a new era where the service
and knowledge-producing sectors are becoming more important. Architecture and planning provide an
exciting example oI this new trend. It is thereIore our great pleasure to hereby present this catalogue
with many examples oI how Swedish architects and planners are working to develop a sustainable
society.
Lena Adelsohn Liljeroth Andreas Carlgren
Minister Ior Culture Minister Ior the Environment
Photos: Pawel Flato
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Architecture matters
The dream oI a better liIe is what attracts people to move to the city. 2008 was a banner year in that
respect. For the frst time, more than fIty percent oI humanity now lives in urban areas at the same
time as the world`s population reached seven billion. The urban population is expected to double in
the next Iorty years, while the total global population grows to ten billion. By then seventy percent
oI the population will live in cities. The challenge will be to deal with all that growth in the Iace oI
diminishing natural resources. Sustainability is going to be about human health and about maintaining
productive, proftable ecosystems that can provide Ior our needs while keeping the planet in good
shape even Ior Iuture generations. Planning and architecture are going to be important tools Ior
creating the sustainable cities and buildings oI the Iuture. Tomorrow`s sustainable solutions need to be
both technologically smart and attractive Ior people`s everyday lives, Ior everyday architecture.
The more people that will live in the city, the easier it becomes to deal with environmental problems
and reduce greenhouse gas emissions with smart technologies. But Ior that to happen, the sustainable
city needs to oIIer its inhabitants a better quality oI liIe. Sustainable technical strategies must be
designed Irom a human perspective while solving the environmental problems. Swedish eIIorts to
develop sustainable cities and architecture are getting a great deal oI attention internationally these
days. In Sweden there are planning methods and an approach to the work process to achieve holistic
solutions, which starts with a balanced integration oI social, economic, and ecological demands and
conditions. It`s what we call SymbioCity. Our approach to building a sustainable society is anchored in
legislation and a regulatory process that gives all stakeholders a voice. That allows a high level oI both
systematization and citizen participation in our work with planning and design. It also provides good
conditions Ior interdisciplinary collaboration among a variety oI actors oI complementary expertise.
What it means is that the solutions we arrive at are already adapted to local conditions and have the
support oI the people aIIected. And that makes the execution oI the project much more eIIective. We
call it consensus.
For this catalogue, we have gathered together a number oI talented writers to describe the Swedish
model in more detail and Irom several diIIerent perspectives and to discuss what it means to work
with Swedish architects and planners. We have also invited municipalities and architecture frms to
explain how they work. Several oI the contributing architects also present some oI their international
work. These Swedish architects can and will contribute to building sustainable buildings and cities
around the world. Sweden has a long history as an export nation. We can contribute the knowledge
and expertise it takes to fnd solutions that always are based on local conditions. What makes us so
successIul is our ability to come up with new solutions. We are a country built on innovation.
We would like to give warm thanks to the Swedish government whose investment in exporting
sustainable cities has provided the support needed to produce this catalogue. We also want to thank all
oI the companies and municipalities who made the eIIort to make this unique compilation possible.
The Swedish Association oI Architects
Laila Strunke
President oI Swedish Association oI Architects

Photo: Urban Orzolek
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ARCHITECTURE FOR
EVERYDAY LIFE
EVERYWHERE
EVERYONE
EVERYBODY
EVERY TIME
SUSTAINABILITY BY SWEDEN
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EVERYONE
It seems we all agree.
That`s how every successIul meeting in Sweden is
summed up. Everyone is on the same page. All oI
the Nordic countries can be described as consensus
democracies. The stability oI their development during
practically the whole oI the 20th century is rooted in a
policy oI consensus which has been both unusual and
victorious. This pursuit oI consensus has been most
energetic in Sweden. A good solution is a solution Ior
everyone.
The policy oI general welIare is visible in what has been
built and planned. The general means that Sweden has
never had any specifc social housing production Ior the
poor. All homes must satisIy the same requirements,
and so Sweden today has the world`s highest housing
standard in terms oI square metres per inhabitant. The
greater part oI Sweden`s housing stock materialised in
the second halI oI the 20th century, with the assistance
oI state Iunding. To qualiIy Ior the Iavourable credits
Open to changes
Sweden stands for a socially conscious architecture. It is an
architecture of wood, of prefabrication, and of nature, with
roots that extend back to the industrial revolution and the
will to create a united and participatory society.
and grants on oIIer, a certain standard had to be met,
not only spatially but also in terms oI urban planning.
The good home was defned in codes and regulations.
Since the market took over the task oI providing the
country with new homes, the importance oI the codes
has diminished, but the vision oI the home as the
nucleus oI the welIare society lives on.
Consensus between citizens and government requires
confdence. The perception oI the state as good Ior one`s
own welIare goes back to more indigent times than our
own. Thanks to a reasonable symmetry between taking
and giving, a process oI urban construction was able
to slowly evolve. Civil registration in Sweden, the very
Ioundation oI governmental planning, dates back to the
17th century, making it the world`s oldest. And in the
local community at that time, decision-making bodies
already existed which were consensus-based.
The ironworks quickly became the pioneers oI urban
development. Industrialists with strategic acumen
organised not only production but also their employees`
Page 67.
Restaurant
Tusen in the
Ramunaberget
ski resort,
by Murman
Architects, won
the awara for
best holiaay
builaing at
the Worla
Architectural
Festival in
Barcelona in
2009.
Page 9.
Playgrouna in
Jasaparken in
the center of
Stockholm. The
reaevelopment of
Jasaparken won
the Siena Pri:e
for best Sweaish
lanascape aesign
in 2007.
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PreIabrication Iavoured a largeness oI scale which
culminated in the 20th century. Industrial methods
now set the tone, not only oI construction but also
oI planning. To husband governmental resources,
planning responsibility was transIerred to the
builder, whereas previously it had been a matter
between the architect and the client.
The diminished infuence oI architects caused
artistic development to switch over to smaller
assignments such as churches and private detached
houses, where beauty was still permitted to overrule
production adjustment. The bid Ior the sacred also
proved highly important, Ior all the smallness oI
output. This is not so much a matter oI religion
Sweden is one oI the world`s most secularised
countries as oI the natural romanticism Ior which
so many Swedes have a hankering. Daylight, natural
materials and greenery were and remain universally
uncontested values.
Pining Ior nature has even created a settlement all
oI its own. Weekend cottages are dotted about in
the landscape, along the coasts, beside lakes, in the
Iorests and in the mountains. In summertime more
than halI the population moves to such dwellings.
The lure oI nature has also made the weekend
cottage an interesting architectural commission
with plentiIul scope Ior manoeuvre. The more
unconventional liIestyle oI people`s leisure and the
more isolated locations oI the houses encourage
a zest Ior experimentation. Growing interest in
architecture has widened the market Ior architect-
designed second homes as well as Ior detached
houses, a niche which Ior a time barely existed.
Nature today is also leaving its imprint on more
large-scale building development. Natural materials
like wood are now being used in every connection,
and woodland or lakeside prospects are valued
assets in the planning context, not least where urban
development is concerned.
EVERY TME
A good building must be long-serving, in terms
oI both Iorm and technology. Functionalism,
introduced in Sweden in 1930, remains the basic
ideology oI architecture, even though the Iorms
are no longer the same. The knowledge base
demands both research and scrutiny. Government
commissions concerning practical, hygienic homes
were already initiated in the 1920s, and Swedish
lives in accordance with rational principles. With
standardised homes in straight lines and with church,
school and medical care underpinning people`s
upbringing and well-being, the lucrative iron industry
was able to construct ideal communities long beIore the
breakthrough oI industrial society.
During Sweden`s industrialisation process and its
concomitant transIormation Irom one oI the poorest
countries in Europe to one oI the wealthiest, society
was strengthened by a host oI institutions, all oI them
Iashioned by a new proIessional category consulting
architects. The schools, hospitals, railway stations,
courthouses and churches oI the 19th century leIt an
imprint on Sweden which lasted well into the next
century and which to a great extent still is strong. The
image oI the Swedish town is historic, even through
more than halI oI all the country`s buildings are under
50 years old.
The humanism oI the 20th century also rested on
rational Ioundations. Optimum production requires
sound management oI resources, a category in which
both raw materials and people could be included.
Organised working conditions, organised communities
and healthy homes generated gains Ior both enterprise
and citizens. Industry once again set the pattern oI
planning. Whereas big 19th century workplaces
breweries, Ior example could be modelled on medieval
castles, Iunctionalist architecture inverted the ideals,
modelling people`s homes on the pragmatic structures
oI Iactory buildings.
These developments were not confned to Sweden.
Germany had led the way as regards both
industrialisation and the radicalisation oI architecture,
but it was Sweden that succeeded in creating national
programmes out oI the housing policy endeavours
oI the 1920s. UnaIIected by direct damage aIter the
Second World War, the strong state was able to work Ior
the country`s transIormation into an eIfcient welIare
society. Architects occupied the IoreIront, planning
suburbs where the neighbourhood ethos would be the
cement joining people together. A sceptical view was
taken oI the muddle and apparent disorder oI the city.
EVERYWHERE
Sweden long remained a Iaintly urbanised society. It
was not until the mid-1950s that the urban population
exceeded its rural counterpart; by the turn oI the
century, one inhabitant in Iour was a country-dweller.
Much oI Sweden`s earlier wealth was generated in the
Iorests, in the mines and through the energy obtainable
Irom a waterIall. But the move towards ever more
large-scale structures caused the towns and cities
to outdistance the countryside growth-wise. State-
subsidised housing production was a locomotive oI the
national economy in the mid-20th century.
Now building too began to be industrialised on a large
scale. Sweden was already exporting preIabricated
houses beIore industrialization, and the expanding
timber industry was already exporting house kits
worldwide in the 19th century. Factory housing
production was already a big number in the 1930s, and
today nearly all housing is made up oI more or less
preIabricated sections.
"Since the market took over the task of
providing the counrty with new homes, the
importance of the codes has diminished, but
the vision of the home as the nucleus of the
welfare society lives on."
Page 1011.
House in the
Stockholm
archipelago by
Tham Jiaegra
Architects.
Page 13.
K.fem, a large
aepartment store
in the Stockholm
suburb of
Jllingby by
Wingrah
Architects, was
selectea as the
best builaing
for shopping
at the Worla
Architectural
Festival in
Barcelona in
2008.
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building research has leIt Iew felds unexplored.
The research fndings became recommendations and
regulations, implying Ior example that everyone,
regardless oI age or disability, must be able to go
everywhere and use every building.
Much knowledge has also been gathered concerning the
best ways oI caring Ior old buildings and environments.
Historic buildings make an important diIIerence to
people`s sense oI belonging. Demolitions are thereIore
avoided to the utmost extent possible, with the result
that building conservation has also become a part
oI modern architecture. Good care augments the
sentimental value oI buildings, and knowledge oI the
way in which old buildings should be looked aIter is
widespread. OIten the Iunction oI a building can be
more worthy oI preservation than details oI its design,
and so knowledge oI ways in which old structures can
be modernised has grown increasingly important. The
same goes Ior the city as such. Several neighbourhoods
which at one time were condemned can now boast the
country`s Ioremost urban qualities. The slowness oI
change has an intrinsic value.
In recent decades the art oI restoration has been
developed into a saIe haven Ior craItsmanship in
building. At the same time, the ideology oI preservation
has Iound itselI in complicated situations, in that
Modernist buildings and developments are now also
in need oI restoration. In addition to the technical
structures being hard to preserve, there are many
environments here which do not inspire the same
unalloyed devotion as austere Iarm cottages or graceIul
summertime retreats. Most debates on architecture and
urban development oI late have been concerned with
the limits oI preservation and with who should make
decisions aIIecting the city the general public, experts
or politicians.
On a deeper level, however, there is a broad consensus
in Iavour oI our common environment confrming
that we are human beings and not just consumers or
temporary visitors on this planet. To these humanist
values a new environmental objective has been added,
"This is not so much a matter of religion
Sweden is one of the world's most
secularised countries. Daylight, natural
materials and greenery were and remain
universally uncontested values."
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namely that oI the built environment not impacting
on ecosystems. Nearness to unspoiled nature has
played a very important part in gaining support and
understanding Ior the environmental objectives. The
sense oI nature as a common asset was leaving its
mark on planning long beIore sustainable development
became a topic oI discussion. The ancient right oI
moving Ireely on other people`s land has among other
things led to prohibition oI the privatisation oI Sweden`s
coasts and lakesides. This has preserved the landscape
as a common asset and a common responsibility.
EVERYDAY
Improved co-operation has long been the essence oI
the Sweaish moael. This concept, like the Sweaish
Welfare State metaphor, dates Irom the inter-war years
and marks the beginning oI the Social Democrats` long
tenure oI power. The idealisation oI everyday liIe was
mirrored by the campaign to eliminate the rural custom
oI keeping the best room in the home closed except
Ior celebrations and holidays. Everyday liIe used to be
lived in the kitchen. The new homes no longer had 'fne
rooms or sitting rooms. The heart oI the home was now
called the 'everyday room, i.e. living room. Then in
1955 the boundary between kitchen and living room was
eliminated with the launching oI the all-in-one room.
That boundary disappeared simultaneously with the
middle-class convention oI having domestic servants.
Nowadays the all-in-one room is taken Ior granted, just
like the sharing oI housework and child care between
both parents. Weekdays are no longer contrasted with
'holy days, meaning a day oI rest reserved Ior church -
going and Iormal dinners, whereas now we have a day
oI leisure. Just as the all-in-one room demolished the
boundaries between classes and sexes in the home,
so has everyday living broken down the barriers in
the city. The bastions oI old-time highbrow culture,
such as museums and concert halls, now address
themselves to all ages, but above all perhaps to the
young. RaIael Moneo`s Modern Museum (1990-98) was
a large and signifcant cultural building project in the
heart oI Stockholm. When completed it was criticised
Ior its conventional view oI the museum visit as a
silent, contemplative and introverted activity. Today,
iI anything, the opposite is expected oI new cultural
institutions. Museums are expected to be public living
rooms.
The outdoor environment today is also being planned
with reIerence to everyday use. Parks Iormerly intended
Ior walking in are now settings Ior games and picnics,
which means new demands on their resilience. In
streets and squares today, outdoor caIs and events are
claiming more and more space, now that Swedes have
adopted more Mediterranean social habits. Intensive
living in a close-knit city is a powerIul ideal which
has augmented the pressure on the traditional city and
its Iringes. Housing has become a choice oI liIestyle,
with the inner city one among several options. Even in
Stockholm one can choose to live in the country without
needing to spend more than an hour travelling to work.
Swedish architecture has made great headway in
making liIe convenient and rational. We know how
parks, streets, homes and workplaces can be made
secure and practical. We have created strategies Ior
making everyone a participant in construction and
planning processes. We have reached agreement
concerning which buildings and which environments
are to be saIeguarded.
The challenge today lies in preserving all these good
things and at the same time allowing buildings to aIIect
people in their everyday lives, in such a way that they
will see their lives in a new light and have the courage
to break with the consensus. Architecture has the
potential to both reaIfrm and provote. The Iorms vary.
Today we are building copies oI historic towns as well
as abstract additions to towns which really are historic.
II the aim is to create environments in which people
Ieel both accepted and challenged, both options are
workable. Everyday architecture can sometimes be a
matter oI not doing anything at all, waiting Ior the right
opportunity and the right building. The good society is
an open one. Open to changes.
RASMUS WRN
architect SAR/MSA and architecture critic
"The sense of nature as a common asset
was leaving its mark on planning long before
sustainable development became a topic of
discussion."
Page 14.
Stora
Katrineberg,
housing in
Stockholm by
Kfellanaer
Sfberg
Architects.
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Township without
empty gestures
Three architects discuss what it means to be a Swedish architect and urban planner.
We are sharp-witted on the human level, says Johannes Tovatt, one of the participants.
Johannes Tovatt (JT) heads Tovatt Architects & Planners, one of Europe's leading
practices in urban planning. Credits include urban development plans in London, Vienna
and St. Petersburg, among other places.
Hans Murman (HM) has made himself known for an architecture in which national
tradition is blended with international concepts. At the 2009 World Architecture Festival in
Barcelona he received an award for a restaurant in the Swedish mountains.
Monica von Schmalensee (MvS) is CEO of White Arkitekter, one of the largest
architecture practices in Europe. They were one of the designers of the Hammarby
Sjstad township, widely noted for its sustainability. The frm recently won an
international competition for a new research hospital in Stockholm.
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What services can Swedish architects offer the
international market?
1T: All services. OI course there are some where it is
harder to compete with the local architects. There is
a huge amount oI very specifc knowledge in various
countries which outsiders do not possess. What we oIIer
has to be something specifcally Swedish, in either a
cultural or a proIessional sense. I`m inclined to believe
that the cultural is what we can oIIer. There we have our
big opportunity and business concept. One can speak oI
a Palme legacy (editor`s note: Social Democratic Prime
Minister oI Sweden, 1969-76 and 1982-86). We have a
sense oI Iairness in Sweden. That might sound a bit cocky,
but I believe it. We are sharp-witted on the human level.
MvS: It`s never that easy to say 'we can export this.
There isn`t any package. But the Swedish model is
still something people turn to Sweden Ior. We know
about society, welIare and quality. It`s our heritage,
because Ior a long time now our everyday liIe has
been caringly shaped. We also know how to achieve
this. We have a process to oIIer. There is much to be
gained Irom fnding an interlocutor who can handle
issues oI this kind. I think it`s important to understand
that a new society cannot be built hastily. Planning,
implementation and management take time. Today,
with everything having to be immediate and look
good in pictures, there is a danger oI our not allowing
the process time enough Ior issues and consequences
to be properly illuminated. It`s important here Ior
cities, policy-makers and oIfcials to possess genuine
knowledge. Sweden has been Iortunate in that
respect. We have been able to devote great care to the
constituent parts.
'We are very
practical,` says
Hans Murman
about Sweaish
architects.
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Is it true to say that there is a specic Swedish
architectural culture? What are its distinguishing
characteristics?
MvS: Most oIten, iI one is to generalise, we work in a
user perspective, Irom the inside outwards. This diIIers
Irom a working approach which begins Irom the outside
and sometimes never reaches the inside, the small part,
such as the organisation oI a workplace. It is important
that we also have to fnd a solution Ior the inner part.
One can also think in terms oI a larger scale. Take
a city, Ior example. Is it to be built Irom the Iaades
or Irom the residents, street liIe, activities, everyday
happenings .?
HM: We are very practical. And we have a great
understanding oI Iunction. For that reason we are
leading in the world when it comes to something like
designing oIfce workplaces. Also, and this is clearly
apparent Irom a lot oI new Swedish architecture, we
have learned that the exterior has an important role,
as a symbol creator, as marketing and Ior the way
the architecture is experienced. We`re dealing with a
holistic entity, with the external and internal interacting.
In Iact, because we are mindIul oI both the interior
and the exterior, we have an extraordinary chance oI
creating something really powerIul.
Isn`t this ~inside knowledge you speak of quite
difcult to get across? How do you make a picture of
the practical?
1T: The core issue here is interesting. For example, iI
you look at open international competitions and who
'We have
non-exclusive
systems.
We incluae
everyboay,` says
Johannes Tovatt.
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wins them, it`s rarely the biggest practices. Very oIten
it`s young ones. They`re good at images and concepts.
I have a diIfculty in seeing how Sweden as a culture
can compete with these concepts and images. Basically
this is a question oI mentality. And that, I think, is
something we can be proud oI.
MvS: I don`t think one should overstate any antithesis
between our way oI creating architecture and an
international way. What you say is rather the way things
used to be.
HM: Once again, our strength lies in our ability to
combine Iunction and aesthetic.
MvS: It`s interesting sometimes to see the comments
to the winner oI an architecture competition. We won
the competition Ior the Karolinska research hospital.
That was an international design competition. But
outside Sweden it was our ideas about Iocusing on the
patient, about care, that people paid tribute to. There is
so much more to it than the mere outward appearance
oI the hospital. Basically the point is that we have raised
hospital issues to a diIIerent level. That, as I see it, is
very Swedish. What we have highlighted are typically
Swedish ideas about social values. When we base things
on our heritage, our tradition, they turn out well.
What are the implications of engaging a Swedish
architect?
1T: As an architect you are oIten expected to be more
authoritarian than you are. In my experience, it is more
positive than negative to be non-authoritan. Clients Ieel
that they can step into the project, be a part oI it. This
creates an opportunity Ior doing something together.
For many years now we have had a major urban
development project in Vienna (editor`s note: FlugIeld,
Aspern). When they twigged our non-authoritarian
attitude, we Iound each other in a new way. The non-
authoritarian is not to be conIused, oI course, with the
absence oI any standpoint. Not laying the law down
Irom beginning to end does not mean that you cease
guiding, directing and running a project.
MvS: OIten it`s a matter oI a diIIerent kind oI authority.
1T: There is a danger in seeing a weakness in not
having all the answers. We know what we are out to
achieve. That imparts security, stability, to the process.
What Swedish architects do is offer a process
mentality, leadership for a process. Correct?
MvS: We have many Ioreign visitors who come to look
at Hammarby Sjstad. I usually give them a description
oI our working approach. First I describe what things
oIten look like. Disciplines are pigeon-holed you`re
an architect, you`re a structural engineer, you`re a
politician, you`re an electrical consultant, and so on.
All the pigeons toil away in their separate holes to
the best oI their ability. But the processes, such as the
planning process, move in the other direction, cutting
straight through the pigeonholes. The big challenge
lies in working a little more holistically, overarchingly.
Instead oI linear thinking, one can put the vision at the
centre oI things. As in the case oI Hammarby Sjstad:
sustainability. Then everyone can relate to it. All the
time, one`s attention is Iocused on the vision, or the
project. That has you working in a diIIerent way. With
that kind oI shared Iocus, moving a process Iorward
comes easily. And moving processes Iorward is the
thing we are best in the world at.
1T: A successIul process is Iounded on personal
involvement. II you spend two days sitting with a
Russian oligarch, as I did in St. Petersburg, and get
him to consider simple matters, you have made a lot oI
headway. He has bought land Ior a billion roubles and
wants a two-billion payback. Those are the Irames. But
then it has to be workable. Olga must be able to get her
bagIul oI shopping Irom the metro to her fat. We also
have a class problem to deal with. All these things are
maniIested in the new township. How are we to solve it
all? This is where my knowledge comes in. It`s a matter
oI the personal aspect, knowing how to do things, what
architecture can do. Most people I have met, whatever
their social standing, take it Ior granted that this
personal side is more important than the billion roubles.
That means we can add Iour or fve points beyond the
fnancial aspect. Those points are about the way we see
each other here in Sweden. It is universally human and
an extraordinary business philosophy.
Does a Swedish architect care much about the
everyday side of things?
1T: Yes. And everybody wants to care. No one enters
into a major urban development process without caring.
I think that`s what makes it so hard to approach things
Irom the other direction, iI one has been reared in an
authoritarian culture, accustomed to seeing things
Irom outside, to assert that one cares about the little
things, about Olga and her walking home with a bag oI
shopping. That`s something we can do with authority.
Putting it the other way round and looking at
Swedish architecture from the outside, is there a
typically Swedish idiom?
1T: Recently I passed by a newly completed
development, Annedal, in a Stockholm suburb. It has 20
or 30 blocks, all by diIIerent architects. Even though it
is not enjoined by the plan or by a design programme,
they do what architects here always do and always have
done. As iI we had a collective code. You can see the
same thing in Hammarby Sjstad. A tremendous, innate
discipline. Everything is neat and good-natured and
meticulously, caringly executed. I don`t think that could
happen anywhere else. At the same time, in the middle
oI it all, there is a vein oI acceptance Ior the personal.
What we see in the successIul Swedish projects is this
very mixture oI the personal and the general.
MvS: Sometimes, when called upon to speak in another
country about Swedish architecture, how we go about
things and so on, it`s hard not to expound the history
oI Sweden our being a small country, the way our
thinking is geared to nature and, not least, to light. All
those dark winters and bright summers. And we have
never been wealthy. We have created architecture on a
shoestring. To this is added all our social schooling in
the 20th century. We come Irom a country which has
had an institute which devised ideals Ior the layout oI a
kitchen. We have a conscious way oI relating to schools,
medical care and so on. We have a social commitment.
22
I am myselI surprised that Ioreign visitors never tire
oI going to see Hammarby Sjstad. And time and time
again I hear the same thing said. They wonder how it
works. Being able to live on top oI each other in fats
and still be blessed with so many spatial qualities. They
talk about the apartment layouts, the way they admit
daylight and the way the courtyards are a part oI the
buildings. The interesting point is that Iew visitors look
specifcally at the appearance oI the buildings. What
they look at is the way people live. Somewhere along
the line it`s all about the relation between the residents
and the architecture. That, I venture to say, is typically
Swedish.
HM: The link to nature that you mentioned is, I
think, signifcant. OIten we achieve things which are
specifcally Scandinavian or Nordic by making nature our
starting point. What I have in mind is not purely aesthetic
utterances but also the Iact oI our then broaching issues
that are deeply rooted within us, issues which are a part
oI our cultural heritage, issues which make us unique.
You keep referring to Hammarby Sjstad. What
makes it such a powerful urban development project?
HM: A powerIul vision has a lot to do with it. That
means the presence oI a holistic concept. Firstly,
the apartments are bright and attractive. Then the
surroundings are well cared Ior. And, not least,
everything works. It`s practical. At the same time,
Hammarby Sjstad looks good.
What do people experience in Hammarby Sjstad?
HM: Essentially, you have the prerequisites oI
urban living: play areas, shops, caIs, restaurants,
communications and schools, among other things, But
then you also have a striking milieu: the water the
quaysides, the canals. It all adds up to much more than
just a dormitory town.
MvS: One can speak oI a whole 24 hours` activity
having been assembled round an inIrastructural node,
the tramway. Which is not to say that you necessarily
have to live, work and fnd recreation in one and the
'We work
from a users
perspective,
from the insiae
outwaras,` says
Monica von
Schmalensee.
23
same area, only that all the diIIerent levels are present
and that there are people coming and going at all times
oI the day and night.
1T: The glorious thing about it is that here we have a
township without empty gestures. There may be a Iew
jarring instances oI blue ceramic tiling, but that`s all.
Architecture and urban development the world over are
Iull oI empty gestures. But here they are absent. You
have a strong wholeness unsubverted by individual
details. The secret lies in this super-traditional
perception oI the street space. Street, pavements and
house Iront, or shop. There is another thing that makes
an important diIIerence to the experience. There is no
question oI Iencing in, oI creating a gated community.
We don`t go in Ior that kind oI thing. Hammarby Sjstad
is an example oI how much better things turn out iI
you allow the roads to continue and join up with their
surroundings, no matter whether you are talking about
industrial Iacilities or housing.
What can you say about environmental technology
in Hammarby Sjstad? What does the interaction
between different consultants and architects look
like in Sweden? How do we address environmental
issues? Is there a specically Swedish way of making
sustainable cities?
MvS: When I show people round there, the concluding
questions are usually about the environmental aspects.
All the general systems which the township is based
on: the tramway, the car pool, the biogas system,
the vacuum suction reIuse collection system, the
stormwater management system. But people are also
hugely interested in the process. How did we get
everyone to pull in the same direction? Adding all the
parameters together, there are oI course a lot oI good
things to be learned. This is a unique instance. One
source oI amazement to many Ioreign visitors is the
Iact oI our working on such a co-ordinated basis, the
Iact that we as architects work with all the consultants
Irom the start so as together to achieve the best solution
between space and technology. We are not always in the
Iront line oI a particular technology, but when it comes
to application we occupy a very diIIerent position. We
arrive at robust solutions.
1T: Much oI what one sees, Ior example, in Hammarby
Sjstad, is concerned with general systems. That is a
legacy oI ours Irom the development oI the Sweaish
Welfare State. It is something we have been occupying
ourselves with Ior a long time. It is our axiomatic
tradition when we set about developing our activities
Iurther. As with district heating and reIuse separation.
We have refned systems oI that kind. Many cities are
short oI them.
HM: We take a down-to-earth approach to
environmental systems. Resource conservation is the
name oI the game. And making residents a part oI it.
MvS: There is a kind oI intelligibility about the
Hammarby Sjstad technical systems. The people living
there Ieel that they are really helping to create a better
environment merely by disposing oI their garbage.
That`s a great Ieeling.
1T: What happens in many countries is that eIIorts are
made to improve the quality oI the individual buildings,
which is a trife exclusive. Who can aIIord it and who
can`t? It`s down to the individual. That makes it private
and introverted. We have non-exclusive systems. We
include everybody.
nterviewer: TOMAS LAUR
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Norden. Savour the name. Literally Englished, it is 'The
North. Who thought it up? Clearly, someone to the south
oI us. As iI there were a bird, a fsh or something midway
between on the globe and we were living up at world`s
end on the brink oI the dragons, a place to which no one
in their right mind dared venture in order to ask us what
we ourselves would like to be known as. The North or
Scandinavia where exactly do we live?
One oI them has fve countries, the other has three. All
oI them are chilly, but they are radically diIIerent. But
this, perhaps, is oI no consequence to anyone in 'the
South or 'the West or 'the East.
Instead it is the names as such that have decided our
address, our abode. And so the answer is a Ioregone
conclusion. 'The Nordic Countries sounds homespun
and magical and downright prehistoric. While 'Scandi-
navia has a blonde, sexy, urban ring to it, rolling oII the
tongue as Iresh and buoyant as a mountain waterIall in
the spring thaw. Seductive! But treacherous too. At least,
to designers. Ever since the Scandinavian Design concept
became a cash cow throughout the western world, many
designers have come close to drowning in that mountain
Iorce. What began as a Iairly literal reinterpretation oI
a local craIt tradition has today been reduced to a style
indiscriminately pasted onto product aIter product as a
means oI jacking up the price a bit. So Iormalised, one
could well believe it to be the brainchild oI a publisher oI
coIIee-table books.
It isn`t, though. Open the coIIee-table book and you`ll see
that the antecedents oI Scandinavian Design are rustic,
robust and austere more unsophisticatedly Nordic than
elegantly Scandinavian, iI you get my meaning. Even
with such a graceIul creation as Hans Wegner`s Y chair.
That was designed almost 60 years ago, and while the
Americans were making glass-fbre Iurniture and the Ital-
ians fashy padded Iurniture, Wegner took what he Iound
and sawed, sandpapered and glued and strung together an
oak chair. Roughly the way people have always done Ior
generations up here on the edge oI the world.
Swedish designers in particular have developed an unu-
sually close conspectus oI the world at large, possibly
with a view to steering clear oI Iormalist Scandinavia-
nism. They are masters oI the art oI sitting on the job
with all ten fngers in the air and grabbing new trends.
A curious work posture, but it works well Ior companies
like Hennes & Mauritz.
Sweden today is a world leader in design. One reason is that
Swedish designers stay more up-to-date than most about whats
happening in the world around them.
The magnetism of style
Page 2425.
Nasaaq OMX,
interior aesign
by Claesson
Koivisto Rune.
Page 26.
Renovation of
an apartment
in Stockholm by
Tham Jiaegra
Architects.
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In music they call it 'sampling. You know the expres-
sion Irom those hip-hop artists who are always angry
and always swearing and always pointing the fnger at
you on MTV. They were the ones who started it all by
borrowing a James Brown groove here and a KraItwerk
beat there and weaving the Iragments into something oI
their own.
This, today, is most designers` preIerred working ap-
proach, and not only in Sweden. A no-nonsense method
which, in this globalised, computerised era, Ieels every
bit as pragmatic as Wegner`s determination to dig where
he stands.
Only it`s a lot less romantic. Whatever became oI the
great creator? The one whose pen moved over the paper
at such length, never blotting a line?
The question is whether he ever existed. 'Bolts Irom
the blue and 'divine inspiration sound today like
euphemisms Ior what a top-level process oI creation is
really about, namely: meeting cultures, reading the most
progressive periodicals, visiting the most innovative
trade Iairs, Iorging contacts with the most venturesome
producers. In a word: being updated. And Swedish
designers are more updated than most.
We Swedes have always considered ourselves a bit
more Scandinavian than other Scandinavians. This was
confrmed a couple oI years ago, when the Stockholm
city Iathers staged a coup by proclaiming their city
'the capital oI Scandinavia inspired by an article in
Newsweek, iI my memory serves me right. And whereas
Oslo scarcely batted an eyelid (content, perhaps, with the
oil and just being one oI the world`s richest nations), Co-
penhagen blew a gasket. Wegner, Jacobsen, Kjrholmen,
Klint surely, Ior heaven`s sake, it was they who had put
Scandinavia on the map, at least among designers?
But Mother Svea liIted her shield. As iI to indicate that
a new age had dawned, a new age demanding that the
Danish king oI design be dethroned and a Swedish one
crowned instead. Now it was Sweden thou Iree, ancient
country, thou high-mountained North that dominated
the design map oI Scandinavia, because Newsweek had
said so and so had Wallpaper and the New York Times
and all the others carrying grandiloquent Iour-page
Ieature articles in recent years, and the Iact is, they were
right. For, in a Iurniture perspective, Sweden today is
Denmark`s superior. Test yourselI: name one single
Danish Iurniture designer active today (and you mustn`t
say Louise Campbell, because she was born and trained
in the UK). And then name a Swede. Just one. Will it
be Front or Monica Frster or Gunilla Allard or Bjrn
Dahlstrm or Thomas Sandell or Claesson Koivisto Rune
or . IKEA?
Whereas the Danes have had diIfculty in shouldering the
legacy oI Jacobsen and the other titans, the Swedes have
been rather like cheIs in Great Britain with everything
to gain and nothing to lose. And while the Danes have
been lured into stewardship rather than renewal, the
Swedes have been able to move out into the Iast lane
which has taken them to Milan and the ICFF and all the
way up to the Swedish parliament.
Swedish politicians nowadays are head over heels in
love with design, so much so that they can`t stop rabbi-
ting on about it. And so much do they rabbit, you could
well believe that Swedish design was born yesterday,
though it has been oI consistently high class all through
the 20th century.
The representatives oI the people have at last come to
realise that in our global era, with the world just one big
untidy marketplace where you have to fght Ior consum-
ers and tourists and investors and students and contrac-
tors and sporting and cultural events and Newsweek
journalists, design is a hard-pulling magnet.
MARK STT
journalist
" You could well believe that Swedish design
was born yesterday, though it has been of
consistently high class all through the 20th
century."
Page 28.
Restaurant
Sturehof in
Stockholm by
Jonas Bohlin
Architects.
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Sweden has one oI the western world`s most
decentralised planning systems. True, there are public
steering mechanisms operating through a number
oI national authorities, but the municipal planning
monopoly has been the Ioundation oI urban planning,
partly through strategic planning measures in the
Iorm oI comprehensive plans and sustainability and
environmental programmes, and also through detailed
development plans and the granting oI building
permission.
Through the frst UN ConIerence on the Human
Environment, in Stockholm in 1972, Sweden also
acquired a wide Iocus on environmental knowledge.
That has been Iollowed, among other things, by
dramatic changes in water purifcation in several
localities. The 1973 oil crisis lent Iurther emphasis to
eIIorts towards readjusting the energy system. Fossil
Iuels have been 90 per cent replaced by district heating,
bioIuels and electricity Ior domestic and other space
heating.
In cities like Vxj named the greenest city in Europe
by the BBC in 2007 deliberate urban planning
A system for the future
When creating the technical infrastructure for a sustainable city,
every level must be included, including the social. Sweden is a
pioneer in this area.
combined with technical system solutions has helped
to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than halI
since the mid-1990s. Western Harbour (Vstra Hamnen)
in Malm is a township which, through a combination
oI district heating, wind power and geothermal energy,
has succeeded in becoming a township with 100 percent
renewable energy Ior heating and air conditioning. In the
planning oI Hammarby Sjstad in Stockholm, an eco-
cycle model has been developed, aimed at minimising
resource consumption and co-ordinating the recycling
oI energy, waste and water/sewage fows. The next step
is now being taken in Stockholm, the idea being Ior
Norra Djurgrdsstaden (Stockholm Royal Seaport), one
oI Stockholm`s three environmental profle zones, to
become an entirely Iossil-Iree township in 2030.
Sustainable readjustment oI existing settlement, not
least as regards the large stock oI housing Irom the
1960s and 70s, has at the same time come in Ior closer
attention. The renovation oI the Grdsten district oI
Gothenburg demonstrates the possibility oI combining
investments in renewables with environmental
improvements oI a social nature. In Brogrden,
Alingss, the energy demand oI the existing settlement
Page 3031.
Townhouse in
Lanaskrona
by Elaing
Oscarsson
Architects.
Page 33.
The aevelopment
Hammarby
Sfstaa in
Stockholm has
become an
international
moael for
sustainable
communities.
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is being more than halved through a holistic grasp oI
construction engineering, architecture and building
Iunction. In all these instances, planning, landscape
and building architects have been active Irom the early
stages, and have co-operated closely with technical
specialists to integrate the technical systems with urban
development and architecture.
THE SUSTANABLE CTY CONCEPT
At the Johannesburg global summit in August 2002,
Sweden`s government launched a new concept to show
how urban development combined with environmental
technology can help to achieve a sustainable society.
The concept is based on Swedish experiences Irom the
past Iew decades. Essentially, it implies a direct linkage
oI systemic solutions Ior transport, energy, water
and waste management with urban planning, urban
development and landscape and building architecture.
The concept has been developed into a communication
platIorm Ior disseminating knowledge internationally.
Dubbed SymbioCity, it involves Swedish agents in both
the public sector and business enterprise, the emphasis
being on co-operation, not least between research,
development, demonstration and Iull-scale practical
implementation. The concept has among other things
served as a point oI departure Ior sustainability reviews
oI townships, in which Swedish expert groups including
architects, engineers and other specialists, have worked
out proposals Ior improvements to urban development
schemes with systemic solutions in Canada, Ireland,
Russia and China. Methods and tools Ior supporting
local processes Ior sustainable development in Third
World cities have also been devised and tested, e.g. in
Macedonia and India.
During the spring oI 2008, Swedish know-how within
the SymbioCity Iramework was linked up with the
planning oI a new city Ior a population oI one million
in the Tangshan region oI China, just over 200 km east
oI Peking.
The new city is called the eco-city CaoIeidian, thereby
expressing the aim oI creating 'a demonstration and
model area oI scientifc development based on circular
economy and frst-class ecological Iunction. One year`s
intensive development and planning work with Swedish
architects and engineers resulted in an extensive body oI
planning documentation in the Iorm oI a sustainability
programme, conceptual plans Ior two townships, 30
and 12 sqm in extent, and a scheme Ior designing a
sustainability centre. Construction work is in Iull swing
and high hopes are entertained oI creating a city that
will be both climatically neutral and attractive.
FUTURE DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNTES
There are many who point to the risks attending urban
development: widening social gaps, social unrest and a
deterioration oI the environmental situation, increased
air pollution and climate hazards due to the rapid rise
in consumption oI Iossil Iuels by the transport and
energy sectors. But more and more we are also coming
to realise that urbanisation can also have positive
consequences, Ior it is a well-attested Iact that cities
environmental problems notwithstanding can also
oIIer great opportunities Ior economic, social and
cultural development.
Cities are also a base Ior systemic solutions which can
be developed through integrated planning oI settlement,
landscape, transport and other inIrastructure systems.
Sweden`s experience indicates that political consensus
on sustainability-related and environmental targets
is a sine qua non oI the success oI planning and
implementation processes at local level. That consensus
is also needed Ior successIul inter-sectoral co-operation
between the city`s experts, architects, entrepreneurs and
other enterprises.
But support Irom the central level can also be needed.
Local investment support (LIP) programmes Ior
measures transcending the norms have been an
important incentive in Sweden. For the period between
2008 and 2010, the Swedish Delegation Ior Sustainable
Cities is providing Iunding support Ior 30 per cent
oI the additional investments resulting in substantial
reductions oI climate impact, while at the same time
Iactoring in social and economic aspects. The idea is Ior
careIully selected projects to create good examples to be
Iollowed by nationally and internationally.
Architects, with their planning and design competence,
can help to meet the great challenges which Iollow in
the wake oI the world`s accelerating urbanisation. One
oI the key issues concerns designing technical systems
as part oI the whole and as a support Ior all dimensions
oI sustainability.
ULF RANHAGEN
architect SAR/MSA and
professor at the Royal nstitute of Technology, Stockholm.
Member of the Swedish Delegation for sustainable cities.
"Sweden's experience indicates that political
consensus on sustainability-related and
environmental targets is a sine qua non of
the success of planning and implementation
processes at local level."
Page 34.
Swimmer in
the pool on
the roof of the
Avalon Hotel
in aowntown
Gothenburg
by Semren
& Mnsson
Architects.
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t's not enough to just have architects designing. The green city
is about a number of other key people, too: the politician who
makes visions reality, the regional strategist who creates a broad
basis of design, and the urban planner who administers over the
resolutions and visions and gets the architecture moving in the
right direction.
Behind the scene
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For several years now she has been working with the
university cities oI Norrkping and Linkping, which
are located 40 km apart on the Vstergtland plain
and, hopeIully, will soon be a 60 minute train ride
Irom Stockholm and 90 minutes Irom Copenhagen, the
two biggest cities in the Nordic area. The idea is Ior
Norrkping and Linkping together to increase their
populations by 100,000 between now and 2030, Irom
400,000 to halI a million.
This is quite some increase Ior a region where
population growth cannot be taken Ior granted.
What Susanne Ingo has emphasised in her reports
is that in order to grow larger a city has to broaden
its market. It must be able to tie larger areas the
surrounding villages and towns to itselI. This is where
transportation come in. Behind every successIul infll
development you fnd good transportation. It`s all about
a dynamic city, a city where travel is a natural part oI
the day.
'Everything, she says, 'can be broken down into time
and expenditure. The time it takes to reach a place and a
reasonable price Ior the journey. It isn`t about distance.
Another essential thing to understand is a concept like
accessibility. Just being able to get there quickly isn`t
enough. You must be able to go where you want to when
you need to.
II transportation is one big Iactor, location is the other
one. Norrkping and Linkping both have great urban
qualities Norrkping with its centrally located historic
industrial settlement, Linkping with its low-rise
inner-city settlement. The buildings defne a character
which must not be travestied when a city expands. The
authentic must endure. II the city is to grow, it must do
so above all round the means oI transport. Susanne Ingo
speaks oI transportation proximity or station proximity.
'Transportation leads to a point in a city. That point
is sacred. Those areas have to be earmarked. Coming
Irom another locality or suburb, you want to be spared
having to change to another type oI transport or having
to walk too Iar to your workplace. Workplaces have to
be created round the near-central station areas. That
is where there is a commercial potential. In Iact, she
says, 'all out-oI-town establishments, shopping centres,
business parks and educational campuses are a step in
the wrong direction.
But just building and starting up isn`t that easy. The
traveller, the human being, must not be lost sight oI
in the big picture. Susanne Ingo says that a high level
oI spatial quality is needed at the nodal points. That
is where the city can develop into something else,
something more human, and ecological development
is part and parcel oI the process. Susanne Ingo sees
transportation, urban population growth and ecology as
an answer to one and the same question.
'There is nothing diIfcult about seeing a Iocus
on population growth as an ecological act. It
provides an opportunity Ior infll, Ior creating good
uniIying systems, Ior investing Iurther in ecological
transportation. Once development towards a
communicatively more close-knit city has been started,
you are heading Ior the good city.
Susanne Ingo is careIul to point out what she considers
Iundamental in this context, namely that Norrkping
and Linkping should start Iormulating themselves
as a single region, because this is oIten Iorgotten.
Good transportation systems are expensive, awkward
investments. Solo perIormances are out oI the question.
'The common thread oI all regional projects is that
people really start to see themselves as a region, a
community, and to work like one. This is not the kind oI
thing that should be allowed to remain on paper, just Ior
the sake oI appearances.
nterviewer: TOMAS LAUR
The Strategist
Page 3637.
Daycare center
in the suburb of
Botkyrka south
of Stockholm by
3ao Architects.
Page 38.
Susanne Ingo,
achitect SAR/
MSA, is a
strategist
who sees the
aevelopment of
a city in a large
scale.
Attention tends very often to focus on the city, on its buildings
and designing them. Susanne ngo, a strategist with the Swedish
Transport Administration, wants to break a lance for a larger scale
of things. To make a city grow and be more ecological, you have
to take in a wider context and put in place the prerequisites of the
sustainable city.
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Malm has been selected twice in the 2000s as one of the best
cities in the world to live in. t has also been praised by the UN for
its investments in the environment.
The city is always hosting groups oI visitors who come
to study the redevelopment oI Vstra Hamnen (the Wes-
tern Harbor): the housing, parks, street space, oIfces,
and shopping. The area has an attractive central location
where downtown Malm extends down to meet the sea.
Construction in Vstra Hamnen took oII at the turn
oI the 21
st
century. Malm University began building
in the area. A housing expo was held in 2001. Most oI
the best-known Swedish architects have contributed
buildings, as well as international stars like Santiago
Calatrava, whose Turning Torso rises like a 190-meter
tall symbol oI the new Malm. A spirit oI optimism and
excitement about the Iuture reigns.
It`s hard to believe that just fIteen years ago Malm
was one derelict industrial city among many in northern
Europe. The last major industries had shut down. Unem-
ployment was high. The population was declining.
The new sustainable Malm is the result oI a visio-
nary eIIort that started in the 1990s. Politics preceded
architecture.
Ilmar Reepalu`s Social Democratic Party won an abso-
lute majority in the 1994 election. Reepalu soon brought
together representatives Irom the business community,
the university, the world oI fnance, and politicians Irom
every party. The group studied other aging industrial
cities that were showing positive signs oI development,
including Glasgow, Bilbao, Barcelona, and San Diego.
Just at that time, new legislation was being enacted that
would create a bridge to connect Denmark and Sweden.
Suddenly Malm was no longer going to be just another
mid-sized European city, but part oI a major metropoli-
tan region.
'Mentally, this was a big step, says Reepalu. 'Together
we would be bigger and stronger than we`d been alone.
Together with Copenhagen and all oI their and our sur-
rounding communities, we make up twenty-six percent
oI the GDP oI the combined Nordic region. We have
150,000 students, 12,000 proIessors, and sixty percent
oI the biotechnology businesses concentrated in one
small area.
Envisioning a larger region has helped Malm ac-
complish the critical inIrastructural changes needed to
support the density oI a sustainable city. Today Malm
has two centrally located train stations and has seen the
number oI train passengers increase by three hundred
percent since 2008. Shopping, instead oI spreading out
in parking-Iriendly suburbs, has been growing stronger
in the center oI town. The availability oI old industrial
land along the train tracks has allowed new oIfces and
housing to be built adjacent to the stations.
The population has grown by 60,000 in just fIteen years.
45,000 new jobs have been created, mostly in new sectors
oI the economy. Small business activity has taken oII.
Reepalu counts three hundred new companies in ten years.
'This has been about retooling Malm to be a knowledge
communitya city based on learning, communications,
art, and creativity, he says.
When Reepalu talks about the sustainable city, he`s envi-
sioning social sustainability as well as ecological. Malm
has invested a great deal in its public spaces. They have
been recognized both nationally and internationally Ior
their work. The keyword has been 'activity. To activate
and stimulate meetings. To get citizens to want to use
urban spaces around the clock. They`ve done it by fxing
up old parks and creating new ones, Ior example, and
investing in sports and play and a good measure oI quali-
tative public activities.
'A sustainable ecological community is also a social
community, says Reepalu. 'When we began our
visionary work, there was a lot oI talk about the verdant
welIare state, an extension oI the society Sweden built
up during the 20
th
century.
The political work on the sustainable city has also been
aimed at putting Malm on the world map. Making it
part oI a worldwide network oI likeminded communi-
ties, exporting and importing services. Today Malm
has a comprehensive collaboration with various sister
citiescommunities with whom it can share a mutually
benefcial exchange. For example, they were one oI the
frst to establish a close collaboration with the growing
Chinese market.
Much oI the city`s international networking is due to its
multicultural population. As many as 174 diIIerent na-
tionalities are represented among its citizenry, making
Malm unique internationallyneither London nor
New York can claim as many.
'We`ve had many natural channels to build on, says
Reepalu. 'We are a global city.
nterviewer: TOMAS LAUR
The Politician
Page 40.
Ilmar Reepalu,
architect, is
the politician
behina Malms
aevelopment into
a sustainable
city.
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So says Anna-Stina Bokander oI the Stockholm City
Planning Department. She is the chieI urban planner
Ior Norra Djurgrdsstaden, Stockholm Royal Seaport,
the city`s next big neighborhood with an environmental
profle. II Hammarby Sjstad was the frst attempt at
building a sustainable city, then Norra Djurgrdsstaden
is a signifcant step Iorward Irom there. The limits on
energy use and emissions are even more rigorous. The
goal is an eco-Iriendly urban district oI world class.
Norra Djurgrdsstaden covers nearly thirty hectares
oI land a couple oI kilometers northeast oI downtown
Stockholm. It`s a diverse area that includes such disparate
elements as an oil harbor, which is to be relocated;
Hjorthagen, a model Functionalist development that
is to be preserved; and an old industrial area, which
is protected Ior its historic signifcance and is to be
revitalized with new construction. Housing Ior 10-12,000
is to be added, along with workplaces Ior some 30,000
people.
'The environmental profle is important as a link to
keep it all together, says Bokander.
By 2020, carbon dioxide emissions Irom the community
must be less than 1.5 metric tons per person annually.
And by 2030 the neighborhood is to be Iree Irom the
use oI Iossil Iuels. It is also supposed to be prepared Ior
the Iuture consequences oI climate change. The vision
Iocuses on fve areas: energy, transportation, adaptation
to climate, closed-loop resource management, and
liIestyle issues.
In 2008 the City oI Stockholm approved the new
district`s environmental profle. Since then, the Planning
Administration has been working to develop an
environmental program.
'We have allowed the stakeholders involved, Irom
the business community, construction frms, and
developers, among others, to express their views on
several occasions, says Bokander. 'It`s a substantial
eIIort in bringing stakeholders on board.
Work on the environmental profle has also generated a
lively internal discussion in the department. Concepts
have had to be defned. What exactly is sustainability?
What infuence should it have on liIe in Norra
Djurgrdsstad?
'We`ve had many discussions about what sustainability
is, says Bokander. 'We don`t want to see the
neighborhood as just a technological maniIestation.
So we`ve been talking about transparent technology. It
needs to be easy Ior residents and users to do the right
thing. That means coming up with Iunctioning systems
that basically make it easy to live ecologically. It could
be anything Irom giving apartments a display that
tells them when the next bus is leaving to organizing
carpools, clearly separating waste streams Ior recycling,
providing community activity space so people don`t
have to travel somewhere else Ior eventsbasically just
a lot oI convenient options.
The ongoing discussion in the planning department has
also touched on the physical design oI the area. They
want to achieve a Iorward-looking character that Iosters
strong social values. But it`s not their responsibility to
design the blocks and the buildings.
The frst areas reveal how the planning department
has begun working to get what they want, or at least as
much oI what they want as possible. They`ve been able
to control the development to a large extent because the
city owns the land in Norra Djurgrdsstaden. They`ve
worked with invited competitions, always striving to
achieve the desired results in each phase oI the process.
The frst competition they held was to design a master
plan Ior the district, laying out the pattern oI streets and
blocks. They chose a plan that allowed a wide variety oI
typologies and home sizes in order to achieve a diverse
population.
Then they held a competition Ior selling the land. The
highest bidder Ior each site was awarded the right to
build.
These developers were then required to present two or
three schemes Irom diIIerent architects, which has given
the city the ability to infuence the selection oI both
architect and building.
'It`s not part oI our job to select the architect, says
Bokander. 'But this procedure has made it possible Ior
us to have a good dialogue with the developers on the
choice oI which projects they`re going to build.
nterviewer: TOMAS LAUR
The Planner
f you're going to succeed in bringing sustainability to large urban
planning projects, you need a strong vision. A vision that builds
consensus among the developers and the different stakeholders
and of course those who are going to live in and use the area.
Page 42.
Anna-Stina
Bokanaer,
Planning achitect
FPR/MSA, is
the aeveloper
in charge of
Stockholm
Seaport, the
citys next big
neighborhooa
with an
environmental
profile.
44
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Planning for everyday life
After decades in which ecology was exclusively about technical
innovation, it was high time to be talking about society in general
and how we live our lives.
The important thing now is not to make plans, but to change
society and us who live in it. Our competence as architects
and planners is requiredwe have only to step into these new
arenas. However, our constant focus on individual projects tends
to objectify urban development at a time when the perspective
instead requires interaction, dialogue and political decisiveness.
Page 4445.
Playgrouna im-
provements have
been part of the
City of Malms
investment in
sustainable
environments.
Page 47.
In Lomma Har-
bor, a new public
library by Henrik
Jais-Nielsen ana
Mats White Ar-
chitects is stra-
tegically locatea
to link the new
neighborhooa to
existing urban
areas.
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Urban planning in Sweden has long been characterized
by a deep insight into how to plan Ior a socially
sustainable society. In the last ten years, that social
sustainability has been enriched by a holistic ecological
view. There are many examples. In the Iollowing pages,
we present some oI the most noteworthy. A common
theme is making the most oI limited resources to create
attractive living environments Ior the citizens.
THE SLAND N UME
In many ways, the Island in Ume is representative oI
the Swedish model Ior a sustainable city. With great
clarity the plan balances requirements Ior resource-
eIfcient construction with the demand Ior an attractive,
dense urban environment. New construction will be
energy-saving, existing historic environments are to be
protected, an armature oI continuous green space will
be established to support biodiversity, and closed-loop
water management will include on-site treatment oI
storm water. At the same time, a dense grid oI streets
and blocks will contribute to a saIe and attractive
environment that blends commercial and residential
space. The neighborhood is to be connected by public
transportation and accessible Ior both pedestrians and
cyclists.
THE CTY OF MALM
Swedish sustainability eIIorts can be divided into issues
oI environmental technology, economic capacity, and
society and culture. But they are Iounded on a holistic
view oI urban development and a discourse on planning
methods.
That kind oI holistic view is the basis Ior the City oI
Malm`s strategy Ior using public space to reduce
segregation and support the development oI an
attractive, green, and secure city oI knowledge. Since
ratiIying its initial urban environmental program
in 1993, Malm`s municipal leaders have continued
to stress the strategic importance oI public space.
The program has been developed in a collaboration
oI several diIIerent administrative departments.
Investments in themed playgrounds, improved street
lighting Ior greater security, and a comprehensive green
area plan integrated with the surrounding communities
are just a Iew examples oI the strategic plan`s infuence.
Many more are planned. The Ioundation Ior all oI
them is the ambition to make public spaces with good
conditions Ior generating social encounters, and to do it
with the participation and infuence oI citizens.
Malm`s administrators have been awarded Ior all
their eIIorts. In 2010 they were named the Swedish
Environmental Municipality oI the Year. They are
represented with a display at the World Expo in
Shanghai because oI having been given in 2007
the prestigious Livable Communities Award by the
International Federation oI Park and Recreation
Administration, which is supported by the United
Nations Environmental Programme.
Sustainability work is being done in Sweden along
several diIIerent paths. The people doing the concrete
work oI urban planning at the municipal level Iace
some typically recurring issues, and these can give
a good picture oI the overall eIIort. Those issues
may be divided into Iour groups: green technologies,
economics, socio-cultural aspects, and methodology.
Sustainable green technologies deal with the actual
execution oI the plans with fnding the technical
solutions needed to achieve the objectives Iormulated
in the sustainable process. They can be anything Irom
new sources oI energy to new methods Ior recycling
waste or new transportation systems. The interesting
thing about Sweden is that green technology eIIorts
are directed at developing not just individual products
but also entire systems. And those systems are being
designed in concert with the work oI urban planning.
The planning and organization oI urban space and
landscapes are indeed Iorms oI environmental
technology insoIar as the way people use spaces and
places determines much oI the city`s demand Ior green
technology. Advances in technological systems also
impact the health oI the environments we inhabit
particularly mechanical ventilation systems, but also
improvements in building materials. The issue oI
sustainable economics deals with fnding solutions that
generate long-term dividends while making it proftable
to choose the most environmentally benefcial solutions.
It can mean getting global actors to take an interest
in investing in green technologies or promoting local
businesses that operate without detriment to our scarce
natural resources. An example is investment to promote
knowledge- and service-based business activity.
Social and cultural sustainability issues address social
cohesion and the community`s desire and ability to
invest in eIfcient collective solutions and to contribute
to bringing them to liIe. It is about inIorming the public
about the challenges oI community planning and fnding
solutions that relate to the existing cultural heritage.
It`s striving to provide security and establish conditions
that encourage people to meet, collaborate, and take
responsibility.
Sustainable methodology issues look at how to develop
the interaction between politics, citizens, investors,
technical experts, and providers oI goods and services.
Working with legislation, regulations, and standards is
Iundamentally important, but it is at least as important
to create arenas in which shared objectives can be
Iormulated and adopted. Another important aspect is
building an administrative system that can promote
interdisciplinary collaboration and develop criteria Ior
monitoring and advancing sustainability.
FLAGGHUSEN
The planning process Ior the Flagghusen block oI
Malm`s Western Harbor district is an interesting
example oI how city oIfcials can work in dialogue with
developers to fnd a realistic level oI sustainability.
The result is reasonably priced housing that uses very
little energy and contains no hazardous materials. The
new residents will also be treated to a rich variety oI
green courtyards. The development even includes one
oI Malm`s most interesting ecological experimental
buildings, Urbana Villor (see presentation on page 78-
79).
Bo01
The Flagghusen development was preceded by a more
visionary urban planning project, the Bo01 housing
expo, whose environmental program touched on many
Page 49.
In-aepth com-
prehensive plan
for greenery in
Malm by city
garaener,
lanascape
architect LAR/
MSA, Gunnar
Ericson. Here,
the potential for
further enhance-
ment of the green
structure in the
public space is
iaentifiea.
49
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diIIerent aspects oI development. The district runs


entirely on energy generated within its borders, and has
an unusually high degree oI biodiversity thanks to its
extensive mandated green areas. Storm water is treated
locally in a stimulating landscape with many lively
refecting pools that contribute to an overall Ieeling
oI Iresh air. The building stock is varied and complex
because oI the large number oI developers and architects
involved.
LOMMA HARBOR
In working with plans to develop Lomma Harbor,
the city has striven to incorporate all aspects oI
sustainability right Irom the start - energy saving, water
conservation and greening. The Iormer harbor area with
an attractive waterIront location adjoining the old local
center oI business is now well on the way to becoming
a new neighborhood. The good architectural design oI
its housing is complemented by community services. A
new city library has been strategically located between
the new neighborhood and the old town center, linking
the old with the new and bringing a stream oI people
into the area to increase interest in the new houses.
The location oI the new development also provided
the impetus Ior cleaning up a polluted tract oI Iormer
industrial land.
Today there is an increased awareness oI the risk
that dividing the work oI sustainability into separate
aspects can split sustainable initiatives into ineIIectual
Iragments. Much oI the methodology development
50
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in the feld is thereIore about fnding ways Ior those
diIIerent aspects to work together. One such method
is the SymbioCity, to which Swedish ProIessor UlI
Ranhagen has dedicated a great deal oI eIIort. He gives
a broad description oI his view oI the city as a system
elsewhere in this catalogue. He has also developed a
comprehensive system oI indicators Ior sustainable
urban development that is now gaining increasing
international recognition. This planning guidance
system highlights the institutional Iactors necessary Ior
success.
In Sweden we began long ago to develop a sophisticated
institutional Iramework at municipal, regional, and
national levels Ior administrating over the development
oI a sustainable society. To build sustainable
architecture and sustainable cities is a concern Ior the
whole society. The Swedish system places particular
emphasis on the importance oI engaging the citizens in
urban planning and development. Since the commitment
to sustainability impacts every aspect oI the social
system`s structure and how it works, the regional
planning level is extremely important to the successIul
transition to sustainability in the long term.
THE GOTHENBURG REGON
In the region surrounding the city oI Gothenburg, a
large number oI communities are voluntarily working
together around a common strategic vision. That
vision weaves together needs Ior expanding the built
environment with an eIIective regional transportation
system that allows corridors oI green to reach into the
very core oI the region.
THE NATONAL CTY PARK
There is a similar regional planning structure Ior the
Stockholm area. There, too, natural areas are allowed to
reach into the central parts oI the city, allowing wildliIe
to range quite Ireely throughout the region. As early as
1995, Stockholm established the Royal National City
Park to protect Irom exploitation the many undeveloped
natural areas near the heart oI the metropolitan area
that had originally been set aside as royal hunting
grounds. Adjacent to the National City Park, a world-
class university hub is growing: Stockholm Science City
benefts Irom the natural beauty oI its surroundings to
create an environment that attracts research talent Irom
around the globe.
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Page. 5051.
Lamp aesignea
by Karin Karls-
son ana Johan
Morit: auring
a public parks
illumination
event callea '.by
Light` in Malm.
Page 52.
The Bo01
housing expo
aistrict in Malm
runs entirely on
locally-genera-
tea renewable
energy ana has
a high aegree of
bioaiversity aue
to its rich variety
of green areas.
Page 53.
The master
plan for the
Lomma harbor
by architect
SAR/MSA
Kfell Forshea
ana lanascape
architect LAR/
MSA Sture
Koinberg .
54
The various aspects oI sustainability eIIorts stem Irom
Sweden`s environmental protection, urban planning,
and building construction legislation. That legislation is
impressive by international standards, covering many
essential environmental issues. One paragraph, Ior
example, ratifed many years ago, states that 'the aim
oI these regulations is to, without impinging upon the
Ireedom oI individual citizens, promote the development
oI a society oI equality and good social living conditions
and a good and sustainable living environment Ior the
people oI today`s society and Ior generations to come.
That generational perspective acknowledges the need
to preserve and develop natural and cultural resources
Ior the Iuture. We must avoid shortsighted actions that
deplete those resources. All planning must strive to fnd
solutions that maintain existing resources, and ideally
even develop new ones, in both ecological and cultural
terms.
THE CTY OF ALNGSS
One exemplary instance oI good Swedish planning
based on these legislative intentions is the city oI
Alingss`s in-depth master plan. AIter an ambitious
process oI consulting with residents, the business
community, and municipal administrators, the plan
provides good conditions Ior business development
while improving opportunities to travel throughout the
city by bicycle and expanding the green areas that are
the city`s lungs.
The work with sustainable development in Sweden is
also supported by the government`s Environmental
Objectives policy Irom 2000. The policy calls Ior
solutions oI a number oI environmental quality goals by
2020. And the goals Ior working toward sustainability
in Swedensixteen major objectives and seventy-two
subsidiary objectivesare specifc and measurable.
The most ambitious planning projects, such as
Bo01, Lomma Harbor, or Hammarby Sjstad, reIer
to the nation`s Environmental Objectives in their
environmental programs. These are not compulsory,
however, so each community decides Ior itselI which
objectives to strive Ior beyond the requirements oI the
legislated environmental code. As a rule, each project
is guided by a selection oI environmental objectives.
The goal 'a Good Built Environment is particularly
relevant, but 'a Rich Diversity oI Plant and Animal
LiIe has also had a proIound infuence over urban
development in Sweden.
The more ambitious municipalities also Iormulate
environmental objectives oI their own that go beyond
the national goals. The reason is the independent
local control oI land and water use planning. But the
pre-conditions Ior that planning vary greatly Irom one
municipality to another. The country is divided into
290 such municipalities. The least populated oI these
has just a Iew thousand inhabitants, while the capital
city oI Stockholm has 1.8 million. One consequence
oI municipal selI-governance is that there is no actual
planning on the national level.
The Delegation Ior Sustainable Cities` mission is to
inspire the municipalities to do their best in light oI


Page 54.
The circles show
bicycle aistance
(rea) ana
walking aistance
(black), from the
city centre of
Alingss.
Page 55.
Social issues
were the basis for
the sustainable
planning of
the Hammarby
Sfstaa
neighbourhooa
in Stockholm.
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A aay for the
people on the
new High Coast
Briage in 1997.
57
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their own unique local conditions. The delegation
spreads inIormation on examples to be emulated, and
has distributed economic support to encourage the
execution oI some important pilot projects.
HAMMARBY SJSTAD
When planning began on Hammarby Sjstad in
Stockholm in the late 1980s, the vision was primarily
social. The oIfcial word was that it was to be a new
housing development with the qualities oI a 'livable
city right Irom the start. In Hammarby Sjstad, housing
and non-objectionable commercial activity were to be
integrated with the rest oI the city. At the same time,
the new area was to make it easy to live an ecologically
sustainable liIestyle.
The environmental agenda Ior Hammarby Sjstad
thereIore Iocused on the closed-loop management
oI water and waste, supported by existing large-
scale inIrastructure systems. One oI the strategies
that garnered the most attention was a system Ior
collecting waste through a network oI pressurized
underground tubes, and then incinerating it to generate
energy. Another important condition Ior liIe in the
neighbourhood is a comIortable and convenient public
transportation system oI trams.
WND POWER N STRMSUND
A diIIerent example oI environmental objectives at the
local level is the in-depth master plan Ior establishing
wind power in the rural municipal region oI Strmsund
on the Iorested edge oI the mountains oI central
Sweden. CareIul planning sited the large-scale array oI
wind turbines so as not to disturb the sensitive mountain
environment.
THE ROYAL SEAPORT
The City oI Stockholm has gone even Iurther, deepening
its commitment to sustainable urban development by
Iocusing on energy and climate issues in a Iormer
harbor area called the Royal Seaport. For the frst part
oI the project, Norra Djurgrdsstaden, the vision is
to create an attractive and dense urban environment.
Well-known Swedish and European architects have
been invited to contribute designs. The objectives Ior
minimizing energy use and carbon dioxide emissions
are extremely demanding.
To provide a link between the goals oI local municipal
planning and the national environmental objectives,
Sweden has a system oI regional state administrations,
County Administrative Boards. Their job is to ensure
that municipalities adhere to the national interests
set out by the parliament in their urban planning.
Wind power is one such stated national interest.
The preservation oI valuable cultural and natural
environments is another. The county administrations
are also charged with coordinating the various planning
directives that come Irom the national government with
those oI the European Union.
VLLNGBY CENTER
When the time came in the early 2000s to renovate
The vision
of Sunasvall
is basea on
aevelopment of
four passages.
events (rea),
knowleage
(yellow),
shopping
(orange), health
ana recreation
(green). The
profect has been
managea by the
city planning
office, architect
MSA Anaers
Bolin.
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Vllingbys commercial center, the world-renowned
mixed-use satellite community, the City oI Stockholm
based its planning on the community`s great value
as a cultural heritage site. The result is an urban
development project in which the existing buildings
have been preserved intact, while new amenities have
been added, including an award-winning Iashion
department store by architect Gert Wingrdh.
The development oI Vllingby Center, originally
planned in the 1940s, also refects the great challenge
oI dealing with all oI the existing buildings constructed
in Sweden during the second halI oI the 20th century.
None oI them is even close to meeting today`s standards
oI sustainability.
TENSTA HOUSNG EXPO
In order to start a discussion on sustainability in
the existing building stock, in 2006 a housing expo
was arranged in Tensta, a typical 1970s suburb oI
Stockholm. The initiative became in many ways a
sampling oI the economic, social, and ecological
challenges these communities Iace. Improving energy
eIfciency is a major concern, but so is providing a
more widely varied selection oI both commercial and
residential spaces. For Tensta, investment in meeting
places and public space became an important means oI
improving the social climate in the community.
In connection with the defnition oI the nation`s
environmental objectives in 2000, Sweden also ratifed
new environmental legislation. It includes all the laws
that aIIect environmental protection issues and the
process Ior evaluating the environmental consequences
oI proposed plans and business activities. Together with
the Planning and Building Act, the Cultural Heritage
Law, a number oI laws that regulate the expansion
oI our transportation inIrastructure, and several EU
directives, the Environmental Code provides powerIul
support Ior Iar-sighted and systematic work with
sustainability issues in Sweden.
SUNDSVALL TOWN VSON
That support is clear when a mid-sized regional hub
like Sundsvall, the gateway to the northern halI oI
Sweden, dares to invest in a strategic vision Ior the
coming twenty years. That vision addresses how the city
can interIace with the heavy arteries Ior automotive,
train, and water traIfc that cross through town. The
visionary project expands upon ideas developed by
Arken Architects during their design oI the Mid-Sweden
University, which won the Belgian Prix Rotthier
Ior Best New Campus 2008 and the American New
Urbanism Charter Award 2005.
Sweden has not yet defned any particular standards or
criteria Ior working with sustainable urban development,
Page 5859.
Tensta Konsthall,
an art gallery at
Taxingeplan in
Stockholm, by
LLP Architects.
Page 60.
The visual effect
of the wina-
towers on the
hills at the lake
Alavattnet in the
north of Jmt-
lana county.
Page 61.
Jision of the
Munksfn lake
in Jnkping
with the new
briage incluaea,
opening
up for new
aevelopments
on the east siae
(right hana).
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but is a signatory to the EU`s Leipzig Charter on
Sustainable European Cities. The Charter emphasizes the
importance oI a working process that integrates all levels
oI administration Irom the EU to the local community.
The primary Iocus oI the Charter is the economic and
social dimensions oI sustainability, citing Ior example the
importance oI good architectural quality as the basis Ior
the development oI Europe`s cities.
As in other European countries, architecture is a
political matter in Sweden. The Swedish politics oI
architecture emphasize its social signifcance and
the importance oI not letting shortsighted economic
concerns determine the quality oI the architecture.
In practice, our residential design projects achieve
a high level oI architectural quality. But there are
also high demands Ior public works projects to be
exemplary, pressure whose eIIectiveness is perhaps
most clearly seen in the work oI the Swedish Transport
Administration (Iormer Swedish Road Administration).
THE HGH COAST BRDGE AND HAGA NORRA
The Road Administration was given the Swedish
Association oI Architects` 1998 Planning Prize Ior its
work with issues oI architectural design. The jury chose
to highlight two examples: the newly inaugurated High
Coast Bridge and the Haga Norra traIfc interchange in
Stockholm, which adjoins the Royal National City Park.
At the municipal level, there are also detailed voluntary
agreements between cities and municipalities in the EU,
such as the Aalborg Commitments. These emphasize the
ecological aspects oI sustainability more than the Leipzig
Charter. The Aalborg Commitments highlight, Ior
example, the importance oI denser development patterns
and more eIIective and climate-smart transportation
systems. The purpose is to reduce emissions that are
dangerous to the environment and to human health,
particularly greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide.
JNKPNG URBAN DEVELOPMENT VSON
The Aalborg Commitments provided the basis Ior the
Urban Development Vision 2.0 Ior the mid-sized town
oI Jnkping. The plan makes use oI old industrial
land adjacent to a planned high-speed rail corridor Ior
train traIfc to Europe. The results are better density
in the heart oI the city, good conditions Ior public
transportation, and improved pedestrian and bicycle
travel. the vision is realised thanks to extensive public
participation and collaboration between the various
bodies oI the municipality.
The Delegation Ior Sustainable Cities is also currently
working to defne the criteria Ior sustainable urban
development, and is scheduled to report to the Swedish
Parliament in 2011.
62
The concept oI sustainability is much broader today,
with implications Ior nearly every aspect oI urban
development. For that reason, it is critically important
how the political process sets the priorities. At present
the Iocus is on energy and adapting buildings and urban
plans to local climatic conditions.
VXJ WATER PLAN
Vxj stands out as the clearest example oI a Swedish
town taking the challenge oI climate change seriously.
Their work began back in the 1990s. They have
systematically reduced their carbon dioxide emissions
and today are world leaders in that area. But Vxj
has also taken a Iorward-looking approach to the
business oI urban planning. For example, they won the
Swedish Association oI Architects Planning Prize in
2002 Ior their water plan. That plan has given the city
a storm water system that creates an attractive urban
environment instead oI lying hidden underground.
BSKOPSHAGEN
One oI the benefts oI Vxj`s water plan was the
opportunity to build a new modern garden city
development on the site oI a Iormer water treatment
plant. Sustainable storm water management and access
to green space were central to the plan Ior the new
development. As with Hammarby Sjstad, the municipal
government invested in creating an attractive and
soulIul urban environment that oIIers a rich variety oI
experiences with high standards Ior the architectural
design oI its individual buildings. They have been
able to achieve that standard thanks to a small-scale
development strategy that brought in many small,
local construction and property development frms to
participate in building up the area.
The Swedish experience demonstrates that successIul
planning Ior sustainable development is as much
about coordinating between the interests oI diIIerent
branches oI the public and private sectors as it is about
knowledge. What we know today about environmental
technology strategies cannot be the basis Ior how we
plan cities that won`t even be completely built out Ior
another ten or twenty or thirty years. So we also need
to weigh in the new urban planning opportunities
that may arise Irom as yet unknown technologies Ior
construction, transportation, energy production, and
Iood cultivation.
RSTAFLTET N STOCKHOLM
That need is clearly demonstrated by the ongoing
planning Ior the development oI a Iormer wetland on the
south side oI Stockholm. The area has been drained and
is scheduled to become another green neighbourhood.
The main idea oI the plan is to create an urban park
surrounded by dense development to achieve the kind oI
urban liIestyle exemplifed by New York`s Central Park.
It is oIten said that people`s desire to live with a view
oI nature is what accounts Ior the property values and
tall buildings around Central Park. At the same time,
many human ecologists consider access to the kind oI
experience oI nature oIIered by the great park to be a
necessary prerequisite Ior living in the truly dense cities
that will be required in a sustainable Iuture.
HYLLE URBANNATURE
In the recently begun work oI planning the new
Hyllie neighbourhood on the outskirts oI Malm, the
landscape architecture frm oI (NOD) c-o-m-b-i-n-e
has introduced a pattern oI development that will allow
Iarming within the Iramework oI the city.
This is a challenge to Sweden`s established urban
development system and its primarily market-
driven land use principles. It points to a question oI
Iundamental importance Ior the next Iorty years, during
which time the world`s urban population is expected
to double Irom 3.5 to 7 billion people. By 2050, the
total population oI the planet is expected to exceed 10
billion. In many parts oI the world, access to arable land
is going to become an increasingly urgent concern. In
that context, the idea oI developing methods Ior urban
Iarming doesn`t seem Iar-Ietched. But getting there will
require a new economic model in which the long-term
value oI land Ior Iood production is equivalent to its
short-term value Ior property development.
PEHR MKAEL SLLSTRM
Swedish Association of Architects

Page 62.
In the
Gteborg Region
Association of
Local Authorities
the
municipalities
agree to
take foint
responsibility
for a
sustainable
regional
structure by
aeveloping
the core, the
metropolitan
area, the arteries
of collective
transport, the
coast, the green
weages ana the
Gta river.
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Sustainable architecture
It has become clear that sustainable design places
new demands on architects and planners to broaden
their expertise to include engineering and ecology in
their building construction, inIrastructure, and urban
development projects. It is about how a building`s spatial
organization, daylighting, and design aIIect its indoor
climate and energy perIormance, and how the choice
oI materials and construction methods rate Irom the
standpoint oI ecological Iototprint. In urban planning, it
is about how to use land eIIectively, how agriculture and
nature can be integrated with the built environment in
new and better ways; how to build Ior the local climate,
and how transportation can be minimized and made
more eIIective.
Sustainable development can not be achieved with
sophisticated technology alone. It is also important to
understand what solutions are most cost-eIIective on
the whole. The emergence oI the passive house concept
is an example oI when a marginal increase in the
insulation and air-tightness oI a home generate huge
energy savings: recovered heat Irom the inhabitants
and their appliances is enough to provide a good indoor
climate, and the amount oI energy consumed annually
can be minimized to as little as 45 kwh/sqm, according
to the Swedish passive house standards (which were
developed Ior the Swedish climate).
When it comes to carbon dioxide emissions, the choice
oI system can produce very diIIerent results. A wood
structure can even have a positive eIIect iI we include
the carbon absorption, while concrete has a relatively
large carbon Iootprint both in the production oI cement
and over the liIetime oI the concrete. From a holistic
point oI view, then, it`s not just about energy eIfciency
and renewable energy sources. It is also very much an
issue oI architectural design.

ENVRONMENTAL RATNG SYSTEMS
In their project presentations, the architects reIer
to a variety oI diIIerent rating systems to describe
the projects` environmental perIormance. Because
environmental issues are so complex, involving so many
diIIerent aspects oI planning and construction, systems
have emerged to classiIy the environmental impact oI
various solutions to make it easier to compare diIIerent
buildings.
The surveys that have been done indicate that a number
oI diIIerent methods, both Swedish and Ioreign, are in
the process oI being established in Sweden. Most result
in some Iorm oI certifcate.
The methods have been developed at diIIerent times,
have diIIerent objectives, and prioritize in diIIerent ways.
n the following pages, you'll fnd over forty projects from twenty-
fve Swedish architecture frms. t is a selection of international
and sustainable projects.
64
BREEAM LEED GreenBuilding Miljklassad byggnad
Excellent Platinum GreenBuilding A
Very Good Gold B
Good Silver C
Pass Certifed D
BREEAM
BRE`s Environmental Assessment Method is a British
system developed in the 1990s by the Building Research
Establishment, a then state-run company that is now
private. The system has several diIIerent versions, each
adapted to a diIIerent type oI building. The international
version accommodates the local country`s conditions,
laws, standards, environmental issues, etc. Evaluation
Iollows standard procedures developed by BRE, which
is also the certiIying agency.
Website: www.breeam.org
LEED
Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
was developed by the US Green Building Council to
promote a holistic view oI buildings. Its objective is to
promote the most environmentally Iriendly construction
currently possible. The system is in widespread use
among large property owners in some fIty countries
besides the United States. Certifcation requires
documentation. The application process must be
stewarded by a LEED Accredited ProIessional educated
by the Green Building Certifcation Institute.
Website: www.usgbc.org
GREENBULDNG
The program was initiated by the European Commission
in 2005. Its primary objective is to minimize energy
use and promote the construction oI more energy-
eIfcient oIfce and industrial buildings through greater
eIfciency, inIormation, and good examples. One oI the
objectives is to minimize carbon dioxide emissions.
Applicants can participate in the project on a company-
basis or based on a property. The system covers only
non-residential buildings, new and existing.
Website: www.eu-greenbuilding.org/
MLJKLASSAD BYGGNAD
Environmental Classifcation oI Buildings
This system was developed by Swedish experts and
researchers in collaboration with companies and
authorities in the construction and real estate industries.
The system provides a Ioundation Ior analyzing how
indoor climate and health conditions can be improved,
how the amount oI harmIul chemical substances in
buildings can be reduced, and how energy use and
operating costs can be lowered. It grades buildings in
several categories Irom A to D, with C being equivalent
to the building code and D Iailing to meet the code. The
Miljklassad Byggnad certifcation is a guarantee that
the building has been classifed according to a scientifc
method and that its assessment has been documented.
Certifcation is voluntary.
Website: www.byggabodialogen.se (Boverket)
There is nothing to prevent a building Irom being
certifed under more than one system.
BREEAM LEED GreenBuilding Miljklassad byggnad
Energy and Climate x x x x
Water Use x x
Material and Waste x x x
Transport and Localization x x
Pollution x
ndoor Climate and Health x x x
Management x
Awareness x
Ecology and Site x x
nnovation and Design x
All systems, except Ior GreenBuilding have grades in
Iour diIIerent levels.
The advantage oI the Swedish system is that it is based
on clear scientifc and measurable criteria, so that
subjective criteria are avoided. This quality is not as
prevalent in the other systems. On the other hand, it`s
not as comprehensive as the others, Iailing in particular
to address how buildings infuence and interact with
their surroundings, the city. We have given this issue a
more thorough treatment in the section on planning Ior
everyday liIe.
Sweden`s national environmental goals and the
requirements oI its environmental protection legislation
are so demanding that iI they were all to be Iulflled by
a construction project, that project could be certifed
under any oI the international classifcation systems.
And there is no international certifcation system or
standard specifcally Ior sustainable cities; the current
systems evaluate only individual projects.
PEHR MKAEL SLLSTRM
Swedish Association of Architects

Page 65.
Greenwich
Millennium
Jillage in
Lonaon by
Erskine Tovatt
Architects.
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Perspective from the marina
Master plan
Green roofs
Commissioned by: TeIegrafberget Fastighets AB / Forsen Projekt
AB. Architect: Britt AImqvist & CarI-Johan VesterIund,
AhIqvist & AImqvist Arkitekter AB. TechnicaI ConsuItant:
IVL, WSP, BrandskonsuIten, SSPA Sweden AB Area: 9 ha
/ buiIt area 45,000 sqm Number of inhabitants: 700 Status:
2005-2010, estimated ground breaking 2011
For more information: www.ahIqvist-aImqvist.se
TELEGRAFBERGET, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN
Telegrafberget, situated on the northwestern part of
Boo on the northern coast of Nacka, is an important
landmark in the entrance to Stockholm. The site
is characterized by the variation in its topography,
reaching from the quay on sea level to a plateau on
the top of the mountain with a spectacular view of the
entrance to Stockholm.
During the 1870s an optic telegraph mast was installed on the top oI the
mountain, serving as a link between Sweden and Finland. In the beginning
oI the 20th century a harbor Ior reloading kerosene was constructed.
The harbor was, in the later part oI the 20th century, transIormed into a
petroleum depot that was closed in the 1970s.
In addition to the harbor, there are a number oI rusty petroleum cisterns,
a series oI pipes leading Irom the harbor up to the reloading station and a
number oI brick buildings housing a restaurant and oIfces. The site slopes
steeply towards the Saltsjn and the only road, connecting the quay to the
entrance oI the area, is at several places very steep. To be able to satisIy the
demands oI an area Ior housing, services and businesses the road has to be
improved. The Iormer industrial harbor is transIormed into a marina with a
foating platIorm Ior sea buses.
The petroleum cisterns, now occupying the grounds on the quay, and a
plateau on the way to the top oI the mountain, are to be replaced by around
100 apartments in blocks. In the valley, situated above the brick buildings,
40 terraced houses are proposed and on the mountain plateaus north oI the
valley around 30 villas are planned Ior. Further up in the valley, along the
existing road, 80 apartments in three housing blocks with a preschool in
the ground foor are proposed. This gives a total oI around 300 apartments.
Most buildings will have green rooIs.
The mix oI diIIerent types oI dwellings and the variations in ownership
contribute to create a diverse and attractive environment Ior living and
working. The businesses that are to be localized in the area will enrich the
vitality and make the area attractive Ior both the residents and the public.
F
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MASTER PLAN FOR A LANDSCAPE CITY IN HYLLIE, MALM, SWEDEN
URBANATURE HYLLIE
BTA 630,000 sqm
(nod) C-O-M-B-I-N-E in coIIaboration with: Minne och MiIj,
Resource Vision
CIient: City of MaIm
Urbanature Hyllie, urban development.
Ten years ago the bridge between Sweden and Denmark opened. In 2010
a new railway connection between Malm city and the bridge is being
completed. Hyllie, the last station beIore the train enters the bridge to the
continent is located at the city edge. Around Hyllie station the growing
city oI Malm gets an international traIfc node with exceptional potential
Ior urban development. At the same time Hyllie has one oI Europe`s most
productive agricultural land. The situation in Hyllie addresses some oI our
most urgent challenges on the global scale. An increasing part oI the world`s
population live in cities. How we handle the production and transportation
oI Iood and energy are key issues to resolve when we have to Iace an increa-
singly urbanized Iuture in a sustainable and resilient manner.
FINGER STRUCTURE
The site`s unique qualities create tension in the interchange between city
and landscape. Closer to the station a dense, populous, urban city structure
enables many people to use public transport and other public - and commer-
cial services. The resource oI productive agricultural land creates the condi-
tions Ior a rich landscape Ior Iarming, recreation and biodiversity. A fnger
structure creates an elongated meeting. The city extends in to the landscape
and the landscape enters the city. The heights oI the buildings are gradually
decreased to meet the wideness oI the agricultural landscape on the plain.
CITY FARMING
The Iarming will be an important part oI the area`s quality and character,
and contributes both to the area`s Iood- and energy production. Centrally si-
tuated in one oI the existing estates, an urban Iarm becomes the new centre
oI the cultured area in the region. Residents Irom the area can participate in
cultivation in diIIerent ways and get both Iood and recreation in return. The
allotment areas are integrated with active public space with recreation, sport
and play. Participating in the work at the urban Iarm also has an educational
potential, where the cultivation and the city are put in an obvious relation.
CLIMATE NEUTRAL
Through an active energy management and a developed view on transport,
a climate neutral city is created where cultivation in the area plays a central
role. The area has zero emissions oI CO
2
Ior the living quarters. We halve
the emissions oI CO
2
Ior transport and reduce the CO
2
impact by one third
in relation to Iood production. Urbanature Hyllie is working hard to make
the sustainable parameters visible and manageable Ior the city`s inhabitants.
An annual environmental report is compiled. By creating a better interIace
between the individual and the environmental impacts, opportunities are
given to change liIestyles.
URBANATURE
Urbanature Hyllie is part oI a series oI urban development projects by (nod)
C-O-M-B-I-N-E. Urbanature is a general method that investigates how new
dynamic combinations between mans ideas and nature`s processes can be
used in sustainable urban development. We are committed to a planning
culture where diIIerent Iorces, instead oI opposing each other, cooperate and
create synergy eIIects.
F
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(nod) C-O-M-B-I-N-E
68
The main entrance of Holmen Timber ABs new sawmill in Brviken, Norrkping. Illustration AIX.
OUR PROFESSIONAL COMMITMENT
At the heart oI our proIessional commitment, is our belieI in the art oI
architecture as a vital ingredient in all our lives. AIX Architects are
dedicated to good design in the broadest sense. It includes the public and
cultural context in which the buildings evolve, eIfciency in use plus a
deeply Ielt concern Ior sustainability.
Our commissions range Irom restoration oI historic buildings to
modern urban design; royal palaces, churches, schools, university and
Iaculty buildings, laboratories, hotels and apartment blocks. We work in
close contact with the academic institutions and support research projects
developing new methods in feld oI wooden design.
TIMBER ARCHITECTURE
To many people, the material wood means world wide shared positive
experiences, Irom the signifcance oI the single tree and Iorest as archetypes
Ior shelter to the tactile tradition oI woodworking inherited through
generations. It`s a material knowledgeable through all senses - vision, hearing,
touch and even smell. This unique quality is our starting point when creating
spaces and architectural architecture growing Irom timber and wood.
A SELECTION OF WOODEN PROJECTS
The last decade we have designed expressive modern wooden structures
Ior sport arenas, equestrian arenas and apartment blocks. Through these
projects we have acquired an understanding and knowledge oI how to
combine high quality architectural design with rational construction
technology, including preIabrication and industrial processing.
We are currently working on an extensive wooden building complex
that is to become the biggest sawmill in Northern Europe, namely Holmen
Timber AB`s venture in Braviken. AIX also recently designed a acclaimed
multi storey parking garage in SkelleIte based on a system oI industrial
preIabrication with wood.
Our practice is moreover involved in an inIrastructural development
project in Stockholm, Ieaturing stations and platIorms Ior a modernized
tramway. The use oI wood is prompted here by heritage conservation
aspects and an ambitious program Ior sustainable development.
A Iurther example is the Copperhill Mountain Lodge in Are, designed by
AIX in partnership with the American architects Bohlin Cywinski Jackson.
Apart Irom being a unique and exclusive resort, it is also one oI the biggest
wooden buildings in Scandinavia.
THE FOREST AND OUR FUTURE
The liIecycle oI a building spans approximately a hundred years. In that
time, our Iorests will have produced timber Ior a new building. During
those hundred years the growing Iorest will have bound carbon dioxide,
which remains embedded in the utilized timber. In that way the use oI wood
spells smaller emissions over time and can thus play a substantial part in
improving the CO balance. Further on transportation oI timber and wooden
products requires less Iuel, considering the low weight in relation to its
structural strength.
In this way environmental and resource related arguments are in Iavour
oI using wood. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon has stated that:
'Climate change cannot be won without the world`s Iorests. We take this
statement to mean that we must utilize the Iorest. Many researchers claim
that planted Iorest resources are especially valuable. A replanted, Iast
growing Iorest is a most eIfcient instrument to absorb CO.
LARGE SCALE RATIONALITY AND ECONOMY
Timber construction systems are applicable Ior a wide range oI building
commissions where we have grown accustomed to seing steel or concrete.
Today, using wood, we can manage both wide spans and heavy loads. New
technical solutions, e.g. sprinkler systems and fame-retardant paint, also
warrant that fre saIety requirements can be met by a generous margin.
Through the progress made in the feld oI wood research on preIabrication
it`s possible to create competitive industrial building systems. This coupled
with the environmental advantages oI wood, means that we oIten can and
should consider a wooden structure.
GOOD DESIGN OF COMPLEX STRUCTURES
For our client, Holmen Timber, one oI the largest industrial corporations in
Sweden, these arguments are oI course crucial Ior their decision to invest in
a new industrial complex in wood. As their architects we are given a unique
possibility to use this material to bridge the gap between a very, large
industrial scale and the Ior architecture constantly crucial, tactile human
scale.
Bridging the scale is yet another signifcant inherent quality in wood and
AIX puts it into eIIect in our awarded architectural designs.
Further inIormation: lars.johanssonaix.se, www.aix.se
ARCHITECTURE IN WOOD
69
Moaern inaoor riaing school with a 40-metre span in a setting of outstanaing historic interest at Flyinge, on the outskirts of Luna. Photo. Natasfa Jovic.
Prefabricatea winabreak for a moaernisea tramway Saltsfbanan, on the
outskirts of Stockholm. Illustration AIX.
Wooaen natural-araught-ventilatea four-storey car park, Skellefte.
Photo. Per Myrehea.
AIX Architects was founded in 2001. Our turnover during
the past scaI year was 68 MSkr. AIX has 85 empIoyees and
10 partners. AIX has an estabIished market aII over Scan-
dinavia. We are through successfuI competitions recentIy
introduced to new cIients in other European countries.
F
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Architectural installation at the exhibition ana seminar Wooa Summit 2010 in
Jirserum on the subfect The Architecture of Necessity. Photo. AIX.
Hotel Copperhill Mountain Loage. One of the biggest wooaen
builaings in Scanainavia. Photo. Mats Olofsson.
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HOUSING BLOCK VIKEN, HAMMARBY SJSTAD, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN
CIient: Svenska Bostder AB Landscape architect: Andersson Jnsson Landskapsarkitekter Architect: EFS
Arkitekter AB Artist: Erik kerIund Period: 2003 The court yard area 2,200 sqm
More information: www.aj-Iandskap.se www.erikakerIund.se
Allotments in the courtyard
The water saver the heart of the precinct
Playing in the courtyard
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Communal garden with greenery, allotments and
trickling water.
Bostadsgrden is one oI the larger precincts in Hammarby Sjstad, with
possibilities Ior several diIIerent ambiences and Iunctions. Private and
communal patios and allotments surround the precinct`s large, open garden
spaces, which are edged with copper-barked Manchurian Cherry Trees
(Prunus Maackii).
The water saver, which is the 'heart oI the precinct, collects all
rainwater Irom the precinct and rooItops, to be used Ior amusement,
beautifcation and watering. At the 'source the water bubbles Iorth Irom
a bowl oI polished black diabase. From there it fows into the paved stream
bed, which has small waterIalls and flters. The water glittering, refecting,
bubbling, running, dripping and sparkling means liIe and repose Ior
everyone living around the courtyard.
The allotments are centrally positioned and make a beautiIul addition,
encouraging social interaction between neighbours. Residents can enjoy
practical care, Iriendship and locally grown Iood.
The opportunities Ior play are maniIold. Along the stream, the children
play with the fowing water. A sanded play area terminates the stream,
symbolising the pond which the water is heading Ior.
Artistic works
The central part oI the court was jointly designed by artist and landscape
architect. The court derives its character Irom the motion oI the water. The
source, the 'eye oI the court, mirrors the sky and, through the motion
oI the water, propagates its shape to the sandy surIace oI the open circle.
Beneath the spreading chestnut tree, the mother watches over her child.
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OFFICE BLOCK, RIGA 2 PRECINCT, ROYAL SEAPORT, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN
Area: gross oor area 30,000 sqm approx., non-residentiaI area, commerce - 3,500 sqm, non-residentiaI area, ofces - 21,000 sqm
7 storeys above ground, of which 1 for commerce and 6 for ofces. Parking storey beIow grade. PIanning period: compIetion 2010.
Project organisation CIient: Vasakronan. Contractor: Peab Architect: Aros Arkitekter, represented by SidseI WIIgren and HeIena
PoIgrd TechnicaI consuItants: buiIding services - Incoord, eIectricaI instaIIations - EIectro Engineering, structuraI enginee ring -
KJAB. Reference: www.arosarkitekter.se PrincipaIs in charge: Robert Thorstenson, Rene MyrIand (Vasakronan)
Aros Arkitekter was commissioned by Vasakronan to
develop Riga precinct into a new commercial and ofhce
building.
Sdra Vrtahamnen, the Royal Seaport, in Stockholm is a neighbourhood
in transition. New building development is underway in the old dockside
precincts, comprising oIfces, housing and shops side by side with the
existing harbour activities. The long-term aim is to create a new urban
centre with a mixture oI activities which will make this a living township
at all hours oI the day and night.
The building is placed centrally in the new neighbourhood and its main
entrance Iaces the water and the Iuture park. The building`s light court with
its restaurant and caI is open to the public.
PLANNING FOR SUSTAINABILITY
From an early stage, great importance has been attached to analyses and
the careIul selection oI systemic solutions, and work has proceeded in close
collaboration with both client and contractor. To make the oIfce storeys bright
and airy, the installations have been built into the foors and ceilings.
Aros Arkitekter has worked together with the property owner, the team
oI consultants and contractors to devise sustainable concepts within the
requirements oI LEED. The project leader evaluated cost proposals at an
early stage and carried out liIecycle analyses oI the project`s development.
This integral processing has made possible an application Ior LEED Gold
Certifcation, while at the same time meeting building and programming
requirements. In addition, the project has been classed as a Green Building,
and classifcation as a Gold Environmentally Classifed Building is in
progress.
The building surrounds a light court which, despite being glass-walled,
conveys the experience oI being on the borderline between outdoors and
indoors. From the light court the building opens upwards into a rooI light
and with a fve-storey-high glass wall Iacing eastwards. Great importance
has been attached to presence-controlled lighting, zonally confgured. The
glazed Iaades on the east side reduce the need Ior artifcial lighting, and
during the warm season oI the year the premises are cooled at night-time
with cold supply air and a needs-regulated ventilation system combined with
natural ventilation. The ventilation system Ior the building has been chosen
as being environmentally advantageous. The VAV (variable air volume)
system provides generous scope Ior adapting air fows to actual needs, using
presence and temperature transducers and also in committee rooms
carbon dioxide transducers to control the air fow. Surplus energy Irom the
shops on the bottom storey oI the building is recycled.
AROS ARKITEKTER
At Aros Arkitekter we have a wide range oI experience in the public
and commercial spheres, both large and complex and smaller and
less complex. In our working approach Ior sustainable design we are
responsive and meticulous in the dialogue with our clients, while at the
same time presenting them with the challenge oI creative ideas. Aros
Arkitekter operates in local, national and international markets in the
felds oI architecture, urban development, interior architecture and project
management.
Aros Arkitekter has been in practice since 1980 and is well-established
in the market. We now have centrally located oIfces in Stockholm, Uppsala
and Norrtlje, and number approximately 80 associates.
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72
On the site of an outdated industrial area adjacent
to a railway yard, Sweden's new national stadium for
soccer, Swedbank Arena, is to be built as part of an
integrated mixed urban development.
While the new stadium is the Iocus oI the development, the surrounding
neighbourhood is to be a vibrant and lively city district in its own right and
will Ieature, among other amenities, Scandinavia`s largest shopping mall,
The Mall oI Scandinavia.`
The central ecological concept oI the project is to transIorm an isolated
and under-utilized tract oI industrial land into a viable part oI the city`s
urban Iabric. As such, the development connects existing city enclaves and
green spaces previously divided by the railway and links them not only to
one another but also, through careIul integration with Stockholm`s existing
public transit network, to the rest oI the region. An important aspect oI
the project`s mixed-use concept is to populate the stadium`s large public
spaces during non-event times and accordingly, extensive studies have been
undertaken to help understand the area`s urban climate and how it aIIects
the use oI the area`s outdoor spaces. The Arenastaden development has a
rigorous environmental program with Iocus on management oI rain and
ground water runoII, remediation oI contaminated land and reduction oI
energy use. Beyond this, the Mall oI Scandinavia has a BREEAM Excellent
rating as its primary environmental goal.
BAU has worked Irom the initial sketch phases through land use plan to
design and coordination oI the masterplan in cooperation with the City oI
Solna planning oIfce. The Arenastaden project is a commercially fnanced
development in which individual building sites within an integrated whole
have been identifed and sold through a complex three dimensional legal
property defnition and BAU has provided illustrations Ior this process.
Numerous architectural frms and technical consulting groups are involved
in the individual building projects which make up the master plan.
BAU in cooperation with Benoy Architects oI Great Britain have been
directly involved in the design oI the Mall oI Scandinavia, as local architects
oI record. The project is executed in a Iull 3-d environment Irom which all
design drawings are extracted and the CAD model is constructed to permit
application oI time and cost parameters using Wico soItware to coordinate
CIient: Rsta ProjektutveckIing AB /UnibaiI-Rodamco
Statistics: Stage one of the deveIopment incIudes a 50,000
seat stadium, 300,000 sqm retaiI and parking compIex,
60,000 sqm of ofce space, 400 room hoteI, and 750
apartment units.
Project period: 2005-2012
ARENASTADEN / MALL OF SCANDINAVIA, SOLNA, STOCKHOLM REGION, SWEDEN
the construction process. This BIM technology has helped Iacilitate the
planning oI site work to a degree which will shorten the construction
process by several months and greatly reduce material wastage. Another key
aspect oI BAU`s involvement in the project has been in assisting with the
certifcation oI the building under the BREEAM environmental assessment
method. In this, one oI only a Iew BREEAM registered projects in Sweden,
BAU has prepared Design Stage Assessment reports and assisted Waterman
Consultants oI London with supporting inIormation on several assessment
criteria. This work includes interior daylight studies carried out using
Autodesk Ecotect / Radiance and IES virtual environment.
BAU currently has two registered BREEAM International assessors on
staII and is at the IoreIront oI the development oI BREEAM in Sweden as
we serve on the Swedish Green Building Council`s development committee
Ior the adaptation oI BREEAM to the Swedish context.
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Urban Academy consists of a 5-year programme for
over 200 students, some 20 teachers and administra-
tion. Besides undergraduate studies the school offers
a research programme and programme for further
education.
The proposed site Ior the school is located in the third largest city in Kenya,
Kisumu, situated by Lake Victoria.
The central location makes the school readily accessible to regional inha-
bitants. The school is to work in close contact with citizens and act outwardly
by involving and engaging the population and disseminating knowledge
through lectures, exhibitions and practical research projects. The school`s
mission is to shed light on issues relating to water, climate, sanitation and
urbanisation highly topical issues in this region and large parts oI the world.
The school is being planned in accordance with the principles it stands
Ior. It is to be an educational and ecological, sustainable building, creating
a pleasant microclimate through its gardens, sun-screening (the rooI) and
airstreams (the wall).
INTEGRATED TECHNICAL SYSTEMS/ARCHITECTURE AND BUILDINGS
The building complex comprises several smaller buildings, alleys and inner
courtyards which together make up a campus. This is surrounded by the
shell oI a perIorated wall which guides the wind and the airstream through
the whole complex, and a perIorated rooI which provides shade and, Irom its
solar collectors, supplies the school with electrical power. The buildings are
organised round a piazza the central meeting point within the complex.
Distinct boundaries between outdoors and indoors have been erased. Both
the gardens and the buildings will be serviceable Ior educational purposes.
In addition to the studio buildings there is a large Iull-scale workshop Ior
experiments with materials and structures. The school`s Iace to the city is an
entrance building containing administration, a caI with space Ior meetings
and exhibitions, and a guest house Ior researchers.
BRUNNBERG & FORSHED ARCHITECTS LTD
Brunnberg & Forshed Architects was Iounded in the 1950s and is today one
oI the largest architecture frms in Sweden.
We have long experience and wide competence in several architectural
felds, Irom city planning projects, housing, comercial oIfces and interior
design. The question oI sustainability has become an important aspect in
the way we work. Our aim is to design energy-eIfcient buildings combined
with good architecture.
URBAN ACADEMY - A SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND PLANNING IN KENYA
Urban Academy, SchooI of Design and PIanning for 200 students. Location: Kisumu, Kenya. Architect: Brunnberg & Forshed
Architects Ltd. Co-operation: ChaImers University of TechnoIogy in Gothenburg, Sweden, Swedish Trade CounciI, UN-Habitat,
Maseno University in Kenya. Contact: Hans Bergstrm, Brunnberg & Forshed Architects Ltd.
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URBAN DEVELOPMENT NYA RSTAFLTET, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN
Jiew towaras the park
Nya rstafltet is part of Stockholm's ambition to
create an organic city structure in its southern parts
and to establish new urban centralities. The project will
become one of Stockholm's largest new developments,
and will be progressively realized during the coming
years.
The core oI the project is the new landscape park which will combine
activity felds, playgrounds, allotments and botanical gardens. The park
is linked to one oI Stockholm`s green corridors and will contribute to the
biodiversity.
On the north and the western side oI the park two large decks concentrate
playgrounds and leisure activities, creating a dynamic transition between the
park and the buildings.
The project connects to the existing neighborhoods and inIrastructures
with the aim to create urban continuity and suppress both social and physical
CIient: City of StockhoIm through the City PIanning and DeveIopment Administrations Team: Architects and pIanners: ARCHI 5
(Laurent BoudriIIet, Thomas Dryjski, Erik Giudice, Bernard GuiIIien and Jacques Sebbag) and Archi5prod Landscape architect:
MicheI Desvigne SustainabiIity consuItants: EIioth_ Iosis Group New city deveIopment: housing, ofces, services,
pubIic buiIdings and a Iarge centraI park. Dimensions: New neighborhoods 30 ha, Iandscape park 50 ha, new constructions 600,000
sqm ScheduIe: Competition - First Prize, February 2009 Under deveIopment. For more information: www.erikgiudice.com
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barriers. The robust and fexible city structure with its Iolded geometry gives
a specifc identity to the layout and creates a great variation in the cityscape
and in public spaces.
The layout has been careIully studied and developed in relation to climatic
and weather conditions: wind, sun and temperature has shaped the design oI
the buildings and public spaces in order to optimize comIort zones and obtain
global energetic eIfciency.
The new city blocks combine a wide diversity oI typologies, scales and
heights, to respond to the needs oI a contemporary evolving society. Towards
the park, higher buildings create a contrasted and airy skyline, letting light
and views pass through to the buildings standing behind.
The project carries a high ecological and social profle that meets up with
the city`s global ambition which has resulted in the nomination oI Stock-
holm to Green Capital 2010.
Solar exposure aiagram Location aiagram
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Master Plan
Activity aeck
LGALkIk GIUDICL AkCnI1LC1S
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Through its integrated Iunctions the project allows synergies that are
benefcial to sustainable development and the high ambitions to minimize
the environmental Iootprint have Iollowed the project throughout the
entire process. By fnding creative solutions Ior energy-saving and water
consumption, eIfcient use oI land, eIfcient waste and water management,
avoiding non-environmentally Iriendly materials a LEED Platinum level has
been achieved.
Opened in October 2009, the shopping mall is a success story, with Iar
more visitors than the most optimistic Iorecasts, confrming that environ-
mentally responsible strategy can go hand-in-hand with commercial success.
FOR MORE INFORMATION:
www.equator.se
Area (GRA): TotaI surface: 65,700 sqm. RetaiI: 43,100 sqm. ResidentiaI: 8,000 sqm. Ofces and Services: 14,600 sqm. Garage:
900 underground parking spaces. Organization: DeveIoper: Citycon Oy. Architect: Equator StockhoIm AB. Head Architects: Yves
Chantereau, Katarina Sipes. Interior design Shopping maII: Wester + EIsner. Project Managers: Forsen Projekt & Veidekke
LILJEHOLMSTORGET, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN
In a long-term commitment, the city of Stockholm has
successively enacted environmental policy as well as a
high level of requirements for environmental standards
to be reached in new developments.
Located at an important hub in Stockholm`s public transportation system, this
project is the key in the Liljeholmen area`s integration into Stockholm`s city
centre.
This is a mixed-use project where public services, retail, oIfces and
housing are integrated to create a new urban node Ior local residents,
developed on a challenging site.
This project has a strong environmental profle and is the frst shopping
centre in Europe certifed at LEED Platinum level, the highest classifcation
Ior overall environmental perIormance.
To develop the area and achieve an urban Ieeling it has been important to
add and integrate housing, commerce and places oI work. Liljeholmstorget
is a successIul development based on this complex integrated Iunctional
puzzle solved through innovative solutions and turning challenges into
successIul key assets.
In spite oI challenging topographic conditions the huge potential oI the
Liljeholmen location could be unlocked, and a Iormer 'sprawl area is now
replaced by a lively city quarter, creating social sustainability.
The project has been developed without public Iunding and used the new
three-dimensional zoning property law, making it possible to optimize the
built area oI the new development.
Liljeholmstorget has a unique location connected to an existing public
transportation node. The subway, tram and a bus systems meet here.
The new additions to the area are defned around a new shopping mall,
integrated with an existing oIfce building containing public services.
Smart spatial solutions: On top oI the shopping mall, the new apartments
are developed around a green courtyard. The loading dock, Iurther up the
hill, uses the adjacent street to access this level on top oI the shopping mall.
The loading dock is sheltered under a green rooI using diIIerent plants to
create a graphic pattern Ior the neighbors who look at it Irom the top oI
the hill. New underground parking in rock caverns in the hill under the
neighborhood towers does not occupy any ground-level space.
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habi bi haus
ar chi t ect ur e concept s proj ect devel opment
Idea, concept deveIopment and design: habibihaus
architects: EIise Grosse, FiIippa StIhane and Sigrid
Svensson. Partners: Stadtwerke Chemnitz, Erfurth Project
Design, Fraunhofer Institute, TU Chemnitz
http://www.habibihaus.se, info@ habibihaus.se
CHEMNITZ, GERMANY
The Wunderland concept was developed for a local
energy supplier that owned an empty lot in the city
center. They had a wish to do something, but just did
not know what.
Wunderland was conceived with the aim oI creating dynamics on a local
as well as a global level. It stresses the necessity oI coming together in
our eIIorts to fnd common sustainable solutions. By creating a space and
networks Ior new types oI interaction, the hope is to plant a seed to see the
growth oI a tree oI an unknown sort. Wunderland was initiated to actively
promote change in terms oI innovation, awareness and responsibility. The
building is to be completely selI sustainable and regenerative parts act both
as building structure and energy sources.
Wunderland consists oI three parts:
FReSH (the Free Energy Research Hub) is a global experiment, open to
researchers, research institutes, companies as well as the general public. It
generates energy research and innovations in a copyright and patent Iree
environment.
In the Event Science Park the visitor sensuously comes to understand that
everyone is part oI everything.
The Urban Park integrates the structure oI Wunderland with the town oI
Chemnitz, through creating new connections and making the city more
accessible to pedestrians and cyclists. The park provides spaces Ior acti-
vity and leisure, everyday strolls and cultural events in an outdoor urban
environment.
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URBAN VILLAS IN MALM, SWEDEN
Many a heart in Sweden throbs for a detached house
in the suburbs. It is fantastic, living in a house with a
garden, hobnobbing with the neighbours and enjoying
self-determination of design but at the same time
it is important that architecture be modernised to
measure up to the sustainable society. Urban Villas is
about stacking villas one on top of the other without
sacrihcing any of the qualities possessed by a villa
standing on the ground.
Urban Villas is located in a block totalling 500 dwelling units in Malm`s
old dockyard area, Western Harbour (Vstra Hamnen), which is being
turned into a township Ior residence, work, education and recreation. Malm
is Sweden`s third largest city and together with Copenhagen, among others,
Iorms part oI what is called the resund Region.
Urban Villas consists oI two buildings: the lower one a courtyard
building looking inwards on the precinct, and the higher one Iacing the
street. The courtyard building consists oI two symmetrical three-storey
buildings with private gardens on a Iourth storey. The street building consist
oI six storeys with one villa and garden per storey and a communal rooItop
piazza at the very top.
Urban Villas is distinguished by each dwelling unit having its own
entrance, garden and foor plan. The units, orangery, inner courtyard and
rooItop piazza are vertically interlinked by an external spiral staircase, a
kind oI Iootpath.
This is near-urban living permitting an ecological liIestyle with bike
instead oI car Ior transport, a personal allotment instead oI a shopping
centre, and so on. The large liIt in the core oI the building permits bicycle
transport to the Iridge. Balconies, Iaades, courtyards and rooI are
gardening allotments. The residential Ieatures also include a communal
fower garden and several communal areas Ior socialisation and relaxation.
The green plants in the courtyard and on the terrace and balconies
elevate the quality oI the local climate by trapping tiny dust particles,
abating noise, producing oxygen and providing shade.
The 30 cm thick layer oI soil on balconies and rooIs also serves Ior
rainwater storage. 7 m
3
oI soil per balcony and 72 m
3
in the rooI gardens
adds up to an average oI 11 m
3
oI soil per dwelling unit.
The Iaade has thick insulation and triple glazing, and the building is
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Land area: 500 sqm No. dweIIing units: 7, each comprising 140 sqm CIient: BRF Urbana ViIIor (tenant-owner association)
Architect: Lead architects: Cord SiegeI and Pontus qvist Participating architect: UIrika Connheim Lead Iandscape architect:
Karin Larsson Associate Iandscape architects: NieIs de Bruin, OIa NieIsen, Magnus Svensson StructuraI engineering: kerman
ingenjrsbyr, Bjrn Yttergren and Sven Johan kesson. EIectricaI instaIIations: LMT eIteknik, Christian WaIter and Mats Larsson
DetaiIed deveIopment pIan: City of MaIm, MaIena LarsvaII.
The project was awarded Kasper SaIin Prize by the Swedish Association of Architects in 2009.
supplied with district heat generated by reIuse incineration. It is ventilated
through a heat exchanger with 80 per cent energy recovery. Residents
preseparate their reIuse into eight Iractions and compost their organic waste
in the courtyard, thus providing Iertilizer Ior the building`s allotments.
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hauschild + siegelarchitecture
The project began as a communal building enterprise, in the sense oI the
residents being clients and thus maximal participants in the design oI the
building and the fnancing oI the project. Construction has been based in its
entirety on a liIecycle perspective, so as to achieve a long-term economic
and ecological investment.
The architects have served as developers and designers, so as to
translate the community`s ideas into concrete reality directly, without any
intermediaries.
Remarks: Cord Siegel Iormed the hauschild siegel practice aIter Urban
Villas.
ReIerence Ior Iurther inIormation: www.urbanavillor.com,
www.hauschild-siegel.com
Principal contact person Cord Siegel
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UMEVA, UME, SWEDEN
The UMEVA new head ofhce uses only half of the
energy of a normal ofhce building.
LINK arkitektur AB designed both the exterior and the interior oI the oIfce,
beautiIully situated at the waterIront oI Ume River. The main objectives
Ior the project have been sustainability and fexibility. The site itselI has
a symbolic value, since UMEVA being a sewage business, uses the river
water. At the same time, the treatment process produces energy Ior the
oIfce.
The objective The most sustainable oIfce in the Nordic Region` meant
to plan an oIfce sustainable in all felds-; environmental, economical as well
as social, says Tomas Blomqvist, CEO oI UMEVA. Our history goes back
more than 100 years and we will probably work Ior another 100 years. With
this perspective in mind we have to behave respectIully towards nature and
the environment. LINK arkitektur is in the middle oI a process oI certiIying
our quality, environmental and work environment systems to challenge all
our employees to everyday improvement. Our vision is to be an inspiring
role model to other businesses in town.
Being environmentally conscious is central Ior LINK arkitektur. This
project, by many means unique, with its sustainable Iocus, has been an
evolving process oI design. A signifcant task was to achieve fexibility
in every possible way, where plan layouts and technical solutions were
essential parts. The Iurnishing, the number oI people and the mix between
open and closed oIfce spaces will vary over time. For instance, all oIfce
desks have telescopic carriages enabling diIIerent sizes oI desktops. 80
percent oI the fttings are recyclable and 65 percent oI the Iurniture has a
'Swan certifcate.
To save costs, piles were not used as a Ioundation. The result oI this was
extra space in the basement plan, which will be used Ior staII recreation
units as well as to create common meeting places Ior the citizens oI Ume.
UMEVA wants to oIIer something to the inhabitants oI the community
as well as to be an open and visible company. The building is designed so
it can expand with another foor on the top a sustainable way oI adding
space.
Energy demand oI modern oIfce buildings is primarily one oI cooling,
rather than heating, even in the northern parts oI Sweden. The west side was
designed compact with small windows since sun is adding much heat Irom
that direction. The east side on the other hand, luckily Iacing the river, was
glazed, though with energy eIfcient glass. The energy demand is met with
heat Irom the sewage process. Cooling is delivered by letting the intake
oI air pass the ground and be naturally chilled. Other smart solutions are;
lighting controlled by daylight access and the presence oI people; ventilation
controlled by the number oI people present; the absence oI personal
computers, which normally producing a lot oI heat. WSP Sweden, a partner
to LINK arkitektur, has designed the technical solutions oI the building.

More inIormation:
www.linkarkitektur.se
www.umeva.se
Project size 2,900 sqm
Ofce buiIding for UMEVA.
The project was compIeted in June, 2009.
The project received the MuncipaIity of Umes EnvironmentaI
Award 2009.
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LHAMMAR, HARGS BRUK, UPPLAND, SWEDEN
Owner: Hargs Bruk. Lessee: Lhammar Grd AB
Acreage: 850 ha
BuiIding: FIoor space: 3,820 sqm, of which 56 insuIated
CubicIes: 300 incIuding breeding buIIs
The Lhammar Ioang barn was designed by Bjrn Edstrm
and GuniIIa Bergstrm, MaImstrm Edstrm Arkitekter,
together with Agronomist Per-Arne Mattsson.
0DOPVWUP(GVWUP
Arkitekter lngenjrer
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The loahng barn at Lhammar, Hargs Bruk, embodies
present-day high-tech, advanced agriculture. The
building is intended to create a good building practice
which will show Swedish farming developing in a
positive direction.
The barn is designed Ior 300 suckling cows. It is a rational building requi-
ring a minimum oI labour input and oIIering simple livestock management
in saIe conditions.
The building is made oI good-quality materials which minimise mainte-
nance and make Ior lean structural solutions and economical use.
The building is fexible and can be adapted Ior diIIerent use at some
Iuture date.
The building is heated by the livestock.
The impression made by the building is dominated by the rooI, suspen-
ded in the landscape like a gigantic leaI. The yellow doors become blocks
connecting the rooI with the ground. The end walls are Ireely patterned with
a mixture oI wind-protective Iabric and boarding.
The building was selected Best Farm Building oI 2006 by the journal
Lantbrukets AIIrer. The decision and presentation took place at the
ELMIA trade Iair on 19th October. The building was commissioned by
Hargs Bruk, represented by UlI Diedrichsson.
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NORRA VRAM NURSING HOME FOR THE ELDERLY, SWEDEN
Partnergruppen is a private care operator that aims to
focus on the residents and their families in the hnal
stage of life. Norra Vram in the South of Sweden is
their hrst example of a new nursing home where the
built environment rehects the care operators ideology.
Spatial questions concern scale, visual contact
between residential and common spaces and how to
integrate greenery as a health component.
A lot oI time was spent initially in the project on analysis- how nursing
homes are normally designed and what the social eIIects oI the design are.
An analysis was done oI the target group which mainly is the residents, their
relatives and the staII. It was important to fnd places where these target
groups meet and how they could fnd stimuli in their physical environment.
Environments that are semi-private/public, Ior example the oIfce, the coIIee
shop, the library or the museum were incorporated in the analysis as well
as the Iunctions oI a private home. We Iound Iunctions in these areas that
could be placed in a home Ior elderly people. Functions that not only help
create meetings and interaction between people but also give the place a
sense oI home and privacy.
Sustainable materials have been used throughout the project. The heating
system was replaced by ground heat. The nursing home in Norra Vram
consists oI a late 19th century Mansion that`s been rebuilt and extended,
in total 2500 sqm. The volumes are designed to aesthetically resemble old
Swedish Iarms, and to complement other houses in the neighborhood. A
couple oI mews are placed next to each other and in the spaces between
them atrium courtyards are situated. The small green gardens allow
residents with medical conditions to enjoy time outdoors by themselves. The
volumes are plastered in diIIerent colors, picking up the shades in the red
brick oI the existing Mansion.
The frst impression oI the interior is a spacious and welcoming entrance
area. This is a fexible space Ior gatherings with a reception, a library and
a small espresso bar. From here you reach three wards - one Ior short time
staying, one Ior people with dementia and one Ior people with physically
and mentally impaired ability. All residential rooms are organized adjacent
to a communal living room or a green court yard. In that way, long corridors
are minimized on behalI oI more stimulating meeting places and Iocal
points.
Project: Norra Vram, Nursing home for the eIderIy, 2007-2009
Size: 40 rooms/ats, in totaI 2,500 sqm.
CIient: Partnergruppen
Architect: Marge Arkitekter
Contact person: Katarina GrundseII
Information: ShortIisted to WAN HeaIth Care Award 2010,
PubIished in Arkitektur 5/2009, Rum 06/2009, Mark Magazine
No 23, Bygginsdustrin 31/2008. www.marge.se
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THE CITYTUNNEL IN MALM, SWEDEN
The City Tunnel Malm project is a railroad line that
connects Malm Central Station with the resund
bridge and the railroads of Skne.
Six kilometres oI the railroad line is a tunnel under the central parts oI
Malm, and eleven kilometres are rail lines above ground. Malm C gets a
new underground station, and new stations will be built at Triangeln and at
Hyllie.
MALM C
Metro has been responsible Ior the design oI all new construction and
alterations at Malm Station above ground. The City Tunnel is being
constructed to the north oI the existing Malm Central Station. A new
arrivals area is being created which is delimited partly by the new Glass
Hall, and partly by the new car park building to the east. The Glass Hall`s
modern design contrasts with the historic building oI the Central Station.
Modern architecture eIfciently caters to the increasing fow oI people
travelling, while some older parts oI the station have been given a diIIerent
use with a greater Iocus on service. Malm Central Station has been altered,
converted and extended over a period oI 150 years. This might thereIore be
viewed as a series oI well defned annual rings. With the Glass Hall and the
other additions being made now, yet another annual ring is being added.
HYLLIE STATION
Hyllie is the frst station you reach when travelling by train Irom
Copenhagen`s Kastrup airport and is thereIore Malm`s gateway to
Copenhagen. This is no traditional station building we have been working
with other elements instead. The large round rooI (diameter 45 m) lit
Irom below using uplights hovers like a UFO above the station entrance.
The rooI is perIorated by 52 round lantern lights which allow daylight to
penetrate right down to the platIorms, thereby eliminating any sense oI an
underground station. Daylight and lines oI sight have acted as important
parameters Ior creating a saIe environment. The station is a regional and
local train station with Iour tracks and two platIorms.
Bartenbach LichtLabor oI Innsbruck are responsible Ior the lighting
concept. The artistic decoration has been carried out by Kristina Matusch oI
Malm.
MaIm CentraI Station CIient: Jernhusen AB
Area: 10,000 sqm CompIeted 2010
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HyIIie Station CIient : CTP represented by Tyrns
Area: 8,500 sqm CompIeted 2010
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Malm Central Station
Hyllie Station
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green spaces. The building development envisaged is oI high density, which
makes Ior eIfcient land use. The structures oI settlement and greenery
interact so as to achieve an attractive local climate.
The plan Iacilitates lean building and the use oI renewable energy. There
is room Ior a variety oI technical installations and an overarching water plan
is part oI the scheme. The plan lays down guidelines Ior the ongoing process
in which co-ordination oI waste management is aimed Ior.

The principal land use takes the Iorm oI a mixed-use township with various
points oI emphasis. Within its precincts it is consistently proposed that
public activities be primarily accommodated on the ground storeys oI the
buildings. The attraction oI mass transit can be Iurther enhanced by making
possible an expansion oI regional and suburban train traIfc, tramways and
bus services. A close-knit street network aIIords room Ior all types oI traIfc
and creates a robust traIfc structure. In planning the street spaces, priority
has been given to pedestrians, cyclists and public transport. The mixed-use
township aIIords prospects oI a varied supply oI public services and leisure
activities.
Conscious planning oI public spaces, with storm water management, Ior
instance, highlighted as a resource, plays a vital part in the project. The mixed-
use township spells good prospects oI achieving a balance between daytime and
night-time population in the townships. The process has been accompanied by
dialogues with residents, aimed at canvassing their views on Flemingsberg.
Clients: The Municipalities oI Huddinge and Botkyrka, represented by Lena
Fyrvald and Per-Anders Framgrd.
Architect: Nyrns Arkitektkontor, represented by Sofa Westerlund, Plan-
ning Architect FPR/MSA, Henrik Storm, Planning Architect MSA, Jrgen
Astrm, Architect SAR/MSA and Nina Rydn, Landscape Architect MSA.
Streetscape. Nyrens Arkitektkontor/Davia Wiberg
Analysis.
ELABORATION OF COMPREHENSIVE PLANS FOR FLEMINGSBERG, SWEDEN
The municipalities of Huddinge and Botkyrka have been
collaborating since 2008 with Nyrns Arkitektkontor on
the elaboration of the comprehensive plan for Flemings-
berg, which has been designated a regional core in the
plan for the region. The planning proposal is based on
the idea of creating a continuous township in the form
of a mixed-use development. The mixed-use township
affords prospects of varied use which will tolerate
changes occurring with the passage of time.
The planning proposal contains an intricate, continuous green structure
which gives people living and working in the area better access to larger
Area: 5.5 square kiIometres approx.
No. workers/residents: about 35,000 / 20,000 in 2030
PIanning period/status: 2030 / consuItation document autumn
2009
Further information: http://www.nyrens.se
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Jiew of terrace houses.
JRVASTADEN -GRNLINGEN AND OTHER PRECINCTS, SOLNA CITY, SWEDEN
In 2006 Nyrns Arkitektkontor was commissioned
by Jrvastaden AB to collaborate with Solna City in
compiling supporting documentation for a detailed
development plan and design programme for the
central part of the new Jrvastaden township in
Solna. The development proposal is based on a dense
structure of multi-family dwellings surrounding a
httingly urban streetscape in the southern part of the
site. The northern half of the site consists of two and
three-storey terrace houses, link houses or semi-
detached houses.
A dense urban Iabric like Jrvastaden`s is generally more energy-eIfcient
than a scattered one, partly because this way you get shorter distances
be tween diIIerent Iunctions and a better local climate. The building
development in the township is mainly located on land developed
previously, and the greenfeld surroundings will be leIt virtually intact.
Jrvastaden will be served by the commuter trains to and Irom Ulriksdal
Station and by three diIIerent bus routes. It has been important to use the
pre-existing inIrastructure as a locomotive oI development and to go on
planning Ior an enlargement oI mass transit. Jrvastaden has pedestrian and
cycle paths running parallel to all its main thoroughIares. In particular, the
route linking the site with Ulriksdal Station has been a starting point Ior our
township development planning.
The Jrvastaden planning structure comprises a network oI streets leading
to parks, green spaces and settlement. The site borders on large, continuous
open-air recreation areas such as Jrvakilen and the Igelbcken Nature
Reserve. A new township park is planned which will oIIer a host oI inIormal
meeting points, small piazzas, precinct parks and paths linking the precincts.
The Jrvastaden clients have defned exacting requirements concerning
energy use and healthy building materials.
In a sustainable township, public spaces and axes, streets and piazzas
are places Ior meetings and interchange. In Jrvastaden, Ior this reason,
important arteries have been localised in places which are naturally
Irequented. The township includes both commercial establishments and
social, public spaces. The public places are located next to important nodes
and commercial street areas.
Jrvastaden is characterised by a varied townscape with secure play
and recreation areas and urban settings Ior Iace-to-Iace encounters. The
variegated nature oI its housing and workplaces and its proximity to
unspoiled country augur well Ior a good Iormative environment Ior rising
generations. Jrvastaden as a whole has been planned with a mixed urban
structure and with an array oI recreational and sporting amenities capable oI
developing into social meeting points.
Client: Jrvastaden AB, represented by AlI Carlsson
Architect: Nyrns Arkitektkontor, represented by Susanna Juhlin Glem-
brandt, Architect SAR/MSA, Johanna Ljungdahl, Planning Architect FPR/
MSA and Anna Frank, Landscape Architect LAR/MSA.
Area: 200,000 sqm
Number of workers/residents: about 1,100 homes,
businesses, preschooIs and a schooI
PIanning period/status: under construction since 2008
Further information: http://www.nyrens.se
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Jrvastaaen.
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Henriksaalshamnen.
Lugnetterrassen. Photo Mattias Nero
HAMMARBY SJSTAD, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN
Over the years, Nyrns Arkitektkontor has been closely
involved in the Hammarby Sjstad development, all
the way from designing several of the construction
phases to designing and planning many precincts
and landscape spaces. A few of the latest plans and
completed projects are presented here.
Right Irom the outset, Hammarby Sjstad was planned with the aim oI
spearheading ecological and environmentally-minded construction and
living. The City oI Stockholm`s Environmental Programme requires
Hammarby Sjstad to be planned and constructed on strictly eco-cyclic
principles, as a lean, environmentally appropriate township. The aim is to
make it 'twice as good as previous building development. The objectives
defned in the City oI Stockholm Environmental Programme, 'Environment
2000, include the Iollowing:
The eco-cycle is to terminate at a level as local as possible.
Consumption oI natural resources shall be minimised.
Total energy consumption is to be reduced.
Energy is to come Irom renewable sources and to be based as Iar as
possible on local sources.
Consumption oI clean water is to be reduced.
Wastewater is to be used Ior energy extraction and its nutrient salt content
restored to agricultural land.
Building materials are to be renewable or recyclable and are to have low
concentrations oI substances harmIul to health and the environment.
Solutions are to be adapted to residents` needs and be conducive to social
participation and assumption oI ecological responsibility.
Health aspects have also been gradually highlighted in the environmental
process oI developing and living up to the concept oI the healthy city. The
Ioundations oI that objective have been laid in the Iorm oI ample Iootpath
and cycle path networks which, together with the Ierry, augment physical
activity and reduce motorism. The vicinity oI Sjstaden includes built
amenities and natural resources Ior physical activity, such as Sjstadshal len,
Hammarbybacken and the Nacka reserve.
HENRIKSDALSHAMNEN
Henriksdalshamnen is Hammarby Sjstad`s latest development phase,
comprising some 800 dwelling units and premises Ior neighbourhood
services. As the result oI a parallel assignment in 2005, Nyrns Arkitektkontor
and Ersus Arkitekter together devised a fnal plan on which to base the
detailed planning work. That plan has a dense structure oI elevated precinct
courts Ior parking and a 'harbour piazza (Hamntorg) in the prime south/
west location. While this in-depth planning work was in progress Nyrns
Arkitektkontor was Iurther commissioned to design the Seniorgrden
precinct, comprising some 60 dwelling units and non-housing units Ior shops
and a restaurant.
Client: City oI Stockholm, Real Estate & TraIfc OIfce and City Planning
Administration, represented by Martin Skillbck and Jan Inghe-Hagstrm.
Architect: Nyrns Arkitektkontor, represented by Dag Cavallius,
Architect SAR/MSA, and Bengt Isling, Landscape Architect LAR/MSA,
in association with Ersus Arkitekter AB, represented by Peter Ersus,
Architect SAR/MSA.
LUGNETTERRASSEN
Lugnetterrassen is both park and piazza. The terrace is made up oI small
gardens Iacing Hammarby Sj and a jetty structure with a pergola.
The jetties oIIer nearness to the water in a Iavourable orientation. The
pergola creates a Iramework and shelter Ior the terrace area. Specially
designed soIa units provide comIortable seating.
Client: City oI Stockholm Urban Development OIfce, represented by
Kristina Menyes.
Landscape architect: Nyrns Arkitektkontor, represented by Bengt Isling,
Landscape Architect LAR/MSA.
HenriksdaIshamnen
No. residents: approx 800 homes in the whoIe township.
The whoIe township is under construction.
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Knallen precinct. Photo Max Plunger
Revet precinct. Photo Ake E.son Linaman
Snickeriet precinct. Photo Sten Jansin
Revet and Knallen precincts make up the eastern
corner of Sickla Kaj. In between them lies Sj-
stadsparterren, an elongated parkland area which,
together with its surrounding precincts, was awarded
the Swedish Association of Architects, Kasper Salin
Prize in 2005.
Revet precinct, occupying the Ierry Irontage oI Sickla Kaj, is divided
into two main buildings separated by an open court with a third, low-rise
building. The open court is supplemented by a sheltered atrium court in
REVET, KNALLEN AND SNICKERIET PRECINCTS, SWEDEN
each oI the main buildings. In the apartments, practically every room gives
onto a balcony, terrace or patio with a view oI the park and water. Shops and
a large restaurant look onto the street and quayside.
Knallen precinct in Sickla Kaj presents two diIIerent aspects. Facing
the broad Esplanade, the buildings have an appropriately urban appearance
and a two-storey socle housing shops and other non-housing premises.
Alongside the Ieeder streets and Sjstadsparterren the Iaades are notable
Ior their many bay windows and balconies, set at an angle to the waterIront.
The buildings have large, glass-walled openings between the volumes to
admit sun and daylight to the green court inside. The apartments are bright
and beautiIul, with views oI Hammarby Sj and Sickla Kanal.
Snickeriet precinct Iorms part oI the Sjstadsporten development phase
and joins up with Hammarby All to the south and in the east and west
with Ieeder streets with verdant Iorecourt areas. This precinct has rendered
Iaades and consists oI two parallel volumes oI fve or six storeys and a
retracted upper terrace storey. Most oI the apartments have windows on
both sides and open room communications, generous headroom and large
window apertures. They are compact and planned Ior adaptability to
diIIerent Iorms oI living.
PROJECT ORGANISATION
Revet precinct: Client: NCC, represented by Bjrn Stenqvist and Mats
Alvtegen.
Architect: Nyrns Arkitektkontor AB, represented by Johan Nyrn,
Architect SAR/MSA, and Bengt Isling, Landscape Architect LAR/MSA.
Knallen precinct: Client: Stockholmshem AB, represented by Bengt Kvist
and Magnus Petersson.
Architect: Nyrns Arkitektkontor AB, represented by Dag Cavallius,
Architect SAR/MSA, and Bengt Isling, Landscape Architect LAR/MSA.
Snickeriet precinct: Client Ior Snickeriet precinct: Svenska Bostder,
represented by LeiI Bergman.
Architect Ior Snickeriet precinct: Nyrns Arkitektkontor AB, represented
by Kerstin Bernow, Architect SAR/MSA, and Magdalena Franciskovic,
Landscape Architect LAR/MSA.
Revet precinct contains 60 dweIIing units, KnaIIen precinct
182 dweIIing units and Snickeriet precinct 211 dweIIing
units.
The precincts were compIeted and ready for occupation
2002-2006.
Further information: http://www.nyrens.se
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AVALON HOTEL, GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN
The local plans and guidelines for what eventually
became the Avalon Hotel were drawn up in close
co-operation with the Gothenburg City Planning
Ofhce. Semrn & Mnsson were involved throughout
the process. From the very outset the aim was to
create an extrovert, experimental building combining
the revivihcation of central Gothenburg with an
expressive exterior.
The asymmetry oI the cone-shaped plot was picked up and reiterated
throughout the hotel by a crooked line, both inside and out. Sensuous
detailing, undulating wooden walls and well-thought-out Iurnishings add up
to an immersive experience which is provocative yet fts in with its sur-
roundings. The design bears the imprint oI energy awareness, the pool Ior
example being heated by waste heat Irom the hotel kitchen Ireezers.
The result is a hotel with 101 rooms, including a top class restaurant
and Iantastic penthouse suite, earning its place in the international Design
Hotels association.
In addition, the building has been nominated Ior the Kasper Salin Prize
and the European Mies van der Rohe Prize as well as winning the
2008 Per and Alma Olsson Fund Ior Good Architecture award. The success
and experience earned Irom Avalon`s infll development is oI great value to
us in other projects both domestic and abroad.
CIient: Bygg-Gta Gteborg AB, represented by Lennart
Persson and WiIIy Arnens
HoteI operator: Svenska Resto AB, represented by Torbjrn
Johansson.
Architect: Semrn & Mnsson AB, represented by Magnus
Mnsson - Iead architect , Christopher KihIberg - interior
architect, Titti Hosa, architect.
No. rooms: 101, TotaI area: 5,960 sqm BTA approx. (incIuding
1,200 sqm rebuiId)
Further information: www.semren-mansson.se
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KUNGSPORTSAVENYN, GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN
Gothenburg is going through a dynamic period of de-
velopment and the infrastructural investments now in
progress will bring great changes to the city's central
districts. Semrn & Mnsson were invited to discuss
the future of the city's iconic main shopping street,
Kungsportsavenyn and its surrounding areas.
Our analysis shows the basic structure oI Gothenburg to be the circle Ior-
med by joining together the Gta Tunnel, the so called events stretch and the
Nya Alln.
The length oI Kungsportsavenyn (the Avenue) Irom the Opera to Gta-
platsen is the city`s obvious central axis. These parts oI the city are in need
CIient: WaIIenstam, City of Gteborg, Gteborg Department
of Urban PIanning and Design
Architect: Semrn & Mnsson AB, Magnus Mnsson - Iead
architect, Andrea HuIting Gustafson - architect, AdeIina
Mehra - architect, Jakob rtendahI, achitect
Scheme submitted: 2004
Gross area: 100,000 sqm approx.
www.semren-mansson.se
oI a partial redefnition or Iurther development. In the case oI Kungsports-
avenyn this is the ideal moment Ior action, given the palpable risks oI the
city`s showpiece street going into decline. The proposal aims to preserve the
original, traditional and Iamiliar, while at the same time showing courage,
capacity Ior action and soundness oI judgement in relation to the new and
unknown.
First and Ioremost, we recommend that tram traIfc be transIerred to a
parallel street so as to make more room Ior Kungsportsavenyn and to reduce
the barrier eIIect. The space liberated will enable pavement caIs to move
out Irom the building Ironts, so that other activity will no longer be obstruc-
ted by them. We indicate several situations where the commercial space can
be increased and also where infll housing development is Ieasible. In addi-
tion, we propose that Kungsportsavenyn be given several diIIerent modes
oI lighting to consolidate its position in the city and to depict various events
and occurrences taking place.
It is our belieI that well-considered infll development and city planning
leads to an energy-eIfcient city centre, as highlighted in our proposal.
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CAOFEIDIAN INTERNATIONAL DEEP GREEN ECOCITY, CHINA
A new ecological city in the Tangshan region 250
kilometres East of Beijing. About 1-1.5 million
people are expected to live in the city in a long
term perspective. The project is supported by
both the Chinese and Swedish governments, and
especially leaders at the ministries and Hebei
provincial government. With the close involvement
of the Tangshan municipal government, the Swedish
Embassy and CENTEC, Caofeidian New District and
Caofeidian Eco-City, and with the contribution of
Chinese consultants and the innovative hard work
of Sweco's team, a concrete plan for a world-class
Eco-City was born. Sweco has performed overall
conceptual planning as well as landscape design and
building design.
The new EcoCity will have an area oI 150 square kilometres with a frst
development phase oI 30 square kilometres. A major deep harbour and an
industrial area is also planned in connection to the city. The goal oI the
project is to build a both climate-neutral and attractive city, mainly based on
a combination and adaptation oI Swedish innovative examples on diIIerent
planning levels. Sweco is also designing a Sustainability Centre including
exhibitions oI sustainable development ideas and city development, training,
Iacilities, R&D and interactive demonstration equipment Ior environmental
technology.
CaoIeidian`s Eco-Cycle Model proposes an integrated management oI
water, energy, waste and materials. The plan strives to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions, manage Iresh water in a sustainable way, and increase recycling/
recovery by connecting water, energy and waste systems. Connected closed-
loop systems Ior industrial, agricultural and urban areas are also envisioned.
A medium and long-term economic beneft is expected especially due to the
eIIective resource and energy recovery.
The climate-neutral energy systems are based on achieving the
lowest possible energy demand through construction oI energy-eIfcient
buildings and systems. Local renewable power production is based mainly
on windmills and waste incineration, with the option oI increasing other
renewable energy sources such as solar cells and tidal energy.
The resources management centre (RMC) is a demonstration area Ior the
Eco-Cycle Model and Iunctions as the 'heart oI CaoIeidian`s inIrastructure,
supplying its public utilities through various treatment plants. These plants
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are organized and linked to improve resource recovery eIfciency. The
recommended location Ior the RMC is north oI the new Ireshwater channel in
the transition zone between CaoIeidian and the surrounding agricultural felds.
The EcoCity has a compact and varied mixed-use structure. DiIIerent
city structures are interwoven to create an inspiring whole. The urban nodes
serve as centres Ior the city-districts and should be given distinct urban
profles such as innovation, trade, science and sports. The structure supports
the development oI sustainable transportation modes with priority Ior
walking, bicycling and public transportation. The green and blue structure
is an integral part oI the public space.
Density varies across the Eco-City, with a certain degree oI compactness
as an overall Ieature. Mixed-use is a major Ieature, and is expressed as a
combination oI housing, workplaces and services. A wide range oI urban
districts with diIIerent characters are interwoven across the city to create an
appealing mix. Each district is served by a mixed-use node, a conceived oI
as distinct areas, each with its own identity.
The city has a general structure that allows rapid or slow expansion
but also diIIerent ways oI varying the subdivision and urban design oI
individual blocks. The overall orthogonal structure oI the EcoCity oIIers a
basis Ior an infnite variety oI urban design and architectural solutions.
This integrated urban structure contributes to quality oI liIe, liveability,
social security, inclusion and health.
Architect: Sweco in StockhoIm, MaIm, Gothenburg and
FaIun
CIient: Administrative Committee of Tangshan Caofeidian
Industry Zone
Area: 150 square kiIometres with a rst deveIopment phase
of 30 square kiIometres
Size: a city for bout 1-1.5 miIIion peopIe
Year: Ongoing project
www.swecogroup.com/cao
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Conceptual plan for a new urban area. According to the
master plan, Dongtuo area is going to contain the admi-
nistrative functions of Hangu, as well as the new busi-
ness ofhce area. By 2020, Dongtuo will accommodate
a major part of the population growth from the existing
120,000 to the planned 250,000 for the Hangu city area.
Development of Dongtuo area is also the hrst step of
transformation of salt production areas into an urban
built environment. It sets new standards, a new fram-
ework and new rules for the transformation of this area.
Based on sustainable development principles, the plan suggests an integra-
ted transportation, greenery and public Iacility belt to Iorm an innovation
valley that connects the old city to the tourism development at the seasho-
re, so that the planned Dongtuo area will act as the urban innovation engine
Ior the development oI Hangu New City.
The project included a centrally situated exhibition hall oI 15,000 square
meters.
TIANJIN HANGU DONGTUO AREA, CHINA
Architect: Sweco in MaIm, Copenhagen, StockhoIm and
Shanghai
CIient: Tianjin ReaI Estate DeveIopment and Management
Group
Land area: 10.8 square kiIometres
www.sweco.se/arch
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SWEDISH PAVILION FOR EXPO 2010, SHANGHAI, CHINA
The Swedish pavilion is designed by Sweco and
expresses the Swedish sustainable approach to
innovation. The theme of rural and urban interaction
has also been an important concept for the design.
The exhibition displays the Swedish contribution to
the World Expo and the theme of Better City, Better
Life and visualizes the essence and theme 'Spirit of
Innovation."
Sustainable architecture and innovations are important. The Swedish
approach to sustainability is a holistic perspective where the environment
and social and economic aspects must be considered as key ingredients.
The 3,000 square metre pavilion contains a 1,500 square metre
exhibition hall and an equal area oI conIerence Iacilities, administration
oIfce, coIIee shop, boutique, kitchen and back oI house Iunctions.
SOME FEATURES OF THE PAVILION:
A large wooden construction oI environmentally certifed glue laminated
timber that makes up the entrance to the Swedish pavilion; a special heat
refective paint on perIorated steel panels that will shade the walls oI the
building; systems that minimise energy and water consumption; a special
lighting concept in which high quality, low-energy lighting is used to
illuminate both the interior and exterior; an advanced system Ior water
purifcation; a good indoor climate with technology Ior cooling, ventilation
and dehumidifcation systems, all oI which are need-regulated.
The pavilion structure refects a sustainability perspective in that it can
be easily moved and reused in another location in China.
Architecture and engineering consuItant:
Sweco through a team Ied by project Ieader Christer Sten-
mark and architect Johannes TII.
Structure: Sweco
Systems: Sweco
CIient: The Swedish Committee for Expo 2010.
Area: 3,000 sqm
www.swecogroup.com/en/expo2010
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The National Museum is the place where Tanzanian
cultural heritage is exhibited. The House of Culture is
the connecting vehicle where contemporary Tanzanian
culture comes spectacularly alive. It is a meeting point,
where Tanzanian culture is collected, displayed and
celebrated, a living culture with dance, story-telling,
music, art, and cooking traditions. Indoor and outdoor
spaces how together seamlessly, designed to support
all of these activities.
The House oI Culture comprises a perIormance theatre, art gallery,
commercially viable multi-media centre, a children`s art studio, workshop
areas, restaurants, improved storage, working Iacilities, and exhibition
spaces. The main target user group is the community in general but more
specifcally children, youth and tourists.
The AIrican architectural tradition oI integration between nature and
building is Iundamental. Prominent existing/heritage buildings and mature
trees are Iully embraced, and the landscaped gardens now Iully integrated.
The House oI Culture and National Museum has been craIted by all parties
involved to celebrate a proud and deep National culture committed to the
environment, community, economy, innovation, tradition, health, saIety, and
perIormance arts.
It is unique globally to integrate a House oI Culture with an existing
National Museum to provide the means and technology to connect
Tanzania`s culture not only with its people but also with the rest oI the
World. The Client collaboration process was started in 2003. In order to
build the National Museum and House oI Culture a contract Ior Consultant
Services and Supervision was signed on 19 May 2006 between the Client
HOUSE OF CULTURE, DAR ES SALAAM, TANZANIA
(The National Museum oI Tanzania) and Tengbom Michelsen, leading the
Swedish/Tanzanian consultant team. The journey towards a design brieI was
a Iully collaborative exercise with a Clients Advisory Board and ReIerence
group guiding the process.
The buildings in the Iormer Botanical garden have been designed to catch
the monsoon breezes Irom the Indian Ocean, through the verandas then
cross-ventilating the buildings via perIorated screen walls and shading
louver panels. Local materials add to the sustainability.
At ground foor and over larger open areas steel-Iramed timber panels
give a warm and soIter character. RooI overhangs and louvered screens
provide additional shading. Gently sloping ventilated rooIs direct rainwater
towards the garden where gutters and pipes lead into sunken storage tanks.
The theatre auditorium is a dominant space, serving 500 people seated
in graded stalls and balconies. Auditorium walls towards the veranda are
perIorated with conic holes providing cross ventilation. Operable screen
shutters control acoustic and climatic eIIect. The theatre is Iully equipped
with modern theatrical, lighting, acoustic, and recording Iacilities as a
commercial asset Ior the community.
CIient: NationaI museum Tanzania
Design team Ieaders: Inger Thede, Architect SAR/MSA,
Tengbom Chazi Rwakanadi, Project Architect Norman &
Dawbarn
Quantity Surveyor: Matawana ConsuIting Group (T) Ltd
StructuraI Engineers: AquoIa Ltd (T)
MechanicaI and EIectricaI Engineers: EIectripIan (T) Ltd
Location: BotanicaI Garden, Dar es SaIaam, Tanzania
CIimate: TropicaI humid
Site area: 162 ha
BuiIt area: 7,400 sqm, (4,453 renovated existing area, 2,853
new buiIt area)
No of empIoyees: 100-150
No of visitors: 40,000 (2004/5)
Construction: 2007-2010
Donor: Sida
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One of the important parts of Hammarby Sjstad is the
Hammarby Grd residential area with about 1,000 units,
retail, ofhces etc.
In 1999 Tengbom/Michelsen was shortlisted by Stockholm City Ior a
master plan competition to redevelop the area oI Hammarby Grd Irom an
industrial estate to an attractive and sustainable urban environment. AIter
winning the competition Tengbom also designed the buildings Ior fve
oI the ten developers involved in the area. This included more than three
blocks including approximately 500 apartments, retail units, a nursery and
a restaurant.
The area is a Iormer industrial and harbour site with a new inlet dock
Iorming an open site Ior the new dwellings. The elliptical central park is
surrounded by town houses and the streets are located to reach out towards
the water. This is done in order to create places to meet, by the water as
well as in the parks and across the blocks. Building heights vary Irom eight
stories towards the waterIront, seven stories Iacing the quayside and fve
stories Iacing the park. All apartments have a view oI the water and the
HAMMARBY GRD RESIDENTIAL AREA, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN
park. The ground level is used Ior retail, restaurants, caIs, daycare and
other communal services. Even though the development has a high density
it still maintains a good atmosphere and pleasant environment oI urban
standard and with high architectural qualities.
Hammarby Grd has, like other parts oI Hammarby Sjstad, a modern,
semi-open, block-based structure, which is a combination oI the closed,
traditional inner city structure and the more modernistic and open structure.
The inner city street dimensions, block sizes, building heights, density and
Iunctionality mix are developed and integrated with a new openness, water-
Iront views, green areas and sunlight.
Limited building depths, recessed penthouse fats, maisonettes, large
balconies and terraces, big windows, fat rooIs and light-coloured rendering
on water-Iacing Iaades embody diIIerent applications oI a modernistic
architectural approach, as does the emphasis on durable materials such as
glass, wood, steel and stone. The structure organizes blocks in enclaves
where blocks are designed to compose in 'Iamily Iriendly groups.
CIient: StockhoIms Stadsbyggnadskontor, Veidekke Bostad,
Riksbyggen, Byggnadsrman WaIIin AB.
Architect: Tengbom
Area: 50,000 sqm
Number of apartments: 500 (incIuding retaiI, nursery and
ofces)
Design team Ieaders: Inger Thede, Bengt Rnnhedh, CeciIia
HoImstrm, SteIIan FryxeII
Location: StockhoIm
Year of Commission: 2000-2008
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NORDICA OSTRAVA, CZECH REPUBLIC
The Nordica Ofhce Building is situated in the centre
of Ostrava which is the third largest city in the Czech
Republic.
The seven-storey building oIIers approximately 11,500 sqm oI prime oIfce
space, including a rooI terrace with a large glass penthouse and 2000 sqm oI
street level retail space and restaurant Iacilities. The building also includes
a two-storey basement car park with 130 spaces. A small landscaped plaza
has been created directly outside the entrance. The project was the frst
building in the country to be certifed according to the energy eIfciency
demands oI the European Union`s Green Building Programme (The
European Commission Award). The project won 1st prize in the competition
'Czech energy eIfcient and environmental project 2008 and was also
named (by Colliers International) as a top-ten Czech oIfce building Ior its
prestige status, address, and possibilities oI use.
The Nordica Ostrava oIfce building is an energy-eIfcient building that
is managed by sophisticated heating and cooling system and recycles waste
heat Irom a local steel plant through the city`s district heating system. The
building provides healthy indoor oIfce environments, is Iunctional, fexible
and is designed Ior a working environment oI high quality. The development
has contributed toward urban redevelopment and sustainable urban planning
by restoring and reusing a contaminated brownfeld site and by being situa-
ted in central part oI the City. The Nordica project has also promoted local
economic development by creating jobs during construction and by bringing
companies and long-term oIfce jobs to central Ostrava. Environmental
impacts were minimised during construction and all construction waste was
sorted on site and recycled where possible. Environmentally responsible
construction materials such as non-toxic substances, materials with recycled
content and certifed timber were used on project.
Our participation started with work on urban planning, continued with
building design including interior design and signage. We also participated
in landscape design and outdoor lighting design.
CIient: Skanska Property CZ
Project architect: Tengbom, Ivan Krejci
Area: 11,500 sqm
Number of empIoyees: 1,000
Year of Commission: 2007-2009
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SINO SWEDISH ECO CITY, TAIHU NEW TOWN, CHINA
After an introduction by the Swedish Consul General
in Shanghai in late-2009, Tengbom Stockholm won a
commission to design 2.4 square kilometres of the 150
square kilometre Taihu New Town in Wuxi City as a
hagship and exemplary Eco-City.
The site will have a strong Chinese-Swedish theme and be named 'The
Wuxi Sino-Swedish Eco-City. Concurrently a working group was set up to
identiIy collaborative projects and companies to get involved between the
Wuxi and Swedish Governments, especially clean-tech solutions to be used
within the new project. The working group comprised oIfcials Irom the
Wuxi New City Authority, the Swedish Trade Department, and The City oI
Sdertlje Authority; Sdertlje is a twin city to Wuxi.
Tengbom designed the 2.4 sq km Sustainable City Master Plan and
30 ha Iocus area. The work includes developing a new environmental
programme Ior the Iocus area relative to the entire 150 square kilometres
and also includes Eco Index guidelines Ior the City and mixed use block
development. Energy consumption, waste management, water preservation,
traIfc and transport, and sustainable building design systems Ieature in
a new Eco City Model developed by the team specifcally Ior the Wuxi
project. The Master Plan and zoning plans include mainly residential
and commercial uses but also an extensive cultural area in which it is
hoped to relocate the Swedish Expo pavilion in 2011, and a Iully fedged
Olympic sports Iacility to the south oI the site. A new transportation and
smart utilities network connects the site with the city and itselI. Existing
green belted canals, preserved wetland, urban parks, and Iamily-Iriendly
residential blocks also connect the scheme together and maintain the rich
biodiversity oI the region and natural heritage oI the Iamous Taihu Lake,
located to the south oI the area.
CIient: Wuxi MunicipaI PeopIes Government
Architect: Tengbom
LocaI architect: LocaI Design Institute: UDG Shanghai
Engineers: F StockhoIm
Design team Ieaders: Jeremy Thompson, SteIIan FryxeII,
Anna Kerr
Area and number of residents: Size 2.4 square kiIometres
with 30,000 residents.
Status: DetaiI pIanning 2009-2010. On-going.
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DIE SEESTADT WIENS, VIENNA, AUSTRIA
TOVATT ARCHI TECTS & PL ANNERS AB
CIient, "Seestadt Wiens": Wien 3420 AG, a joint venture company owned by: BundesimmobiIienGeseIIschaft/BIG www.big.at. Die
Wirtschaftsagentur Wien www.wirtschaftsagentur.at Site area, 240 ha. 800,000 sqm housing by compIetion (2028). 1,100,000 sqm
commerciaI, retaiI and education/research by compIetion (2028). Construction start infrastructure, 2008, residentiaI/pubIic functions,
2011. First stage in operation, 2013.
The 'Seestadt Wiens" (Vienna Lake City) is regarded
as one of Austria's largest and most important
urban development areas of this decade, expected
to strengthen the Vienna- Bratislava axis into an
international point of attraction and hub for economy,
science and research in the cross-border CENTROPE
region.
Tovatt Architects and Planners won the international competition in 2006
Iollowed by a comprehensive commission to refne the urban design,
including issues such as strategies Ior implementation, content and likewise.
The urban design Ior the 'Seestadt Wiens creates a relatively dense
environment; it is a structure built up oI large-scale civic gestures coupled
with small and spontaneous spatial surprises. A central park at the Iocal
point oI the plan connects and links smaller squares and public open spaces
into a meandering net, providing a saIe and clear way oI movements. A
generous ring-road (Ringstrasse) and radial connections give the masterplan
its main elements oI structure. The radial streets pick up all possible streets
and paths in the existing developments adjacent to the new development
area.
The 'Seestadt Wiens will be highly connected by public transport: The
underground line U2 is already in construction and the frst station within
the area will be opened already in 2013. The main station, in the north oI the
area will be opened a Iew years later. A high-speed train (S80), connecting
Vienna central and Bratislava will be opened in 2018 and the 'Seestadt
Wiens will become the mediating node between the two neighbour cities.
Furthermore, two tram lines will serve the area, connecting local and
adjacent neighbourhoods to the Seestadt train and underground stations.
The 'Seestadt Wiens prioritizes pedestrian and cycling traIfc; public
spaces, parks and well-proportioned street sections create a clear, legible
and dense network oI car-Iree routes.
The Seestadt will become a new urban centre within a large catchment
area north oI the Danube river; existing small settlements and villages will
tie into this development at all levels. The 'Seestadt Wiens will provide
premises Ior work and education in the region oI 1 million square meter
gross area. At least 8,000 apartments will be provided in the initial stages
oI the implementation. Nearly 50,000 people will live and work here by the
completion at the end oI the next decade.
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The EcoEnergyWTE plant in Donetsk, Ukraine, is a
pilot project for new clean-tech energy support and
waste processing in Eastern Europe.
Today the main part oI Ukraine`s household waste is deposited on landflls,
thereby causing several environmental problems like production oI methane
gas and leakage oI heavy metals and dioxin into the ground water.
The WTE plant takes advantage oI the energy in the waste by using it
as Iuel in a combined power- and heating plant. Besides solving the waste
problem in the city oI Donetsk, with about 1,1 million inhabitants, it also
produces enough energy to support fve city districts with all their hot tap
water and halI oI their heating supply.
THE CONCEPT
Modern powerplants are large-scale constructions with a signifcant visual
impact on the site. Regardless iI they are situated in urban or rural contexts,
these buildings demand diIIerent visual solutions to become a positive Iactor
in the neighbourhood.
The new WTE Power Plant in Donetsk will look like no other. The Iunc-
tional boxes oI the power plant are enIolded in a semi-transparent Iacetted
'skin oI light aluminium, metal mesh and glass. Solar panels are mounted
on upper parts oI the eastern, western and southern Iacade. Like a giant
shimmering beetle or a bright soap bubble, it sits on the surrounding felds
and ponds. The overall impression is clean, Iriendly and slightly Iuturistic.
The building is design by URBAN DESIGN, a young Swedish architec-
ture oIfce that aims Ior a high architectonic level that combines technologi-
cal competence with resource-eIIective constructions.
THE LANDSCAPE
In Donetsk, the Iertile topsoil oI the site is moved to the side, creating
distinct grass-covered earth-works that separate the plant area Irom the
surrounding green land. The earth-works also separate the 'messy areas
WTE (WASTE-TO-ENERGY) POWER PLANT, DONETSK, UKRAINE
around the plant Irom the neighbouring felds and roads. Such Iunctions as
staII canteen, gatehouse, gym and staII rooms are also accommodated in the
sloping embankments.
Finding inspiration in the traditional Ukraine Iarming land, the imme-
diate surroundings are landscaped with elongated ponds (Ior leakage water)
and stretches oI energy Iorests. The earth-works that separates the lay-down
and transport areas Irom the landscape should be sown with grass and wild
fowers. The inside is more plain and simple with asphalt on the roadways
and reinIorced grass Ior the lay-down areas, but the grass oI the sloping
walls surrounding it will add greenery to the workspace.
CIient: Eco Energy Scandinavia AB Site area: Ca. 10 acres (ca 50,000 sqm). BuiIding area: Footprint ca. 10,500 sqm. BuiIding
voIume: Ca. 270.000 cubic metre. Power output: 100 MW. Status: PIanning phase. Bidding process starts November 2010.
Construction works (foundation) wiII start in the spring of 2011. F
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part in the competition, and the jury`s frst prize was shared between White
and WSP Finland.
White`s idea is to create a distinct central point, a densifed urban
core, with a potential Ior stimulating movement and social contact, with a
judiciously balanced, integrated structure oI settlement and landscape. A
new piazza, a higher, 12-storey tower block and a new House oI Culture
Park are included in White`s scheme, but so too is heavy emphasis on public
transport, including a tramway to Vaasa. The Smedsby oI tomorrow is being
built on sustainability in all dimensions ecological, social and technical.
White`s Sara Grahn is a ProIessor oI Sustainable Design and is
overseeing the whole design, which is being evolved in collaboration with
White`s environmental experts. The entire area is to be made climate
neutral, i.e. will not emit more carbon dioxide than it receives. New
buildings are to be constructed to the Passive House Standard, using
the quintessentially Finnish raw material wood. A geothermal heating
installation is proposed, wind power will provide a complement at chosen
points, and all alterations will conIorm to the Green Building Standard.
SuccessIul urban planning is not a project but a process, with driving
Iorces and impediments all oI its own. White`s proposal points towards
an overarching structure, using tools which can provide guidance, and be
sustainable Ior a long time to come.
With a progressive new detailed area development
plan, an entire community can make the move from the
age of gasoline to a more sustainable future. A good
example of this can be seen in Korsholm (Mustasaari),
Finland, where White emerged as winner of a hercely
fought international competition for creating a coherent
and upgraded urban nucleus characterised by sustain-
ability in all dimensions. An old community is being
given a modern form through White's architecture and
environmental expertise.
Korsholm is a small community with just over 18,000 residents, a little to
the northeast oI Vaasa in Finland. Smedsby, the central locality, is sparsely
populated and incoherent, having been traversed Ior decades past by a
national highway. Construction oI a bypass now presents the opportunity oI
amalgamating the two halves and renewing their urban quality.
The competition brieI was to present innovative ideas on which to base a
new, fexible detailed area development plan. No Iewer than 54 teams took
KORSHOLM, FINLAND
CIient: MunicipaIity of KorshoIm (Mustasaari)
White's competence: architecture, urban deveIopment,
environment and visuaIisation
Size/area: 130,000 sqm new township
Project start/compIetion: 2009-2030
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NORRA KAJEN, SUNDSVALL, SWEDEN
The aim in Sundsvall is to achieve the best sea-front
housing in the Nordic countries, in an ecological, long-
term and sustainable district of Norra Kajen ('North
Quayside"). White is helping to make this bright green
vision come true.
For some years now, the Municipality oI Sundsvall has been engaged
in a very ambitious task with a distinct, high-level environmental
profle. The Norra Kajen development scheme, in partnership with the
Norrlandspojkarna real estate company, is a major part oI the municipal
eIIort to develop the city.
White won the architecture competition in the heat oI opposition Irom
some oI the leading Nordic practices. By proposing a new traIfc structure
whereby through traIfc is channelled round the city, we were able to devise
a scheme which broadened the picture oI tomorrow`s Sundsvall, one oI the
key moves being to transIer incoming traIfc Irom the present E4 highway to
HeIIners All, which passes through the new township.
In this way Norra Kajen will become a new township, and not just a
housing area on the immediate outskirts which one drives past in order to
reach the centre oI Sundsvall.
Ongoing work is giving the Municipality oI Sundsvall opportunities
oI infll urban development in a very attractive location and the chance
oI contributing towards sustainable development. The cogently holistic
approach is enabling environmental sights to be aimed higher still. The
vision is to create Sweden`s frst township with a selI-contained energy
system.
Green stretches are linked together with green spaces, and on rooIs
and Iaades green plants grow which puriIy the air. This in turn improves
water fows, giving us a better climate Ior man and beast alike. The heat
pumps beneft Irom the Sundsvall Fjord (SundsvallsIjrden), the buildings
have recycling systems and electricity is generated by solar panels and
combustion oI biogas.
CIient: Norra Kajen ExpIoaterings AB
White's competences: architecture, Iandscaping, environ-
ment, buiIding conservation
Project commencement/compIetion: 2008-2020
Size/area: 360,000 sqm gross oor area
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VLLINGBY CITY, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN
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CIient: Svenska Bostder White's competences: architecture, urban pIanning, Iandscaping, environment, design. Project
Start/compIetion: 2001-2010. Size/area: 100,000 sqm gross oor area.
The project was rewarded the Sveriges Arkitekter PIanning Prize in 2006.
The classic Vllingby Centrum has been transformed
into an urbane Vllingby City. White oversaw the
bal ancing of old and new - an energetic package
solution with a distinct environmental prohle.
Following its inauguration in 1954, Vllingby Centrum was widely
emulated, both in Sweden and abroad. HalI a century`s wear and tear, plus
relentlessly stiIIening competition, led to a necessary renewal. Vllingby
City has now been given a comprehensive IaceliIt, with White as the lead
planning architect.
The challenge lay in striking the right balance between the original and
the new in an urban centre oI national heritage conservation interest. Two
parallel commissions were carried out, using a wide-ranging competence in
urban development, commerce and housing. White`s entry was selected in
both cases. Through our solution the original structure oI open streets and
piazzas was made the basis oI the Iurther expansion oI commerce, parking
Iacilities and housing.
The unique Iactor here is the process oI consensus and consensual
vision which secured the qualities oI implementation. With all interests
represented, a sustainable urban development has been achieved.
Commercial, environmental and heritage-related requirements have been
reconciled in an attractive wholeness.
Renovating Ior the most part, instead oI demolishing and building anew,
was interesting not only architecturally but also Irom the viewpoint oI
husbanding natural resources. On White`s initiative, a geothermal Iacility
was created which is the largest in northern Europe. Beneath one oI the
department stores there are a total oI 27 km oI drilling holes. In addition,
waste Irom shops and restaurants is converted into new energy.
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CIient/marina operator/deveIoper: Viamare Promarina Management AB Architect: YAJ Architects AB, Architects SAR/MSA
Jonas Nyberg and YIva Lindstedt, www.yaj.se TotaI on-shore area: 7,700 sqm approx. TotaI water area: 16,200 sqm approx., rising
to some 20,000 sqm in a possibIe second stage. TotaI buiIt area: 660 sqm approx.
THE MARIEFRED GUEST MARINA, SWEDEN
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Under YAJ Architects' direction, the Mariefred Marina is
to undergo development with an emphasis on sustaina -
bility. The quai facing Gripsholm Castle - at present
a gravelled car park - is to be developed stage by
stage with modern warehouse buildings, a quayside
promenade, landing stages and a paved piazza, all
of which combined will link the township with Lake
Mlaren. In addition to providing guest harbour
facilities, the warehouse buildings will house marine
supplies, aquatic sports businesses, delicatessen
shops, cafs and restaurants.
The wooden town oI MarieIred, 70 km Irom Stockholm by road, reverberates
to the wingbeats oI history. Its marina is located right in between
Gripsholm Castle, Iounded in 1537 by King Gustav Vasa, and Gripsholms
Vrdshus, a hostelry dating Irom 1610 and today the home ground oI the
Swedish National CheI Team. The grounds oI Gripsholm Castle directly
adjoin the western end oI the marina. The marina area is traversed by
a narrow-gauge historic railway which operates during the summer season
and at certain holidays. The immediate continuation oI the marina is the
steamboat quai, where the Mlaren steamer S/S MarieIred has been linking
MarieIred to Stockholm by water ever since 1903.
SUSTAINABLE URBAN DEVELOPMENT
The marina development will boost the entire locality as a tourist destination,
and in that sense it`s also an example oI regional development. The intention
is Ior the marina`s architectureto be attractive in itselI and, coupled with
the content and response oI the complex, to create new reasons Ior visiting
MarieIred. The architecture oI the complex is attuned to the setting and,
moreover, is to highlight the qualities oI the immediate context. The
development is modern, albeit soIt-spoken, but takes its point oI departure
in historic lengths oI street and vistas, traditional settlement typologies and
traditional building materials and surIace fnishes.
To ensure as comprehensive a body oI supporting documentation as
possible Ior the planning work, YAJ Architects have worked in dialogue
with the parties involved, such as the Municipality oI Strngns, the general
public in MarieIred, representatives oI the local business community and the
Gripsholm Castle administration. The marina is served by public transport
train, bus and boat, and its services are to include bicycle rentals. Through its
design and content the marina complex addresses visitors oI all ages, and all
parts oI it are to be wheelchair accessible. Sustainable building materials will
be used. Heating and hot water will be supplied by means oI solar panels.
Hot wastewater will be heat-exchanger processed. The marina will provide
a waste pre-separation Iacility Ior marina guests, other visitors and business
entrepreneurs within the complex, plus suction evacuation oI boat toilets Ior
marina guests. The marina operator collaborates with the Keep Sweden Tidy
Foundation and is aiming Ior the international blue Flag eco-label.
TIMETABLE
YAJ Architects made the concept design, commissioned by Viamare
promarina Management AB, in the autumn oI 2008. A contract between
the Municipality oI Strngns and Promarina was signed in February
2009. Current project phase: planning phase. Planning and construction:
construction will proceed in three stages.

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Stage 2: Preliminary sketch oI local area development plan (see illustration)
Client: Stockholm City Planning Administration
Parallel sketch Ior 100 dwelling units divided between two properties:
Client: Skanska Nya Hem, represented by Johan GraI
Architect: AWL Arkitekter AB, represented by Bertil Molin
FURTHER INFORMATION:
www.awlark.se
www.stockholm.se/norradjurgardsstaden
STOCKHOLM ROYAL SEAPORT (NORRA DJURGRDSSTADEN), SWEDEN
Aerial view of Stockholm with the environmental profile :one in front ana the profects by AWL markea
Proposal for two apartment blocks in the secona stage Norra Dfurgrasstaaen
for Skanska Nya Hem. Ongoing parallell commission.
- Stage 1: precinct 5, 64 apartments, buiIding start pIanned for 2010, and precinct 6, 82 apartments, buiIding start pIanned for 2010.
- Stage 2: 100 dweIIing units divided between two properties and totaIIing some 10,000 sqm.
- TotaI size of the Norra Djurgrdsstaden urban deveIopment project: 10,000 homes and 30,000 workpIaces.
WL arkitekter is planning housing for a better climate
in the Stockholm Royal Seaport (Norra Djurgrdsstaden),
the new Stockholm environmental prohle zone that forms
part of the Clinton Foundation programme entitled 'The
Climate Positive Development."
The project is concerned with sustainable urban development on Iormer
industrial land.
In Stage 1 West AWL is designing Ior JM AB two apartment blocks
totalling 164 dwelling units.
In Stage 2 AWL has carried out a preliminary study Ior a detailed area
development plan and typology, commissioned by the Stockholm City
Planning Administration. AWL has also been commissioned by Skanska
Nya Hem to present, in a parallel sketch, two apartment buildings totalling
100 dwelling units and with a high environmental profle. The buildings,
located on the north shore oI Husarviken, opposite the National City Park,
are to limit specifc energy consumption to a level close to the Swedish
Passive House Standard and are also to produce, locally within the property,
the equivalent oI 30 oI the operating requirement.
Other environmentally profled AWL projects (see markings on the aeriel
view): AWL is designing 72 apartments in multi-Iamily passive houses in
Blackeberg, has parallel assignments Ior sustainable renewal and urban
development oI the Tullgrden 2 precinct, oIfce premises at Svea Artilleri
(in the Nedre Grdet district) Ior Green Building Certifcation, and a scheme
Ior sustainable urban development in Hgersten, Stockholm.
Stage 1: Client: JM AB, represented by Allan Rasmussen and Gunnar
Landing. Architect: AWL Arkitekter AB, represented by OloI Lotstrm
(lead architect), Lars Werner (partially responsible, precinct 5), James
Martin (partially responsible, precinct 6)
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VASAGATAN 7, RESHAPED OFFICE BUILDING, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN
The central parts of Stockholm are currently
undergoing an extensive redevelopment overseen by
the City of Stockholm, one of the most important of
these areas being the central 'cross" formed by the
intersection of Vasagatan and Klarabergsgatan.
Vasagatan 7 is right next to the 'cross. The building contains oIfces,
shops and restaurants and has now been rebuilt and given a new, modern
makeover and new technology, based on Green Building. In addition, the
building is now LEED-certifed a Swedish frst.
The top management oI the property owner, Vasakronan, have resolved
to pursue energy eIfciency improvements in their property stock, aimed at
reducing emissions oI greenhouse gases, other environmental impact and
their own energy costs. Energy consumption has now been reduced by more
than halI. Design was introduced at an early stage, meaning that soIt Iactors
like at-homeness and work environment are also being implemented.
What used to be a massively Iaceless building has now been transIormed
into a modern edifce oI glass and steel. The heavy old Iaade has been
pulled down and the building opened up towards Vasagatan. A two-storey
glazed shop unit has been created with a distinct oIfce entrance in the
middle oI the Vasagatan Iaade.
The new Iaade has a cladding oI storey-high glazed sections and
light, perIorated steel sheeting which provides variegated fltration oI
daylight into the building. The steeply sloping rooI, which Iormerly housed
CIient: Vasakronan. Architect: Reex Arkitekter, Iead architect Johan Linnros, project
architect Anna Wijkmark. TotaI area: 17,500 sqm gross oor area approx. Ofces:
12,500 sqm approx. Shops/restaurants: 2,000 sqm approx. Sundry: 3,000 sqm approx.
Possession: 1st quarter of 2010.
Engingering consuItant: Bengt DahIgren. EnvironmentaI consuItant: Soe berg
an air handling unit, has now been turned into airy oIfces in a studio
environment, with tall windows in the sloping rooI and glazed domes
overlooking the street and courtyard. There is also a small rooI terrace
here on the Iair-weather sides. The fat rooI to the south is ftted with 150
sqm solar panels Ior production oI direct electric heating. The fat rooIs
oI the two wings have been ftted with solar collectors Ior producing air
conditioning and running hot water. The sedum rooI oI the wings traps air
contaminants and rainwater. The building`s ventilation and air conditioning
systems are needs-regulated and the lighting presence controlled. The new
Iaade copes admirably with light irradiation, surplus heat and street noise.
In daytime the building makes a variegated impression, with gleaming
panes oI glass contrasting with matte cladding oI perIorated sheet metal.
The new Iaade also refects the older Iaade opposite, ampliIying the
encounter between old and new. In the evenings the building changes
character, 'opens up and radiates light, in that the perIorated steel sheeting
also allows evening light to escape Irom inside. The courtyard Iaades have
also been redesigned, but, owing to the strong incident sunlight, are not
opened up as much. The courtyard Iaades have a cladding oI silky-matte
sheet-metal coIIers and oI detached screen-printed glass which flters the
sunlight Irom the south.
Refex Arkitekter, who designed the building, have developed parts oI
both building and courtyard together with graphic artist Gabor Palotai and
landscape architect UlI NordIjell so as to impart greater wholeness and a
sharper edge to the project.
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Kontaktregister
108
Vi p Aros Arkitekter har stor erfarenhet frn alla
typer av uppdrag inom de offentliga och kommer-
siella sfrerna. vrt stt att arbeta fr ett hllbart
fretagande r vi lyhrda och omsorgsfulla i dia-
logen med vra uppdragsgivare samtidigt som vi
utmanar med kreativa ider. Aros Arkitekter verkar
p lokala, nationella och internationella marknader
inom omrdena Arkitektur, Stadsutveckling, nred-
ning och Projekteringsledning.
BAU arbetar frmst med stadsplaneringsprojekt
och utformning av kontor, bostder och kom-
mersiella fastigheter. Ett hllbart urbant synstt
har lnge varit centralt fr vrt arbete och vi
kan tillhandahlla bde BREEAM- och LEED-
certifering.
AX har tre huvudsakliga typer av uppdrag;
stadsutveckling, nybyggnad och ombyggnad.
Projekten spnner frn visionsfrslag fr nya
stadsdelar via bostder, skolor och laboratorier
till ombyggnader/ restaureringar i knsliga miljer
som Storkyrkan och Drottningholms slott. Vi har
de senaste tio ren samlat ett stort kunnande
frn vrt deltagande i utvecklingen
av industrialiserade system fr
modernt trbyggande.
Byrn fr Arkitektur och Urbanism
GvIegatan 12A
Box 6641
113 84 StockhoIm
tel: 08-508 818 00
www.bau.se
AIX Arkitekter AB
HudiksvaIIsgatan 8
113 30 StockhoIm
tel: 08-690 29 00
kontakt: Lars Johansson
e-post: lars.johansson@aix.se
mobil: 070 585 58 50
www.aix.se
Arken SE Arkitekter AB
Hkens gata 2
116 46 StockhoIm
tel: 08-442 75 80
www.arken-se-arkitekter.se
AhIqvist & AImqvist Arkitekter AB
Peter Myndes Backe 12
Box 15221
104 65 StockhoIm
tel: 08-556 968 80
e-post: mail@ahlqvist-almqvist.se
www.ahlqvist-almqvist.se
Aros Arkitekter AB
Vstmannagatan 43
113 25 StockhoIm
tel: 08-690 07 80
Trdgrdsgatan 7E
753 09 UppsaIa
tel: 018-172 000
kontakt: Robert Martin
e-post: robert.martin@arosarkitekter.se
www.arosarkitekter.se
Ahlqvist & Almqvist Arkitekter AB har mer n 25
rs erfarenhet av hllbar arkitektur och hllbart
stadsbyggande. Framgngsrika projekt har ge-
nomfrts i Europa, Kina och Sverige.
Berg Arkitektkontor AB
Box 15055
104 65 StockhoIm
tel: 08-555 760 00
kontakt: Svante Berg
mobil: 070-595 33 59
e-post: svante.berg@bergark.se
www.bergark.se
www.cfmoller.com
Berg r vl knda fr att producera innovativ och
realistisk arkitektur fr komplexa utformningsls-
ningar runt om vrlden.
Berg Arkitektkontor r en del av Arkitektfrmaet
C.F. Mller.
Planer fr stder & regioner, urban design,
arkitektur fr bostder, kontor eller universitet!
Med vr unika STEP-metod erbjuder vi en
deltagande workshop fr att uppmuntra nya ider
och n hllbara stadsmnster. Genom att visa
p lokala och globala kvaliter
med bevisbaserade metoder
mts potentialen fr en framtida
succ ert stadsarv!
109
LGALkIk GIUDICL AkCnI1LC1S
EQUATOR STOCKHOLM AB
Kungsgatan 18, 3tr
Box 1351
111 83 StockhoIm
tel: 08-506 025 00
kontakt: Annica Carlsson, vd
mobil: 070-453 00 79
e-post: annica.carlsson@equator-europe.com
stockholm@equator-europe.com
www.equator.se

habi bi haus
ar chi t ect ur e concept s proj ect devel opment
hauschiId-siegeI
VimpeIgatan 9
211 14 MaIm
tel: 073-523 90 01
kontakt: Cord Siegel
e-post: cord@hauschild-siegel.com
www.urbanavillor.com
www.hauschild-siegel.com
Arkitektur nredning Stadsbyggnad Projekt-
ledning Byggledning Lokalrdgivning Kva-
litetsansvarig Tillgnglighetsexpertis CAD-
samordning
Ersus Arkitekter AB
St Badhusgatan 18-20
411 21 Gteborg
tel: 031-10 95 00
Fiskargatan 8
116 20 StockhoIm
tel: 08-556 939 00
www.erseus.se
Vi arbetar med alla typer av projekt, frn stads-
utveckling till mindre byggprojekt, fr bde priva-
ta och offentliga uppdragsgivare. Vi har erfaren-
het av genomfrda miljklassade byggnader.
Erik Giudice Architects
5 rue de Charonne, FR-750 11 Paris, France
tel: +33 1 433 837 08
Vrtavgen 60, 115 38 StockhoIm
tel: 08-515 140 25
kontakt: Erik Giudice
e-post: info@erikgiudice.com
www.erikgiudice.com
Brunnberg & Forshed Architects Ltd
KungshoIms Strand 135
112 48 StockhoIm
tel: 08-617 61 00
kontakt: Hans Bergstrm
e-post: info@brunnbergoforshed.se
www.brunnbergoforshed.se
Vi har lng erfarenhet och stor kompetens inom
omrden som stadsbyggnad, bostder, kommer-
siella lokaler/kontor och inredning.
Hllbarhet r en viktig utgngspunkt i vrt arbete.
Vrt ml r att rita energieffektiva byggnader i
kombination med god arkitektur.
habibihaus
HornstuII Strand 13
117 39 StockhoIm
tel: 08-334 819
e-post: info@habibihaus.se
www.habibihaus.se
EGA Erik Guidice Architects r ett multidisciplinrt
kontor baserat i Paris och Stockholm. Guidice och
hans team har genom vinnande tvlingsbidrag och
genomfrda projekt ftt internationellt erknnande
inom ett brett spektra av storlekar och innehll:
frn kulturhus, sporthallar till stora stadsutveck-
lingsprojekt. EGA har kapacitet att ta sig stora och
komplexa projekt och arbetar med ett ntverk av
hgt kvalifcerade specialister inom alla relevanta
omrden.
habibihaus nrmar sig den internationella arenan
med vilda ider, frn koncept till genomfrande!
habibihaus tillhr en ung generation av arkitekter
som vet hur skarp analys, korsdisciplinra expe-
riment och socialt ansvarstagande ska kombine-
ras med behag och humor. habibihaus strvar
alltid efter att hitta kreativa, fantasifulla och ovan-
liga lsningar fr hllbarhet,
god design och sknhet.
hauschild + siegelarchitecture
Vrt kontor arbetar med ekologiskt inriktad
arkitektur som tar ansvar gentemot samhlle
och milj. Fr nrvarande arbetar vi med ett
bostadsprojekt till den internationella byggms-
san i Hamburg 2013. Byggnadens gestaltning
baseras p ett koncept med en serie vertikala
gemensamma rum som uppmuntrar till dialog
och gemenskap bland de boende fr att skapa
ett lantligt grannskap i en urban omgivning.
110
Metro Arkitekter startades i Malm 1999. Freta-
get har i dag 28 fast anstllda i Gteborg, Malm
och Stockholm.
Metro r engagerat i alla typer av uppdrag, frn
sommarvillor till centralstationer.
Metro Arkitekter AB
Gustav AdoIfs Torg 8B
211 39 MaIm
tel: 040-665 59 60
stra Hamngatan 52
411 09 Gteborg
tel: 031-788 14 00
www.metroarkitekter.se
Vi strvar efter att skapa strukturer och rum
med starka egna identiteter.
Vi designar kontor, handel och bostder.
Vi ritade det frsta Svanen-mrkta hotellet i
Sverige.
Vi vann frsta pris i semesterkategorin i WAF
2009 med restaurant Tusen.
Vi vann frsta pris i tvlingen om Sameparla-
mentet i Kiruna 2006.
Murman Arkitekter AB
Peter Myndes Backe 12
118 46 StockhoIm
tel: 08-462 14 50
kontakt: Hans Murman
e-post: info@murman.se
www.murman.se
(nod) C-O-M-B-I-N-E
Tjrhovsgatan 5
116 21 StockhoIm
tel: 08-551 100 55
e-post: info@c-o-m-b-i-n-e.coop
www.c-o-m-b-i-n-e.coop
Nyrns Arkitektkontor AB
Nackagatan 4
Box 4709
116 92 StockhoIm
tel: 08-698 43 00
kontakt: Dag Cavallius
e-post: dag.cavallius@nyrens.se
mobil: 070-459 43 66
www.nyrens.se
Lomar Arkitekter grundades 1994 och har sedan
dess utvecklat en rad byggnader. Ett pgende
projekt r utformningen av Vin- och Sprithisto-
riska museet, som ocks innehller Absolut Art
Collection.
Lomar Arkitekter AB
Kungsgatan 48
111 35 StockhoIm
tel: 08-441 77 70
kontakt: Pontus Lomar
e-post: pontus.lomar@lomar.se
www.lomar.se
(nod) C-O-M-B-I-N-E
Nyrns Arkitektkontor verkar fr den hllbara, funk-
tionella och attraktiva staden. Vi tar utgngspunkt i
platsens frutsttningar och en humanistisk grund-
syn. Tillsammans med vra kunder, brukare och
experter utvecklar vi unika helhetslsningar med
lngsiktig hllbarhet i fokus. Med std av vra kom-
petenser, arbetsmetoder och en stndigt pgende
kunskapsutveckling strvar vi efter att vara ledande
inom hllbart stadsbyggande.
(nod)C-O-M-B--N-E arbetar med id- och
designproduktion inom flten stadsutveckling
arkitektur, landskap och framtidsanalyser. Vi
arbetar med fysiska och mentala rum i vr livsmilj
och mnniskans grnssnitt gentemot dessa
och varandra. Vi r konsulter och medverkar
och driver projekt i alla skalor. Vi bedriver ven
forskning och utvecklingsprojekt och deltar ofta
och grna i den samhlls- och designutvecklande
diskursen.
LNK har en sammanlagd personalstyrka p ver
250 anstllda i Sverige och Norge. Vi kombinerar
storskaliga projekt med noggrant detaljarbete; frn
stadsbyggnad till inredningsarkitektur, frn fyg-
platser till daghem, frn sjukhus till bostder, frn
kontor till laboratorier. Oavsett storleken ges varje
projekt ett miljfokus.
LINK arkitektur AB
Lumaparksvgen 7
Box 92126
120 08 StockhoIm
tel: 08-688 75 00
kontakt: Linda Marend
e-post: linda.marend@linkarkitektur.se
www.linkarkitektur.se
111
Sweco skapar arkitektur fr svl hem, kontor
och industrier som fr utbildning, vrd och medi-
cin. Vra tjnster inkluderar inredningsarkitektur,
stadsbyggande och planering, landskapsarkitek-
tur samt hllbar stadsutveckling.
Semrn & Mnsson erbjuder, med erfarenhet
som grundpelare och nyfkenhet som drivkraft,
allt frn stadsplanering, byggnader till inredning.
Vi har ferrig erfarenhet av projekt utanfr Sveri-
ge, i exempelvis Ryssland, Polen, rak med fera.

Semrn & Mnsson AB
Storgatan 26, 411 38 Gteborg
tel: 031-743 02 00
kontakt: Magnus Mnsson
e-post: goteborg@semren-mansson.se
Ferkens grnd 3, 111 30 StockhoIm
tel: 08-459 37 00
kontakt: Adelina Mehra
e-post: stockholm@semren-mansson.se
www.semren-mansson.se
Sweco
Box 17920
118 95 StockhoIm
tel: 08-522 952 00
kontakt: Jan Mattsson
direkt: 08-522 952 65
e-post: jan.mattsson@sweco.se
www.sweco.cn
www.sweco.se
www.swecogroup.com
TOVATT ARCHI TECTS & PL ANNERS AB
Tovatt Architects & PIanners AB
Medevigatan 5
113 61 StockhoIm
tel: 08-759 00 50
kontakt: Johannes Tovatt
mobil: 070-641 98 25
e-post: johannes.tovatt@tovatt.com
www.tovatt.com
Tovatt Architects & Planners AB r ett stock-
holmsbaserat arkitektkontor med lng interna-
tionell erfarenhet av stadsutveckling och bo-
stadsplanering. Vi arbetar fr stadsfrvaltningar,
oberoende organisationer, privata fretag och
engagerade personer.
Tengbom
Katarinavgen 15
Box 1230
111 82 StockhoIm
tel: 08-412 52 00
kontakt: Magnus Meyer, vd
direkt: 08-412 52 12
e-post: magnus.meyer@tengbom.se
www.tengbom.se
Tengbom r ett av Nordens ledande
arkitektfretag med drygt 300 medarbetare
i Helsingborg, Malm, Gteborg, Kalmar,
Ume, Uppsala och Stockholm. Tengbom
erbjuder tjnster inom arkitektur, stadsbyggnad,
landskapsarkitektur, inredningsarkitektur och
projektledning.
Vi arbetar ansvarsfullt, kreativt, professionellt
och kostnadseffektivt med allt som hr
arkitekturen till. Vi ser vrt arbete som ett stt
att verkliggra mnniskors drmmar om att bo,
arbeta, studera, vrdas, shoppa, roa och rra sig
i staden.
ScheiwiIIer Svensson Arkitektkontor AB
sgatan 119
116 24 StockhoIm
tel: 08-506 016 50
e-post: info@ssark.se
www.ssark.se
Reex Arkitekter AB
Renstiernas gata 12
116 28 StockhoIm
tel: 08-702 64 01
kontakt: Johan Linnros
mobil: 070-621 33 93
e-post: johan.linnros@refexark.se
www.refexark.se
Refex Arkitekter bestr av ett femtiotal perso-
ner arkitekter och inredningsarkitekter, fysiska
planerare och byggnadsingenjrer.
Den breda kompetensen och mnghvdade
medarbetarskaran gr att Refex kan erbjuda ett
helhetskoncept dr kontoret arbetar med alla
delar i processen frn analys och id till frdig
byggnad och hela inredningslsningar.
112
YAJ arkitekter ab
Edsviksvgen 87
182 35 Danderyd
kontakt: Ylva Lindstedt, vd, arkitekt SAR/MSA
tel: 08-755 88 80
e-post: ylva.lindstedt@yaj.se
www.yaj.se
WL Arkitekter AB
FoIkungagatan 92 B
116 22 StockhoIm
tel: 08-555 786 80
kontakt: James Martin
info@awlark.se
www.awlark.se
Hus och byggnadsprojektering/fastighetsutveck-
ling fr lngsiktig hllbarhet, hllbar stadsbygg-
nad/stadsutveckling/stadsplanering, landskaps-
arkitektur/utemilj, utredningar/programarbete/
idkoncept.
YAJ arkitekter skapar nutida arkitektur inom tre
flt:
turism + varumrkesbyggande arkitektur
planering + infrastruktur
villor + vindar
Gemensam nmnare r unika upplevelser t
kunder med hga frvntningar p arkitektens
idkraft.
U.D. URBAN DESIGN AB
RepsIagargatan 15 A 2tr
118 46 StockhoIm
tel: 08-500 015 30
e-post: info@urbandesign.se
www.urbandesign.se
Urban Design r ett arkitektkontor som fokuserar
p avancerade tekniska och konceptuella projekt
och processer.
White arkitekter AB
Magasinsgatan 10
Box 2502
403 17 Gteborg
tel: 031-60 86 00
kontakt: Alexandra Hagen, nternational Business
Offcer
e-post: alexandra.hagen@white.se
www.white.se
Vr samlade kompetens omfattar arkitektur, projekt-
ledning, stadsbyggnad, landskap, byggnadsvrd,
inredning, design och miljledning i skedena strategi,
koncept och produktion.
Sveriges Arkitekter
Sveriges Arkitekter
Swedish Association of Architects
The Swedish Association of Architects is the unifying organisation of Swedens
architects, interior architects, landscape architects and planning architects. Our
members are private and public sector employees, self-employed professionals
or architecture students. They all share a common educational background and
a professional involvement in matters of architecture and planning.
The Swedish Association of Architects has 10,800 members (2010), including
95 per cent of Swedens architects.
Some 7,000 of the Associations members are professional practitioners.

The Swedish Association of Architects is the professional and interest
organisation of architects in Sweden. We safeguard the overarching interests
of the architectural professions in the market and we work to achieve good
conditions for our members professional activity and development. We assert
the importance of qualied architectural and planning work in all sectors of
society and we actively address issues concerning conditions in the architects
profession.
The Swedish Association of Architects is a partite organisation and negotiates
agreements on behalf of architect employees, while at the same time, through
our ArkitektService, providing advisory and other services to architects who are
self-employed. We publish comprehensive pay statistics every year and carry out
annual follow-up of architects fees.
We provide advisory and supportive services to clients in matters of
procurement through our competition and procurement service. We also work
to develop Swedish architectural policy, we highlight quality aspects of building
and planning and we address environmental and technical issues as well as
sustainable urban development.
The Swedish Association of Architects deals with architectural and professional
issues, educational matters, editorial activities and publications, advisory
and other services, legal assistance and negotiating assistance for members,
competition and procurement services, market observation, professional and
commercial development issues and professional training.
The Swedish Association of Architects website, www.arkitekt.se.
The ofce can be called on +46 8 505 577 00 and e-mailed on
kansli@arkitekt.se
Sveriges Arkitekter
Swedish Association
of Architects
Storgatan 41
Box 5027, SE-102 41
Stockholm, Sweden
phone: +46(0)8 505 577 00
mail: kansli@arkitekt.se
www.arkitekt.se
Sveriges Arkitekter, Swedish Association of Architects